One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.
The process of TOOTH formation. It is divided into several stages including: the dental lamina stage, the bud stage, the cap stage, and the bell stage. Odontogenesis includes the production of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS), dentin (DENTINOGENESIS), and dental cementum (CEMENTOGENESIS).
The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)
Mesodermal tissue enclosed in the invaginated portion of the epithelial enamel organ and giving rise to the dentin and pulp.
The collective tissues from which an entire tooth is formed, including the DENTAL SAC; ENAMEL ORGAN; and DENTAL PAPILLA. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
Cylindrical epithelial cells in the innermost layer of the ENAMEL ORGAN. Their functions include contribution to the development of the dentinoenamel junction by the deposition of a layer of the matrix, thus producing the foundation for the prisms (the structural units of the DENTAL ENAMEL), and production of the matrix for the enamel prisms and interprismatic substance. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
Odontoblasts are columnar, highly differentiated, dentin-forming cells that originate from the ectodermal neural crest and reside within the pulp cavity of teeth, characterized by their production and secretion of the organic matrix component of dentin during amelogenesis.
The emergence of a tooth from within its follicle in the ALVEOLAR PROCESS of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE into the ORAL CAVITY. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)
A homeodomain protein that interacts with TATA-BOX BINDING PROTEIN. It represses GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of target GENES and plays a critical role in ODONTOGENESIS.
The failure to retain teeth as a result of disease or injury.
Epithelial cells surrounding the dental papilla and differentiated into three layers: the inner enamel epithelium, consisting of ameloblasts which eventually form the enamel, and the enamel pulp and external enamel epithelium, both of which atrophy and disappear before and upon eruption of the tooth, respectively.
Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)
A hard thin translucent layer of calcified substance which envelops and protects the dentin of the crown of the tooth. It is the hardest substance in the body and is almost entirely composed of calcium salts. Under the microscope, it is composed of thin rods (enamel prisms) held together by cementing substance, and surrounded by an enamel sheath. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)
The teeth of the first dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.
A normal developing tooth which has not yet perforated the oral mucosa or one that fails to erupt in the normal sequence or time interval expected for the type of tooth in a given gender, age, or population group.
Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the teeth.
The upper part of the tooth, which joins the lower part of the tooth (TOOTH ROOT) at the cervix (TOOTH CERVIX) at a line called the cementoenamel junction. The entire surface of the crown is covered with enamel which is thicker at the extremity and becomes progressively thinner toward the cervix. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p216)
An abnormal opening or fissure between two adjacent teeth.
The part of a tooth from the neck to the apex, embedded in the alveolar process and covered with cementum. A root may be single or divided into several branches, usually identified by their relative position, e.g., lingual root or buccal root. Single-rooted teeth include mandibular first and second premolars and the maxillary second premolar teeth. The maxillary first premolar has two roots in most cases. Maxillary molars have three roots. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p690)
The elaboration of dental enamel by ameloblasts, beginning with its participation in the formation of the dentino-enamel junction to the production of the matrix for the enamel prisms and interprismatic substance. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992).
The proteins that are part of the dental enamel matrix.
The hard portion of the tooth surrounding the pulp, covered by enamel on the crown and cementum on the root, which is harder and denser than bone but softer than enamel, and is thus readily abraded when left unprotected. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
Two teeth united during development by the union of their tooth germs; the teeth may be joined by the enamel of their crowns, by their root dentin, or by both.
An extra tooth, erupted or unerupted, resembling or unlike the other teeth in the group to which it belongs. Its presence may cause malposition of adjacent teeth or prevent their eruption.
Neoplasms composed of primordial GERM CELLS of embryonic GONADS or of elements of the germ layers of the EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the gonads or present in an embryo or FETUS.
Loss of the tooth substance by chemical or mechanical processes
The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.
A major dental enamel-forming protein found in mammals. In humans the protein is encoded by GENES found on both the X CHROMOSOME and the Y CHROMOSOME.
The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)
A tooth from which the dental pulp has been removed or is necrotic. (Boucher, Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)
The middle germ layer of an embryo derived from three paired mesenchymal aggregates along the neural tube.
A bone morphogenetic protein that is a potent inducer of bone formation. It also functions as a regulator of MESODERM formation during EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT.
A tooth that is prevented from erupting by a physical barrier, usually other teeth. Impaction may also result from orientation of the tooth in an other than vertical position in the periodontal structures.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.
Any change in the hue, color, or translucency of a tooth due to any cause. Restorative filling materials, drugs (both topical and systemic), pulpal necrosis, or hemorrhage may be responsible. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p253)
A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.
A technique for maintenance or growth of animal organs in vitro. It refers to three-dimensional cultures of undisaggregated tissue retaining some or all of the histological features of the tissue in vivo. (Freshney, Culture of Animal Cells, 3d ed, p1)
The constricted part of the tooth at the junction of the crown and root or roots. It is often referred to as the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), the line at which the cementum covering the root of a tooth and the enamel of the tooth meet. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p530, p433)
One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.
A family of intercellular signaling proteins that play and important role in regulating the development of many TISSUES and organs. Their name derives from the observation of a hedgehog-like appearance in DROSOPHILA embryos with genetic mutations that block their action.
Lectins purified from the germinating seeds of common wheat (Triticum vulgare); these bind to certain carbohydrate moieties on cell surface glycoproteins and are used to identify certain cell populations and inhibit or promote some immunological or physiological activities. There are at least two isoforms of this lectin.
Physiologic loss of the primary dentition. (Zwemer, Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)
Partial or complete displacement of a tooth from its alveolar support. It is commonly the result of trauma. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p312)
Bone-growth regulatory factors that are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of proteins. They are synthesized as large precursor molecules which are cleaved by proteolytic enzymes. The active form can consist of a dimer of two identical proteins or a heterodimer of two related bone morphogenetic proteins.
The third tooth to the left and to the right of the midline of either jaw, situated between the second INCISOR and the premolar teeth (BICUSPID). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p817)
Transference of a tissue or organ from either an alive or deceased donor, within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.
The development of anatomical structures to create the form of a single- or multi-cell organism. Morphogenesis provides form changes of a part, parts, or the whole organism.
'Tooth diseases' is a broad term referring to various conditions affecting the teeth, including dental caries (cavities), periodontal disease (gum disease), tooth wear, tooth sensitivity, oral cancer, and developmental anomalies, which can result in pain, discomfort, or loss of teeth if left untreated.
The process whereby calcium salts are deposited in the dental enamel. The process is normal in the development of bones and teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p43)
One of the eight permanent teeth, two on either side in each jaw, between the canines (CUSPID) and the molars (MOLAR), serving for grinding and crushing food. The upper have two cusps (bicuspid) but the lower have one to three. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p822)
A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
Solid fixation of a tooth resulting from fusion of the cementum and alveolar bone, with obliteration of the periodontal ligament. It is uncommon in the deciduous dentition and very rare in permanent teeth. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
Progressive loss of the hard substance of a tooth by chemical processes that do not involve bacterial action. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p296)
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
A hollow part of the alveolar process of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE where each tooth fits and is attached via the periodontal ligament.
Reinsertion of a tooth into the alveolus from which it was removed or otherwise lost.
One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.
Resorption of calcified dental tissue, involving demineralization due to reversal of the cation exchange and lacunar resorption by osteoclasts. There are two types: external (as a result of tooth pathology) and internal (apparently initiated by a peculiar inflammatory hyperplasia of the pulp). (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p676)
The male gonad containing two functional parts: the SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES for the production and transport of male germ cells (SPERMATOGENESIS) and the interstitial compartment containing LEYDIG CELLS that produce ANDROGENS.
The process of germ cell development in the male from the primordial germ cells, through SPERMATOGONIA; SPERMATOCYTES; SPERMATIDS; to the mature haploid SPERMATOZOA.
Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.
The three primary germinal layers (ECTODERM; ENDODERM; and MESODERM) developed during GASTRULATION that provide tissues and body plan of a mature organism. They derive from two early layers, hypoblast and epiblast.
Inbred ICR mice are a strain of albino laboratory mice that have been selectively bred for consistent genetic makeup and high reproductive performance, making them widely used in biomedical research for studies involving reproduction, toxicology, pharmacology, and carcinogenesis.
The teeth collectively in the dental arch. Dentition ordinarily refers to the natural teeth in position in their alveoli. Dentition referring to the deciduous teeth is DENTITION, PRIMARY; to the permanent teeth, DENTITION, PERMANENT. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
A treatment modality in endodontics concerned with the therapy of diseases of the dental pulp. For preparatory procedures, ROOT CANAL PREPARATION is available.
Measurement of tooth characteristics.
Proteins encoded by homeobox genes (GENES, HOMEOBOX) that exhibit structural similarity to certain prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins. Homeodomain proteins are involved in the control of gene expression during morphogenesis and development (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION, DEVELOPMENTAL).
A tooth's loss of minerals, such as calcium in hydroxyapatite from the tooth matrix, caused by acidic exposure. An example of the occurrence of demineralization is in the formation of dental caries.
The 32 teeth of adulthood that either replace or are added to the complement of deciduous teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)
A restoration designed to remain in service for not less than 20 to 30 years, usually made of gold casting, cohesive gold, or amalgam. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
The farthest or outermost projections of the body, such as the HAND and FOOT.
Tumors or cancer of the TESTIS. Germ cell tumors (GERMINOMA) of the testis constitute 95% of all testicular neoplasms.
Congenital absence of the teeth; it may involve all (total anodontia) or only some of the teeth (partial anodontia, hypodontia), and both the deciduous and the permanent dentition, or only teeth of the permanent dentition. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The selected form given to a natural tooth when it is reduced by instrumentation to receive a prosthesis (e.g., artificial crown or a retainer for a fixed or removable prosthesis). The selection of the form is guided by clinical circumstances and physical properties of the materials that make up the prosthesis. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239)
The processes occurring in early development that direct morphogenesis. They specify the body plan ensuring that cells will proceed to differentiate, grow, and diversify in size and shape at the correct relative positions. Included are axial patterning, segmentation, compartment specification, limb position, organ boundary patterning, blood vessel patterning, etc.
The fibrous CONNECTIVE TISSUE surrounding the TOOTH ROOT, separating it from and attaching it to the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS).
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
The thickest and spongiest part of the maxilla and mandible hollowed out into deep cavities for the teeth.
A means of identifying the age of an animal or human through tooth examination.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Diffusible gene products that act on homologous or heterologous molecules of viral or cellular DNA to regulate the expression of proteins.
The bonelike rigid connective tissue covering the root of a tooth from the cementoenamel junction to the apex and lining the apex of the root canal, also assisting in tooth support by serving as attachment structures for the periodontal ligament. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
Mature male germ cells derived from SPERMATIDS. As spermatids move toward the lumen of the SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES, they undergo extensive structural changes including the loss of cytoplasm, condensation of CHROMATIN into the SPERM HEAD, formation of the ACROSOME cap, the SPERM MIDPIECE and the SPERM TAIL that provides motility.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
In a medical context, the term "wing" is not typically used as a standalone definition; however, it can refer to various flat, wing-shaped structures in anatomy, such as the iliac wings of the pelvis or the zygomatic wings of the cheekbone.
The space in a tooth bounded by the dentin and containing the dental pulp. The portion of the cavity within the crown of the tooth is the pulp chamber; the portion within the root is the pulp canal or root canal.
Chromosomal, biochemical, intracellular, and other methods used in the study of genetics.
A malignant neoplasm of the germinal tissue of the GONADS; MEDIASTINUM; or pineal region. Germinomas are uniform in appearance, consisting of large, round cells with vesicular nuclei and clear or finely granular eosinophilic-staining cytoplasm. (Stedman, 265th ed; from DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, pp1642-3)
Death of pulp tissue with or without bacterial invasion. When the necrosis is due to ischemia with superimposed bacterial infection, it is referred to as pulp gangrene. When the necrosis is non-bacterial in origin, it is called pulp mummification.
Euploid male germ cells of an early stage of SPERMATOGENESIS, derived from prespermatogonia. With the onset of puberty, spermatogonia at the basement membrane of the seminiferous tubule proliferate by mitotic then meiotic divisions and give rise to the haploid SPERMATOCYTES.
Supporting cells projecting inward from the basement membrane of SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES. They surround and nourish the developing male germ cells and secrete ANDROGEN-BINDING PROTEIN and hormones such as ANTI-MULLERIAN HORMONE. The tight junctions of Sertoli cells with the SPERMATOGONIA and SPERMATOCYTES provide a BLOOD-TESTIS BARRIER.
The convoluted tubules in the TESTIS where sperm are produced (SPERMATOGENESIS) and conveyed to the RETE TESTIS. Spermatogenic tubules are composed of developing germ cells and the supporting SERTOLI CELLS.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
Therapeutic technique for replacement of minerals in partially decalcified teeth.
Presentation devices used for patient education and technique training in dentistry.
The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.
Extraoral body-section radiography depicting an entire maxilla, or both maxilla and mandible, on a single film.
Inflammation of the PERIAPICAL TISSUE. It includes general, unspecified, or acute nonsuppurative inflammation. Chronic nonsuppurative inflammation is PERIAPICAL GRANULOMA. Suppurative inflammation is PERIAPICAL ABSCESS.
The description and measurement of the various factors that produce physical stress upon dental restorations, prostheses, or appliances, materials associated with them, or the natural oral structures.
Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.
The gamete-producing glands, OVARY or TESTIS.
Male germ cells derived from SPERMATOGONIA. The euploid primary spermatocytes undergo MEIOSIS and give rise to the haploid secondary spermatocytes which in turn give rise to SPERMATIDS.
The study of the teeth of early forms of life through fossil remains.
Male germ cells derived from the haploid secondary SPERMATOCYTES. Without further division, spermatids undergo structural changes and give rise to SPERMATOZOA.
An operation in which carious material is removed from teeth and biomechanically correct forms are established in the teeth to receive and retain restorations. A constant requirement is provision for prevention of failure of the restoration through recurrence of decay or inadequate resistance to applied stresses. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239-40)
Absence of teeth from a portion of the mandible and/or maxilla.
Synthetic resins, containing an inert filler, that are widely used in dentistry.
An acquired or hereditary condition due to deficiency in the formation of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS). It is usually characterized by defective, thin, or malformed DENTAL ENAMEL. Risk factors for enamel hypoplasia include gene mutations, nutritional deficiencies, diseases, and environmental factors.
The relationship of all the components of the masticatory system in normal function. It has special reference to the position and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth for the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p556, p472)
A radiosensitive, malignant neoplasm of the testis, thought to be derived from primordial germ cells of the sexually undifferentiated embryonic gonad. There are three variants: classical (typical), the most common type; anaplastic; and spermatocytic. The classical seminoma is composed of fairly well differentiated sheets or cords of uniform polygonal or round cells (seminoma cells), each cell having abundant clear cytoplasm, distinct cell membranes, a centrally placed round nucleus, and one or more nucleoli. In the female, a grossly and histologically identical neoplasm, known as dysgerminoma, occurs. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The practice of personal hygiene of the mouth. It includes the maintenance of oral cleanliness, tissue tone, and general preservation of oral health.
An adhesion procedure for orthodontic attachments, such as plastic DENTAL CROWNS. This process usually includes the application of an adhesive material (DENTAL CEMENTS) and letting it harden in-place by light or chemical curing.
The aftermost permanent tooth on each side in the maxilla and mandible.
Use of a metal casting, usually with a post in the pulp or root canal, designed to support and retain an artificial crown.
Dental procedure in which the entire pulp chamber is removed from the crown and roots of a tooth.
Total lack of teeth through disease or extraction.
Materials used in the production of dental bases, restorations, impressions, prostheses, etc.
The structures surrounding and supporting the tooth. Periodontium includes the gum (GINGIVA), the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS), the DENTAL CEMENTUM, and the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT.
Pathological processes involving the PERIODONTIUM including the gum (GINGIVA), the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS), the DENTAL CEMENTUM, and the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT.
"Decayed, missing and filled teeth," a routinely used statistical concept in dentistry.
Inability or inadequacy of a dental restoration or prosthesis to perform as expected.
Materials placed inside a root canal for the purpose of obturating or sealing it. The materials may be gutta-percha, silver cones, paste mixtures, or other substances. (Dorland, 28th ed, p631 & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p187)
Dental cements composed either of polymethyl methacrylate or dimethacrylate, produced by mixing an acrylic monomer liquid with acrylic polymers and mineral fillers. The cement is insoluble in water and is thus resistant to fluids in the mouth, but is also irritating to the dental pulp. It is used chiefly as a luting agent for fabricated and temporary restorations. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p159)
Migration of the teeth toward the midline or forward in the DENTAL ARCH. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)
The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.
The plan, delineation, and location of actual structural elements of dentures. The design can relate to retainers, stress-breakers, occlusal rests, flanges, framework, lingual or palatal bars, reciprocal arms, etc.
Preparatory activities in ROOT CANAL THERAPY by partial or complete extirpation of diseased pulp, cleaning and sterilization of the empty canal, enlarging and shaping the canal to receive the sealing material. The cavity may be prepared by mechanical, sonic, chemical, or other means. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p1700)
A partial denture designed and constructed to be removed readily from the mouth.
An artificial replacement for one or more natural teeth or part of a tooth, or associated structures, ranging from a portion of a tooth to a complete denture. The dental prosthesis is used for cosmetic or functional reasons, or both. DENTURES and specific types of dentures are also available. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p244 & Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p643)
The seepage of fluids, debris, and micro-organisms between the walls of a prepared dental cavity and the restoration.
Phase of endodontic treatment in which a root canal system that has been cleaned is filled through use of special materials and techniques in order to prevent reinfection.
Inflammation of the DENTAL PULP, usually due to bacterial infection in dental caries, tooth fracture, or other conditions causing exposure of the pulp to bacterial invasion. Chemical irritants, thermal factors, hyperemic changes, and other factors may also cause pulpitis.
The act and process of chewing and grinding food in the mouth.
Substances used to bond COMPOSITE RESINS to DENTAL ENAMEL and DENTIN. These bonding or luting agents are used in restorative dentistry, ROOT CANAL THERAPY; PROSTHODONTICS; and ORTHODONTICS.
Devices used for influencing tooth position. Orthodontic appliances may be classified as fixed or removable, active or retaining, and intraoral or extraoral. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p19)
A paired box transcription factor that is involved in ODONTOGENESIS.
A type of CELL NUCLEUS division, occurring during maturation of the GERM CELLS. Two successive cell nucleus divisions following a single chromosome duplication (S PHASE) result in daughter cells with half the number of CHROMOSOMES as the parent cells.
A film that attaches to teeth, often causing DENTAL CARIES and GINGIVITIS. It is composed of MUCINS, secreted from salivary glands, and microorganisms.
The application of dental knowledge to questions of law.
Dense fibrous layer formed from mesodermal tissue that surrounds the epithelial enamel organ. The cells eventually migrate to the external surface of the newly formed root dentin and give rise to the cementoblasts that deposit cementum on the developing root, fibroblasts of the developing periodontal ligament, and osteoblasts of the developing alveolar bone.
The process of germ cell development in the female from the primordial germ cells through OOGONIA to the mature haploid ova (OVUM).
Technique involving the passage of X-rays through oral structures to create a film record while a central tab or wing of dental X-ray film is being held between upper and lower teeth.
Diseases of the PERIAPICAL TISSUE surrounding the root of the tooth, which is distinguished from DENTAL PULP DISEASES inside the TOOTH ROOT.
Such malposition and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth as to interfere with the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)
The curve formed by the row of TEETH in their normal position in the JAW. The inferior dental arch is formed by the mandibular teeth, and the superior dental arch by the maxillary teeth.
A partial denture attached to prepared natural teeth, roots, or implants by cementation.
Bony structure of the mouth that holds the teeth. It consists of the MANDIBLE and the MAXILLA.
The plan and delineation of dental prostheses in general or a specific dental prosthesis. It does not include DENTURE DESIGN. The framework usually consists of metal.
A numerical rating scale for classifying the periodontal status of a person or population with a single figure which takes into consideration prevalence as well as severity of the condition. It is based upon probe measurement of periodontal pockets and on gingival tissue status.
Photographic techniques used in ORTHODONTICS; DENTAL ESTHETICS; and patient education.
Dentin sensitivity is a short, sharp pain originating from exposed dentin in response to stimuli, typically thermal, evaporative, tactile, osmotic, or chemical changes in the oral environment.
An alloy used in restorative dentistry that contains mercury, silver, tin, copper, and possibly zinc.
Small metal or ceramic attachments used to fasten an arch wire. These attachments are soldered or welded to an orthodontic band or cemented directly onto the teeth. Bowles brackets, edgewise brackets, multiphase brackets, ribbon arch brackets, twin-wire brackets, and universal brackets are all types of orthodontic brackets.
A polymer obtained by reacting polyacrylic acid with a special anion-leachable glass (alumino-silicate). The resulting cement is more durable and tougher than others in that the materials comprising the polymer backbone do not leach out.
Inflammation of gum tissue (GINGIVA) without loss of connective tissue.
A white powder prepared from lime that has many medical and industrial uses. It is in many dental formulations, especially for root canal filling.
Skills, techniques, standards, and principles used to improve the art and symmetry of the teeth and face to improve the appearance as well as the function of the teeth, mouth, and face. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p108)
A plant genus of the family POACEAE that is the source of EDIBLE GRAIN. A hybrid with rye (SECALE CEREALE) is called TRITICALE. The seed is ground into FLOUR and used to make BREAD, and is the source of WHEAT GERM AGGLUTININS.
Restorations of metal, porcelain, or plastic made to fit a cavity preparation, then cemented into the tooth. Onlays are restorations which fit into cavity preparations and overlay the occlusal surface of a tooth or teeth. Onlays are retained by frictional or mechanical factors.
Preparation of TOOTH surfaces and DENTAL MATERIALS with etching agents, usually phosphoric acid, to roughen the surface to increase adhesion or osteointegration.
The process of germ cell development from the primordial GERM CELLS to the mature haploid GAMETES: ova in the female (OOGENESIS) or sperm in the male (SPERMATOGENESIS).
Fixed or removable devices that join teeth together. They are used to repair teeth that are mobile as a result of PERIODONTITIS.
The reproductive organ (GONADS) in female animals. In vertebrates, the ovary contains two functional parts: the OVARIAN FOLLICLE for the production of female germ cells (OOGENESIS); and the endocrine cells (GRANULOSA CELLS; THECA CELLS; and LUTEAL CELLS) for the production of ESTROGENS and PROGESTERONE.
Coagulated exudate isolated from several species of the tropical tree Palaquium (Sapotaceae). It is the trans-isomer of natural rubber and is used as a filling and impression material in dentistry and orthopedics and as an insulator in electronics. It has also been used as a rubber substitute.
Substances that inhibit or arrest DENTAL CARIES formation. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)
Tissue surrounding the apex of a tooth, including the apical portion of the periodontal membrane and alveolar bone.
Agents used to occlude dental enamel pits and fissures in the prevention of dental caries.
A true neoplasm composed of a number of different types of tissue, none of which is native to the area in which it occurs. It is composed of tissues that are derived from three germinal layers, the endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. They are classified histologically as mature (benign) or immature (malignant). (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1642)
Cements that act through infiltration and polymerization within the dentinal matrix and are used for dental restoration. They can be adhesive resins themselves, adhesion-promoting monomers, or polymerization initiators that act in concert with other agents to form a dentin-bonding system.
The formation of dentin. Dentin first appears in the layer between the ameloblasts and odontoblasts and becomes calcified immediately. Formation progresses from the tip of the papilla over its slope to form a calcified cap becoming thicker by the apposition of new layers pulpward. A layer of uncalcified dentin intervenes between the calcified tissue and the odontoblast and its processes. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The epithelium lining the seminiferous tubules composed of primary male germ cells (SPERMATOGONIA) and supporting SERTOLI CELLS. As SPERMATOGENESIS proceeds, the developing germ cells migrate toward the lumen. The adluminal compartment, the inner two thirds of the tubules, contains SPERMATOCYTES and the more advanced germ cells.
The phase of orthodontics concerned with the correction of malocclusion with proper appliances and prevention of its sequelae (Jablonski's Illus. Dictionary of Dentistry).
Orthodontic movement in the coronal direction achieved by outward tension on the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT. It does not include the operative procedure that CROWN LENGTHENING involves.
A malignant ovarian neoplasm, thought to be derived from primordial germ cells of the sexually undifferentiated embryonic gonad. It is the counterpart of the classical seminoma of the testis, to which it is both grossly and histologically identical. Dysgerminomas comprise 16% of all germ cell tumors but are rare before the age of 10, although nearly 50% occur before the age of 20. They are generally considered of low-grade malignancy but may spread if the tumor extends through its capsule and involves lymph nodes or blood vessels. (Dorland, 27th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1646)
A mixture of metallic elements or compounds with other metallic or metalloid elements in varying proportions for use in restorative or prosthetic dentistry.
A dental specialty concerned with the maintenance of the dental pulp in a state of health and the treatment of the pulp cavity (pulp chamber and pulp canal).
The planning, calculation, and creation of an apparatus for the purpose of correcting the placement or straightening of teeth.
An abnormal extension of a gingival sulcus accompanied by the apical migration of the epithelial attachment and bone resorption.
Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.
Dental procedure in which part of the pulp chamber is removed from the crown of a tooth.
A type of porcelain used in dental restorations, either jacket crowns or inlays, artificial teeth, or metal-ceramic crowns. It is essentially a mixture of particles of feldspar and quartz, the feldspar melting first and providing a glass matrix for the quartz. Dental porcelain is produced by mixing ceramic powder (a mixture of quartz, kaolin, pigments, opacifiers, a suitable flux, and other substances) with distilled water. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
A disorder characterized by grinding and clenching of the teeth.
Resorption or wasting of the tooth-supporting bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS) in the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE.
A rapid, low-dose, digital imaging system using a small intraoral sensor instead of radiographic film, an intensifying screen, and a charge-coupled device. It presents the possibility of reduced patient exposure and minimal distortion, although resolution and latitude are inferior to standard dental radiography. A receiver is placed in the mouth, routing signals to a computer which images the signals on a screen or in print. It includes digitizing from x-ray film or any other detector. (From MEDLINE abstracts; personal communication from Dr. Charles Berthold, NIDR)
A commonly used prosthesis that results in a strong, permanent restoration. It consists of an electrolytically etched cast-metal retainer that is cemented (bonded), using resins, to adjacent teeth whose enamel was previously acid-treated (acid-etched). This type of bridgework is sometimes referred to as a Maryland bridge.
The generic term for salts derived from silica or the silicic acids. They contain silicon, oxygen, and one or more metals, and may contain hydrogen. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th Ed)
Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.
Radiographic techniques used in dentistry.
Acrylic resins, also known as polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), are a type of synthetic resin formed from polymerized methyl methacrylate monomers, used in various medical applications such as dental restorations, orthopedic implants, and ophthalmic lenses due to their biocompatibility, durability, and transparency.
Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.
A prosthesis or restoration placed for a limited period, from several days to several months, which is designed to seal the tooth and maintain its position until a permanent restoration (DENTAL RESTORATION, PERMANENT) will replace it. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
Natural teeth or teeth roots used as anchorage for a fixed or removable denture or other prosthesis (such as an implant) serving the same purpose.
Polymeric resins derived from OXIRANES and characterized by strength and thermosetting properties. Epoxy resins are often used as dental materials.

Msx1 is required for the induction of Patched by Sonic hedgehog in the mammalian tooth germ. (1/161)

We have used the mouse developing tooth germ as a model system to explore the transmission of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal in the induction of Patched (Ptc). In the early developing molar tooth germ, Shh is expressed in the dental epithelium, and the transcripts of Shh downstream target genes Ptc and Gli1 are expressed in dental epithelium as well as adjacent mesenchymal tissue. The homeobox gene Msx1 is also expressed in the dental mesenchyme of the molar tooth germ at this time. We show here that the expression of Ptc, but not Gli1, was downregulated in the dental mesenchyme of Msx1 mutants. In wild-type E11.0 molar tooth mesenchyme SHH-soaked beads induced the expression of Ptc and Gli1. However, in Msx1 mutant dental mesenchyme SHH-soaked beads were able to induce Gli1 but failed to induce Ptc expression, indicating a requirement for Msx1 in the induction of Ptc by SHH. Moreover, we show that another signaling molecule, BMP4, was able to induce Ptc expression in wild-type dental mesenchyme, but induced a distinct expression pattern of Ptc in the Msx1 mutant molar mesenchyme. We conclude that in the context of the tooth germ Msx1 is a component of the Shh signaling pathway that leads to Ptc induction. Our results also suggest that the precise pattern of Ptc expression in the prospective tooth-forming region is controlled and coordinated by at least two inductive signaling pathways.  (+info)

An immunocytochemical study of amelogenin proteins in the developing tooth enamel of the gar-pike, Lepisosteus oculatus (Holostei, Actinopterygii). (2/161)

Previous studies have demonstrated the morphological similarity of the enamel-like layer found in the teeth of the coelacanth, lungfish and gar-pike to the enamel of tetrapods. In order to clarify the phylogenetic continuity between both structures, tooth germs of the gar-pike were immunocytochemically studied using an anti-bovine amelogenin polyclonal antibody. Intense immunoreaction was shown over the enamel-like matrix layer. Certain cell organelles associated with the secretory pathway of the ameloblasts were recognized as immunoreactive. These results indicate that the enamel-like layer of the gar-pike is a tissue homologous with the mammalian enamel because both possess a common, amelogenin-like substance.  (+info)

Antagonistic signals between BMP4 and FGF8 define the expression of Pitx1 and Pitx2 in mouse tooth-forming anlage. (3/161)

Members of the Pitx/RIEG family of homeodomain-containing transcription factors have been implicated in vertebrate organogenesis. In this study, we examined the expression and regulation of Pitx1 and Pitx2 during mouse tooth development. Pitx1 expression is detected in early development in a widespread pattern, in both epithelium and mesenchyme, covering the tooth-forming region in the mandible, and is then maintained in the dental epithelium from the bud stage to the late bell stage. Pitx2 expression, on the other hand, is restricted to the dental epithelium throughout odontogenesis. Interestingly, from E9.5 to E10.5, the expression domains of Pitx1 and Pitx2, in the developing mandible, overlap with that of Fgf8 but are exclusive to the zone of Bmp4 expression. Bead implantation experiments demonstrate that ectopic expression of Fgf8 can induce/maintain the expression of both Pitx1 and Pitx2 at E9.5. In contrast, Bmp4-expressing tissues and BMP4-soaked beads were able to repress Pitx1 expression in mandibular mesenchyme and Pitx2 expression in the presumptive dental epithelium, respectively. However, the effects of FGF8 and BMP4 are transient. It thus appears that the early expression patterns of Pitx1 and Pitx2 in the developing mandible are regulated by the antagonistic effects of FGF8 and BMP4 such that the Pitx1 and Pitx2 expression patterns are defined. These results indicate that the epithelial-derived signaling molecules are responsible not only for restricting specific gene expression in the dental mesenchyme, but also for defining gene expression in the dental epithelium.  (+info)

Proteinases in developing dental enamel. (4/161)

For almost three decades, proteinases have been known to reside within developing dental enamel. However, identification and characterization of these proteinases have been slow and difficult, because they are present in very small quantities and they are difficult to purify directly from the mineralizing enamel. Enamel matrix proteins such as amelogenin, ameloblastin, and enamelin are cleaved by proteinases soon after they are secreted, and their cleavage products accumulate in the deeper, more mature enamel layers, while the full-length proteins are observed only at the surface. These results suggest that proteinases are necessary for "activating" enamel proteins so the parent proteins and their cleavage products may perform different functions. A novel matrix metalloproteinase named enamelysin (MMP-20) was recently cloned from tooth tissues and was later shown to localize primarily within the most recently formed enamel. Furthermore, recombinant porcine enamelysin was demonstrated to cleave recombinant porcine amelogenin at virtually all of the sites that have previously been described in vivo. Therefore, enamelysin is at least one enzyme that may be important during early enamel development. As enamel development progresses to the later stages, a profound decrease in the enamel protein content is observed. Proteinases have traditionally been assumed to degrade the organic matrix prior to its removal from the enamel. Recently, a novel serine proteinase named enamel matrix serine proteinase-1 (EMSP1) was cloned from enamel organ epithelia. EMSP1 localizes primarily to the early maturation stage enamel and may, therefore, be involved in the degradation of proteins prior to their removal from the maturing enamel. Other, as yet unidentified, proteinases and proteinase inhibitors are almost certainly present within the forming enamel and await discovery.  (+info)

A new function of BMP4: dual role for BMP4 in regulation of Sonic hedgehog expression in the mouse tooth germ. (5/161)

The murine tooth development is governed by sequential and reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Multiple signaling molecules are expressed in the developing tooth germ and interact each other to mediate the inductive tissue interactions. Among them are Sonic hedgehog (SHH), Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (BMP2) and Bone Morphogenetic Protein-4 (BMP4). We have investigated the interactions between these signaling molecules during early tooth development. We found that the expression of Shh and Bmp2 is downregulated at E12.5 and E13.5 in the dental epithelium of the Msx1 mutant tooth germ where Bmp4 expression is significantly reduced in the dental mesenchyme. Inhibition of BMP4 activity by noggin resulted in repression of Shh and Bmp2 in wild-type dental epithelium. When implanted into the dental mesenchyme of Msx1 mutants, beads soaked with BMP4 protein were able to restore the expression of both Shh and Bmp2 in the Msx1 mutant epithelium. These results demonstrated that mesenchymal BMP4 represents one component of the signal acting on the epithelium to maintain Shh and Bmp2 expression. In contrast, BMP4-soaked beads repressed Shh and Bmp2 expression in the wild-type dental epithelium. TUNEL assay indicated that this suppression of gene expression by exogenous BMP4 was not the result of an increase in programmed cell death in the tooth germ. Ectopic expression of human Bmp4 to the dental mesenchyme driven by the mouse Msx1 promoter restored Shh expression in the Msx1 mutant dental epithelium but repressed Shh in the wild-type tooth germ in vivo. We further demonstrated that this regulation of Shh expression by BMP4 is conserved in the mouse developing limb bud. In addition, Shh expression was unaffected in the developing limb buds of the transgenic mice in which a constitutively active Bmpr-IB is ectopically expressed in the forelimb posterior mesenchyme and throughout the hindlimb mesenchyme, suggesting that the repression of Shh expression by BMP4 may not be mediated by BMP receptor-IB. These results provide evidence for a new function of BMP4. BMP4 can act upstream to Shh by regulating Shh expression in mouse developing tooth germ and limb bud. Taken together, our data provide insight into a new regulatory mechanism for Shh expression, and suggest that this BMP4-mediated pathway in Shh regulation may have a general implication in vertebrate organogenesis.  (+info)

Wnt/Shh interactions regulate ectodermal boundary formation during mammalian tooth development. (6/161)

Interactions between the Wnt (wingless) and hedgehog signaling pathways were first described as playing a role in establishing boundaries between ectodermal cells in Drosophila segmentation. During the initiation of mammalian tooth development, boundaries that distinguish oral from dental ectoderm must be formed to correctly position the sites of tooth formation. We describe a reciprocal relationship between the expression of Wnt-7b in presumptive oral ectoderm and Shh in presumptive dental ectoderm in mouse embryos that mark boundaries between these cells with different developmental fates. By using a murine retrovirus to ectopically express Wnt-7b in presumptive dental ectoderm in mandibular arch explants, we show that Shh expression in the ectoderm and Ptc expression in the underlying ectomesenchyme are down-regulated, and tooth development is subsequently arrested. This suggests that Wnt-7b acts to repress Shh expression in oral ectoderm, thus maintaining the boundaries between oral and dental ectodermal cells. Implantation of beads soaked in Shh protein into Wnt-7b-infected explants resulted in complete rescue of tooth development, confirming that the repressive action of Wnt-7b specifically affects Shh signaling.  (+info)

Nestin expression in embryonic and adult human teeth under normal and pathological conditions. (7/161)

Nestin is an intermediate filament most related to neurofilaments and expressed predominantly in the developing nervous system and muscles. In the present study we examined the in vivo distribution of nestin in human teeth during embryonic development and in permanent teeth under normal and pathological conditions. The results show that nestin is first expressed at the bell stage and that its distribution is restricted in pulpal cells located at the cusp area of the fetal teeth. In young permanent teeth, nestin is found only in functional odontoblasts, which produce the hard tissue matrix of dentin. Expression is progressively down-regulated and nestin is absent from older permanent teeth. In carious and injured teeth, nestin expression is up-regulated in a selective manner in odontoblasts surrounding the injury site, showing a link between tissue repair competence and nestin up-regulation under pathological conditions. In an in vitro assay system of human dental pulp explants, nestin is up-regulated after local application of bone morphogenic protein-4. A similar effect is seen in cultures of primary pulp cells during their differentiation into odontoblasts. Taken together, these results suggest that nestin plays a potential role in odontoblast differentiation during normal and pathological conditions and that bone morphogenic protein-4 is involved in nestin up-regulation.  (+info)

Molecular signaling and pulpal nerve development. (8/161)

The purpose of this review is to discuss molecular factors influencing nerve growth to teeth. The establishment of a sensory pulpal innervation occurs concurrently with tooth development. Epithelial/mesenchymal interactions initiate the tooth primordium and change it into a complex organ. The initial events seem to be controlled by the epithelium, and subsequently, the mesenchyme acquires odontogenic properties. As yet, no single initiating epithelial or mesenchymal factor has been identified. Axons reach the jaws before tooth formation and form terminals near odontogenic sites. In some species, local axons have an initiating function in odontogenesis, but it is not known if this is also the case with mammals. In diphyodont mammals, the primary dentition is replaced by a permanent dentition, which involves a profound remodeling of terminal pulpal axons. The molecular signals underlying this remodeling remain unknown. Due to the senescent deterioration of the dentition, the target area of tooth nerves shrinks with age, and these nerves show marked pathological-like changes. Nerve growth factor and possibly also brain-derived neurotrophic factor seem to be important in the formation of a sensory pulpal innervation. Neurotrophin-3 and -4/5 are probably not involved. In addition, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, but not neurturin, seems to be involved in the control of pulpal axon growth. A variety of other growth factors may also influence developing tooth nerves. Many major extracellular matrix molecules, which can influence growing axons, are present in developing teeth. It is likely that these molecules influence the growing pulpal axons.  (+info)

A tooth is a hard, calcified structure found in the jaws (upper and lower) of many vertebrates and used for biting and chewing food. In humans, a typical tooth has a crown, one or more roots, and three layers: the enamel (the outermost layer, hardest substance in the body), the dentin (the layer beneath the enamel), and the pulp (the innermost layer, containing nerves and blood vessels). Teeth are essential for proper nutrition, speech, and aesthetics. There are different types of teeth, including incisors, canines, premolars, and molars, each designed for specific functions in the mouth.

Odontogenesis is the process of tooth development that involves the formation and calcification of teeth. It is a complex process that requires the interaction of several types of cells, including epithelial cells, mesenchymal cells, and odontoblasts. The process begins during embryonic development with the formation of dental lamina, which gives rise to the tooth bud. As the tooth bud grows and differentiates, it forms the various structures of the tooth, including the enamel, dentin, cementum, and pulp. Odontogenesis is completed when the tooth erupts into the oral cavity. Abnormalities in odontogenesis can result in developmental dental anomalies such as tooth agenesis, microdontia, or odontomas.

In the context of dentistry, a molar is a type of tooth found in the back of the mouth. They are larger and wider than other types of teeth, such as incisors or canines, and have a flat biting surface with multiple cusps. Molars are primarily used for grinding and chewing food into smaller pieces that are easier to swallow. Humans typically have twelve molars in total, including the four wisdom teeth.

In medical terminology outside of dentistry, "molar" can also refer to a unit of mass in the apothecaries' system of measurement, which is equivalent to 4.08 grams. However, this usage is less common and not related to dental or medical anatomy.

The dental papilla is a type of tissue found in the developing tooth within the jawbone. It is composed of cells that will eventually differentiate into odontoblasts, which are the cells responsible for producing dentin, one of the main hard tissues that make up the tooth. The dental papilla is located in the center of the tooth germ and is surrounded by the dental follicle, another type of tissue that helps to form the tooth. As the tooth develops, the dental papilla becomes smaller and eventually forms the pulp chamber, which contains the blood vessels, nerves, and connective tissue that support and nourish the tooth.

A tooth germ is a small cluster of cells that eventually develop into a tooth. It contains the dental papilla, which will become the dentin and pulp of the tooth, and the dental follicle, which will form the periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone. The tooth germ starts as an epithelial thickening called the dental lamina, which then forms a bud, cap, and bell stage before calcification occurs and the tooth begins to erupt through the gums. It is during the bell stage that the enamel organ, which will form the enamel of the tooth, is formed.

Ameloblasts are the specialized epithelial cells that are responsible for the formation of enamel, which is the hard, outermost layer of a tooth. These cells are a part of the dental lamina and are present in the developing tooth's crown region. They align themselves along the surface of the developing tooth and secrete enamel proteins and minerals to form the enamel rods and interrod enamel. Once the enamel formation is complete, ameloblasts undergo programmed cell death, leaving behind the hard, mineralized enamel matrix. Any damage or abnormality in the functioning of ameloblasts can lead to developmental defects in the enamel, such as hypoplasia or hypocalcification, which may affect the tooth's structure and function.

Odontoblasts are defined as columnar-shaped cells that are located in the pulp tissue of teeth, specifically within the predentin region. They are responsible for the formation of dentin, one of the main components of a tooth, by synthesizing and depositing collagenous and non-collagenous proteins, as well as the mineral hydroxyapatite.

Odontoblasts have a single process that extends into the dentinal tubules, which are microscopic channels within the dentin matrix. These cells play a crucial role in sensing external stimuli, such as heat, cold, or pressure, and transmitting signals to the nerves located in the pulp tissue, thereby contributing to the tooth's sensitivity.

In summary, odontoblasts are specialized dental cells that produce dentin, provide structural support for teeth, and contribute to their sensory functions.

Tooth eruption is the process by which a tooth emerges from the gums and becomes visible in the oral cavity. It is a normal part of dental development that occurs in a predictable sequence and timeframe. Primary or deciduous teeth, also known as baby teeth, begin to erupt around 6 months of age and continue to emerge until approximately 2-3 years of age. Permanent or adult teeth start to erupt around 6 years of age and can continue to emerge until the early twenties.

The process of tooth eruption involves several stages, including the formation of the tooth within the jawbone, the movement of the tooth through the bone and surrounding tissues, and the final emergence of the tooth into the mouth. Proper tooth eruption is essential for normal oral function, including chewing, speaking, and smiling. Any abnormalities in the tooth eruption process, such as delayed or premature eruption, can indicate underlying dental or medical conditions that require further evaluation and treatment.

MSX1 (Homeobox protein MSX-1) is a transcription factor that belongs to the muscle segment homebox gene family, also known as the msh homeobox genes. These genes are involved in the development and differentiation of various tissues, including muscle, bone, and neural crest derivatives.

MSX1 plays crucial roles during embryonic development, such as regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. It is widely expressed in the developing embryo, particularly in the oral ectoderm, neural crest, and mesenchyme. In the oral region, MSX1 helps control tooth development by interacting with other transcription factors and signaling molecules.

As a transcription factor, MSX1 binds to specific DNA sequences called homeobox response elements (HREs) in the promoter regions of its target genes. This binding either activates or represses gene expression, depending on the context and interacting partners. Dysregulation of MSX1 has been implicated in various developmental disorders and diseases, such as tooth agenesis, cleft lip/palate, and cancer.

Tooth loss is the condition or process characterized by the disappearance or absence of one or more teeth from their normal position in the dental arch. This can occur due to various reasons such as tooth decay, periodontal disease (gum disease), injury, or aging. The consequences of tooth loss include difficulties in chewing, speaking, and adversely affecting the aesthetics of a person's smile, which may lead to psychological impacts. Additionally, it can cause shifting of adjacent teeth, bone resorption, and changes in the bite, potentially leading to further dental issues if not treated promptly.

The enamel organ is a structure found in the developing teeth of vertebrates. It is responsible for the formation of enamel, which is the hard, outermost layer of the tooth crown. The enamel organ is derived from the dental papilla and is composed of several layers: the outer enamel epithelium, the stellate reticulum, the stratum intermedium, and the inner enamel epithelium. These layers work together to produce the enamel matrix, which is then mineralized to form the hard tissue that covers the tooth's crown. The enamel organ disappears after the formation of enamel is complete, leaving only the hardened enamel layer behind.

An incisor is a type of tooth that is primarily designed for biting off food pieces rather than chewing or grinding. They are typically chisel-shaped, flat, and have a sharp cutting edge. In humans, there are eight incisors - four on the upper jaw and four on the lower jaw, located at the front of the mouth. Other animals such as dogs, cats, and rodents also have incisors that they use for different purposes like tearing or gnawing.

Dental enamel is the hard, white, outermost layer of a tooth. It is a highly mineralized and avascular tissue, meaning it contains no living cells or blood vessels. Enamel is primarily composed of calcium and phosphate minerals and serves as the protective covering for the crown of a tooth, which is the portion visible above the gum line.

Enamel is the hardest substance in the human body, and its primary function is to provide structural support and protection to the underlying dentin and pulp tissues of the tooth. It also plays a crucial role in chewing and biting by helping to distribute forces evenly across the tooth surface during these activities.

Despite its hardness, dental enamel can still be susceptible to damage from factors such as tooth decay, erosion, and abrasion. Once damaged or lost, enamel cannot regenerate or repair itself, making it essential to maintain good oral hygiene practices and seek regular dental checkups to prevent enamel damage and protect overall oral health.

A deciduous tooth, also known as a baby tooth or primary tooth, is a type of temporary tooth that humans and some other mammals develop during childhood. They are called "deciduous" because they are eventually shed and replaced by permanent teeth, much like how leaves on a deciduous tree fall off and are replaced by new growth.

Deciduous teeth begin to form in the womb and start to erupt through the gums when a child is around six months old. By the time a child reaches age three, they typically have a full set of 20 deciduous teeth, including incisors, canines, and molars. These teeth are smaller and less durable than permanent teeth, but they serve important functions such as helping children chew food properly, speak clearly, and maintain space in the jaw for the permanent teeth to grow into.

Deciduous teeth usually begin to fall out around age six or seven, starting with the lower central incisors. This process continues until all of the deciduous teeth have been shed, typically by age 12 or 13. At this point, the permanent teeth will have grown in and taken their place, with the exception of the wisdom teeth, which may not erupt until later in adolescence or early adulthood.

A tooth is classified as "unerupted" when it has not yet penetrated through the gums and entered the oral cavity. This can apply to both primary (baby) teeth and permanent (adult) teeth. The reasons for a tooth's failure to erupt can vary, including crowding of teeth, lack of sufficient space, or anatomical barriers such as bone or soft tissue. In some cases, unerupted teeth may need to be monitored or treated, depending on the specific situation and any symptoms experienced by the individual.

Tooth abnormalities refer to any variations or irregularities in the size, shape, number, structure, or development of teeth that deviate from the typical or normal anatomy. These abnormalities can occur in primary (deciduous) or permanent teeth and can be caused by genetic factors, environmental influences, systemic diseases, or localized dental conditions during tooth formation.

Some examples of tooth abnormalities include:

1. Microdontia - teeth that are smaller than normal in size.
2. Macrodontia - teeth that are larger than normal in size.
3. Peg-shaped teeth - teeth with a narrow, conical shape.
4. Talon cusps - additional cusps or points on the biting surface of a tooth.
5. Dens invaginatus - an abnormal development where the tooth crown has an extra fold or pouch that can trap bacteria and cause dental problems.
6. Taurodontism - teeth with large pulp chambers and short roots.
7. Supernumerary teeth - having more teeth than the typical number (20 primary and 32 permanent teeth).
8. Hypodontia - missing one or more teeth due to a failure of development.
9. Germination - two adjacent teeth fused together, usually occurring in the front teeth.
10. Fusion - two separate teeth that have grown together during development.

Tooth abnormalities may not always require treatment unless they cause functional, aesthetic, or dental health issues. A dentist can diagnose and manage tooth abnormalities through various treatments, such as fillings, extractions, orthodontic care, or restorative procedures.

A tooth crown is a type of dental restoration that covers the entire visible portion of a tooth, restoring its shape, size, and strength. It is typically made of materials like porcelain, ceramic, or metal alloys and is custom-made to fit over the prepared tooth. The tooth crown is cemented in place and becomes the new outer surface of the tooth, protecting it from further damage or decay.

The process of getting a tooth crown usually involves two dental appointments. During the first appointment, the dentist prepares the tooth by removing any decay or damaged tissue and shaping the tooth to accommodate the crown. An impression is then taken of the prepared tooth and sent to a dental laboratory where the crown is fabricated. In the meantime, a temporary crown is placed over the prepared tooth to protect it until the permanent crown is ready. At the second appointment, the temporary crown is removed, and the permanent crown is cemented in place.

Tooth crowns are often recommended for several reasons, including:

* To restore a broken or fractured tooth
* To protect a weakened tooth from further damage or decay
* To support a large filling when there isn't enough natural tooth structure left
* To cover a dental implant
* To improve the appearance of a discolored or misshapen tooth

Overall, a tooth crown is an effective and long-lasting solution for restoring damaged or decayed teeth and improving oral health.

A diastema is a gap or space that occurs between two teeth. The most common location for a diastema is between the two upper front teeth (central incisors). Diastemas can be caused by various factors, including:

1. Tooth size discrepancy: If the size of the teeth is smaller than the size of the jawbone, spaces may occur between the teeth. This is a common cause of diastema in children as their jaws grow and develop faster than their teeth. In some cases, these gaps close on their own as the permanent teeth erupt and fully emerge.
2. Thumb sucking or pacifier use: Prolonged thumb sucking or pacifier use can exert pressure on the front teeth, causing them to protrude and creating a gap between them. This habit typically affects children and may result in a diastema if it persists beyond the age of 4-5 years.
3. Tongue thrust: Tongue thrust is a condition where an individual pushes their tongue against the front teeth while speaking or swallowing. Over time, this force can push the front teeth forward and create a gap between them.
4. Missing teeth: When a person loses a tooth due to extraction, decay, or injury, the surrounding teeth may shift position and cause gaps to form between other teeth.
5. Periodontal disease: Advanced periodontal (gum) disease can lead to bone loss and receding gums, which can result in spaces between the teeth.
6. Genetic factors: Some people have a natural tendency for their front teeth to be widely spaced due to genetic predisposition.

Diastemas can be closed through various orthodontic treatments, such as braces or aligners, or by using dental restorations like bonding, veneers, or crowns. The appropriate treatment option depends on the underlying cause of the diastema and the individual's overall oral health condition.

A tooth root is the part of a tooth that is embedded in the jawbone and cannot be seen when looking at a person's smile. It is the lower portion of a tooth that typically has a conical shape and anchors the tooth to the jawbone through a periodontal ligament. The tooth root is covered by cementum, a specialized bone-like tissue, and contains nerve endings and blood vessels within its pulp chamber.

The number of roots in a tooth can vary depending on the type of tooth. For example, incisors typically have one root, canines may have one or two roots, premolars usually have one or two roots, and molars often have two to four roots. The primary function of the tooth root is to provide stability and support for the crown of the tooth, allowing it to withstand the forces of biting and chewing.

Amelogenesis is the biological process of forming enamel, which is the hard and highly mineralized outer layer of teeth. Enamel is primarily made up of calcium and phosphate minerals and is the toughest substance in the human body. Amelogenesis involves the synthesis, secretion, and maturation of enamel proteins by specialized cells called ameloblasts.

The medical definition of 'Amelogenesis' refers to a genetic disorder that affects the development and formation of tooth enamel. This condition is also known as Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) and can result in teeth that are discolored, sensitive, and prone to decay. There are several types of Amelogenesis Imperfecta, each with its own set of symptoms and genetic causes.

In summary, 'Amelogenesis' is the biological process of enamel formation, while 'Amelogenesis Imperfecta' is a genetic disorder that affects this process, leading to abnormal tooth enamel development.

Dental enamel is the hard, outermost layer of a tooth that protects the dentin and pulp inside. It is primarily made up of minerals, mainly hydroxyapatite, and contains very little organic material. However, during the formation of dental enamel, proteins are synthesized and secreted by ameloblast cells, which help in the development and mineralization of the enamel. These proteins play a crucial role in the proper formation and structure of the enamel.

Some of the main dental enamel proteins include:

1. Amelogenin: This is the most abundant protein found in developing enamel, accounting for about 90% of the organic matrix. Amelogenin helps regulate the growth and organization of hydroxyapatite crystals during mineralization. It also plays a role in determining the final hardness and structure of the enamel.

2. Enamelin: This protein is the second most abundant protein in developing enamel, accounting for about 5-10% of the organic matrix. Enamelin is involved in the elongation and thickening of hydroxyapatite crystals during mineralization. It also helps maintain the stability of the enamel structure.

3. Ameloblastin: This protein is produced by ameloblast cells and is essential for proper enamel formation. Ameloblastin plays a role in regulating crystal growth, promoting adhesion between crystals, and maintaining the structural integrity of the enamel.

4. Tuftelin: This protein is found in both dentin and enamel but is more abundant in enamel. Tuftelin is involved in the initiation of mineralization and helps regulate crystal growth during this process.

5. Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP): Although primarily associated with dentin formation, DSPP is also found in developing enamel. It plays a role in regulating crystal growth and promoting adhesion between crystals during mineralization.

After the formation of dental enamel is complete, these proteins are largely degraded and removed, leaving behind the highly mineralized and hard tissue that characterizes mature enamel. However, traces of these proteins may still be present in the enamel and could potentially play a role in its structure and properties.

Dentin is the hard, calcified tissue that lies beneath the enamel and cementum of a tooth. It forms the majority of the tooth's structure and is composed primarily of mineral salts (hydroxyapatite), collagenous proteins, and water. Dentin has a tubular structure, with microscopic channels called dentinal tubules that radiate outward from the pulp chamber (the center of the tooth containing nerves and blood vessels) to the exterior of the tooth. These tubules contain fluid and nerve endings that are responsible for the tooth's sensitivity to various stimuli such as temperature changes, pressure, or decay. Dentin plays a crucial role in protecting the dental pulp while also providing support and structure to the overlying enamel and cementum.

'Fused teeth', also known as congenitally missing or malformed teeth, is a dental condition where two or more teeth are fused together. This condition is called "gemination" when a single tooth bud fails to completely separate, resulting in two teeth that share a common pulp chamber and root canal. When this occurs with more than one tooth, it is referred to as "twinning." In contrast, "congenital fusion" or "synthesis" refers to the union of two separate tooth buds during development.

Fused teeth can cause cosmetic concerns, difficulty in biting and chewing, and may affect the alignment of surrounding teeth. Depending on the severity and location of the fusion, treatment options may include observation, dental restorations, or even orthodontic or surgical intervention to correct the malocclusion and improve oral function and aesthetics.

A supernumerary tooth, also known as hyperdontia, refers to an additional tooth or teeth that grow beyond the regular number of teeth in the dental arch. These extra teeth can erupt in various locations of the dental arch and may occur in any of the tooth types, but they are most commonly seen as extra premolars or molars, and less frequently as incisors or canines. Supernumerary teeth may be asymptomatic or may cause complications such as crowding, displacement, or impaction of adjacent teeth, and therefore, they often require dental treatment.

Neoplasms, germ cell and embryonal are types of tumors that originate from the abnormal growth of cells. Here's a brief medical definition for each:

1. Neoplasms: Neoplasms refer to abnormal tissue growths or masses, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They result from uncontrolled cell division and may invade surrounding tissues or spread to other parts of the body through a process called metastasis.
2. Germ Cell Tumors: These are rare tumors that develop from the germ cells, which give rise to sperm and eggs in the reproductive organs (ovaries and testes). They can be benign or malignant and may occur in both children and adults. Germ cell tumors can also arise outside of the reproductive organs, a condition known as extragonadal germ cell tumors.
3. Embryonal Tumors: These are a type of malignant neoplasm that primarily affects infants and young children. They develop from embryonic cells, which are immature cells present during fetal development. Embryonal tumors can occur in various organs, including the brain (medulloblastomas), nervous system (primitive neuroectodermal tumors or PNETs), and other areas like the kidneys and liver.

It is essential to note that these conditions require professional medical evaluation and treatment by healthcare professionals with expertise in oncology and related fields.

Tooth wear is the progressive loss of tooth structure that can occur as a result of various factors. According to the medical definition, it refers to the wearing down, rubbing away, or grinding off of the hard tissues of the teeth (enamel and dentin) due to mechanical forces or chemical processes.

There are three primary types of tooth wear:

1. Abrasion: This is the loss of tooth structure caused by friction from external sources, such as incorrect brushing techniques, bite appliances, or habits like nail-biting and pipe smoking.
2. Attrition: This type of tooth wear results from the natural wearing down of teeth due to occlusal forces during biting, chewing, and grinding. However, excessive attrition can occur due to bruxism (teeth grinding) or clenching.
3. Erosion: Chemical processes, such as acid attacks from dietary sources (e.g., citrus fruits, sodas, and sports drinks) or gastric reflux, cause the loss of tooth structure in this type of tooth wear. The enamel dissolves when exposed to low pH levels, leaving the dentin underneath vulnerable to further damage.

Professional dental examination and treatment may be necessary to address significant tooth wear and prevent further progression, which can lead to sensitivity, pain, and functional or aesthetic issues.

The mandible, also known as the lower jaw, is the largest and strongest bone in the human face. It forms the lower portion of the oral cavity and plays a crucial role in various functions such as mastication (chewing), speaking, and swallowing. The mandible is a U-shaped bone that consists of a horizontal part called the body and two vertical parts called rami.

The mandible articulates with the skull at the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) located in front of each ear, allowing for movements like opening and closing the mouth, protrusion, retraction, and side-to-side movement. The mandible contains the lower teeth sockets called alveolar processes, which hold the lower teeth in place.

In medical terminology, the term "mandible" refers specifically to this bone and its associated structures.

Amelogenin is a protein that plays a crucial role in the formation and mineralization of enamel, which is the hard, calcified tissue that covers the outer surface of teeth. It is expressed during tooth development and is secreted by ameloblasts, the cells responsible for producing enamel.

Amelogenin makes up approximately 90% of the organic matrix of developing enamel and guides the growth and organization of hydroxyapatite crystals, which are the primary mineral component of enamel. The protein is subsequently degraded and removed as the enamel matures and becomes fully mineralized.

Mutations in the gene that encodes amelogenin (AMELX on the X chromosome) can lead to various inherited enamel defects, such as amelogenesis imperfecta, which is characterized by thin, soft, or poorly formed enamel. Additionally, because of its high expression in developing teeth and unique size and structure, amelogenin has been widely used as a marker in forensic dentistry for human identification and sex determination.

Tooth extraction is a dental procedure in which a tooth that is damaged or poses a threat to oral health is removed from its socket in the jawbone. This may be necessary due to various reasons such as severe tooth decay, gum disease, fractured teeth, crowded teeth, or for orthodontic treatment purposes. The procedure is performed by a dentist or an oral surgeon, under local anesthesia to numb the area around the tooth, ensuring minimal discomfort during the extraction process.

A nonvital tooth is one that no longer has a living or viable pulp, which contains the nerves and blood vessels inside the tooth. This condition can occur due to various reasons such as tooth decay that has progressed deeply into the tooth, dental trauma, or previous invasive dental procedures. As a result, the tooth loses its sensitivity to temperature changes and may darken in color. Nonvital teeth typically require root canal treatment to remove the dead pulp tissue, disinfect the canals, and fill them with an inert material to preserve the tooth structure and function.

In medical and embryological terms, the mesoderm is one of the three primary germ layers in the very early stages of embryonic development. It forms between the ectoderm and endoderm during gastrulation, and it gives rise to a wide variety of cell types, tissues, and organs in the developing embryo.

The mesoderm contributes to the formation of structures such as:

1. The connective tissues (including tendons, ligaments, and most of the bones)
2. Muscular system (skeletal, smooth, and cardiac muscles)
3. Circulatory system (heart, blood vessels, and blood cells)
4. Excretory system (kidneys and associated structures)
5. Reproductive system (gonads, including ovaries and testes)
6. Dermis of the skin
7. Parts of the eye and inner ear
8. Several organs in the urogenital system

Dysfunctions or abnormalities in mesoderm development can lead to various congenital disorders and birth defects, highlighting its importance during embryogenesis.

Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 (BMP-4) is a growth factor that belongs to the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily. It plays crucial roles in various biological processes, including embryonic development, cell growth, and differentiation. In the skeletal system, BMP-4 stimulates the formation of bone and cartilage by inducing the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocytes and osteoblasts. It also regulates the maintenance and repair of bones throughout life. An imbalance in BMP-4 signaling has been associated with several skeletal disorders, such as heterotopic ossification and osteoarthritis.

An impacted tooth is a condition where a tooth fails to erupt into the oral cavity within its expected time frame, resulting in its partial or complete entrapment within the jawbone or soft tissues. This commonly occurs with wisdom teeth (third molars) but can affect any tooth. Impacted teeth may cause problems such as infection, decay of adjacent teeth, gum disease, or cyst formation, and they may require surgical removal.

Developmental gene expression regulation refers to the processes that control the activation or repression of specific genes during embryonic and fetal development. These regulatory mechanisms ensure that genes are expressed at the right time, in the right cells, and at appropriate levels to guide proper growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis of an organism.

Developmental gene expression regulation is a complex and dynamic process involving various molecular players, such as transcription factors, chromatin modifiers, non-coding RNAs, and signaling molecules. These regulators can interact with cis-regulatory elements, like enhancers and promoters, to fine-tune the spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development.

Dysregulation of developmental gene expression can lead to various congenital disorders and developmental abnormalities. Therefore, understanding the principles and mechanisms governing developmental gene expression regulation is crucial for uncovering the etiology of developmental diseases and devising potential therapeutic strategies.

Tooth discoloration, also known as tooth staining or tooth color change, refers to the darkening or staining of teeth. It can be categorized into two main types: extrinsic and intrinsic. Extrinsic discoloration occurs when the outer layer of the tooth (enamel) becomes stained due to exposure to colored substances such as coffee, tea, wine, tobacco, and certain foods. Intrinsic discoloration, on the other hand, occurs when the inner structure of the tooth (dentin) darkens or gets a yellowish tint due to factors like genetics, aging, trauma, or exposure to certain medications during tooth development. Tooth discoloration can also be caused by dental diseases or decay. It is important to note that while some forms of tooth discoloration are cosmetic concerns, others may indicate underlying oral health issues and should be evaluated by a dental professional.

In situ hybridization (ISH) is a molecular biology technique used to detect and localize specific nucleic acid sequences, such as DNA or RNA, within cells or tissues. This technique involves the use of a labeled probe that is complementary to the target nucleic acid sequence. The probe can be labeled with various types of markers, including radioisotopes, fluorescent dyes, or enzymes.

During the ISH procedure, the labeled probe is hybridized to the target nucleic acid sequence in situ, meaning that the hybridization occurs within the intact cells or tissues. After washing away unbound probe, the location of the labeled probe can be visualized using various methods depending on the type of label used.

In situ hybridization has a wide range of applications in both research and diagnostic settings, including the detection of gene expression patterns, identification of viral infections, and diagnosis of genetic disorders.

Organ culture techniques refer to the methods used to maintain or grow intact organs or pieces of organs under controlled conditions in vitro, while preserving their structural and functional characteristics. These techniques are widely used in biomedical research to study organ physiology, pathophysiology, drug development, and toxicity testing.

Organ culture can be performed using a variety of methods, including:

1. Static organ culture: In this method, the organs or tissue pieces are placed on a porous support in a culture dish and maintained in a nutrient-rich medium. The medium is replaced periodically to ensure adequate nutrition and removal of waste products.
2. Perfusion organ culture: This method involves perfusing the organ with nutrient-rich media, allowing for better distribution of nutrients and oxygen throughout the tissue. This technique is particularly useful for studying larger organs such as the liver or kidney.
3. Microfluidic organ culture: In this approach, microfluidic devices are used to create a controlled microenvironment for organ cultures. These devices allow for precise control over the flow of nutrients and waste products, as well as the application of mechanical forces.

Organ culture techniques can be used to study various aspects of organ function, including metabolism, secretion, and response to drugs or toxins. Additionally, these methods can be used to generate three-dimensional tissue models that better recapitulate the structure and function of intact organs compared to traditional two-dimensional cell cultures.

The term "tooth cervix" is not commonly used in medical dentistry with a specific technical definition. However, if you are referring to the "cervical region of a tooth," it generally refers to the area where the crown (the visible part of the tooth) meets the root (the portion of the tooth that is below the gum line). This region is also sometimes referred to as the "cementoenamel junction" (CEJ), where the enamel covering of the crown meets the cementum covering of the root. Dental issues such as tooth decay, receding gums, or abrasion can affect this area and may require professional dental treatment.

Epithelium is the tissue that covers the outer surface of the body, lines the internal cavities and organs, and forms various glands. It is composed of one or more layers of tightly packed cells that have a uniform shape and size, and rest on a basement membrane. Epithelial tissues are avascular, meaning they do not contain blood vessels, and are supplied with nutrients by diffusion from the underlying connective tissue.

Epithelial cells perform a variety of functions, including protection, secretion, absorption, excretion, and sensation. They can be classified based on their shape and the number of cell layers they contain. The main types of epithelium are:

1. Squamous epithelium: composed of flat, scalelike cells that fit together like tiles on a roof. It forms the lining of blood vessels, air sacs in the lungs, and the outermost layer of the skin.
2. Cuboidal epithelium: composed of cube-shaped cells with equal height and width. It is found in glands, tubules, and ducts.
3. Columnar epithelium: composed of tall, rectangular cells that are taller than they are wide. It lines the respiratory, digestive, and reproductive tracts.
4. Pseudostratified epithelium: appears stratified or layered but is actually made up of a single layer of cells that vary in height. The nuclei of these cells appear at different levels, giving the tissue a stratified appearance. It lines the respiratory and reproductive tracts.
5. Transitional epithelium: composed of several layers of cells that can stretch and change shape to accommodate changes in volume. It is found in the urinary bladder and ureters.

Epithelial tissue provides a barrier between the internal and external environments, protecting the body from physical, chemical, and biological damage. It also plays a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis by regulating the exchange of substances between the body and its environment.

Hedgehog proteins are a group of signaling molecules that play crucial roles in the development and regulation of various biological processes in animals. They are named after the hedgehog mutant fruit flies, which have spiky bristles due to defects in this pathway. These proteins are involved in cell growth, differentiation, and tissue regeneration. They exert their effects by binding to specific receptors on the surface of target cells, leading to a cascade of intracellular signaling events that ultimately influence gene expression and cell behavior.

There are three main types of Hedgehog proteins in mammals: Sonic hedgehog (Shh), Indian hedgehog (Ihh), and Desert hedgehog (Dhh). These protecules undergo post-translational modifications, including cleavage and lipid modification, which are essential for their activity. Dysregulation of Hedgehog signaling has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, developmental abnormalities, and degenerative disorders.

Wheat germ agglutinins (WGA) are proteins found in wheat germ that have the ability to bind to specific carbohydrate structures, such as N-acetylglucosamine and sialic acid, which are present on the surface of many cells in the human body. WGA is a type of lectin, a group of proteins that can agglutinate, or clump together, red blood cells and bind to specific sugars on cell membranes.

WGA has been studied for its potential effects on various biological processes, including inflammation, immune response, and gut barrier function. Some research suggests that WGA may interact with the gut epithelium and affect intestinal permeability, potentially contributing to the development of gastrointestinal symptoms in some individuals. However, more research is needed to fully understand the clinical significance of these findings.

It's worth noting that while WGA has been studied for its potential biological effects, it is not currently recognized as a major allergen or toxic component of wheat. However, some people may still choose to avoid foods containing WGA due to personal dietary preferences or sensitivities.

Tooth exfoliation is not a term that is commonly used in dental or medical literature. However, I believe you may be referring to the natural process of tooth loss that occurs with the shedding of primary (baby) teeth to make way for permanent (adult) teeth. This process is also known as physical or physiological tooth exfoliation.

Exfoliation in this context refers to the separation and shedding of the primary tooth's root from the underlying permanent tooth, allowing the permanent tooth to erupt into its proper position. The primary tooth becomes loose due to the resorption of its roots by the developing permanent tooth beneath it. Eventually, the primary tooth falls out, making room for the adult tooth to emerge and take its place in the dental arch.

It is essential to maintain good oral hygiene during this process to prevent any potential complications such as infection or premature loss of primary teeth.

Tooth avulsion is the complete separation of a tooth from its socket in the alveolar bone due to traumatic injury. This occurs when the periodontal ligament, which holds the tooth in place, gets severed or torn, resulting in the tooth being displaced from its original position. Avulsed teeth can be either primary (baby) or permanent teeth, and the trauma can result in damage to the surrounding tissues, including the gingiva, alveolar bone, and sometimes even the nerves and blood vessels. Prompt and appropriate first aid, as well as professional dental care, are crucial for ensuring the best possible outcome for reimplantation and healing.

Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) are a group of growth factors that play crucial roles in the development, growth, and repair of bones and other tissues. They belong to the Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily and were first discovered when researchers found that certain proteins extracted from demineralized bone matrix had the ability to induce new bone formation.

BMPs stimulate the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into osteoblasts, which are the cells responsible for bone formation. They also promote the recruitment and proliferation of these cells, enhancing the overall process of bone regeneration. In addition to their role in bone biology, BMPs have been implicated in various other biological processes, including embryonic development, wound healing, and the regulation of fat metabolism.

There are several types of BMPs (BMP-2, BMP-4, BMP-7, etc.) that exhibit distinct functions and expression patterns. Due to their ability to stimulate bone formation, recombinant human BMPs have been used in clinical applications, such as spinal fusion surgery and non-healing fracture treatment. However, the use of BMPs in medicine has been associated with certain risks and complications, including uncontrolled bone growth, inflammation, and cancer development, which necessitates further research to optimize their therapeutic potential.

A cuspid, also known as a canine tooth or cuspid tooth, is a type of tooth in mammals. It is the pointiest tooth in the dental arch and is located between the incisors and bicuspids (or premolars). Cuspids have a single cusp or pointed tip that is used for tearing and grasping food. In humans, there are four cuspids, two on the upper jaw and two on the lower jaw, one on each side of the dental arch.

Transplantation is a medical procedure where an organ or tissue is removed from one person (the donor) and placed into another person (the recipient) for the purpose of replacing the recipient's damaged or failing organ or tissue with a functioning one. The goal of transplantation is to restore normal function, improve quality of life, and extend lifespan in individuals with organ failure or severe tissue damage. Common types of transplants include kidney, liver, heart, lung, pancreas, small intestine, and bone marrow transplantations. The success of a transplant depends on various factors, including the compatibility between the donor and recipient, the health of both individuals, and the effectiveness of immunosuppressive therapy to prevent rejection of the transplanted organ or tissue.

Morphogenesis is a term used in developmental biology and refers to the process by which cells give rise to tissues and organs with specific shapes, structures, and patterns during embryonic development. This process involves complex interactions between genes, cells, and the extracellular environment that result in the coordinated movement and differentiation of cells into specialized functional units.

Morphogenesis is a dynamic and highly regulated process that involves several mechanisms, including cell proliferation, death, migration, adhesion, and differentiation. These processes are controlled by genetic programs and signaling pathways that respond to environmental cues and regulate the behavior of individual cells within a developing tissue or organ.

The study of morphogenesis is important for understanding how complex biological structures form during development and how these processes can go awry in disease states such as cancer, birth defects, and degenerative disorders.

Tooth diseases are conditions that affect the teeth and can cause discomfort, pain, and even loss of teeth if left untreated. These diseases can be caused by various factors such as poor oral hygiene, bacterial infections, trauma, genetics, and certain medical conditions. Some common tooth diseases include:

1. Dental caries (tooth decay): This is a breakdown of the tooth enamel due to the action of acid-producing bacteria that feed on sugars and starches in the mouth. Over time, this can lead to cavities or holes in the teeth.
2. Gingivitis: This is an inflammation of the gums caused by the buildup of plaque and tartar at the gum line. If left untreated, gingivitis can progress to periodontitis, a more serious form of gum disease that can cause tooth loss.
3. Periodontitis: This is a severe infection of the gums and bones that support the teeth. It is caused by the buildup of plaque and tartar, which leads to the destruction of the tissue and bone that hold the teeth in place.
4. Abscess: This is a pocket of pus that forms in the tooth or gum due to a bacterial infection. An abscess can cause pain, swelling, and fever, and may require antibiotics or surgical drainage.
5. Tooth erosion: This is the loss of tooth structure due to acid wear, which can be caused by factors such as diet, stomach acid, and teeth grinding.
6. Hypersensitivity: This is a condition in which the teeth become sensitive to hot, cold, or sweet foods and drinks. It can be caused by factors such as gum recession, tooth decay, and tooth wear.
7. Oral cancer: This is a type of cancer that affects the mouth, lips, tongue, or throat. It can cause symptoms such as sores, lumps, or difficulty swallowing, and may require surgery, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy for treatment.

Tooth calcification, also known as dental calculus or tartar formation, refers to the hardening of plaque on the surface of teeth. This process occurs when minerals from saliva combine with bacterial deposits and dental plaque, resulting in a hard, calcified substance that adheres to the tooth surface. Calcification can occur both above and below the gum line, and if not removed through professional dental cleanings, it can lead to periodontal disease, tooth decay, and other oral health issues.

A bicuspid valve, also known as a mitral valve in the heart, is a heart valve that has two leaflets or cusps. It lies between the left atrium and the left ventricle and helps to regulate blood flow between these two chambers of the heart. In a healthy heart, the bicuspid valve opens to allow blood to flow from the left atrium into the left ventricle and closes tightly to prevent blood from flowing back into the left atrium during contraction of the ventricle.

A congenital heart defect known as a bicuspid aortic valve occurs when the aortic valve, which normally has three leaflets or cusps, only has two. This can lead to narrowing of the valve (aortic stenosis) or leakage of the valve (aortic regurgitation), which can cause symptoms and may require medical treatment.

Dental pulp is the soft tissue located in the center of a tooth, surrounded by the dentin. It contains nerves, blood vessels, and connective tissue, and plays a vital role in the development and health of the tooth. The dental pulp helps to form dentin during tooth development and continues to provide nourishment to the tooth throughout its life. It also serves as a sensory organ, allowing the tooth to detect hot and cold temperatures and transmit pain signals to the brain. Injury or infection of the dental pulp can lead to serious dental problems, such as tooth decay or abscesses, and may require root canal treatment to remove the damaged tissue and save the tooth.

Tooth ankylosis is a dental condition where the tooth becomes abnormally fused to the alveolar bone, which is the part of the jawbone that contains the tooth sockets. This fusion typically occurs through the cementum of the root surface and the adjacent alveolar bone, resulting in the loss of the periodontal ligament (PLD) space that normally separates the tooth from the bone.

Ankylosis can affect both primary (deciduous or baby) teeth and permanent teeth. In primary teeth, ankylosis may lead to early exfoliation or premature loss of the tooth due to the lack of PDL resorption, which is necessary for natural tooth shedding. In permanent teeth, ankylosis can result in infraocclusion, where the affected tooth fails to erupt fully and remains at a lower level than the surrounding teeth.

The causes of tooth ankylosis include trauma, infection, developmental disorders, or previous orthodontic treatment. It is essential to diagnose and manage this condition promptly, as it can lead to complications such as malocclusion, dental crowding, or periodontal issues if left untreated. Treatment options may include extraction of the affected tooth, surgical separation from the bone, or orthodontic treatment to correct any resulting occlusal discrepancies.

Tooth erosion is defined as the progressive, irreversible loss of dental hard tissue, primarily caused by chemical dissolution from acids, rather than mechanical forces such as abrasion or attrition. These acids can originate from extrinsic sources like acidic foods and beverages, or intrinsic sources like gastric reflux or vomiting. The erosion process leads to a reduction in tooth structure, altering the shape and function of teeth, and potentially causing sensitivity, pain, and aesthetical concerns. Early detection and management of tooth erosion are crucial to prevent further progression and preserve dental health.

Cell differentiation is the process by which a less specialized cell, or stem cell, becomes a more specialized cell type with specific functions and structures. This process involves changes in gene expression, which are regulated by various intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factors. Differentiation results in the development of distinct cell types that make up tissues and organs in multicellular organisms. It is a crucial aspect of embryonic development, tissue repair, and maintenance of homeostasis in the body.

A tooth socket, also known as an alveolus (plural: alveoli), refers to the hollow cavity or space in the jawbone where a tooth is anchored. The tooth socket is part of the alveolar process, which is the curved part of the maxilla or mandible that contains multiple tooth sockets for the upper and lower teeth, respectively.

Each tooth socket has a specialized tissue called the periodontal ligament, which attaches the root of the tooth to the surrounding bone. This ligament helps absorb forces generated during biting and chewing, allowing for comfortable and efficient mastication while also maintaining the tooth's position within the jawbone. The tooth socket is responsible for providing support, stability, and nourishment to the tooth through its blood vessels and nerves.

Tooth replantation is a dental procedure that involves the replanting and reattachment of a tooth that has been avulsed or knocked out due to trauma. The primary goal of this emergency procedure is to preserve the natural tooth and its periodontal ligament (PDL) tissue, allowing for potential reattachment and function.

The steps involved in tooth replantation include:

1. Locating the avulsed tooth: Carefully handle the knocked-out tooth by holding it by the crown (the chewing surface), avoiding touching the root area to prevent further damage to the periodontal ligament fibers.
2. Rinsing the tooth: Gently rinse the tooth with saline solution, sterile water, or milk to remove any debris or dirt, but avoid using alcohol or scrubbing the tooth as it may cause more damage to the PDL.
3. Replanting the tooth: As soon as possible, reposition the tooth back into its socket in the correct orientation and alignment. Apply gentle pressure to seat it in place while ensuring that it is facing the right direction. Ideally, this should be done within 30 minutes of avulsion for better prognosis.
4. Stabilizing the tooth: Use a splint or a wire to secure the replanted tooth to the adjacent teeth, providing stability and support during the healing process. This helps maintain the alignment and position of the replanted tooth.
5. Seeking professional dental care: Immediately consult with a dentist or endodontist for further evaluation, additional treatment, and follow-up care. The dentist will assess the success of the replantation and determine if any root canal therapy or other treatments are necessary to ensure long-term survival of the tooth.

The success of tooth replantation depends on several factors, including the timeliness of the procedure, the condition of the avulsed tooth, and the patient's overall oral health. Prompt action and professional care can significantly increase the likelihood of a successful outcome and preserve the natural tooth for years to come.

The maxilla is a paired bone that forms the upper jaw in vertebrates. In humans, it is a major bone in the face and plays several important roles in the craniofacial complex. Each maxilla consists of a body and four processes: frontal process, zygomatic process, alveolar process, and palatine process.

The maxillae contribute to the formation of the eye sockets (orbits), nasal cavity, and the hard palate of the mouth. They also contain the upper teeth sockets (alveoli) and help form the lower part of the orbit and the cheekbones (zygomatic arches).

Here's a quick rundown of its key functions:

1. Supports the upper teeth and forms the upper jaw.
2. Contributes to the formation of the eye sockets, nasal cavity, and hard palate.
3. Helps shape the lower part of the orbit and cheekbones.
4. Partakes in the creation of important sinuses, such as the maxillary sinus, which is located within the body of the maxilla.

Tooth resorption is a process in which there is an abnormal loss or breakdown of tooth structure, either internally (internal resorption) or externally (external resorption), due to the action of specialized cells called odontoclasts. This can lead to weakening and destruction of the tooth, potentially causing sensitivity, pain, or even tooth loss if left untreated. The causes of tooth resorption can vary, including trauma, orthodontic treatment, periodontal disease, and certain systemic conditions. It is important to diagnose and treat tooth resorption early to prevent further damage and preserve the tooth structure.

The testis, also known as the testicle, is a male reproductive organ that is part of the endocrine system. It is located in the scrotum, outside of the abdominal cavity. The main function of the testis is to produce sperm and testosterone, the primary male sex hormone.

The testis is composed of many tiny tubules called seminiferous tubules, where sperm are produced. These tubules are surrounded by a network of blood vessels, nerves, and supportive tissues. The sperm then travel through a series of ducts to the epididymis, where they mature and become capable of fertilization.

Testosterone is produced in the Leydig cells, which are located in the interstitial tissue between the seminiferous tubules. Testosterone plays a crucial role in the development and maintenance of male secondary sexual characteristics, such as facial hair, deep voice, and muscle mass. It also supports sperm production and sexual function.

Abnormalities in testicular function can lead to infertility, hormonal imbalances, and other health problems. Regular self-examinations and medical check-ups are recommended for early detection and treatment of any potential issues.

Spermatogenesis is the process by which sperm cells, or spermatozoa, are produced in male organisms. It occurs in the seminiferous tubules of the testes and involves several stages:

1. Spermatocytogenesis: This is the initial stage where diploid spermatogonial stem cells divide mitotically to produce more spermatogonia, some of which will differentiate into primary spermatocytes.
2. Meiosis: The primary spermatocytes undergo meiotic division to form haploid secondary spermatocytes, which then divide again to form haploid spermatids. This process results in the reduction of chromosome number from 46 (diploid) to 23 (haploid).
3. Spermiogenesis: The spermatids differentiate into spermatozoa, undergoing morphological changes such as the formation of a head and tail. During this stage, most of the cytoplasm is discarded, resulting in highly compacted and streamlined sperm cells.
4. Spermation: The final stage where mature sperm are released from the seminiferous tubules into the epididymis for further maturation and storage.

The entire process takes approximately 72-74 days in humans, with continuous production throughout adulthood.

Dental caries, also known as tooth decay or cavities, refers to the damage or breakdown of the hard tissues of the teeth (enamel, dentin, and cementum) due to the activity of acid-producing bacteria. These bacteria ferment sugars from food and drinks, producing acids that dissolve and weaken the tooth structure, leading to cavities.

The process of dental caries development involves several stages:

1. Demineralization: The acidic environment created by bacterial activity causes minerals (calcium and phosphate) to be lost from the tooth surface, making it weaker and more susceptible to decay.
2. Formation of a white spot lesion: As demineralization progresses, a chalky white area appears on the tooth surface, indicating early caries development.
3. Cavity formation: If left untreated, the demineralization process continues, leading to the breakdown and loss of tooth structure, resulting in a cavity or hole in the tooth.
4. Infection and pulp involvement: As the decay progresses deeper into the tooth, it can reach the dental pulp (the soft tissue containing nerves and blood vessels), causing infection, inflammation, and potentially leading to toothache, abscess, or even tooth loss.

Preventing dental caries involves maintaining good oral hygiene, reducing sugar intake, using fluoride toothpaste and mouthwash, and having regular dental check-ups and cleanings. Early detection and treatment of dental caries can help prevent further progression and more severe complications.

Germ layers refer to the primary layers of cells that form during embryonic development and give rise to the various tissues and organs in the body. In humans, there are three germ layers: the ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. Each germ layer differentiates into distinct cell types and structures during the process of gastrulation. The ectoderm gives rise to the nervous system, sensory organs, and skin; the mesoderm forms muscles, bones, blood vessels, and the circulatory system; and the endoderm develops into the respiratory and digestive systems, including the lungs, liver, and pancreas.

ICR (Institute of Cancer Research) is a strain of albino Swiss mice that are widely used in scientific research. They are an outbred strain, which means that they have been bred to maintain maximum genetic heterogeneity. However, it is also possible to find inbred strains of ICR mice, which are genetically identical individuals produced by many generations of brother-sister mating.

Inbred ICR mice are a specific type of ICR mouse that has been inbred for at least 20 generations. This means that they have a high degree of genetic uniformity and are essentially genetically identical to one another. Inbred strains of mice are often used in research because their genetic consistency makes them more reliable models for studying biological phenomena and testing new therapies or treatments.

It is important to note that while inbred ICR mice may be useful for certain types of research, they do not necessarily represent the genetic diversity found in human populations. Therefore, it is important to consider the limitations of using any animal model when interpreting research findings and applying them to human health.

Dentition refers to the development, arrangement, and appearance of teeth in the dental arch. It includes the number, type, size, and shape of teeth, as well as their alignment and relationship with each other and the surrounding structures in the oral cavity. Dentition can be classified into two main types: deciduous (primary) dentition and permanent (secondary) dentition. Deciduous dentition consists of 20 temporary teeth that erupt during infancy and childhood, while permanent dentition consists of 32 teeth that replace the deciduous teeth and last for a lifetime, excluding the wisdom teeth which may or may not erupt. Abnormalities in dentition can indicate various dental and systemic conditions, making it an essential aspect of oral health assessment and diagnosis.

Root canal therapy, also known as endodontic treatment, is a dental procedure that involves the removal of infected or damaged pulp tissue from within a tooth's root canal system. The root canal system is a series of narrow channels that run from the center of the tooth (pulp chamber) down to the tip of the tooth roots, containing nerves, blood vessels, and connective tissues.

During the procedure, the dentist or endodontist will gain access to the pulp chamber, carefully clean and shape the root canals using specialized instruments, and then fill and seal them with a rubber-like material called gutta-percha. This helps prevent reinfection and preserves the structural integrity of the tooth. In many cases, a crown or other restoration is placed over the treated tooth to protect it and restore its function and appearance.

Root canal therapy is typically recommended when the pulp tissue becomes inflamed or infected due to deep decay, repeated dental procedures, cracks, or chips in the teeth. The goal of this treatment is to alleviate pain, preserve natural tooth structure, and prevent the need for extraction.

Odontometry is a term used in dentistry that refers to the measurement of teeth, particularly the size and length of teeth or tooth roots. It is often used in forensic dentistry for identification purposes, such as in age estimation, sex determination, or individual identification of human remains. The measurements can be taken using various methods, including radiographs (x-rays), calipers, or specialized software.

In some contexts, odontometry may also refer to the process of measuring the amount of dental work required for a particular treatment plan, although this usage is less common.

Homeodomain proteins are a group of transcription factors that play crucial roles in the development and differentiation of cells in animals and plants. They are characterized by the presence of a highly conserved DNA-binding domain called the homeodomain, which is typically about 60 amino acids long. The homeodomain consists of three helices, with the third helix responsible for recognizing and binding to specific DNA sequences.

Homeodomain proteins are involved in regulating gene expression during embryonic development, tissue maintenance, and organismal growth. They can act as activators or repressors of transcription, depending on the context and the presence of cofactors. Mutations in homeodomain proteins have been associated with various human diseases, including cancer, congenital abnormalities, and neurological disorders.

Some examples of homeodomain proteins include PAX6, which is essential for eye development, HOX genes, which are involved in body patterning, and NANOG, which plays a role in maintaining pluripotency in stem cells.

Tooth demineralization is a process that involves the loss of minerals, such as calcium and phosphate, from the hard tissues of the teeth. This process can lead to the development of dental caries or tooth decay. Demineralization occurs when acids produced by bacteria in the mouth attack the enamel of the tooth, dissolving its mineral content. Over time, these attacks can create holes or cavities in the teeth. Fluoride, found in many toothpastes and public water supplies, can help to remineralize teeth and prevent decay. Good oral hygiene practices, such as brushing and flossing regularly, can also help to prevent demineralization by removing plaque and bacteria from the mouth.

Permanent dentition is the second and final set of teeth that humans grow during their lifetime. These teeth are also known as adult or secondary teeth and typically begin to erupt in the mouth around the age of 6 or 7 years old, with all permanent teeth usually present by the time a person reaches their late teens or early twenties.

There are 32 teeth in a complete set of permanent dentition, including 8 incisors, 4 canines, 8 premolars (also called bicuspids), and 12 molars (including 4 third molars or wisdom teeth). The primary function of permanent teeth is to help with biting, chewing, and grinding food into smaller pieces that are easier to swallow and digest. Proper care and maintenance of permanent teeth through good oral hygiene practices, regular dental checkups, and a balanced diet can help ensure their longevity and health throughout a person's life.

A dental restoration, permanent, is a type of dental treatment that involves the use of materials such as gold, silver amalgam, porcelain, or composite resin to repair and restore the function, form, and aesthetics of a damaged or decayed tooth. Unlike temporary restorations, which are meant to be replaced with a permanent solution, permanent restorations are designed to last for many years, if not a lifetime.

Examples of permanent dental restorations include:

1. Dental fillings: These are used to fill cavities caused by tooth decay. The decayed portion of the tooth is removed, and the resulting space is filled with a material such as amalgam, composite resin, or gold.
2. Inlays and onlays: These are similar to dental fillings but are made in a laboratory and then bonded to the tooth. They are used when there is not enough tooth structure left to support a filling.
3. Dental crowns: Also known as caps, these are used to cover and protect a tooth that has been damaged or weakened by decay, injury, or wear. The crown fits over the entire tooth, restoring its shape, size, and strength.
4. Dental bridges: These are used to replace one or more missing teeth. A bridge consists of one or more artificial teeth (pontics) that are held in place by crowns on either side.
5. Dental implants: These are used to replace missing teeth. An implant is a small titanium post that is surgically placed in the jawbone, where it functions as an anchor for a replacement tooth or bridge.

Permanent dental restorations are custom-made for each patient and require careful planning and preparation. They are designed to blend in with the surrounding teeth and provide a natural-looking appearance. With proper care and maintenance, these restorations can last for many years and help preserve the health and function of the teeth and mouth.

Transcription factors are proteins that play a crucial role in regulating gene expression by controlling the transcription of DNA to messenger RNA (mRNA). They function by binding to specific DNA sequences, known as response elements, located in the promoter region or enhancer regions of target genes. This binding can either activate or repress the initiation of transcription, depending on the properties and interactions of the particular transcription factor. Transcription factors often act as part of a complex network of regulatory proteins that determine the precise spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development, differentiation, and homeostasis in an organism.

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a technique used in pathology and laboratory medicine to identify specific proteins or antigens in tissue sections. It combines the principles of immunology and histology to detect the presence and location of these target molecules within cells and tissues. This technique utilizes antibodies that are specific to the protein or antigen of interest, which are then tagged with a detection system such as a chromogen or fluorophore. The stained tissue sections can be examined under a microscope, allowing for the visualization and analysis of the distribution and expression patterns of the target molecule in the context of the tissue architecture. Immunohistochemistry is widely used in diagnostic pathology to help identify various diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and immune-mediated disorders.

The term "extremities" in a medical context refers to the most distant parts of the body, including the hands and feet (both fingers and toes), as well as the arms and legs. These are the farthest parts from the torso and head. Medical professionals may examine a patient's extremities for various reasons, such as checking circulation, assessing nerve function, or looking for injuries or abnormalities.

Testicular neoplasms are abnormal growths or tumors in the testicle that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They are a type of genitourinary cancer, which affects the reproductive and urinary systems. Testicular neoplasms can occur in men of any age but are most commonly found in young adults between the ages of 15 and 40.

Testicular neoplasms can be classified into two main categories: germ cell tumors and non-germ cell tumors. Germ cell tumors, which arise from the cells that give rise to sperm, are further divided into seminomas and non-seminomas. Seminomas are typically slow-growing and have a good prognosis, while non-seminomas tend to grow more quickly and can spread to other parts of the body.

Non-germ cell tumors are less common than germ cell tumors and include Leydig cell tumors, Sertoli cell tumors, and lymphomas. These tumors can have a variety of clinical behaviors, ranging from benign to malignant.

Testicular neoplasms often present as a painless mass or swelling in the testicle. Other symptoms may include a feeling of heaviness or discomfort in the scrotum, a dull ache in the lower abdomen or groin, and breast enlargement (gynecomastia).

Diagnosis typically involves a physical examination, imaging studies such as ultrasound or CT scan, and blood tests to detect tumor markers. Treatment options depend on the type and stage of the neoplasm but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these modalities. Regular self-examinations of the testicles are recommended for early detection and improved outcomes.

Anodontia is a medical term that refers to the congenital absence or lack of development of all primary (deciduous) and/or permanent teeth. It is a rare dental condition that affects tooth development and can be isolated or associated with various syndromes and genetic disorders.

In anodontia, the dental tissues responsible for forming teeth, including the dental lamina, dental papilla, and dental follicle, fail to develop properly, resulting in missing teeth. The condition can affect all teeth or only some of them, leading to partial anodontia.

Anodontia is different from hypodontia, which refers to the congenital absence of one or more, but not all, teeth. It is also distinct from oligodontia, which is the absence of six or more permanent teeth, excluding third molars (wisdom teeth).

People with anodontia may experience difficulties in chewing, speaking, and maintaining oral hygiene, leading to various dental and social problems. Prosthodontic treatments, such as dentures or implants, are often necessary to restore oral function and aesthetics.

Tooth preparation in prosthodontics refers to the process of altering the clinical crown of a tooth or teeth to receive a restoration, such as a crown, veneer, or bridge. This procedure involves removing a portion of the enamel and dentin to create a suitable foundation for the prosthetic device. The preparation aims to achieve proper retention, resistance form, and marginal fit, ensuring the successful integration and longevity of the restoration. The process may also include the management of tooth structure loss due to decay, trauma, or wear, and the establishment of harmonious occlusion with the opposing teeth.

"Body patterning" is a general term that refers to the process of forming and organizing various tissues and structures into specific patterns during embryonic development. This complex process involves a variety of molecular mechanisms, including gene expression, cell signaling, and cell-cell interactions. It results in the creation of distinct body regions, such as the head, trunk, and limbs, as well as the organization of internal organs and systems.

In medical terminology, "body patterning" may refer to specific developmental processes or abnormalities related to embryonic development. For example, in genetic disorders such as Poland syndrome or Holt-Oram syndrome, mutations in certain genes can lead to abnormal body patterning, resulting in the absence or underdevelopment of certain muscles, bones, or other structures.

It's important to note that "body patterning" is not a formal medical term with a specific definition, but rather a general concept used in developmental biology and genetics.

The periodontal ligament, also known as the "PDL," is the soft tissue that connects the tooth root to the alveolar bone within the dental alveolus (socket). It consists of collagen fibers organized into groups called principal fibers and accessory fibers. These fibers are embedded into both the cementum of the tooth root and the alveolar bone, providing shock absorption during biting and chewing forces, allowing for slight tooth movement, and maintaining the tooth in its position within the socket.

The periodontal ligament plays a crucial role in the health and maintenance of the periodontium, which includes the gingiva (gums), cementum, alveolar bone, and the periodontal ligament itself. Inflammation or infection of the periodontal ligament can lead to periodontal disease, potentially causing tooth loss if not treated promptly and appropriately.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

The alveolar process is the curved part of the jawbone (mandible or maxilla) that contains sockets or hollow spaces (alveoli) for the teeth to be embedded. These processes are covered with a specialized mucous membrane called the gingiva, which forms a tight seal around the teeth to help protect the periodontal tissues and maintain oral health.

The alveolar process is composed of both compact and spongy bone tissue. The compact bone forms the outer layer, while the spongy bone is found inside the alveoli and provides support for the teeth. When a tooth is lost or extracted, the alveolar process begins to resorb over time due to the lack of mechanical stimulation from the tooth's chewing forces. This can lead to changes in the shape and size of the jawbone, which may require bone grafting procedures before dental implant placement.

"Age determination by teeth" is a method used in forensic dentistry to estimate the age of an individual based on the development and wear of their teeth. This process involves examining various features such as tooth eruption, crown and root formation, and dental attrition or wear.

The developmental stages of teeth can provide a rough estimate of age during childhood and adolescence, while dental wear patterns can offer insights into an individual's age during adulthood. However, it is important to note that there can be significant variation in tooth development and wear between individuals, making this method somewhat imprecise.

In addition to forensic applications, age determination by teeth can also be useful in archaeology and anthropology for studying past populations and their lifestyles.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Trans-activators are proteins that increase the transcriptional activity of a gene or a set of genes. They do this by binding to specific DNA sequences and interacting with the transcription machinery, thereby enhancing the recruitment and assembly of the complexes needed for transcription. In some cases, trans-activators can also modulate the chromatin structure to make the template more accessible to the transcription machinery.

In the context of HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) infection, the term "trans-activator" is often used specifically to refer to the Tat protein. The Tat protein is a viral regulatory protein that plays a critical role in the replication of HIV by activating the transcription of the viral genome. It does this by binding to a specific RNA structure called the Trans-Activation Response Element (TAR) located at the 5' end of all nascent HIV transcripts, and recruiting cellular cofactors that enhance the processivity and efficiency of RNA polymerase II, leading to increased viral gene expression.

Dental cementum is a type of hard connective tissue that covers the root of a tooth. It is primarily composed of calcium salts and collagen fibers, and it serves to attach the periodontal ligaments (the fibers that help secure the tooth in its socket) to the tooth's root. Cementum also helps protect the root of the tooth and contributes to the maintenance of tooth stability. It continues to grow and deposit new layers throughout an individual's life, which can be seen as incremental lines called "cementum annulations."

Spermatozoa are the male reproductive cells, or gametes, that are produced in the testes. They are microscopic, flagellated (tail-equipped) cells that are highly specialized for fertilization. A spermatozoon consists of a head, neck, and tail. The head contains the genetic material within the nucleus, covered by a cap-like structure called the acrosome which contains enzymes to help the sperm penetrate the female's egg (ovum). The long, thin tail propels the sperm forward through fluid, such as semen, enabling its journey towards the egg for fertilization.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

In medical terms, "wing" is not a term that is used as a standalone definition. However, it can be found in the context of certain anatomical structures or medical conditions. For instance, the "wings" of the lungs refer to the upper and lower portions of the lungs that extend from the main body of the organ. Similarly, in dermatology, "winging" is used to describe the spreading out or flaring of the wings of the nose, which can be a characteristic feature of certain skin conditions like lupus.

It's important to note that medical terminology can be highly specific and context-dependent, so it's always best to consult with a healthcare professional for accurate information related to medical definitions or diagnoses.

The dental pulp cavity, also known as the pulp chamber, is the innermost part of a tooth that contains the dental pulp. It is located in the crown portion of the tooth and is shaped like an upside-down pyramid with the narrow end point towards the root of the tooth.

The dental pulp is a soft tissue that contains nerves, blood vessels, and connective tissue. It plays an important role in the development and maintenance of the tooth, including providing nutrients to the dentin and producing reparative dentin.

The dental pulp cavity can become infected or inflamed due to tooth decay, trauma, or other factors, leading to symptoms such as pain, sensitivity, and swelling. In such cases, treatment options may include root canal therapy, which involves removing the infected or inflamed pulp tissue from the dental pulp cavity and sealing the space to prevent further infection.

Genetic techniques refer to a variety of methods and tools used in the field of genetics to study, manipulate, and understand genes and their functions. These techniques can be broadly categorized into those that allow for the identification and analysis of specific genes or genetic variations, and those that enable the manipulation of genes in order to understand their function or to modify them for therapeutic purposes.

Some examples of genetic analysis techniques include:

1. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR): a method used to amplify specific DNA sequences, allowing researchers to study small amounts of DNA.
2. Genome sequencing: the process of determining the complete DNA sequence of an organism's genome.
3. Genotyping: the process of identifying and analyzing genetic variations or mutations in an individual's DNA.
4. Linkage analysis: a method used to identify genetic loci associated with specific traits or diseases by studying patterns of inheritance within families.
5. Expression profiling: the measurement of gene expression levels in cells or tissues, often using microarray technology.

Some examples of genetic manipulation techniques include:

1. Gene editing: the use of tools such as CRISPR-Cas9 to modify specific genes or genetic sequences.
2. Gene therapy: the introduction of functional genes into cells or tissues to replace missing or nonfunctional genes.
3. Transgenic technology: the creation of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) by introducing foreign DNA into their genomes.
4. RNA interference (RNAi): the use of small RNA molecules to silence specific genes and study their function.
5. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs): the creation of stem cells from adult cells through genetic reprogramming, allowing for the study of development and disease in vitro.

A germinoma is a type of tumor that develops in the brain or the spine, primarily in the pituitary gland or pineal gland. It is a rare form of primary central nervous system (CNS) cancer and is classified as a type of germ cell tumor. These tumors arise from cells that normally develop into sperm or eggs, which can migrate to unusual locations during embryonic development.

Germinomas are highly sensitive to radiation therapy and chemotherapy, making them generally treatable and curable with appropriate medical intervention. Symptoms of a germinoma may include headaches, nausea, vomiting, visual disturbances, hormonal imbalances, and neurological deficits, depending on the location and size of the tumor. Diagnosis typically involves imaging studies like MRI or CT scans, followed by a biopsy to confirm the presence of malignant cells.

Dental pulp necrosis is the death of the soft tissue inside a tooth, known as the dental pulp. The dental pulp contains nerves, blood vessels, and connective tissue that help the tooth grow and develop. It also provides sensations like hot or cold. Dental pulp necrosis can occur due to various reasons such as tooth decay, trauma, or infection. When the dental pulp dies, it can no longer provide nutrients to the tooth, making it more susceptible to fractures and infections. Symptoms of dental pulp necrosis may include pain, sensitivity, swelling, or abscess formation. Treatment options for dental pulp necrosis typically involve root canal therapy or extraction of the affected tooth.

Spermatogonia are a type of diploid germ cells found in the seminiferous tubules of the testis. They are the stem cells responsible for sperm production (spermatogenesis) in males. There are two types of spermatogonia: A-dark (Ad) and A-pale (Ap). The Ad spermatogonia function as reserve stem cells, while the Ap spermatogonia serve as the progenitor cells that divide to produce type B spermatogonia. Type B spermatogonia then differentiate into primary spermatocytes, which undergo meiosis to form haploid spermatozoa.

Sertoli cells, also known as sustentacular cells or nurse cells, are specialized cells in the seminiferous tubules of the testis in mammals. They play a crucial role in supporting and nurturing the development of sperm cells (spermatogenesis). Sertoli cells create a microenvironment within the seminiferous tubules that facilitates the differentiation, maturation, and survival of germ cells.

These cells have several essential functions:

1. Blood-testis barrier formation: Sertoli cells form tight junctions with each other, creating a physical barrier called the blood-testis barrier, which separates the seminiferous tubules into basal and adluminal compartments. This barrier protects the developing sperm cells from the immune system and provides an isolated environment for their maturation.
2. Nutrition and support: Sertoli cells provide essential nutrients and growth factors to germ cells, ensuring their proper development and survival. They also engulf and digest residual bodies, which are byproducts of spermatid differentiation.
3. Phagocytosis: Sertoli cells have phagocytic properties, allowing them to remove debris and dead cells within the seminiferous tubules.
4. Hormone metabolism: Sertoli cells express receptors for various hormones, such as follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), testosterone, and estradiol. They play a role in regulating hormonal signaling within the testis by metabolizing these hormones or producing inhibins, which modulate FSH secretion from the pituitary gland.
5. Regulation of spermatogenesis: Sertoli cells produce and secrete various proteins and growth factors that influence germ cell development and proliferation. They also control the release of mature sperm cells into the epididymis through a process called spermiation.

Seminiferous tubules are the long, convoluted tubes within the testicles that are responsible for producing sperm in males. They are lined with specialized epithelial cells called Sertoli cells, which provide structural support and nourishment to developing sperm cells. The seminiferous tubules also contain germ cells, which divide and differentiate into spermatozoa (sperm) through the process of spermatogenesis.

The seminiferous tubules are surrounded by a thin layer of smooth muscle called the tunica albuginea, which helps to maintain the structure and integrity of the testicle. The tubules are connected to the rete testis, a network of channels that transport sperm to the epididymis for further maturation and storage before ejaculation.

Damage or dysfunction of the seminiferous tubules can lead to male infertility, as well as other reproductive health issues.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Tooth remineralization is a natural process by which minerals, such as calcium and phosphate, are redeposited into the microscopic pores (hydroxyapatite crystals) in the enamel of a tooth. This process can help to repair early decay and strengthen the teeth. It occurs when the mouth's pH is neutral or slightly alkaline, which allows the minerals in our saliva, fluoride from toothpaste or other sources, and calcium and phosphate ions from foods to be absorbed into the enamel. Remineralization can be promoted through good oral hygiene practices, such as brushing with a fluoride toothpaste, flossing, and eating a balanced diet that includes foods rich in calcium and phosphate.

Dental models are replicas of a patient's teeth and surrounding oral structures, used in dental practice and education. They are typically created using plaster or other materials that harden to accurately reproduce the shape and position of each tooth, as well as the contours of the gums and palate. Dental models may be used for a variety of purposes, including treatment planning, creating custom-fitted dental appliances, and teaching dental students about oral anatomy and various dental procedures. They provide a tactile and visual representation that can aid in understanding and communication between dentists, patients, and other dental professionals.

Cell division is the process by which a single eukaryotic cell (a cell with a true nucleus) divides into two identical daughter cells. This complex process involves several stages, including replication of DNA, separation of chromosomes, and division of the cytoplasm. There are two main types of cell division: mitosis and meiosis.

Mitosis is the type of cell division that results in two genetically identical daughter cells. It is a fundamental process for growth, development, and tissue repair in multicellular organisms. The stages of mitosis include prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase, followed by cytokinesis, which divides the cytoplasm.

Meiosis, on the other hand, is a type of cell division that occurs in the gonads (ovaries and testes) during the production of gametes (sex cells). Meiosis results in four genetically unique daughter cells, each with half the number of chromosomes as the parent cell. This process is essential for sexual reproduction and genetic diversity. The stages of meiosis include meiosis I and meiosis II, which are further divided into prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase.

In summary, cell division is the process by which a single cell divides into two daughter cells, either through mitosis or meiosis. This process is critical for growth, development, tissue repair, and sexual reproduction in multicellular organisms.

Panoramic radiography is a specialized type of dental X-ray imaging that captures a panoramic view of the entire mouth, including the teeth, upper and lower jaws, and surrounding structures. It uses a special machine that rotates around the head, capturing images as it moves. This technique provides a two-dimensional image that is helpful in diagnosing and planning treatment for various dental conditions such as impacted teeth, bone abnormalities, and jaw disorders.

The panoramic radiograph can also be used to assess the development and positioning of wisdom teeth, detect cysts or tumors in the jaws, and evaluate the effects of trauma or injury to the mouth. It is a valuable tool for dental professionals as it allows them to see a comprehensive view of the oral structures, which may not be visible with traditional X-ray techniques.

It's important to note that while panoramic radiography provides valuable information, it should be used in conjunction with other diagnostic tools and clinical examinations to ensure accurate diagnosis and treatment planning.

Periapical periodontitis is a medical condition that affects the tissues surrounding the root tip (apex) of a tooth. It is typically caused by bacterial infection that originates from the dental pulp, which is the soft tissue inside the tooth that contains nerves and blood vessels. When the dental pulp becomes inflamed or infected due to decay or injury, it can lead to periapical periodontitis if left untreated.

The infection spreads from the pulp through the root canal and forms an abscess at the tip of the tooth root. This results in inflammation and destruction of the surrounding bone and periodontal tissues, leading to symptoms such as pain, swelling, tenderness, and sensitivity to hot or cold temperatures.

Periapical periodontitis is usually treated with root canal therapy, which involves removing the infected pulp tissue, cleaning and disinfecting the root canal, and filling and sealing the space to prevent reinfection. In some cases, antibiotics may also be prescribed to help clear up any residual infection. If left untreated, periapical periodontitis can lead to more serious complications such as tooth loss or spread of infection to other parts of the body.

Dental stress analysis is a method used in dentistry to evaluate the amount and distribution of forces that act upon teeth and surrounding structures during biting, chewing, or other functional movements. This analysis helps dental professionals identify areas of excessive stress or strain that may lead to dental problems such as tooth fracture, mobility, or periodontal (gum) disease. By identifying these areas, dentists can develop treatment plans to reduce the risk of dental issues and improve overall oral health.

Dental stress analysis typically involves the use of specialized equipment, such as strain gauges, T-scan occlusal analysis systems, or finite element analysis software, to measure and analyze the forces that act upon teeth during various functional movements. The results of the analysis can help dentists determine the best course of treatment, which may include adjusting the bite, restoring damaged teeth with crowns or fillings, or fabricating custom-made oral appliances to redistribute the forces evenly across the dental arch.

Overall, dental stress analysis is an important tool in modern dentistry that helps dental professionals diagnose and treat dental problems related to occlusal (bite) forces, ensuring optimal oral health and function for their patients.

Proteins are complex, large molecules that play critical roles in the body's functions. They are made up of amino acids, which are organic compounds that are the building blocks of proteins. Proteins are required for the structure, function, and regulation of the body's tissues and organs. They are essential for the growth, repair, and maintenance of body tissues, and they play a crucial role in many biological processes, including metabolism, immune response, and cellular signaling. Proteins can be classified into different types based on their structure and function, such as enzymes, hormones, antibodies, and structural proteins. They are found in various foods, especially animal-derived products like meat, dairy, and eggs, as well as plant-based sources like beans, nuts, and grains.

Gonads are the reproductive organs that produce gametes (sex cells) and sex hormones. In males, the gonads are the testes, which produce sperm and testosterone. In females, the gonads are the ovaries, which produce eggs and estrogen and progesterone. The development, function, and regulation of the gonads are crucial for reproductive health and fertility.

Spermatocytes are a type of cell that is involved in the process of spermatogenesis, which is the formation of sperm in the testes. Specifically, spermatocytes are the cells that undergo meiosis, a special type of cell division that results in the production of four haploid daughter cells, each containing half the number of chromosomes as the parent cell.

There are two types of spermatocytes: primary and secondary. Primary spermatocytes are diploid cells that contain 46 chromosomes (23 pairs). During meiosis I, these cells undergo a process called crossing over, in which genetic material is exchanged between homologous chromosomes. After crossing over, the primary spermatocytes divide into two secondary spermatocytes, each containing 23 chromosomes (but still with 23 pairs).

Secondary spermatocytes then undergo meiosis II, which results in the formation of four haploid spermatids. Each spermatid contains 23 single chromosomes and will eventually develop into a mature sperm cell through a process called spermiogenesis.

It's worth noting that spermatocytes are only found in males, as they are specific to the male reproductive system.

Paleodontology is not a medical field, but rather a subfield of archaeology and paleontology. It is the study of fossil teeth and dental tissues from extinct animals or ancient human populations to understand their evolutionary history, diet, health status, and lifestyle. By analyzing tooth wear patterns, growth rates, and pathologies, paleodontologists can gain insights into the ecological adaptations and environmental conditions experienced by these organisms throughout their lives.

Spermatids are immature sperm cells that are produced during the process of spermatogenesis in the male testes. They are the product of the final stage of meiosis, where a diploid spermatocyte divides into four haploid spermatids. Each spermatid then undergoes a series of changes, including the development of a tail for motility and the condensation of its nucleus to form a head containing the genetic material. Once this process is complete, the spermatids are considered mature spermatozoa and are capable of fertilizing an egg.

Dental cavity preparation is the process of removing decayed and damaged tissue from a tooth and shaping the remaining healthy structure in order to prepare it for the placement of a filling or a crown. The goal of cavity preparation is to remove all traces of decay and create a clean, stable surface for the restoration to bond with, while also maintaining as much of the natural tooth structure as possible.

The process typically involves the use of dental drills and other tools to remove the decayed tissue and shape the tooth. The size and depth of the preparation will depend on the extent of the decay and the type of restoration that will be used. After the preparation is complete, the dentist will place the filling or crown, restoring the function and integrity of the tooth.

Edentulous partially refers to a condition where some teeth are missing in the jaw but not all. In other words, it is a state of having fewer teeth than normal for that particular dental arch. A dental arch can be either the upper or lower jaw.

In medical terms, "edentulous" means lacking teeth. So, when we say "jaw, edentulous, partially," it indicates a jaw that has some missing teeth. This condition is different from being completely edentulous, which refers to having no teeth at all in the dental arch.

Being edentulous or partially edentulous can impact an individual's ability to eat, speak, and affect their overall quality of life. Dental professionals often recommend various treatment options, such as dentures, bridges, or implants, to restore functionality and aesthetics for those who are partially edentulous.

Composite resins, also known as dental composites or filling materials, are a type of restorative material used in dentistry to restore the function, integrity, and morphology of missing tooth structure. They are called composite resins because they are composed of a combination of materials, including a resin matrix (usually made of bisphenol A-glycidyl methacrylate or urethane dimethacrylate) and filler particles (commonly made of silica, quartz, or glass).

The composite resins are widely used in modern dentistry due to their excellent esthetic properties, ease of handling, and ability to bond directly to tooth structure. They can be used for a variety of restorative procedures, including direct and indirect fillings, veneers, inlays, onlays, and crowns.

Composite resins are available in various shades and opacities, allowing dentists to match the color and translucency of natural teeth closely. They also have good wear resistance, strength, and durability, making them a popular choice for both anterior and posterior restorations. However, composite resins may be prone to staining over time and may require more frequent replacement compared to other types of restorative materials.

Dental enamel hypoplasia is a condition characterized by the deficiency or reduction in the thickness of the tooth's enamel surface. This results in the enamel being thin, weak, and prone to wear, fractures, and dental cavities. The appearance of teeth with enamel hypoplasia may be yellowish, brownish, or creamy white, and they can have pits, grooves, or bands of varying widths and shapes.

Enamel hypoplasia can occur due to various factors, including genetics, premature birth, low birth weight, malnutrition, infections during childhood (such as measles or chickenpox), trauma, exposure to environmental toxins, and certain medical conditions that affect enamel formation.

The condition is usually diagnosed through a dental examination, where the dentist can observe and assess the appearance and structure of the teeth. Treatment options depend on the severity of the hypoplasia and may include fluoride treatments, sealants, fillings, crowns, or extractions in severe cases. Preventive measures such as maintaining good oral hygiene, a balanced diet, and regular dental check-ups can help reduce the risk of developing enamel hypoplasia.

Dental occlusion refers to the alignment and contact between the upper and lower teeth when the jaws are closed. It is the relationship between the maxillary (upper) and mandibular (lower) teeth when they approach each other, as occurs during chewing or biting.

A proper dental occlusion, also known as a balanced occlusion, ensures that the teeth and jaw joints function harmoniously, reducing the risk of tooth wear, damage, and temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Malocclusion, on the other hand, refers to improper alignment or contact between the upper and lower teeth, which may require orthodontic treatment or dental restorations to correct.

Seminoma is a type of germ cell tumor that develops in the testicle. It is a malignant tumor, meaning it can spread to other parts of the body if left untreated. Seminomas are typically slow-growing and tend to remain localized to the testicle for a longer period compared to other types of testicular cancer. They usually occur in men between the ages of 25 and 45 but can develop at any age.

Seminomas can be classified into two main subtypes: classical seminoma and spermatocytic seminoma. Classical seminoma is more common and typically responds well to treatment, while spermatocytic seminoma is rarer and tends to have a better prognosis with a lower risk of spreading.

Seminomas are usually treated with surgery to remove the affected testicle (orchiectomy), followed by radiation therapy or chemotherapy to kill any remaining cancer cells. The prognosis for seminoma is generally good, especially when caught and treated early. Regular self-examinations of the testicles can help detect any lumps or abnormalities that may indicate the presence of a seminoma or other type of testicular cancer.

Oral hygiene is the practice of keeping the mouth and teeth clean to prevent dental issues such as cavities, gum disease, bad breath, and other oral health problems. It involves regular brushing, flossing, and using mouthwash to remove plaque and food particles that can lead to tooth decay and gum disease. Regular dental check-ups and cleanings are also an essential part of maintaining good oral hygiene. Poor oral hygiene can lead to a range of health problems, including heart disease, diabetes, and respiratory infections, so it is important to prioritize oral health as part of overall health and wellbeing.

Dental bonding is a cosmetic dental procedure in which a tooth-colored resin material (a type of plastic) is applied and hardened with a special light, which ultimately "bonds" the material to the tooth to improve its appearance. According to the American Dental Association (ADA), dental bonding can be used for various purposes, including:

1. Repairing chipped or cracked teeth
2. Improving the appearance of discolored teeth
3. Closing spaces between teeth
4. Protecting a portion of the tooth's root that has been exposed due to gum recession
5. Changing the shape and size of teeth

Dental bonding is generally a quick and painless procedure, often requiring little to no anesthesia. The surface of the tooth is roughened and conditioned to help the resin adhere properly. Then, the resin material is applied, molded, and smoothed to the desired shape. A special light is used to harden the material, which typically takes only a few minutes. Finally, the bonded material is trimmed, shaped, and polished to match the surrounding teeth.

While dental bonding can be an effective solution for minor cosmetic concerns, it may not be as durable or long-lasting as other dental restoration options like veneers or crowns. The lifespan of a dental bonding procedure typically ranges from 3 to 10 years, depending on factors such as oral habits, location of the bonded tooth, and proper care. Regular dental checkups and good oral hygiene practices can help extend the life of dental bonding.

A third molar is the most posterior of the three molars present in an adult human dental arch. They are also commonly known as wisdom teeth, due to their late eruption period which usually occurs between the ages of 17-25, a time traditionally associated with gaining maturity and wisdom.

Anatomically, third molars have four cusps, making them the largest of all the teeth. However, not everyone develops third molars; some people may have one, two, three or no third molars at all. In many cases, third molars do not have enough space to fully erupt and align properly with the rest of the teeth, leading to impaction, infection, or other dental health issues. As a result, third molars are often extracted if they cause problems or if there is a risk they will cause problems in the future.

The post and core technique is a dental restorative procedure that involves the use of a post made of metal or other materials, which is placed inside the root canal of a severely damaged tooth, to provide support and retention for a dental core. The dental core is then built up using various materials such as composite resin, glass ionomer cement, or amalgam, to restore the missing portion of the tooth structure. This technique is often used as a foundation for a dental crown in cases where there is not enough remaining tooth structure to support the crown on its own. The post and core restoration helps to reinforce the tooth, prevent fractures, and improve the overall functionality and esthetics of the restored tooth.

A pulpectomy is a dental procedure that involves the removal of the entire pulp tissue, which includes the nerves, blood vessels, and connective tissues from within the root canal(s) of a tooth. This procedure is typically performed when the pulp tissue becomes infected or inflamed due to decay, trauma, or other causes.

Once the pulp tissue is removed, the root canal(s) are cleaned, shaped, and filled with an inert material such as gutta-percha to prevent reinfection and maintain the structural integrity of the tooth. A pulpectomy may be performed as a standalone procedure or as part of a larger treatment plan, such as a root canal therapy or endodontic treatment.

It's important to note that while a pulpectomy removes the infected or inflamed tissue from within the tooth, it does not address any external damage or decay that may be present on the tooth's surface. Additional dental work, such as a filling or crown, may be necessary to restore the tooth's function and appearance.

"Edentulous mouth" is a medical term used to describe a condition where an individual has no remaining natural teeth in either their upper or lower jaw, or both. This situation can occur due to various reasons such as tooth decay, gum disease, trauma, or aging. Dentists often recommend dental prosthetics like dentures to restore oral function and aesthetics for individuals with edentulous mouths.

Dental materials are substances that are used in restorative dentistry, prosthodontics, endodontics, orthodontics, and preventive dentistry to restore or replace missing tooth structure, improve the function and esthetics of teeth, and protect the oral tissues from decay and disease. These materials can be classified into various categories based on their physical and chemical properties, including metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, cements, and alloys.

Some examples of dental materials include:

1. Amalgam: a metal alloy used for dental fillings that contains silver, tin, copper, and mercury. It is strong, durable, and resistant to wear but has been controversial due to concerns about the toxicity of mercury.
2. Composite: a tooth-colored restorative material made of a mixture of glass or ceramic particles and a bonding agent. It is used for fillings, veneers, and other esthetic dental treatments.
3. Glass ionomer cement: a type of cement used for dental restorations that releases fluoride ions and helps prevent tooth decay. It is often used for fillings in children's teeth or as a base under crowns and bridges.
4. Porcelain: a ceramic material used for dental crowns, veneers, and other esthetic restorations. It is strong, durable, and resistant to staining but can be brittle and prone to fracture.
5. Gold alloy: a metal alloy used for dental restorations that contains gold, copper, and other metals. It is highly biocompatible, corrosion-resistant, and malleable but can be expensive and less esthetic than other materials.
6. Acrylic resin: a type of polymer used for dental appliances such as dentures, night guards, and orthodontic retainers. It is lightweight, flexible, and easy to modify but can be less durable than other materials.

The choice of dental material depends on various factors, including the location and extent of the restoration, the patient's oral health status, their esthetic preferences, and their budget. Dental professionals must consider these factors carefully when selecting the appropriate dental material for each individual case.

The periodontium is a complex structure in the oral cavity that surrounds and supports the teeth. It consists of four main components:
1. Gingiva (gums): The pink, soft tissue that covers the crown of the tooth and extends down to the neck of the tooth, where it meets the cementum.
2. Cementum: A specialized, calcified tissue that covers the root of the tooth and provides a surface for the periodontal ligament fibers to attach.
3. Periodontal ligament (PDL): A highly vascular and cell-rich connective tissue that attaches the cementum of the tooth root to the alveolar bone, allowing for tooth mobility and absorption of forces during chewing.
4. Alveolar bone: The portion of the jawbone that contains the sockets (alveoli) for the teeth. It is a spongy bone with a rich blood supply that responds to mechanical stresses from biting and chewing, undergoing remodeling throughout life.

Periodontal diseases, such as gingivitis and periodontitis, affect the health and integrity of the periodontium, leading to inflammation, bleeding, pocket formation, bone loss, and ultimately tooth loss if left untreated.

According to the American Academy of Periodontology, periodontal diseases are chronic inflammatory conditions that affect the tissues surrounding and supporting the teeth. These tissues include the gums, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. The primary cause of periodontal disease is bacterial plaque, a sticky film that constantly forms on our teeth.

There are two major stages of periodontal disease:

1. Gingivitis: This is the milder form of periodontal disease, characterized by inflammation of the gums (gingiva) without loss of attachment to the teeth. The gums may appear red, swollen, and bleed easily during brushing or flossing. At this stage, the damage can be reversed with proper dental care and improved oral hygiene.
2. Periodontitis: If left untreated, gingivitis can progress to periodontitis, a more severe form of periodontal disease. In periodontitis, the inflammation extends beyond the gums and affects the deeper periodontal tissues, leading to loss of bone support around the teeth. Pockets filled with infection-causing bacteria form between the teeth and gums, causing further damage and potential tooth loss if not treated promptly.

Risk factors for developing periodontal disease include poor oral hygiene, smoking or using smokeless tobacco, genetic predisposition, diabetes, hormonal changes (such as pregnancy or menopause), certain medications, and systemic diseases like AIDS or cancer. Regular dental check-ups and good oral hygiene practices are crucial for preventing periodontal disease and maintaining overall oral health.

I'm not aware of a medical definition for "DMF Index." The abbreviation "DMF" could potentially stand for many things, as it is used in various contexts across different fields. In the field of dentistry, DMF stands for Decayed, Missing, and Filled teeth/surfaces, which is a method for measuring dental caries or tooth decay. However, there is no standard medical definition for "DMF Index." If you could provide more context or specify the field of study or practice, I would be happy to help further!

Dental restoration failure refers to the breakdown or loss of functionality of a dental restoration, which is a procedure performed to restore the function, integrity, and morphology of a tooth that has been damaged due to decay, trauma, or wear. The restoration can include fillings, crowns, veneers, bridges, and implants. Failure of dental restorations can occur due to various reasons such as recurrent decay, fracture, poor fit, or material failure, leading to further damage or loss of the tooth.

Root canal filling materials are substances used to fill and seal the root canal system inside a tooth following root canal treatment. The main goal of using these materials is to prevent reinfection, provide structural support to the weakened tooth, and restore its functionality.

Commonly used root canal filling materials include:

1. Gutta-percha: A rubber-like material derived from the sap of the Palaquium gutta tree. It is widely used as the primary filling material due to its biocompatibility, malleability, and ability to be compacted into the root canal space. Gutta-percha points or cones are typically used in conjunction with a sealer for optimal adaptation and seal.

2. Sealers: These are adhesive materials that help bond gutta-percha to dentin walls and improve the seal between the filling material and root canal walls. Some commonly used sealers include zinc oxide eugenol, calcium hydroxide-based sealers, and resin-based sealers.

3. Silver points: These are silver cones with a sharp tip that can be inserted into the root canal space as an alternative to gutta-percha. However, their use has declined due to concerns about corrosion and potential tooth discoloration.

4. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA): A biocompatible cement composed primarily of Portland cement, bismuth oxide, and other additives. MTA is used for various applications in endodontics, including root-end filling, perforation repair, and apexification. It has excellent sealing ability, antibacterial properties, and promotes hard tissue formation.

5. Bioceramics: These are advanced materials with similar properties to MTA but with improved handling characteristics and setting times. They include materials like Bioaggregate, EndoSequence BC Sealer, and iRoot SP.

6. Thermoplasticized gutta-percha: This technique involves heating and softening gutta-percha using a specialized device called a thermomechanical compactor or an oven. The softened gutta-percha is then injected into the root canal space, providing better adaptation to the root canal walls and creating a more uniform seal.

The choice of materials depends on various factors, including the clinical situation, patient's needs, and practitioner's preference.

Resin cements are dental materials used to bond or cement restorations, such as crowns, bridges, and orthodontic appliances, to natural teeth or implants. They are called "resin" cements because they are made of a type of synthetic resin material that can be cured or hardened through the use of a chemical reaction or exposure to light.

Resin cements typically consist of three components: a base, a catalyst, and a filler. The base and catalyst are mixed together to create a putty-like consistency, which is then applied to the restoration or tooth surface. Once the cement is in place, it is exposed to light or allowed to chemically cure, which causes it to harden and form a strong bond between the restoration and the tooth.

Resin cements are known for their excellent adhesive properties, as well as their ability to withstand the forces of biting and chewing. They can also be color-matched to natural teeth, making them an aesthetically pleasing option for dental restorations. However, they may not be suitable for all patients or situations, and it is important for dental professionals to carefully consider the specific needs and conditions of each patient when choosing a cement material.

"Mesial movement of teeth" is a dental term that refers to the natural drifting or shifting of teeth in a forward direction towards the front of the mouth. This movement typically occurs over time and can be influenced by various factors such as:

* The loss of adjacent teeth, which can create space for other teeth to move into
* Oral habits like thumb sucking or tongue thrusting
* Periodontal disease that weakens the supporting structures of the teeth
* Malocclusion or misalignment of teeth

It is essential to monitor and manage mesial movement of teeth to prevent dental issues such as crowding, malocclusion, and periodontal problems. Dental professionals may use various treatments, including orthodontic appliances, space maintainers, or restorations, to address this issue.

I'm happy to help! However, I must clarify that "materials testing" is not a medical term per se. It is a term used in various fields, including engineering and materials science, to describe the process of subjecting materials to different tests to evaluate their properties and performance under various conditions.

In the context of medical devices or implants, materials testing may refer to the evaluation of the physical and mechanical properties of materials used in their construction. These tests can include assessments of strength, durability, biocompatibility, and other factors that are critical to ensuring the safety and efficacy of medical devices.

Medical device manufacturers must comply with regulatory standards for materials testing to ensure that their products meet specific requirements for performance, safety, and quality. These standards may vary depending on the type of device, its intended use, and the country or region in which it will be marketed and sold.

Denture design refers to the plan and configuration of a removable dental prosthesis, which is created to replace missing teeth and surrounding tissues in the mouth. The design process involves several factors such as:

1. The number and position of artificial teeth (pontics) used to restore the functional occlusion and aesthetics.
2. The type and arrangement of the denture base material that supports the artificial teeth and conforms to the oral tissues.
3. The selection and placement of various rests, clasps, or attachments to improve retention, stability, and support of the denture.
4. The choice of materials used for the construction of the denture, including the type of acrylic resin, metal alloys, or other components.
5. Consideration of the patient's individual needs, preferences, and oral conditions to ensure optimal fit, comfort, and functionality.

The design process is typically carried out by a dental professional, such as a prosthodontist or denturist, in close collaboration with the patient to achieve a custom-made solution that meets their specific requirements.

Root canal preparation is a procedure in endodontics, which is the branch of dentistry dealing with the dental pulp and tissues surrounding the root of a tooth. The goal of root canal preparation is to thoroughly clean, shape, and disinfect the root canal system of an infected or damaged tooth, in order to prepare it for a filling material that will seal and protect the tooth from further infection or damage.

The procedure involves the use of specialized dental instruments, such as files and reamers, to remove the infected or necrotic pulp tissue and debris from within the root canal. The root canal is then shaped using progressively larger files to create a tapering preparation that facilitates the placement of the filling material. Irrigation solutions are used to help flush out any remaining debris and disinfect the canal.

The success of root canal preparation depends on several factors, including the thoroughness of cleaning and shaping, the effectiveness of disinfection, and the sealing ability of the filling material. Properly performed, root canal preparation can alleviate pain, save a tooth from extraction, and restore function and aesthetics to the mouth.

A partial denture, removable is a type of dental prosthesis used when one or more natural teeth remain in the upper or lower jaw. It is designed to replace the missing teeth and rest on the remaining teeth and gums for support. This type of denture can be removed by the patient for cleaning and while sleeping. It is typically made of acrylic resin, metal, or a combination of both, and is custom-fabricated to fit the individual's mouth for comfort and functionality.

A dental prosthesis is a device that replaces one or more missing teeth or parts of teeth to correct deficiencies in chewing ability, speech, and aesthetics. It can be removable or fixed (permanent) and can be made from various materials such as acrylic resin, porcelain, metal alloys, or a combination of these. Examples of dental prostheses include dentures, bridges, crowns, and implants.

Dental leakage, also known as "microleakage" in dental terminology, refers to the seepage or penetration of fluids, bacteria, or other substances between the walls of a dental restoration (such as a filling, crown, or bridge) and the prepared tooth structure. This occurs due to the presence of microscopic gaps or spaces at the interface of the restoration and the tooth.

Dental leakage can lead to several problems, including:

1. Recurrent decay: The seepage of fluids, bacteria, and sugars from the oral environment can cause secondary tooth decay around the margins of the restoration.
2. Sensitivity: Microleakage may result in temperature sensitivity or pain when consuming hot or cold foods and beverages due to fluid movement within the gap.
3. Discoloration: Over time, dental leakage might lead to staining of the tooth structure around the restoration, resulting in an unaesthetic appearance.
4. Failed restorations: Persistent dental leakage can weaken the bond between the restoration and the tooth, increasing the risk of restoration failure and the need for replacement.

To prevent dental leakage, dentists employ various techniques during restoration placement, such as using appropriate adhesives, following meticulous preparation protocols, and ensuring a tight seal around the margins of the restoration. Regular dental check-ups and professional cleanings are essential to monitor the condition of existing restorations and address any issues before they become more severe.

Root canal obturation is the process of filling and sealing the root canal system of a tooth after it has been cleaned and shaped during endodontic treatment. The goal of obturation is to prevent reinfection or contamination of the root canal system by completely filling and sealing the space with an inert, biocompatible material such as gutta-percha and a suitable sealant. This procedure helps to preserve the natural tooth structure, alleviate pain, and maintain proper dental function.

Pulpitis is a dental term that refers to the inflammation of the pulp, which is the soft tissue inside the center of a tooth that contains nerves, blood vessels, and connective tissue. The pulp helps to form the dentin, the hard layer beneath the enamel. Pulpitis can result from tooth decay, dental trauma, or other factors that cause damage to the tooth's protective enamel and dentin layers, exposing the pulp to irritants and bacteria.

There are two types of pulpitis: reversible and irreversible. Reversible pulpitis is characterized by mild inflammation that can be treated and potentially reversed with dental intervention, such as a filling or root canal treatment. Irreversible pulpitis, on the other hand, involves severe inflammation that cannot be reversed, and typically requires a root canal procedure to remove the infected pulp tissue and prevent further infection or damage to the tooth.

Symptoms of pulpitis may include tooth sensitivity to hot or cold temperatures, pain or discomfort when biting down or applying pressure to the tooth, and in some cases, spontaneous or radiating pain. If left untreated, pulpitis can lead to more serious dental issues, such as abscesses or bone loss around the affected tooth.

Mastication is the medical term for the process of chewing food. It's the first step in digestion, where food is broken down into smaller pieces by the teeth, making it easier to swallow and further digest. The act of mastication involves not only the physical grinding and tearing of food by the teeth but also the mixing of the food with saliva, which contains enzymes that begin to break down carbohydrates. This process helps to enhance the efficiency of digestion and nutrient absorption in the subsequent stages of the digestive process.

Dental cements are materials used in dentistry to bond or seal restorative dental materials, such as crowns, fillings, and orthodontic appliances, to natural tooth structures. They can be made from various materials including glass ionomers, resin-modified glass ionomers, zinc oxide eugenol, polycarboxylate, and composite resins. The choice of cement depends on the specific clinical situation and the properties required, such as strength, durability, biocompatibility, and esthetics.

Orthodontic appliances are devices used in orthodontics, a branch of dentistry focused on the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of dental and facial irregularities. These appliances can be fixed or removable and are used to align teeth, correct jaw relationships, or modify dental forces. They can include braces, aligners, palatal expanders, space maintainers, and headgear, among others. The specific type of appliance used depends on the individual patient's needs and the treatment plan developed by the orthodontist.

PAX9 is a transcription factor that belongs to the PAX family of genes, which are characterized by a highly conserved DNA-binding domain known as the paired box. The PAX9 gene provides instructions for making a protein that plays important roles in the development of several parts of the body, including the face and the teeth.

As a transcription factor, PAX9 binds to specific regions of DNA and helps control the activity of other genes. In the developing face, PAX9 helps regulate the formation of facial structures by controlling the growth and development of cells that give rise to bones and cartilage. In the developing teeth, PAX9 plays a critical role in tooth development by controlling the formation and growth of dental tissues.

Mutations in the PAX9 gene have been associated with several genetic disorders, including tooth agenesis (the absence of one or more teeth) and oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (a disorder that affects the development of the eyes, ears, and spine).

Meiosis is a type of cell division that results in the formation of four daughter cells, each with half the number of chromosomes as the parent cell. It is a key process in sexual reproduction, where it generates gametes or sex cells (sperm and eggs).

The process of meiosis involves one round of DNA replication followed by two successive nuclear divisions, meiosis I and meiosis II. In meiosis I, homologous chromosomes pair, form chiasma and exchange genetic material through crossing over, then separate from each other. In meiosis II, sister chromatids separate, leading to the formation of four haploid cells. This process ensures genetic diversity in offspring by shuffling and recombining genetic information during the formation of gametes.

Dental plaque is a biofilm or mass of bacteria that accumulates on the surface of the teeth, restorative materials, and prosthetic devices such as dentures. It is initiated when bacterial colonizers attach to the smooth surfaces of teeth through van der Waals forces and specific molecular adhesion mechanisms.

The microorganisms within the dental plaque produce extracellular polysaccharides that help to stabilize and strengthen the biofilm, making it resistant to removal by simple brushing or rinsing. Over time, if not regularly removed through oral hygiene practices such as brushing and flossing, dental plaque can mineralize and harden into tartar or calculus.

The bacteria in dental plaque can cause tooth decay (dental caries) by metabolizing sugars and producing acid that demineralizes the tooth enamel. Additionally, certain types of bacteria in dental plaque can cause periodontal disease, an inflammation of the gums that can lead to tissue damage and bone loss around the teeth. Regular professional dental cleanings and good oral hygiene practices are essential for preventing the buildup of dental plaque and maintaining good oral health.

Forensic dentistry, also known as forensic odontology, is a specialty in forensic science that involves the examination, identification, and evaluation of dental evidence for legal purposes. It encompasses various aspects such as:

1. Identification of deceased individuals through dental records comparison (e.g., during mass disasters or unidentified human remains).
2. Analysis of bite marks found on victims or objects related to criminal investigations.
3. Assessment of age, sex, ancestry, and other personal characteristics based on dental features.
4. Examination of cases of abuse, neglect, or malpractice in dentistry.
5. Evaluation of occupational dental injuries and diseases.

Forensic dentists often work closely with law enforcement agencies, medical examiners, and other legal professionals to provide expert testimony in court proceedings.

The dental sac, also known as the dental follicle, is a soft tissue structure that surrounds the developing tooth crown during odontogenesis, which is the process of tooth development. It is derived from the ectoderm and mesenchyme of the embryonic oral cavity. The dental sac gives rise to several important structures associated with the tooth, including the periodontal ligament, cementum, and the alveolar bone that surrounds and supports the tooth in the jaw.

The dental sac plays a critical role in tooth development by regulating the mineralization of the tooth crown and providing a protective environment for the developing tooth. It also contains cells called odontoblasts, which are responsible for producing dentin, one of the hard tissues that make up the tooth. Abnormalities in the development or growth of the dental sac can lead to various dental anomalies, such as impacted teeth, dilacerated roots, and other developmental disorders.

Oogenesis is the biological process of formation and maturation of female gametes, or ova or egg cells, in the ovary. It begins during fetal development and continues throughout a woman's reproductive years. The process involves the division and differentiation of a germ cell (oogonium) into an immature ovum (oocyte), which then undergoes meiotic division to form a mature ovum capable of being fertilized by sperm.

The main steps in oogenesis include:

1. Multiplication phase: The oogonia divide mitotically to increase their number.
2. Growth phase: One of the oogonia becomes primary oocyte and starts to grow, accumulating nutrients and organelles required for future development.
3. First meiotic division: The primary oocyte undergoes an incomplete first meiotic division, resulting in two haploid cells - a secondary oocyte and a smaller cell called the first polar body. This division is arrested in prophase I until puberty.
4. Second meiotic division: At ovulation or just before fertilization, the secondary oocyte completes the second meiotic division, producing another small cell, the second polar body, and a mature ovum (egg) with 23 chromosomes.
5. Fertilization: The mature ovum can be fertilized by a sperm, restoring the normal diploid number of chromosomes in the resulting zygote.

Oogenesis is a complex and highly regulated process that involves various hormonal signals and cellular interactions to ensure proper development and maturation of female gametes for successful reproduction.

Bitewing radiography is a type of dental x-ray examination that involves taking multiple images of the teeth while they are bite together. These x-rays primarily provide a detailed view of the crowns of the upper and lower teeth in a single view, allowing dentists to diagnose and monitor interdental decay (decay between teeth), dental caries, and any bone loss around fillings or near the gum line. Bitewing radiographs are essential for detecting dental problems at an early stage, which can help prevent further damage and costly treatments in the future. They are typically taken annually or biennially during routine dental checkups.

Periapical diseases are a group of conditions that affect the periapical tissue, which is the tissue located at the tip of the tooth roots. These diseases are primarily caused by bacterial infections that originate from the dental pulp, the soft tissue inside the tooth. The most common types of periapical diseases include:

1. Periapical periodontitis: This is an inflammatory reaction of the periapical tissues due to the spread of infection from the dental pulp. It can cause symptoms such as pain, swelling, and tenderness in the affected area.
2. Periapical abscess: An abscess is a collection of pus that forms in response to an infection. A periapical abscess occurs when the infection from the dental pulp spreads to the periapical tissue, causing pus to accumulate in the area. This can cause severe pain, swelling, and redness in the affected area.
3. Periapical granuloma: A granuloma is a mass of inflammatory cells that forms in response to an infection. A periapical granuloma is a small, benign tumor-like growth that develops in the periapical tissue due to chronic inflammation caused by a bacterial infection.

Periapical diseases are typically treated with root canal therapy, which involves removing the infected dental pulp and cleaning and sealing the root canals to prevent further infection. In some cases, extraction of the affected tooth may be necessary if the infection is too severe or if the tooth is not salvageable.

Malocclusion is a term used in dentistry and orthodontics to describe a misalignment or misrelation between the upper and lower teeth when they come together, also known as the bite. It is derived from the Latin words "mal" meaning bad or wrong, and "occludere" meaning to close.

There are different types of malocclusions, including:

1. Class I malocclusion: The most common type, where the upper teeth slightly overlap the lower teeth, but the bite is otherwise aligned.
2. Class II malocclusion (overbite): The upper teeth significantly overlap the lower teeth, causing a horizontal or vertical discrepancy between the dental arches.
3. Class III malocclusion (underbite): The lower teeth protrude beyond the upper teeth, resulting in a crossbite or underbite.

Malocclusions can be caused by various factors such as genetics, thumb sucking, tongue thrusting, premature loss of primary or permanent teeth, and jaw injuries or disorders. They may lead to several oral health issues, including tooth decay, gum disease, difficulty chewing or speaking, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction. Treatment for malocclusions typically involves orthodontic appliances like braces, aligners, or retainers to realign the teeth and correct the bite. In some cases, surgical intervention may be necessary.

The dental arch refers to the curved shape formed by the upper or lower teeth when they come together. The dental arch follows the curve of the jaw and is important for proper bite alignment and overall oral health. The dental arches are typically described as having a U-shaped appearance, with the front teeth forming a narrower section and the back teeth forming a wider section. The shape and size of the dental arch can vary from person to person, and any significant deviations from the typical shape or size may indicate an underlying orthodontic issue that requires treatment.

A partial denture that is fixed, also known as a fixed partial denture or a dental bridge, is a type of prosthetic device used to replace one or more missing teeth. Unlike removable partial dentures, which can be taken out of the mouth for cleaning and maintenance, fixed partial dentures are permanently attached to the remaining natural teeth or implants surrounding the gap left by the missing tooth or teeth.

A typical fixed partial denture consists of an artificial tooth (or pontic) that is fused to one or two crowns on either side. The crowns are cemented onto the prepared surfaces of the adjacent teeth, providing a stable and secure attachment for the pontic. This creates a natural-looking and functional replacement for the missing tooth or teeth.

Fixed partial dentures offer several advantages over removable options, including improved stability, comfort, and aesthetics. However, they typically require more extensive preparation of the adjacent teeth, which may involve removing some healthy tooth structure to accommodate the crowns. Proper oral hygiene is essential to maintain the health of the supporting teeth and gums, as well as the longevity of the fixed partial denture. Regular dental check-ups and professional cleanings are also necessary to ensure the continued success of this type of restoration.

In medical terms, the jaw is referred to as the mandible (in humans and some other animals), which is the lower part of the face that holds the lower teeth in place. It's a large, horseshoe-shaped bone that forms the lower jaw and serves as a attachment point for several muscles that are involved in chewing and moving the lower jaw.

In addition to the mandible, the upper jaw is composed of two bones known as the maxillae, which fuse together at the midline of the face to form the upper jaw. The upper jaw holds the upper teeth in place and forms the roof of the mouth, as well as a portion of the eye sockets and nasal cavity.

Together, the mandible and maxillae allow for various functions such as speaking, eating, and breathing.

A dental prosthesis is a device that replaces missing teeth or parts of teeth and restores their function and appearance. The design of a dental prosthesis refers to the plan and specifications used to create it, including the materials, shape, size, and arrangement of the artificial teeth and any supporting structures.

The design of a dental prosthesis is typically based on a variety of factors, including:

* The number and location of missing teeth
* The condition of the remaining teeth and gums
* The patient's bite and jaw alignment
* The patient's aesthetic preferences
* The patient's ability to chew and speak properly

There are several types of dental prostheses, including:

* Dentures: A removable appliance that replaces all or most of the upper or lower teeth.
* Fixed partial denture (FPD): Also known as a bridge, this is a fixed (non-removable) appliance that replaces one or more missing teeth by attaching artificial teeth to the remaining natural teeth on either side of the gap.
* Removable partial denture (RPD): A removable appliance that replaces some but not all of the upper or lower teeth.
* Implant-supported prosthesis: An artificial tooth or set of teeth that is supported by dental implants, which are surgically placed in the jawbone.

The design of a dental prosthesis must be carefully planned and executed to ensure a good fit, proper function, and natural appearance. It may involve several appointments with a dentist or dental specialist, such as a prosthodontist, to take impressions, make measurements, and try in the finished prosthesis.

The Periodontal Index (PI) is not a current or widely used medical/dental term. However, in the past, it was used to describe a method for assessing and measuring the severity of periodontal disease, also known as gum disease.

Developed by Henry H. Klein and colleagues in 1978, the Periodontal Index was a scoring system that evaluated four parameters: gingival inflammation, gingival bleeding, calculus (tartar) presence, and periodontal pocket depths. The scores for each parameter ranged from 0 to 3, with higher scores indicating worse periodontal health. The overall PI score was the sum of the individual parameter scores, ranging from 0 to 12.

However, due to its limited ability to predict future disease progression and the introduction of more comprehensive assessment methods like the Community Periodontal Index (CPI) and the Basic Periodontal Examination (BPE), the use of the Periodontal Index has become less common in dental practice and research.

Dental photography is a type of clinical photography that focuses on documenting the condition and treatment of teeth and oral structures. It involves using specialized cameras, lenses, and lighting to capture high-quality images of the mouth and related areas. These images can be used for diagnostic purposes, patient education, treatment planning, communication with other dental professionals, and monitoring progress over time. Dental photography may include various types of shots, such as extraoral (outside the mouth) and intraoral (inside the mouth) views, close-ups of individual teeth or restorations, and full-face portraits. It requires a strong understanding of dental anatomy, lighting techniques, and image composition to produce accurate and informative images.

Dentin sensitivity is a common dental condition characterized by the short, sharp pain or discomfort in response to external stimuli, such as cold air, hot or cold foods and drinks, sweet or sour substances, and physical touch. This pain is typically caused by the exposure of dentin, the hard tissue beneath the tooth's enamel, due to receding gums, tooth decay, or other factors that wear down or damage the protective enamel layer.

When the dentin is exposed, the microscopic tubules within it become sensitive to temperature and pressure changes, allowing external stimuli to reach the nerve endings inside the tooth. This results in the characteristic pain or discomfort associated with dentin sensitivity. Dentin sensitivity can be managed through various treatments, including desensitizing toothpaste, fluoride applications, and dental restorations, depending on the underlying cause of the condition.

Dental amalgam is a commonly used dental filling material that consists of a mixture of metals, including silver, tin, copper, and mercury. The mercury binds the other metals together to form a strong, durable, and stable restoration that is resistant to wear and tear. Dental amalgam has been used for over 150 years to fill cavities and repair damaged teeth, and it remains a popular choice among dentists due to its strength, durability, and affordability.

However, there has been some controversy surrounding the use of dental amalgam due to concerns about the potential health effects of mercury exposure. While the majority of scientific evidence suggests that dental amalgam is safe for most people, some individuals may be more sensitive to mercury and may experience adverse reactions. As a result, some dentists may recommend alternative filling materials, such as composite resin or gold, for certain patients.

Overall, dental amalgam is a safe and effective option for filling cavities and restoring damaged teeth, but it is important to discuss any concerns or questions with a qualified dental professional.

Orthodontic brackets are small square attachments that are bonded to the teeth or bands that are attached to the back molars. They have a slot in which the orthodontic archwire fits and is held in place. The bracket can be made of stainless steel, ceramic, plastic or a combination of these materials. They play an essential role in moving the teeth into the desired position during orthodontic treatment.

Glass Ionomer Cements (GICs) are a type of dental restorative material that have the ability to chemically bond to tooth structure. They are composed of a mixture of silicate glass powder and an organic acid, such as polyacrylic acid. GICs have several clinical applications in dentistry, including as a filling material for small to moderate sized cavities, as a liner or base under other restorative materials, and as a cement for securing crowns, bridges, and orthodontic appliances.

GICs are known for their biocompatibility, caries inhibition, and adhesion to tooth structure. They also have the ability to release fluoride ions, which can help protect against future decay. However, they are not as strong or wear-resistant as some other dental restorative materials, such as amalgam or composite resin, so they may not be suitable for use in high-load bearing restorations.

GICs can be classified into two main types: conventional and resin-modified. Conventional GICs have a longer setting time and are more prone to moisture sensitivity during placement, while resin-modified GICs contain additional methacrylate monomers that improve their handling properties and shorten their setting time. However, the addition of these monomers may also reduce their fluoride release capacity.

Overall, glass ionomer cements are a valuable dental restorative material due to their unique combination of adhesion, biocompatibility, and caries inhibition properties.

Gingivitis is a mild form of gum disease (periodontal disease) that causes irritation, redness, swelling and bleeding of the gingiva, or gums. It's important to note that it is reversible with good oral hygiene and professional dental treatment. If left untreated, however, gingivitis can progress to a more severe form of gum disease known as periodontitis, which can result in tissue damage and eventual tooth loss.

Gingivitis is most commonly caused by the buildup of plaque, a sticky film of bacteria that constantly forms on our teeth. When not removed regularly through brushing and flossing, this plaque can harden into tartar, which is more difficult to remove and contributes to gum inflammation. Other factors like hormonal changes, poor nutrition, certain medications, smoking or a weakened immune system may also increase the risk of developing gingivitis.

Calcium hydroxide is an inorganic compound with the chemical formula Ca(OH)2. It is also known as slaked lime or hydrated lime. Calcium hydroxide is a white, odorless, tasteless, and alkaline powder that dissolves in water to form a caustic solution.

Medically, calcium hydroxide is used as an antacid to neutralize stomach acid and relieve symptoms of heartburn, indigestion, and upset stomach. It is also used as a topical agent to treat skin conditions such as poison ivy rash, sunburn, and minor burns. When applied to the skin, calcium hydroxide helps to reduce inflammation, neutralize irritants, and promote healing.

In dental applications, calcium hydroxide is used as a filling material for root canals and as a paste to treat tooth sensitivity. It has the ability to stimulate the formation of new dentin, which is the hard tissue that makes up the bulk of the tooth.

It's important to note that calcium hydroxide should be used with caution, as it can cause irritation and burns if it comes into contact with the eyes or mucous membranes. It should also be stored in a cool, dry place away from heat and open flames.

Dental esthetics refers to the branch of dentistry concerned with the aesthetic appearance of teeth and smile. It involves the use of various dental treatments and procedures to improve the color, shape, alignment, and position of teeth, thereby enhancing the overall facial appearance and self-confidence of a person. Some common dental esthetic treatments include tooth whitening, dental veneers, composite bonding, orthodontic treatment (braces), and dental implants. It is important to note that dental esthetics not only focuses on improving the appearance but also maintaining or improving oral health and function.

"Triticum" is the genus name for a group of cereal grains that includes common wheat (T. aestivum), durum wheat (T. durum), and spelt (T. spelta). These grains are important sources of food for humans, providing carbohydrates, proteins, and various nutrients. They are used to make a variety of foods such as bread, pasta, and breakfast cereals. Triticum species are also known as "wheat" in layman's terms.

Inlays are a type of dental restoration used to repair and restore teeth that have been damaged by decay or trauma. They are custom-made fillings made in a laboratory, typically from materials such as gold, porcelain, or composite resin. Inlays are designed to fit precisely into the cavity or damaged area of a tooth, restoring its strength, function, and appearance. Unlike traditional fillings, which are molded directly onto the tooth, inlays are created outside of the mouth and then bonded or cemented into place during a separate dental appointment. This makes them a more durable and long-lasting solution for repairing damaged teeth. Inlays can also be used to replace old or failing fillings, providing a stronger and more aesthetically pleasing alternative.

Acid etching in dental terminology refers to a surface treatment technique used in dentistry, particularly for bonding procedures. This process involves the application of a mild acid (usually phosphoric or maleic acid) onto the enamel or dentin surface of a tooth. The acid etches the surface by selectively removing the minerals and creating microscopic irregularities or porosities.

This etched surface provides an increased surface area and better mechanical retention for bonding agents, resin composites, or dental cements. As a result, the bond between the tooth and the restorative material becomes stronger and more durable. Acid etching is widely used in various dental procedures such as direct and indirect tooth-colored restorations, veneers, crowns, bridges, and orthodontic attachments.

Gametogenesis is the biological process by which haploid gametes, or sex cells (sperm and egg cells), are produced through the meiotic division of diploid germ cells. In females, this process is called oogenesis, where an oogonium (diploid germ cell) undergoes mitosis to form an oocyte (immature egg cell). The oocyte then undergoes meiosis I to form a secondary oocyte and a polar body. After fertilization by a sperm cell, the secondary oocyte completes meiosis II to form a mature ovum or egg cell.

In males, this process is called spermatogenesis, where a spermatogonium (diploid germ cell) undergoes mitosis to form primary spermatocytes. Each primary spermatocyte then undergoes meiosis I to form two secondary spermatocytes, which subsequently undergo meiosis II to form four haploid spermatids. The spermatids then differentiate into spermatozoa or sperm cells through a process called spermiogenesis.

Gametogenesis is essential for sexual reproduction and genetic diversity, as it involves the random segregation of chromosomes during meiosis and the recombination of genetic material between homologous chromosomes.

Periodontal splints are dental devices used to stabilize and support loose teeth that have been weakened by periodontal disease (gum disease). These splints can be made from various materials such as acrylic, metal wire, or fiber-reinforced composites. They function by connecting the affected tooth or teeth to adjacent stable teeth, creating a fixed unit that helps distribute forces evenly during biting and chewing, reducing mobility and promoting healing of the periodontal tissues.

There are different types of periodontal splints, including:

1. Intra-coronal splints: These are fixed to the inside (lingual) surface of the affected teeth using dental cement or adhesive. They typically involve the use of a metal wire that is bonded to the inner surfaces of the loose teeth and connected to stable neighboring teeth.
2. Extra-coronal splints: These are fixed to the outside (labial or buccal) surface of the affected teeth using dental cement or adhesive. They usually consist of a metal wire or fiber-reinforced composite material that encircles the loose teeth and is connected to stable neighboring teeth.
3. Removable splints: These are similar to dental appliances such as dentures or orthodontic retainers, and they can be removed for cleaning and maintenance. They typically consist of an acrylic base with metal clasps or wires that hook onto the affected teeth and stable neighboring teeth.

The choice of periodontal splint depends on various factors, including the number of loose teeth, their location in the mouth, the severity of mobility, patient preferences, and oral hygiene practices. Periodontal splints are often used in conjunction with other periodontal treatments, such as scaling and root planing, to improve treatment outcomes and promote long-term dental health.

An ovary is a part of the female reproductive system in which ova or eggs are produced through the process of oogenesis. They are a pair of solid, almond-shaped structures located one on each side of the uterus within the pelvic cavity. Each ovary measures about 3 to 5 centimeters in length and weighs around 14 grams.

The ovaries have two main functions: endocrine (hormonal) function and reproductive function. They produce and release eggs (ovulation) responsible for potential fertilization and development of an embryo/fetus during pregnancy. Additionally, they are essential in the production of female sex hormones, primarily estrogen and progesterone, which regulate menstrual cycles, sexual development, and reproduction.

During each menstrual cycle, a mature egg is released from one of the ovaries into the fallopian tube, where it may be fertilized by sperm. If not fertilized, the egg, along with the uterine lining, will be shed, leading to menstruation.

Gutta-Percha is defined in the medical field as a naturally occurring rubber derived from the sap of the Palaquium gutta tree, which is native to Malaysia. It has been historically used in various medical and dental applications due to its unique properties such as being malleable yet durable when heated, and remaining stable at room temperature.

In dentistry, gutta-percha is commonly utilized as a root canal filling material, as it can be easily shaped and compacted into the root canal space to seal off the tooth from bacteria and other infectious agents. It is often used in combination with a sealer cement to ensure a proper seal and prevent reinfection of the tooth.

Overall, gutta-percha is a valuable material in medical and dental applications due to its unique properties and versatility.

Cariostatic agents are substances or medications that are used to prevent or inhibit the development and progression of dental caries, also known as tooth decay or cavities. These agents work by reducing the ability of bacteria in the mouth to produce acid, which can erode the enamel and dentin of the teeth and lead to cavities.

There are several types of cariostatic agents that are commonly used in dental care, including:

1. Fluorides: These are the most widely used and well-studied cariostatic agents. They work by promoting the remineralization of tooth enamel and making it more resistant to acid attacks. Fluoride can be found in toothpaste, mouthwashes, gels, varnishes, and fluoridated water supplies.
2. Antimicrobial agents: These substances work by reducing the population of bacteria in the mouth that contribute to tooth decay. Examples include chlorhexidine, triclosan, and xylitol.
3. Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP): This is a complex protein that has been shown to help remineralize tooth enamel and reduce the risk of dental caries. It can be found in some toothpastes and mouthwashes.
4. Silver diamine fluoride: This is a topical fluoride compound that contains silver ions, which have antimicrobial properties. It has been shown to be effective in preventing and arresting dental caries, particularly in high-risk populations such as young children and older adults with dry mouth.

It's important to note that while cariostatic agents can help reduce the risk of tooth decay, they are not a substitute for good oral hygiene practices such as brushing twice a day, flossing daily, and visiting the dentist regularly.

Periapical tissue, in the field of dentistry and oral medicine, refers to the tissue that surrounds the apical region of a tooth. The apical region is the tip or apex of the root of a tooth. Periapical tissues include the periodontal ligament, the alveolar bone, and the dental follicle. These tissues play a crucial role in supporting and protecting the tooth. Inflammation or infection of the periapical tissue can lead to a condition known as periapical periodontitis, which may require root canal treatment or tooth extraction.

Pit and fissure sealants are a preventive dental treatment that involves the application of a thin, plastic coating to the chewing surfaces of teeth, usually the molars and premolars. The goal of this treatment is to protect the pits and fissures, which are the grooves and depressions on the chewing surfaces of teeth, from decay.

The sealant material flows into the pits and fissures, creating a smooth, protective barrier that prevents food and bacteria from becoming trapped in these areas and causing cavities. The procedure is typically quick, painless, and non-invasive, and can be performed during a routine dental checkup. Sealants are most commonly recommended for children and adolescents, but they may also be appropriate for adults who are at high risk of tooth decay.

A teratoma is a type of germ cell tumor, which is a broad category of tumors that originate from the reproductive cells. A teratoma contains developed tissues from all three embryonic germ layers: ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. This means that a teratoma can contain various types of tissue such as hair, teeth, bone, and even more complex organs like eyes, thyroid, or neural tissue.

Teratomas are usually benign (non-cancerous), but they can sometimes be malignant (cancerous) and can spread to other parts of the body. They can occur anywhere in the body, but they're most commonly found in the ovaries and testicles. When found in these areas, they are typically removed surgically.

Teratomas can also occur in other locations such as the sacrum, coccyx (tailbone), mediastinum (the area between the lungs), and pineal gland (a small gland in the brain). These types of teratomas can be more complex to treat due to their location and potential to cause damage to nearby structures.

Dentin-bonding agents are substances used in dentistry to create a strong and durable bond between the dental restoration material (such as composite resin, glass ionomer cement, or crowns) and the dentin surface of a tooth. Dentin is the hard tissue that lies beneath the enamel and consists of microscopic tubules filled with fluid.

The primary function of dentin-bonding agents is to improve the adhesion of restorative materials to the tooth structure, enhancing the retention and durability of dental fillings, crowns, veneers, and other types of restorations. These agents typically contain one or more types of bonding resins, such as hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META), and/or phosphoric acid ester monomers.

The application process for dentin-bonding agents usually involves several steps, including:

1. Etching the dentin surface with a mild acid to remove the smear layer and expose the collagen network within the dentin tubules.
2. Applying a primer that penetrates into the etched dentin and promotes the infiltration of bonding resins into the dentinal tubules.
3. Applying an adhesive, which is typically a mixture of hydrophilic and hydrophobic monomers, to form a stable bond between the tooth structure and the restoration material.
4. Light-curing the adhesive to polymerize the resin and create a strong mechanical bond with the dentin surface.

Dentin-bonding agents have significantly improved the clinical success of various dental restorations by enhancing their retention, reducing microleakage, and minimizing postoperative sensitivity. However, they may still be susceptible to degradation over time due to factors such as moisture contamination, enzymatic degradation, or hydrolysis, which can lead to the failure of dental restorations. Therefore, continuous advancements in dentin-bonding technology are essential for improving the long-term success and durability of dental restorations.

Dentinogenesis is the process of dentin formation, which is one of the main components of teeth. Dentin is a hard, calcified tissue that lies beneath the tooth's enamel and cementum layers, providing structural support and protection to the pulp tissue containing nerves and blood vessels. The process of dentinogenesis involves the differentiation and activation of odontoblasts, which are specialized cells that synthesize and secrete the organic and inorganic components of dentin matrix. These components include collagenous proteins and hydroxyapatite crystals, which form a highly mineralized tissue that is both strong and flexible. Dentinogenesis continues throughout life as new layers of dentin are formed in response to various stimuli such as tooth wear, dental caries, or injury.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

The seminiferous epithelium is a specialized type of epithelial tissue that lines the seminiferous tubules within the testes. It is composed of various cell types, including germ cells in different stages of development (spermatogonia, primary and secondary spermatocytes, spermatids) and supportive cells called Sertoli cells.

The primary function of the seminiferous epithelium is to support sperm production (spermatogenesis). The Sertoli cells provide structural support and nourishment to the developing germ cells, helping them to differentiate into mature spermatozoa (sperm). This process involves a series of complex cellular events, including mitosis, meiosis, and spermiogenesis.

In addition to its role in sperm production, the seminiferous epithelium also plays a crucial part in maintaining the blood-testis barrier, which separates the testicular environment from the systemic circulation. This barrier helps protect developing germ cells from potential immune attacks and maintains an optimal microenvironment for spermatogenesis.

Orthodontics is a specialized branch of dentistry that focuses on the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of dental and facial irregularities. The term "corrective" in this context refers to the use of appliances (such as braces, aligners, or other devices) to move teeth into their proper position and correct malocclusion (bad bite). This not only improves the appearance of the teeth but also helps to ensure better function, improved oral health, and overall dental well-being.

The goal of corrective orthodontics is to create a balanced and harmonious relationship between the teeth, jaws, and facial structures. Treatment may be recommended for children, adolescents, or adults and can help address various issues such as crowding, spacing, overbites, underbites, crossbites, open bites, and jaw growth discrepancies. A combination of techniques, including fixed or removable appliances, may be used to achieve the desired outcome. Regular follow-up appointments are necessary throughout treatment to monitor progress and make any necessary adjustments.

Orthodontic extrusion is a dental treatment procedure that involves the deliberate and controlled vertical movement of a tooth out of its socket with the use of orthodontic appliances. This technique is often used in orthodontics to align teeth, correct their position, or prepare them for other procedures such as crowns or bridges.

During the extrusion process, gentle force is applied to the tooth using specific orthodontic appliances, like a spring or an elastic band, which causes the tooth to move slowly in an upward direction. The movement is usually slow and gradual, taking several weeks or even months to achieve the desired result.

Orthodontic extrusion has various clinical applications, such as intruding deep overerupted teeth, uprighting tilted teeth, creating space for restorative work, or aiding in the eruption of impacted teeth. It is essential to maintain good oral hygiene and have regular check-ups with an orthodontist during the treatment to ensure proper healing and avoid any potential complications.

Dysgerminoma is a type of germ cell tumor that develops in the ovaries. It is a malignant (cancerous) tumor that primarily affects girls and women of reproductive age, although it can occur at any age. Dysgerminomas are composed of large, round, or polygonal cells with clear cytoplasm and distinct cell borders, arranged in nests or sheets. They may also contain lymphoid aggregates and may produce hormones such as estrogen or testosterone.

Dysgerminomas are usually unilateral (affecting one ovary), but they can be bilateral (affecting both ovaries) in about 10-15% of cases. They tend to grow and spread rapidly, so early detection and treatment are crucial for a favorable prognosis.

The standard treatment for dysgerminoma is surgical removal of the affected ovary or ovaries, followed by chemotherapy with agents such as bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP). With appropriate treatment, the five-year survival rate for patients with dysgerminoma is high, ranging from 80% to 95%.

Dental alloys are materials made by combining two or more metals to be used in dental restorations, such as crowns, bridges, fillings, and orthodontic appliances. These alloys can be classified into three main categories based on their composition:

1. Precious Alloys: Predominantly composed of precious metals like gold, platinum, palladium, and silver. They are highly corrosion-resistant, biocompatible, and durable, making them suitable for long-term use in dental restorations. Common examples include high noble (gold) alloys and noble alloys.
2. Base Metal Alloys: Contain primarily non-precious metals like nickel, chromium, cobalt, and beryllium. They are more affordable than precious alloys but may cause allergic reactions or sensitivities in some patients. Common examples include nickel-chromium alloys and cobalt-chromium alloys.
3. Castable Glass Ionomer Alloys: A combination of glass ionomer cement (GIC) powder and metal liquid, which can be cast into various dental restorations. They have the advantage of being both strong and adhesive to tooth structure but may not be as durable as other alloy types.

Each type of dental alloy has its unique properties and applications, depending on the specific clinical situation and patient needs. Dental professionals consider factors like cost, biocompatibility, mechanical properties, and esthetics when selecting an appropriate alloy for a dental restoration.

Endodontics is a branch of dentistry that deals with the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases or injuries of the dental pulp (the soft tissue inside the tooth that contains nerves, blood vessels, and connective tissue) and the tissues surrounding the root of the tooth. The most common endodontic procedure is root canal therapy, which involves removing infected or inflamed pulp tissue from within the tooth, cleaning and shaping the root canals, and filling and sealing the space to prevent reinfection. Endodontists are dental specialists who have undergone additional training in this field beyond dental school.

Orthodontic appliance design refers to the creation and development of medical devices used in orthodontics, which is a branch of dentistry focused on the diagnosis, prevention, and correction of dental and facial irregularities. The design process involves creating a customized treatment plan for each patient, based on their specific needs and goals.

Orthodontic appliances can be removable or fixed and are used to move teeth into proper alignment, improve jaw function, and enhance the overall appearance of the smile. Some common types of orthodontic appliances include braces, aligners, palatal expanders, and retainers.

The design of an orthodontic appliance typically involves several factors, including:

1. The specific dental or facial problem being addressed
2. The patient's age, overall health, and oral hygiene habits
3. The patient's lifestyle and personal preferences
4. The estimated treatment time and cost
5. The potential risks and benefits of the appliance

Orthodontic appliance design is a complex process that requires a thorough understanding of dental anatomy, biomechanics, and materials science. It is typically performed by an orthodontist or a dental technician with specialized training in this area. The goal of orthodontic appliance design is to create a device that is both effective and comfortable for the patient, while also ensuring that it is safe and easy to use.

A periodontal pocket is a pathological space or gap that develops between the tooth and the surrounding gum tissue (gingiva) as a result of periodontal disease. This condition is also known as a "periodontal depth" or "probing depth." It is measured in millimeters using a dental probe, and it indicates the level of attachment loss of the gingival tissue to the tooth.

In a healthy periodontium, the sulcus (the normal space between the tooth and gum) measures 1-3 mm in depth. However, when there is inflammation due to bacterial accumulation, the gums may become red, swollen, and bleed easily. As the disease progresses, the sulcus deepens, forming a periodontal pocket, which can extend deeper than 3 mm.

Periodontal pockets provide an environment that is conducive to the growth of harmful bacteria, leading to further tissue destruction and bone loss around the tooth. If left untreated, periodontal disease can result in loose teeth and eventually tooth loss. Regular dental check-ups and professional cleanings are essential for maintaining healthy gums and preventing periodontal pockets from developing or worsening.

Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a type of electron microscopy that uses a focused beam of electrons to scan the surface of a sample and produce a high-resolution image. In SEM, a beam of electrons is scanned across the surface of a specimen, and secondary electrons are emitted from the sample due to interactions between the electrons and the atoms in the sample. These secondary electrons are then detected by a detector and used to create an image of the sample's surface topography. SEM can provide detailed images of the surface of a wide range of materials, including metals, polymers, ceramics, and biological samples. It is commonly used in materials science, biology, and electronics for the examination and analysis of surfaces at the micro- and nanoscale.

A pulpotomy is a dental procedure that involves the removal of the pulp tissue from the crown portion of a tooth, while leaving the vital pulp tissue in the root canals. This procedure is typically performed on primary teeth (baby teeth) that have been damaged due to decay or trauma, but still have a healthy root canal system.

The goal of a pulpotomy is to preserve the vitality of the remaining tooth structure and prevent premature exfoliation of the primary tooth. After removing the infected or inflamed pulp tissue from the crown, a medicated dressing is placed over the remaining pulpal tissue in the root canals to promote healing and maintain the tooth's vitality.

A stainless steel crown is then typically placed over the tooth to provide additional protection and support. A pulpotomy can help alleviate pain, prevent further infection, and maintain the natural space for the permanent tooth to erupt properly.

Dental porcelain is a type of biocompatible ceramic material that is commonly used in restorative and cosmetic dentistry to create tooth-colored restorations such as crowns, veneers, inlays, onlays, and bridges. It is made from a mixture of powdered porcelain and water, which is heated to high temperatures to form a hard, glass-like substance. Dental porcelain has several desirable properties for dental restorations, including:

1. High strength and durability: Dental porcelain is strong enough to withstand the forces of biting and chewing, making it suitable for use in load-bearing restorations such as crowns and bridges.
2. Natural appearance: Dental porcelain can be matched closely to the color, translucency, and texture of natural teeth, allowing for highly aesthetic restorations that blend seamlessly with the surrounding dentition.
3. Biocompatibility: Dental porcelain is biologically inert and does not cause adverse reactions or toxicity in the body, making it a safe choice for dental restorations.
4. Chemical resistance: Dental porcelain is resistant to staining and chemical attack from substances such as coffee, tea, red wine, and acidic foods and drinks.
5. Low thermal conductivity: Dental porcelain has low thermal conductivity, which means it does not transmit heat or cold readily, reducing the risk of temperature sensitivity in dental restorations.

Overall, dental porcelain is a versatile and reliable material for creating high-quality, natural-looking, and durable dental restorations.

Bruxism is the medical term for grinding or clenching your teeth. It's often an unconscious habit that can occur during the day or at night (nocturnal bruxism). Mild bruxism may not require treatment, but chronic, severe grinding can lead to jaw disorders, headaches, and damaged teeth.

There are several potential causes of bruxism, including stress, anxiety, certain medications, alcohol and drug use, and sleep disorders. Dentists often diagnose bruxism based on the visible signs of wear on your teeth, or they may ask you about symptoms you're experiencing. Treatment for bruxism can include stress management techniques, dental guards to protect your teeth during sleep, and in some cases, medication.

Alveolar bone loss refers to the breakdown and resorption of the alveolar process of the jawbone, which is the part of the jaw that contains the sockets of the teeth. This type of bone loss is often caused by periodontal disease, a chronic inflammation of the gums and surrounding tissues that can lead to the destruction of the structures that support the teeth.

In advanced stages of periodontal disease, the alveolar bone can become severely damaged or destroyed, leading to tooth loss. Alveolar bone loss can also occur as a result of other conditions, such as osteoporosis, trauma, or tumors. Dental X-rays and other imaging techniques are often used to diagnose and monitor alveolar bone loss. Treatment may include deep cleaning of the teeth and gums, medications, surgery, or tooth extraction in severe cases.

Dental digital radiography is a type of medical imaging that uses digital sensors instead of traditional X-ray film to produce highly detailed images of the teeth, gums, and surrounding structures. This technology offers several advantages over conventional dental radiography, including:

1. Lower radiation exposure: Digital sensors require less radiation to produce an image compared to traditional film, making it a safer option for patients.
2. Instant results: The images captured by digital sensors are immediately displayed on a computer screen, allowing dentists to quickly assess the patient's oral health and discuss any findings with them during the appointment.
3. Improved image quality: Digital radiography produces clearer and more precise images compared to traditional film, enabling dentists to better detect issues such as cavities, fractures, or tumors.
4. Enhanced communication: The ability to easily manipulate and enhance digital images allows for better communication between dental professionals and improved patient education.
5. Environmentally friendly: Digital radiography eliminates the need for chemical processing and disposal of used film, making it a more environmentally conscious choice.
6. Easy storage and retrieval: Digital images can be stored electronically and accessed easily for future reference or consultation with other dental professionals.
7. Remote consultations: Digital images can be shared remotely with specialists or insurance companies, facilitating faster diagnoses and treatment planning.

A partial denture that is fixed and bonded with resin is a type of dental restoration used when one or more natural teeth are missing in a jaw. Unlike removable partial dentures, fixed partial dentures, also known as "dental bridges," are permanently attached to the remaining teeth or implants for support.

In this specific type, the false tooth (or pontic) is connected to the adjacent teeth with the help of resin-bonded retainers, which are made from a special dental resin material. The retainers are bonded to the back surfaces of the supporting teeth, providing a secure and stable fit for the replacement tooth.

Resin-bonded fixed partial dentures offer several advantages, including minimally invasive preparation, lower cost compared to other types of bridges, and quicker installation time. However, they may not be suitable for all cases, especially when supporting teeth have large fillings or significant crowning. A dental professional can determine the most appropriate treatment option based on an individual's oral health needs and preferences.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "silicates" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. Silicates are a broad class of minerals that are composed of silicon and oxygen atoms in various arrangements. They are abundant in Earth's crust and are commonly found in sand, quartz, and many types of rocks.

While not directly related to human health, some silicate-based materials can have medical applications. For example, certain forms of magnesium silicate (talc) have been used as a component in some medications for their ability to absorb moisture and help reduce the risk of skin irritation. However, exposure to certain types of silica dust (like crystalline silica) has been linked to lung diseases such as silicosis, bronchitis, and lung cancer, especially in occupational settings like construction, sandblasting, and mining.

If you have any concerns about silicates or their potential impact on your health, I would recommend consulting a healthcare professional for personalized advice based on your specific situation.

Surface properties in the context of medical science refer to the characteristics and features of the outermost layer or surface of a biological material or structure, such as cells, tissues, organs, or medical devices. These properties can include physical attributes like roughness, smoothness, hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity, and electrical conductivity, as well as chemical properties like charge, reactivity, and composition.

In the field of biomaterials science, understanding surface properties is crucial for designing medical implants, devices, and drug delivery systems that can interact safely and effectively with biological tissues and fluids. Surface modifications, such as coatings or chemical treatments, can be used to alter surface properties and enhance biocompatibility, improve lubricity, reduce fouling, or promote specific cellular responses like adhesion, proliferation, or differentiation.

Similarly, in the field of cell biology, understanding surface properties is essential for studying cell-cell interactions, cell signaling, and cell behavior. Cells can sense and respond to changes in their environment, including variations in surface properties, which can influence cell shape, motility, and function. Therefore, characterizing and manipulating surface properties can provide valuable insights into the mechanisms of cellular processes and offer new strategies for developing therapies and treatments for various diseases.

Dental radiography is a specific type of imaging that uses radiation to produce detailed images of the teeth, bones, and soft tissues surrounding them. It is a crucial tool in dental diagnostics and treatment planning. There are several types of dental radiographs, including:

1. Intraoral Radiographs: These are taken inside the mouth and provide detailed images of individual teeth or small groups of teeth. They can help detect cavities, assess periodontal health, plan for restorations, and monitor tooth development in children. Common types of intraoral radiographs include bitewing, periapical, and occlusal radiographs.
2. Extraoral Radiographs: These are taken outside the mouth and provide images of larger areas, such as the entire jaw or skull. They can help diagnose issues related to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), detect impacted teeth, assess bone health, and identify any abnormalities in the facial structure. Common types of extraoral radiographs include panoramic, cephalometric, and sialography radiographs.
3. Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT): This is a specialized type of dental radiography that uses a cone-shaped X-ray beam to create detailed 3D images of the teeth, bones, and soft tissues. It is particularly useful in planning complex treatments such as dental implants, orthodontic treatment, and oral surgery.

Dental radiographs are typically taken using a specialized machine that emits a low dose of radiation. Patients are provided with protective lead aprons to minimize exposure to radiation. The frequency of dental radiographs depends on the patient's individual needs and medical history. Dentists follow strict guidelines to ensure that dental radiography is safe and effective for their patients.

Acrylic resins are a type of synthetic polymer made from methacrylate monomers. They are widely used in various industrial, commercial, and medical applications due to their unique properties such as transparency, durability, resistance to breakage, and ease of coloring or molding. In the medical field, acrylic resins are often used to make dental restorations like false teeth and fillings, medical devices like intraocular lenses, and surgical instruments. They can also be found in orthopedic implants, bone cement, and other medical-grade plastics. Acrylic resins are biocompatible, meaning they do not typically cause adverse reactions when in contact with living tissue. However, they may release small amounts of potentially toxic chemicals over time, so their long-term safety in certain applications is still a subject of ongoing research.

In medical terms, "fossils" do not have a specific or direct relevance to the field. However, in a broader scientific context, fossils are the remains or impressions of prehistoric organisms preserved in petrified form or as a mold or cast in rock. They offer valuable evidence about the Earth's history and the life forms that existed on it millions of years ago.

Paleopathology is a subfield of paleontology that deals with the study of diseases in fossils, which can provide insights into the evolution of diseases and human health over time.

A dental restoration, temporary, is a type of dental restorative material or device that is used for a short period of time to restore the function, shape, and aesthetics of a damaged or decayed tooth. It serves as a placeholder until a permanent restoration can be created and placed.

Temporary dental restorations are typically made of materials such as cotton, plastic, or metal alloys that are easy to manipulate and remove. They may be used in various situations, including:

1. To protect the tooth pulp from further damage or infection after a deep cavity preparation or root canal treatment.
2. To restore the shape and function of a fractured or chipped tooth while waiting for a permanent restoration to be fabricated.
3. As a provisional restoration during the period of healing following oral surgery, such as extraction or implant placement.
4. In some cases, temporary dental restorations may also serve as a diagnostic tool to evaluate the patient's comfort and function before proceeding with a permanent restoration.

It is important to note that temporary dental restorations are not intended for long-term use and should be replaced with a permanent restoration as soon as possible to ensure optimal oral health and functionality.

A dental abutment is a component of a dental implant restoration that connects the implant to the replacement tooth or teeth. It serves as a support structure and is attached to the implant, which is surgically placed in the jawbone. The abutment provides a stable foundation for the placement of a crown, bridge, or denture, depending on the patient's individual needs.

Dental abutments can be made from various materials such as titanium, zirconia, or other biocompatible materials. They come in different shapes and sizes to accommodate the specific requirements of each implant case. The selection of an appropriate dental abutment is crucial for ensuring a successful and long-lasting dental implant restoration.

Epoxy resins are a type of synthetic polymer that are created through the reaction of an epoxide compound with a hardening agent or curing agent. These materials are known for their strong adhesive properties, chemical resistance, and durability. They are commonly used in coatings, adhesives, and composite materials for various industrial, commercial, and consumer applications.

In medical contexts, epoxy resins may be used to create durable and reliable components for medical devices or equipment. For example, they might be used to make housings for medical instruments, or to bond together different parts of a medical device. However, it's worth noting that epoxy resins are not typically used in direct contact with the body or as part of medical treatments.

It's important to note that while epoxy resins have many useful properties, they can also release potentially harmful chemicals during their production and disposal. As such, appropriate safety precautions should be taken when working with these materials.

... a sequlae of trauma to developing tooth germ". Journal of Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry. 26 (Suppl 3 ... Developmental defects in enamel that affect tooth appearance in the esthetic zone (i.e. upper front teeth) may cause ... It can be identified as missing tooth structure and may manifest as pits or grooves in the crown of the affected teeth, and in ... Turner's hypoplasia or Turner's tooth is a presentation of enamel hypoplasia that normally affects only a single tooth. Its ...
Germs 10/20/88 9. More Germs 10/27/88 10. Teeth 11/3/88 11. The Dentist 11/10/88 12. Safety 11/17/88 13. Environmental Health ... They instruct their new odd and strangely clueless friend Zardip on topics ranging from nutrition, to exercise, to germs all ...
Each epithelial swelling and the surrounding mesenchymal cells form a tooth germ. Tooth germs are the primitive structure of ... Ameloblast Tooth Tooth development Tooth enamel Antonio N (2017-10-13). Ten Cate's oral histology: development, structure, and ... These ameloblasts will move down to the enamel surface of the tooth and the shape of the crown and tooth is then established. ... Each dental arch will have 10 tooth buds, accounting for 20 primary teeth. The cap stage occurs in week 9-10 i.u. Unequal ...
"Ameloblastin expression in rat incisors and human tooth germs". The International Journal of Developmental Biology. 40 (6): ... Ameloblastin is a specific protein found in tooth enamel. Although less than 5% of enamel consists of protein, ameloblastins ... Pandya M, Diekwisch TG (December 2021). "Amelogenesis: Transformation of a protein-mineral matrix into tooth enamel". Journal ... is believed to be in controlling the elongation of enamel crystals and generally directing enamel mineralization during tooth ...
FGF-10 helps to stimulate epithelial cell proliferation, in order make larger tooth germs. Mammalian teeth develop from ... FGF-9 is an important factor during the initiation of tooth germ development. The rate of epithelial invagination in ... This creates a uniform embryo composed of the three germ layers in their respective positions. Once the three germ layers have ... The ectoderm is one of the three primary germ layers formed in early embryonic development. It is the outermost layer, and is ...
The tooth germ is an aggregation of cells that eventually forms a tooth. These cells are derived from the ectoderm of the first ... As a general rule, four teeth erupt for every six months of life, mandibular teeth erupt before maxillary teeth, and teeth ... Keratin is also present in epithelial cells of tooth germ and a thin film of keratin is present on a recently erupted tooth ( ... As a tooth is forming, a force can move the tooth from its original position, leaving the rest of the tooth to form at an ...
A paralectotype was also assigned to Z. laevis: SMNS 6045a, a loose germ tooth. Z. plieningeri was named by Fraas in 1896, but ... Zanclodon ("scythe tooth") is an extinct genus of archosauriform from the Erfurt Formation in southern Germany. It was once a ... The paratype, SMNS 56045, a maxilla with teeth, was discovered in the Gaildorf Alumn Mine in southern Germany. Zanclodon was ... cutting teeth into a family]. Jahreshefte des Vereins für Vaterländische Naturkunde in Württemberg 2: 148-154. Fraas, E. (1896 ...
"Expression survey of genes critical for tooth development in the human embryonic tooth germ". Developmental Dynamics. 236 (5): ... However, the remaining teeth of H. floresiensis show similarities to the bigger tooth sizes of the earlier genera ... While the form of the teeth themselves is not affected by post-canine megadontia, the ratio of molar teeth volume to total ... with average post-canine tooth area ranging from approximately 460mm2 and going all the way up to the largest tooth area, ...
Brushing one's teeth is also essential for hygiene and is a part of washing. 'Washing' can also refer to the washing of ... Hand washing is important in reducing the spread of germs. Also common is washing the face, which is done after waking up, or ...
Brushing one's teeth is also essential for hygiene and is a part of washing. 'Washing' can also refer to the washing of ... Hand washing is important in reducing the spread of germs. Also common is washing the face, which is done after waking up, or ... Z. Wahrman, Miryam (2016). The Hand Book: Surviving in a Germ-Filled World. University Press of New England. pp. 46-48. ISBN ...
Deciduous teeth are not replanted because of the risk of damaging the permanent tooth germ. Immediate replantation is ... Management of injured primary teeth differs from management of permanent teeth; avulsed primary tooth should not be re-planted ... When a tooth is knocked out, this ligament is stretched and splits in half, half stays on the tooth root and half stays on the ... When a tooth is picked up, it should always be grasped by the enamel on the crown. Finger pressure on the tooth root cells will ...
The pulp has a background similar to that of dentin because both are derived from the dental papilla of the tooth germ. During ... A tooth that does not respond at all to sensitivity testing may have become necrotic. In a healthy tooth, enamel and dentin ... Together the epithelial enamel organ and ectomesenchymal dental papilla and follicle form the tooth germ. The dental papilla is ... There are 4 main stages of tooth development: Bud stage Cap stage Bell stage Crown stage The first sign of tooth development is ...
Teeth are another example of the abiotic environmental factors involved in oral ecology. Bacteria settle on the tooth surface ... Black GV (1884). The Formation of Poisons by Microorganisms: A Biological Study of the Germ Theory of Disease. Philadelphia, PA ... While teeth provide stability to the microbial community, the overgrowth of bacteria is known to result in tooth decay ... which proposed that tooth decay is initiated by bacterial acid production on the surface of teeth. This theory is considered to ...
Get the New Ipana-it's dandy for your teeth!" Mr. Decay Germ, stylized as D.K. Germ, was the villain in the Ipana toothpaste ... Decay Germ, stay away from me. I'm sick and tired of cavities. Go bother someone else now." Stan Drake, artist of the newspaper ... ads at that time proudly proclaimed that this ingredient made Ipana superior to competitive toothpaste brands in germ-killing ...
Karlsen, K. (1962). "Development of tooth germs and adjacent structures in the whalebone whale (Balaenoptera physalus)". ... The toothed whales (parvorder Odontoceti), as the name suggests, are characterized by having teeth (rather than baleen). ... two or more fused cervical vertebrae and 20 or more pairs of teeth in their upper jaws. None is more than 4 m long. This family ... and it has no teeth on the upper jaw. The Platanistidae were originally thought to hold only one species (the South Asian river ...
Fused teeth arise through union of two normally separated tooth germs, and depending upon the stage of development of the teeth ... However, fusion can also be the union of a normal tooth bud to a supernumerary tooth germ. In these cases, the number of teeth ... Restore teeth with crown. Root canal treatment then surgically divide the tooth into two teeth. If the tooth is not suitable ... that caused damage to the developing tooth germ The phenomenon of gemination arises when two teeth develop from one tooth bud ...
"TOOTH GERM: Hall Crowns: Top 10 Tips". Kindelan, S. A.; Day, P.; Nichol, R.; Willmott, N.; Fayle, S. A. (2008-11-01). "UK ... Baby teeth are known as primary teeth or deciduous teeth. Biologically orientated strategies for managing dental decay are ... Some children respond better to the idea of the crown being a "Terminator tooth", "Iron Man tooth", shiny helmet tooth or a ... The tooth will still be able to exfoliate naturally, and the tooth should exfoliate with the crown in place. However, if the ...
miR-720 is upregulated in myelodysplastic syndromes, in molar tooth germ in newborn mice following anti-miR-214 injection and ... "Effects of in vivo transfection with anti-miR-214 on gene expression in murine molar tooth germ". Physiol Genomics. 43 (9): 488 ...
However, fusion can also be the union of a normal tooth bud to a supernumerary tooth germ. In these cases, the number of teeth ... Tooth gemination, in contrast to fusion, arises when two teeth develop from one tooth bud. When the anomalous tooth appears to ... Tooth fusion arises through union of two normally separated tooth germs, and depending upon the stage of development of the ... v t e (Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, Teeth, Tooth development, Acquired tooth ...
The tooth bud (sometimes called the tooth germ) is an aggregation of cells that eventually forms a tooth. It is organized into ... "primary teeth", "baby teeth", or "milk teeth", normally eventually contains 20 teeth. Primary teeth typically start to appear ... Tooth eruption in humans is a process in tooth development in which the teeth enter the mouth and become visible. Current ... Dens invaginatus, also called Dens in dente, is a deep invagination in a tooth causing the appearance of a tooth within a tooth ...
"Immunohistochemical examination for the distribution of podoplanin-expressing cells in developing mouse molar tooth germs". ... in human squamous cell carcinomas and germ cell tumors". The American Journal of Pathology. 166 (3): 913-21. doi:10.1016/S0002- ... "Podoplanin expression in primary central nervous system germ cell tumors: a useful histological marker for the diagnosis of ...
Using a toothbrush and dental floss, the player must keep the teeth clean while avoiding contact with the Plaque Germ, known as ... The brush needs tooth paste to work so the player must apply tooth paste. Floss is used for the space between teeth. If the ... Eventually the tooth will disappear, reflecting tooth loss. If a tooth is completely cleaned, a brief musical score will play ... and the teeth will change colors repeatedly. If the player comes into contact with D.K. at this time, the Plaque Germ will ...
No doubt Caraka conceived the germ theory of the causation of diseases, but he rejected the idea that germs are the only ... He gave 360 as the total number of bones, including teeth, present in the human body. He was right when he considered heart to ... Although he was aware of germs in the body, he did not give them primary importance. Charaka studied the anatomy of the human ... and various germs may grow in the body only when they get such a congenial environment. Both for metabolic diseases and ...
There are forty or more developed teeth in each row, besides ten or twelve undeveloped germs of teeth. The fully developed ... could not be discovered until the mass was boiled in caustic potash in the hope of finding some traces of teeth. The teeth are ... The tooth sac opens near the end of the proboscis, but being filled with coagulated mucus, and extremely reduced in size by ... The shaft is set in a chitinous yellow socket, which is extended on the back of the tooth so as to form a little hooked knob. ...
Medicine portal Tooth development Ameloblast Cementoblast List of human cell types derived from the germ layers List of ... The tooth is often able to be saved by a simple restoration. In contrast, reparative dentin is secreted when the tooth has a ... because both are originally derived from the dental papilla of the tooth germ. To aid in the secretion of intertubular and ... Odontoblasts first appear at sites of tooth development at 17-18 weeks in utero and remain present until death unless killed by ...
... and the Germs. Except for Negative Trend and the Germs, all bands on Tooth and Nail were co-produced by the Flesh Eaters ... The three Germs songs on Tooth and Nail are early versions of the best known tracks of the same titles featured on (GI), the ... Tooth and Nail was mastered by Larry Boden in May 1979 at MCA Whitney Recording Studios in Glendale, California. Featuring only ... Tooth and Nail is a seminal compilation album featuring six early Californian punk rock bands: the Controllers, the Flesh ...
Tooth formation relies on BMP4 expression, which induces Msx 1 and 2. These transcription factors turn the forming tooth to ... Ying Y, Liu XM, Marble A, Lawson KA, Zhao GQ (2000). "Requirement of Bmp8b for the generation of primordial germ cells in the ... The BMP4 signaling has been found in formation of early mesoderm and germ cells. Limb bud regulation and development of the ... Tucker AS, Matthews KL, Sharpe PT (1998). "Transformation of tooth type induced by inhibition of BMP signaling". Science. 282 ( ...
It is absent in the part of the tooth germ that outlines the root portions of the tooth which does not form enamel. Cate, A.R. ... The stratum intermedium in a developing tooth is a layer of two or three cells between the inner enamel epithelium and the ... This layer, along with the inner enamel epithelium, is responsible for the tooth enamel formation. It is a part of the dental ( ... It first appears during the early bell stage of tooth development, at around the 14th week of intrauterine life. These cells ...
In Sudan, fish hooks and metal wires were used to remove deciduous tooth germs before an infant reached one month. In the Upper ... Tooth ablation (also known as tooth evulsion, dental evulsion and tooth extraction) is the deliberate removal of a person's ... Human tooth sharpening Teeth blackening Humphrey, Louise T.; Bocaege, Emmy (2008). "Tooth Evulsion in the Maghreb: ... In Indonesia, the teeth that are most commonly removed in such rituals are the incisors. The teeth to be removed are either ...
Germ (Plant Beast): appears in episode 4. Powers include extensible tentacles and emitting massive amounts of carbon dioxide. ... Marmiga (Shark Beast): appears in episode 5. Powers include fast swimming, sharp teeth, a powerful tail, and mouth tentacles. ...
The tooth germs (#43, #44 and #45) were maintained. Only the teeth #74 and #75 were extracted. Suture of the region was ... It was observed in both cases a secondary reossification of the lesion and conservation of tooth germs, avoiding surgery and ... Another decisive factor to determine the extent and predictability of treatment was the presence of tooth germs and the teams ... Eisenbud et al advocated curettage or curettage plus peripheral osteotomy with maintenance of tooth germs for treatment of CGCG ...
TGF-β3 induces ectopic mineralization in fetal mouse dental pulp during tooth germ development. In: Development Growth and ... TGF-β3 induces ectopic mineralization in fetal mouse dental pulp during tooth germ development. Development Growth and ... Dive into the research topics of TGF-β3 induces ectopic mineralization in fetal mouse dental pulp during tooth germ ... TGF-β3 induces ectopic mineralization in fetal mouse dental pulp during tooth germ development. / Huojia, Muhetaer; Muraoka, ...
Stops cavity-causing germs.. In addition to aloe veras ability to reduce inflammation, it also kills certain bacteria1. , ... Whitens teeth? Possibly.. Some websites promote the use of aloe vera for teeth whitening, but there is limited evidence to back ... Gingivitis is most often due to poor oral hygiene, which allows plaque to form on the teeth. Although many cases are mild, if ... While aloe vera products may help your teeth and gums feel cleaner and healthier, they cant do it by themselves. Brushing and ...
tooth shows decay from bacteria germs oral hygiene clipart. #54834. tooth cartoon holding a toothbrush brush twice a day ... Category: Dental Clipart Description: dentist holding teeth and tool clipart Keywords. clipart clip+clipart dentist cleaning ...
Colgate Total Charcoal Deep Clean is a holistic multi-benefit solution that fights germs on teeth, tongue, cheeks, and gums up ... Only 20% of the germs in your mouth are on your teeth, the rest 80% are on gums, tongue and cheeks. Colgate Total Advanced ... Health is an antibacterial toothpaste that fights germs for 12 hours on teeth, tongue, cheeks, and gums, giving you Whole Mouth ... Its Dual Zinc + Arginine technology actively seeks out bacteria and forms a protective, anti-germ barrier - unlike an ordinary ...
... a sequlae of trauma to developing tooth germ". Journal of Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry. 26 (Suppl 3 ... Developmental defects in enamel that affect tooth appearance in the esthetic zone (i.e. upper front teeth) may cause ... It can be identified as missing tooth structure and may manifest as pits or grooves in the crown of the affected teeth, and in ... Turners hypoplasia or Turners tooth is a presentation of enamel hypoplasia that normally affects only a single tooth. Its ...
In situ expression of 15 kDa interferon alpha responsive gene in the developing tooth germ of the mouse lower first molar. In: ... In situ expression of 15 kDa interferon alpha responsive gene in the developing tooth germ of the mouse lower first molar. ... In situ expression of 15 kDa interferon alpha responsive gene in the developing tooth germ of the mouse lower first molar」の研究 ... In situ expression of 15 kDa interferon alpha responsive gene in the developing tooth germ of the mouse lower first molar. / ...
A, Tooth germ morphologies are shown with different combinations of mesenchymal homotypic adhesion and suprabasal homotypic ... Even when high suprabasal growth is forcing the tooth germ into a globular shape, high mesenchymal growth can contribute to the ... Even when high suprabasal growth is forcing the tooth germ into a globular shape, high mesenchymal growth can contribute to the ... but only in hypotheses II and III these are oriented downwards as in tooth development. D, Variation in tooth morphology when ...
The mouth is home to millions of germs. In removing plaque and other soft debris from the teeth, toothbrushes become ... Do toothbrushes spread germs? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is unaware of any adverse health effects directly ... Toothbrushes can have germs on them even after rinsing that could raise the risk of infection, especially for people with ... Tooth brushing in group settings should always be supervised to ensure that toothbrushes are not shared and that they are ...
Download free molar tooth photos and vectors. Thousands of free images, photos and vectors. ... Related Searches:dental implantsbrushing teethcavitiesveneersmolar toothoral surgerycanine teethhappy toothroot canal ... Tooth from chocolate on blue paper background top view copy space healthy teeth or dental care conceptPLUS ... A healthy white tooth isolated on light background dental care conceptPLUS ...
... kill germs between teeth. To Open: Squeeze the cap and turn. To Close: Turn cap until it locks. ... Kills 99.9% of germs that cause bad breath, plaque & gingivitis. For a fresher & cleaner mouth than brushing alone. Clinically ... Kills germs by millions on contact. ADA: Accepted. American Dental Association. Helps prevent and reduce plaque. Helps prevent ... Accepted by the American Dental Association (ADA), this bad breath mouthwash kills 99.9% of germs that cause bad breath, plaque ...
Teeth surgery:- ==, Remove green teeth ==, Tissue (For nosy) ==, Brush ==, Drill(Remove black part) ==, Put braces Tongue ... surgery:- ==, Remove Forks, kill germs ==, Water sprayer ==, Water dryer ==, Spray(heal injury) ==, Funny bandied ==, Injection ...
Categories: Tooth Germ Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, CopyrightRestricted 4 images ...
Teratomas are germ cell tumors commonly composed of multiple cell types derived from one or more of the 3 germ layers. ... Cells differentiate along various germ lines, essentially recapitulating any tissue of the body. Examples include hair, teeth, ... Teratomas are germ cell tumors commonly composed of multiple cell types derived from one or more of the 3 germ layers. ... MR Imaging of Germ Cell and Sex Cord Stromal Tumors. Magn Reson Imaging Clin N Am. 2023 Feb. 31 (1):65-78. [QxMD MEDLINE Link] ...
Taking care of your childs gums and teeth every day helps prevent tooth decay and gum disease. It also helps make it a regular ... Taking care of your childs gums and teeth every day helps prevent tooth decay and gum disease. It also helps make it a regular ... Teach children to brush their tongue to keep breath fresh and remove germs. ... Your babys teeth will start to come in between ages 6 to 14 months. Baby teeth can decay, so you should start cleaning them as ...
Tooth Components [A14.549.167.900]. *Tooth Germ [A14.549.167.900.720]. *Enamel Organ [A14.549.167.900.720.265] ... MicroRNAs play a critical role in tooth development. J Dent Res. 2010 Aug; 89(8):779-84. ... both of which atrophy and disappear before and upon eruption of the tooth, respectively. ...
Thanks. Donika said, ripping open the packet with her teeth.. EWWW!!!!DONT YOU KNOW THEIRS GERMS ON THAT?! I screamed.. ...
Define Cavity and plaque: tiny hole in a tooth caused when plaque, which is a sticky film of germs, forms on teeth. The germs ... "Soda is to teeth what smoking is to lungs." 9. Demonstrate the proper way to brush and floss teeth by using the model of teeth ... Your teeth are designed to last you a lifetime, with proper care they can! 5. Basic care of teeth includes brushing your teeth ... Label the teeth on the model and how many teeth most people have. 10. Allow students to practice on this model 11. Go over ...
Reliability of prenatal detection of X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia by tooth germ sonography. Prenat. Diagn. 39, ... Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia by tooth germ sonography.. Ultraschall Med. 36, 381-385 ... Congenital Hair Anomaly in Association with Hypodontia of Permanent Teeth: A Quiz. Karola Maria STIELER und Ulrike BLUME- ... The combination of hair and tooth abnormalities, alopecia, and cutaneous syndactyly is characteristic of ectodermal dysplasia- ...
David Kennedy says the thought that fluoride reduces tooth decay is nothing but a myth. He mentions a much more effective way ... So its a germ. Its transferred from the people that care for the child. All the germs in the babys body come from mother. So ... People talk about tooth decay, tooth decay is a disease of children, because the malnourished children. Most people lose their ... I had a guy in my practice, he never brushed his teeth. There was gum everywhere and his teeth were perfectly healthy. He ...
I want to see th germs offn my teeth. I jist want to see a germ. Ive never seen one in my life. Seein is believin, Pap ... I dont believe I have germs on my teeth!". "Stay with me today and Ill show you. I want to take you through the school anyway ... Thats the germ. Germs live in a worId we cannot see with the naked eye. We must use the microscope. There are millions of them ... "All right, Luster, youve heard of germs, havent you?". "Yes," says Pa, "but I dont believe in germs. Im sixty-five years ...
... the enamel germ of permanent tooth; m, bone of jaw; v, vessel cut across. ... B- Section similar to A, but passing through one of the special enamel germs here becoming flask-shaped; c, d, epithelium of ... A- 1, common enamel germ dipping down into the mucous membrane; 2, palantine process of jaw; 3, Reta Malpighi. ... The first step in the development of teeth consists in a downward growth from the Rete Malpighi or the deeper layer of ...
The conundrum of pharyngeal teeth origin : the role of germ layers, pouches, and gill slits Ann Huysseune (UGent) , Robert ... Miniaturization : how many cells are needed to build a tooth? Daria Larionova (UGent) , Hervé Lesot (UGent) and Ann Huysseune ( ... zebrafish, danio-rerio, atlantic salmon, teeth, teleost fish, evolution, bone, expression, salmon salmo-salar, vertebral column ... fish, tooth replacement, dentition, skeleton, zebrafish danio-rerio, osteoblasts, axial skeleton, cells, identification, ...
These cells are attempting to destroy the bacteria, but instead, the germs continue to divide. ...
They help whiten your teeth and simultaneously fight against the complaints of germ build-up and the poor oral health youve ... 4. Are the teeth whitening toothpaste any good?. Depending on what brand and quality of toothpaste you are availing, teeth ... Prevents: Yellowing of the teeth. For those who are tired of sporting yellow teeth, the Colgate Visible White is hands down one ... It also gently polishes the exterior of your teeth, ensuring to leave you with a dazzling white smile and teeth. This has ...
Whitens Surface of Teeth Safely. *Kills Germs that Cause Bad Breath. *Dynamic Foaming Action Whitens Teeth and Freshens Breath ...
T Chapter 15: Germs. In: The lives of a cell: notes of a biology watcher. New York: Penguin Books; 1978. [Originally published ... In the interim, he had taken up the habit of drinking scalding coffee, which he realized cleansed his anterior teeth but did ... Chapter 15: Germs.. Pictured on this months cover is a portrait of Anthonie van Leeuwenhoek (sometimes spelled Antony or ... In: Germ theory: medical pioneers in infectious diseases. Washington (DC): ASM Press, 2011. p. 65. [Quoting Dobell C. Anthony ...
It whitens teeth, effectively removes bacteria, strengthens enamel and helps to prevent cavities. ... Advanced stain-prevention power that keeps teeth white for longer*. *Antibacterial: Effectively removes germs ... Not only to keep teeth white, it also effectively fights bacteria. Whats more, this whitening mouthwash strengthens enamel and ...
what does the Oil of Oregano do for teeth? just a germ killer? ... what does the Oil of Oregano do for teeth? just a germ killer? ... Free Remineralizing Tooth Powder!. Make your own Organic, Tasty, and Effective, Fluorid.... Free Remineralizing Tooth Powder!. ... Oil of Oregano used to brush teeth joanne 17 years ago 29,875 * how did you use it for your dandruff ? and , is th... TBO 17 ... Yes, it kills germs, plus gets rid of plaque and w... joanne 17 years ago 28,969 * I just tried this...took one drop, put it in ...
4 BENEFITS IN 1: This fluoride mouthwash is designed to strengthen tooth enamel, remineralize soft spots, help prevent tooth ... Listerine Zero Alcohol Mouthwash, Alcohol-Free Oral Rinse to Kill 99% of Germs That Cause Bad Breath... Check on Amazon. ... 1-L bottle of Listerine Zero Alcohol Cool Mint Mouthwash kills 99.9% of bad breath germs with a less intense taste for a ... 6-IN-1 BENEFITS: Fluoride mouthwash offers six dental hygiene benefits in one oral rinse to kill 99% of germs that cause bad ...
  • Aloe vera may help you in treating cavities because it inhibits the growth of bacteria called Streptococcus mutans , which are mostly responsible for tooth decay," says Henry Hackney, DDS. (mindbodygreen.com)
  • Although aloe vera is proven to inhibit the growth of bacteria," says Linhart, "I've yet to see research regarding its impact on whitening teeth or reducing the chances of cavities. (mindbodygreen.com)
  • Brushing your teeth helps to remove bacteria and plaque from your teeth, gums, and mouth. (teach-nology.com)
  • These cells are attempting to destroy the bacteria, but instead, the germs continue to divide. (livescience.com)
  • The animalcules have become variously known as germs, microbes, bacteria, micro-organisms or simply 'organisms. (cdc.gov)
  • Not only to keep teeth white, it also effectively fights bacteria. (colgate.com)
  • They can chew on surfaces that have bacteria and other germs. (petside.com)
  • Over time, bacteria produce a thin fluid known as biofilm which coats the surface of the teeth. (petside.com)
  • It covers the bacteria on the surface of the teeth to protect it from removal. (petside.com)
  • As bacteria grow in number, they also secrete toxins and other substances that react with the outer layer of the teeth. (petside.com)
  • If this happens, bacteria can also damage or destroy the other structures that support the teeth. (petside.com)
  • If germs or bacteria from other parts of your body, such as your mouth , spread through your blood and attach to this lining, it causes endocarditis. (webmd.com)
  • Yes, you read that correctly: Germ theory denialists-also known as people who don't believe that pathogenic viruses and bacteria can cause disease. (balloon-juice.com)
  • Plaque Plaque is an excessive accumulation of the bacteria and germs that normally live in your mouth. (howstuffworks.com)
  • When plaque forms, a gelatinous substance protects the oral bacteria, allowing it to thrive and manufacture tooth-eating acids. (howstuffworks.com)
  • As unpleasant as it may sound, your mouth is a living swarm of bacteria and germs. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Although a certain amount of bacteria is normal, excessive accumulations can destroy your teeth and periodontia (the teeth's support system). (howstuffworks.com)
  • Plaque is a gelatinous substance that gives oral bacteria protection from the air (which can kill the germs). (howstuffworks.com)
  • What's more, plaque pins the bacteria to your teeth, where they feast heartily on the leftover food particles in your mouth. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Aloe Vera For Whiter Teeth & Healthier Gums? (mindbodygreen.com)
  • Only 20% of the germs in your mouth are on your teeth, the rest 80% are on gums, tongue and cheeks. (colgate.com)
  • Colgate Total Advanced Health is an antibacterial toothpaste that fights germs for 12 hours on teeth, tongue, cheeks, and gums, giving you Whole Mouth Health. (colgate.com)
  • Taking care of your child's gums and teeth every day helps prevent tooth decay and gum disease. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Learn how to care for your children's teeth and gums starting when they are a newborn. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Brush in tiny circles on the gums and on the teeth. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Not only does it help clean your teeth and gums, but it also works amazingly in helping remove the risks of plaque and tartar that you have been complaining about. (cdacmohali.in)
  • With this information, it is important for pet parents to do everything they can to help their dogs have healthier teeth and gums. (petside.com)
  • Always make sure to brush and floss your teeth and gums and go to the dentist regularly. (webmd.com)
  • It whitens the teeth, prevents cavities and gingivitis, and strengthens the gums. (mindbodygreen.com)
  • The pros are improved health of gums, germ killing effects, fresh taste, and cavity prevention," says Dr. Rich. (knowyourteeth.com)
  • Periodontal Disease Periodontal disease is, literally, disease 'around the tooth' -- disease of the gums. (howstuffworks.com)
  • According to clinical trials, topical fluoride treatment in the form of gel or varnish is effective in preventing tooth decay in children with enamel defects. (wikipedia.org)
  • In decayed teeth with enamel defects, only bonded restorations (e.g. glass ionomer, polyacid-modified composite resin and not amalgam) should be placed and cavity margins should not be placed in areas of defective enamel as this may lead to marginal leakage and recurrent decay. (wikipedia.org)
  • Baby teeth can decay, so you should start cleaning them as soon as they appear. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Your child's dentist can show you other ways to help prevent tooth decay . (medlineplus.gov)
  • Fluoride has been identified as the most important factor in preventing tooth decay. (teach-nology.com)
  • Fluoride Does Not Reduce Tooth Decay-But THIS Does! (ihealthtube.com)
  • Dr. Kennedy: Well, let me first point out the fact that fluoride does not reduce tooth decay that is a myth. (ihealthtube.com)
  • People talk about tooth decay, tooth decay is a disease of children, because the malnourished children. (ihealthtube.com)
  • It doesn't solve the problem, because tooth decay is caused by a bug called streptococcus mutants. (ihealthtube.com)
  • So then you take that kid have them, the mother brush the teeth with iodine or one of the bug killing agents and then you have them spit in the tube again and you look until that tube doesn't turn purple, you've got rid of the bug that causes tooth decay. (ihealthtube.com)
  • It prevents the risks of tooth decay, gum diseases, and even halitosis or bad breath. (cdacmohali.in)
  • But once the microorganisms reach the dentin, the process of tooth decay can proceed at a much faster rate. (petside.com)
  • The best method to stop tooth decay and gum issues is to practice good oral hygiene, which involves brushing and flossing your teeth every day, as well as making regular dentist checkups. (thisisguernsey.com)
  • Tooth -decay and toothaches were seen as inevitable parts of life, and care of the teeth was widely considered a mechanical concern. (saturdayeveningpost.com)
  • Some of these are beneficial, such as the appropriate amount of a disinfectant, like chlorine, that helps keep your water safe from germs and fluoride , which helps prevent tooth decay. (cdc.gov)
  • Enamel hypoplasia is a defect of the teeth in which the enamel is deficient in quantity, caused by defective enamel matrix formation during enamel development, as a result of inherited and acquired systemic condition(s). (wikipedia.org)
  • It can be identified as missing tooth structure and may manifest as pits or grooves in the crown of the affected teeth, and in extreme cases, some portions of the crown of the tooth may have no enamel, exposing the dentin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hypoplastic lesions are found in areas of the teeth where the enamel was being actively formed during a systemic or local disturbance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the formation of enamel extends over a long period of time, defects may be confined to one well-defined area of the affected teeth. (wikipedia.org)
  • The severity and localization of disease presentation is dependent on the timing and stage of tooth development in which the defective enamel formation occurred. (wikipedia.org)
  • Developmental defects in enamel that affect tooth appearance in the esthetic zone (i.e. upper front teeth) may cause individuals to experience social embarrassment or anxiety regarding the appearance of their teeth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stainless steel crowns with conservative preparation may be an effective method to eliminate sensitivity and prevent further breakdown in teeth with enamel defects requiring full-coverage crowns. (wikipedia.org)
  • In these cases, teeth may lose their weakened enamel shortly after eruption and are highly susceptible to dental caries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Epithelial cells surrounding the dental papilla and differentiated into three layers: the inner enamel epithelium, consisting of ameloblasts which eventually form the enamel, and the enamel pulp and external enamel epithelium, both of which atrophy and disappear before and upon eruption of the tooth, respectively. (harvard.edu)
  • The acid can cause demineralization of the tooth enamel which can lead to cavities. (teach-nology.com)
  • Within the tooth bud created by this process, a differentiation of various cell types occurs: the enamel organ, the dental papilla, and the dental lamina. (bionity.com)
  • They chip away at the enamel of the teeth until they reach the dentin. (petside.com)
  • the teeth may be joined by the enamel of their crowns, by their root dentin, or by both. (bvsalud.org)
  • Fluoride in the water supply, in toothpaste, and oral rinses will coat teeth with a protective layer and promote tooth remineralization. (teach-nology.com)
  • There is a high prevalence of fluoride exposure in the fingernails of the children studied, presenting risk of developing dental fluorosis in permanent teeth. (bvsalud.org)
  • In Dentistry, the main clinical manifestation from chronic poisoning occurs because of the intake of excessive doses of fluoride during teeth formation, which may cause the appearance of an anomaly called dental fluorosis 2 . (bvsalud.org)
  • Dental fluorosis is caused by the exposure of the tooth germ to high fluoride ion concentrations (F-1) during the mineralization process 3 . (bvsalud.org)
  • Teratomas are germ cell tumors commonly composed of multiple cell types derived from one or more of the 3 germ layers. (medscape.com)
  • Tumor markers serum alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and/or the beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG) are elevated in extragonadal nonseminomatous germ cell tumors. (medscape.com)
  • The levels of bhCG in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with primary intracranial germ cell tumors (ICGCT) were elevated more frequently than in the plasma before treatment and became detectable prior to any increase of the serum values in case of relapse. (medscape.com)
  • AFP, bhCG, or both are elevated in approximately 85% of extragonadal nonseminomatous germ cell tumors. (medscape.com)
  • Cytogenetic analysis of patients with mediastinal germ cell tumors (MGCTs) reveals trisomy 8 in 16% of cases and Klinefelter syndrome (XXY) in 14-20% of cases. (medscape.com)
  • The presence of this abnormality helps identify midline germ cell tumors presenting as poorly differentiated carcinomas with atypical features. (medscape.com)
  • Obtain baseline evaluation of pituitary function (ie, thyroid-stimulating hormone, cortisol, GH, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, prolactin) before treatment and then at regular intervals in patients with intracranial germ cell tumors. (medscape.com)
  • Nonseminomatous mediastinal germ cell tumors (NS-MGCTs) appear as irregular, anterior mediastinal masses, often with extensive, central heterogeneous areas of low attenuation caused by necrosis, hemorrhage, and/or cyst formation. (medscape.com)
  • Still, plaque has a yellowish color that over time can make your sparkly white teeth look dull and dingy. (mindbodygreen.com)
  • By removing plaque and reducing tartar formation, aloe vera may be able to keep your teeth whiter longer. (mindbodygreen.com)
  • Gingivitis is most often due to poor oral hygiene, which allows plaque to form on the teeth. (mindbodygreen.com)
  • Accepted by the American Dental Association (ADA), this bad breath mouthwash kills 99.9% of germs that cause bad breath, plaque, and gingivitis for a fresher and cleaner mouth than brushing alone. (safeway.com)
  • Clinically shown to reduce 52 percent more plaque and 21 percent more gingivitis than brushing and flossing alone, this refreshing germ killing oral rinse provides a deep clean that cares for your whole mouth. (safeway.com)
  • Kills 99.9% of germs that cause bad breath, plaque & gingivitis. (safeway.com)
  • Define Cavity and plaque: tiny hole in a tooth caused when plaque, which is a sticky film of germs, forms on teeth. (teach-nology.com)
  • Define Plaque as buildup on our teeth. (teach-nology.com)
  • Friedman and Friedland also explain that Leeuwenhoek was later puzzled to discover that the plaque on his front teeth had quit harboring his little animals, yet his molars still hosted them. (cdc.gov)
  • And in there is already plaque on the dog's teeth, it is imperative to prevent it from turning into tartar. (petside.com)
  • Go to the next page to learn about how plaque can cause serious damage to your teeth and periodontia. (howstuffworks.com)
  • If plaque is left undisturbed on your teeth for an extended period (anywhere from two days to two weeks), it can start to harden into a substance called tartar (or calculus, in dentist's terms). (howstuffworks.com)
  • But, what kind of toothpaste do you use to keep your teeth and your oral health in check? (cdacmohali.in)
  • But you will come to know for a fact that there are several types and composition of toothpaste in the market that are meant for normal teeth, sensitive teeth, and some even come with an Ayurvedic composition. (cdacmohali.in)
  • Optical Illusion: Are you sure your toothpaste kills maximum germs? (jagranjosh.com)
  • Eleven children (55%) brush their teeth three times a day, but only three children (15%) swallow toothpaste. (bvsalud.org)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is unaware of any adverse health effects directly related to toothbrush use, although people with bleeding disorders or who are severely immunosuppressed may suffer trauma from tooth brushing and may need to seek alternate means of oral hygiene. (cdc.gov)
  • This is because a worn-out toothbrush may not work as well, not because it might carry more germs. (cdc.gov)
  • Gently brush your child's teeth with a soft, child-sized toothbrush and water. (medlineplus.gov)
  • 9. Demonstrate the proper way to brush and floss teeth by using the model of teeth and the toothbrush. (teach-nology.com)
  • The battery-operated toothbrush delivers Sonic Vibration Technology that works hard to remove surface stains and polish teeth for a smoother and brighter smile. (gosmile.com)
  • This travel-sized battery-powered toothbrush comes with our Sonic Vibration technology to keep your teeth healthy, wherever you go! (gosmile.com)
  • Aloe vera also had few side effects compared to this prescription mouthwash, which can cause a change in taste or staining of the teeth. (mindbodygreen.com)
  • You do not need to soak toothbrushes in disinfecting solutions or mouthwash, which may actually spread germs under the right conditions. (cdc.gov)
  • Protect your mouth from germs and get fresh breath with Listerine Original Antiseptic Mouthwash. (safeway.com)
  • Left untreated, gingivitis can develop into periodontitis, a more serious disorder that causes gum recession, damage to soft and hard tissues, and eventually tooth loss. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Cells differentiate along various germ lines, essentially recapitulating any tissue of the body. (medscape.com)
  • The parthenogenic theory, which suggests an origin from the primordial germ cells, is now the most widely accepted. (medscape.com)
  • This theory is bolstered by the anatomic distribution of the tumors along lines of migration of the primordial germ cells from the yolk sac to the primitive gonads. (medscape.com)
  • Miniaturization : how many cells are needed to build a tooth? (ugent.be)
  • In the case of teeth, certain precursor cells cluster together in the jaw beneath the outer skin layer. (bionity.com)
  • These cells condense and form a kind of embryonic tooth germ. (bionity.com)
  • The approach adopted by researchers at TU Berlin for the natural growth of third teeth is as simple as it is ingenious: They remove dental pulp cells from the interior of an extracted tooth, which they then cultivate and de-differentiate in such a way as to produce an active embryonic tooth germ. (bionity.com)
  • Roland Lauster's team, however, sees a decisive competitive advantage in the method it has been pursuing: All other competing research groups use embryonic stem cells to produce embryonic tooth germs. (bionity.com)
  • it's called how to save your teeth with toxic-free preventive dentistry. (ihealthtube.com)
  • In the present study, beads soaked with human recombinant TGF-β3 induced ectopic mineralization in dental pulp from fetal mouse tooth germ samples, which increased in a dose-dependent manner. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Plus, it gently removes surface stains to help whiten your teeth. (ralphs.com)
  • How Tooth Whitening Works takes a look at procedures you can undergo to brighten and whiten your teeth. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Make an appointment for your baby to see a dentist when you see a first tooth or by age 1 year. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Students will visit the dentist regularly and place a high value on their teeth. (teach-nology.com)
  • Once again, remind them to brush and floss their teeth daily, and to visit their dentist regularly. (teach-nology.com)
  • Brush your teeth at least twice daily and see your dentist at least every six months. (rediff.com)
  • In the face of the mass extractions, dentist and dental x‑ray innovator C. Edmund Kells stood up for tooth preservation. (saturdayeveningpost.com)
  • Your baby's teeth will start to come in between ages 6 to 14 months. (medlineplus.gov)
  • All the germs in the baby's body come from mother. (ihealthtube.com)
  • In addition, good healing of soft tissues and correct eruption of the teeth #42, #43 and #44 were observed. (bvsalud.org)
  • These tissues continue to differentiate until a complete tooth is formed," says Rosowski, describing the process of tooth development. (bionity.com)
  • The cons include altered taste, tooth staining, drying of oral tissues in the mouth, burning sensation, and ulcers. (knowyourteeth.com)
  • Using cluster sampling techniques of form, function or position of the variations in the prevalence of dental 500 children (aged 4-6 years) were teeth, bones and tissues of the jaw and and soft tissue anomalies. (who.int)
  • The mouth is home to millions of germs. (cdc.gov)
  • The first step in the development of teeth consists in a downward growth from the Rete Malpighi or the deeper layer of stratified epithelium of the mucous membrane of the mouth, which first becomes thickened in the neighborhood of the maxillae now in the course of formation. (usf.edu)
  • Good oral hygiene can protect you from the germs in your mouth leading to infections. (rediff.com)
  • Germs from infections in your mouth can travel to your heart through your bloodstream and cause the infection. (webmd.com)
  • Then rinse your mouth a couple times and wash your teeth. (mindbodygreen.com)
  • Check out how your teeth and mouth change in every stage of life. (knowyourteeth.com)
  • Close lips and, keeping teeth slightly apart, swish liquid around the mouth. (knowyourteeth.com)
  • And although not all germs are bad, illness can occur when harmful germs enter our bodies through the eyes, nose, and mouth. (cdc.gov)
  • If we lose our adult teeth, we need implants or dentures to be able to bite effectively. (bionity.com)
  • Dental students learned the mechanics of drilling and filling teeth and constructing dentures. (saturdayeveningpost.com)
  • The information determining which kind of tooth is required - incisor or molar - is provided by the surrounding jaw tissue. (bionity.com)
  • Some can make your water taste better, while others can filter out harmful chemicals or germs. (cdc.gov)
  • Other substances that might be in water can be harmful, such as lead and the germ Cryptosporidium . (cdc.gov)
  • It helps fight bad breath germs to leave your breath feeling fresh up to 7x longer. (ralphs.com)
  • Tooth brushing in group settings should always be supervised to ensure that toothbrushes are not shared and that they are handled properly. (cdc.gov)
  • Therefore, officials in charge of tooth brushing programs in these settings should evaluate their programs carefully. (cdc.gov)
  • Students will know the importance of brushing and flossing their teeth and they will know why they need to brush and floss. (teach-nology.com)
  • 5. Basic care of teeth includes brushing your teeth daily, at least twice a day, and after meals if possible. (teach-nology.com)
  • Brushing our teeth two to three times a day is feels so natural, it's habitual. (mindbodygreen.com)
  • Believe it or not, our bodies needs brushing too, just like our hair and teeth! (mindbodygreen.com)
  • Your twice-daily brushing and flossing routine could someday be automated using tiny microrobots that scrub your teeth for a customized clean, thanks to new research from the University of Pennsylvania. (medscape.com)
  • When these microorganisms come in contact with the surface of the teeth, they initiate a chemical reaction. (petside.com)
  • They attach themselves to the surface of the dog's teeth. (petside.com)
  • As the dog chews on the crunchy texture of kibbles, they rub against the surface of the teeth. (petside.com)
  • An accumulation of germs on a tooth can cause the surface to erode. (thisisguernsey.com)
  • Teach children to brush their tongue to keep breath fresh and remove germs. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Your teeth need lots of care and attention to ensure life-long good oral health. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Knowledge of chronological development of deciduous and permanent teeth makes it possible to determine the approximate time at which the developmental disturbance occurred. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the interim, he had taken up the habit of drinking scalding coffee, which he realized cleansed his anterior teeth but did not affect his molars. (cdc.gov)
  • More often than not they use their molars which are the back teeth. (petside.com)
  • That's why it is critical to wash hands at key times , such as after a flood or during a flu pandemic , when germs can be passed from person to person and make others sick. (cdc.gov)
  • It may be generalized across the dentition or localized to a few teeth. (wikipedia.org)
  • The third (posterior baleen hypothesis) suggests that functional baleen evolved posterior to vestigial adult teeth retained at the distal tip of the rostrum and dentaries, with the dentition and baleen aligned in the rostrum ( Boessenecker and Fordyce, 2015a , b ). (frontiersin.org)
  • We suggest that the origin of baleen is decoupled from the loss of teeth, with a separate morphological and genetic basis. (frontiersin.org)
  • We elaborate on this idea to raise this latter possibility to suggest that a transitional step in stem mysticetes included taxa bearing neither teeth nor baleen (Figure 1 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • I understand that the risk to him is minimal, but I am concerned about health risks of transferring germs to humans, my small children in particular. (bigpawsonly.com)
  • As it happens, I'm working on a book right now, tentatively titled So Very Small * about the origins of germ theory and the perplexing difficulty humans have had in fully coming to grips with the discovery that we share the world with a whole universe of creatures that seem, but are not, so very distant from our daily experience. (balloon-juice.com)
  • In all cases, cervical loops form when is relatively high and is relatively low, but only in hypotheses II and III these are oriented downwards as in tooth development. (thekingsfoundation.org)
  • MicroRNAs play a critical role in tooth development. (harvard.edu)
  • If you were to implant this embryonic tooth germ into a patient, the idea goes, it would begin to communicate with the surrounding tissue, thus releasing the entire cascade of messengers and initiating the process of tooth development. (bionity.com)
  • This means kibbles will not scrape against the surfaces of their front and side teeth. (petside.com)
  • Scientists used magnetic fields to assemble nanoparticles into tiny, brush-like robotic structures that precisely remove biofilms, a network of germs and other sticky substances, from the surfaces of teeth. (medscape.com)
  • Mole notes, entirely correctly, that doubters of germ theory were present from very early in its modern history-the period in the 1860s, 70s, and 80s when Pasteur and Koch and others established that microbes do indeed cause human (and animal) diseases, and that t his knowledge could be used to erect defenses against such scourges. (balloon-juice.com)
  • Aching teeth and inflamed tonsils were teeming with newly discovered germs. (saturdayeveningpost.com)
  • Early published studies have compared positron emission tomography (PET) to CT for the evaluation of patients with newly diagnosed disease or residual germ cell neoplasms after chemotherapy and have suggested that PET may be more sensitive than CT, disease smaller than 0.5 cm was not detected. (medscape.com)
  • The gel base helps form more foam, thus enabling you to clean your teeth without any hassle. (cdacmohali.in)
  • A relatively high mesenchymal proliferation is necessary for the proper formation of the tooth crown. (thekingsfoundation.org)
  • A, Tooth germ morphologies are shown with different combinations of mesenchymal homotypic adhesion and suprabasal homotypic adhesion values, while the other adhesion parameters are set to 1 1.0. (thekingsfoundation.org)
  • Under natural conditions, hair, teeth, and even nails grow as a result of what is termed mesenchymal condensation. (bionity.com)
  • Karlsen, 1962 ) reflects this ancestry, but the developmental mechanisms responsible for tooth loss in utero remain obscure. (frontiersin.org)
  • Printable Lesson Plan On How to have Healthy Teeth! (teach-nology.com)
  • How to have Healthy Teeth! (teach-nology.com)
  • Given all of the information about healthy teeth, students will take detailed notes during the lecture and prepare for a quiz following the lecture. (teach-nology.com)
  • Mostly everyone knows what to do in order to have healthy teeth, however not everyone does it. (teach-nology.com)
  • Today, I am going to explain how each of you can have healthy teeth! (teach-nology.com)
  • Most people lose their teeth because of gum disease and that's a chronic disease that you get when you are child and by the time you get to be 30, 40, 50 years old, your teeth get lose and start to falling out or being extracted. (ihealthtube.com)
  • Cowboys might have castrated lambs with their teeth back in the Old West days, but this is not a good idea now, says the Centers for Disease Control, in case you were wondering. (hcn.org)
  • As well as being messy, bloody and unpleasant for all concerned, especially the animal, using your teeth to bite off animal testicles can lead to campylobacteriosis, a disease that causes diarrhea, cramps, fever, nausea and vomiting. (hcn.org)
  • If you are not convinced by the group's ideas and point to medical experts who say wild things like " viruses can make you sick " and " protein is necessary for a healthy diet ," you are embarrassingly mistaken…"The germ theory is nothing but a massive profit driver for the disease industry," germ theory denialist Nora Lenz said in a video hosted on the site . (balloon-juice.com)
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is one of the most common inherited nerve disorders. (hnf-cure.org)
  • The word disease may sound a bit scary, but we all know too well that things can go wrong with teeth. (howstuffworks.com)
  • It is faster, germ transmission during health care. (who.int)