Tooth DiseasesTooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Tooth Loss: The failure to retain teeth as a result of disease or injury.Tooth Germ: The collective tissues from which an entire tooth is formed, including the DENTAL SAC; ENAMEL ORGAN; and DENTAL PAPILLA. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth, Deciduous: The teeth of the first dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.Tooth Crown: The upper part of the tooth, which joins the lower part of the tooth (TOOTH ROOT) at the cervix (TOOTH CERVIX) at a line called the cementoenamel junction. The entire surface of the crown is covered with enamel which is thicker at the extremity and becomes progressively thinner toward the cervix. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p216)Tooth Root: The part of a tooth from the neck to the apex, embedded in the alveolar process and covered with cementum. A root may be single or divided into several branches, usually identified by their relative position, e.g., lingual root or buccal root. Single-rooted teeth include mandibular first and second premolars and the maxillary second premolar teeth. The maxillary first premolar has two roots in most cases. Maxillary molars have three roots. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p690)Tooth Eruption: The emergence of a tooth from within its follicle in the ALVEOLAR PROCESS of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE into the ORAL CAVITY. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Tooth, Supernumerary: An extra tooth, erupted or unerupted, resembling or unlike the other teeth in the group to which it belongs. Its presence may cause malposition of adjacent teeth or prevent their eruption.Tooth Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the teeth.Tooth Wear: Loss of the tooth substance by chemical or mechanical processesTooth Extraction: The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Tooth, Nonvital: A tooth from which the dental pulp has been removed or is necrotic. (Boucher, Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Molar: The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)Tooth, Impacted: A tooth that is prevented from erupting by a physical barrier, usually other teeth. Impaction may also result from orientation of the tooth in an other than vertical position in the periodontal structures.Tooth Discoloration: Any change in the hue, color, or translucency of a tooth due to any cause. Restorative filling materials, drugs (both topical and systemic), pulpal necrosis, or hemorrhage may be responsible. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p253)Tooth, Unerupted: A normal developing tooth which has not yet perforated the oral mucosa or one that fails to erupt in the normal sequence or time interval expected for the type of tooth in a given gender, age, or population group.Incisor: Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)Odontogenesis: The process of TOOTH formation. It is divided into several stages including: the dental lamina stage, the bud stage, the cap stage, and the bell stage. Odontogenesis includes the production of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS), dentin (DENTINOGENESIS), and dental cementum (CEMENTOGENESIS).Tooth Cervix: The constricted part of the tooth at the junction of the crown and root or roots. It is often referred to as the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), the line at which the cementum covering the root of a tooth and the enamel of the tooth meet. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p530, p433)Dental Enamel: A hard thin translucent layer of calcified substance which envelops and protects the dentin of the crown of the tooth. It is the hardest substance in the body and is almost entirely composed of calcium salts. Under the microscope, it is composed of thin rods (enamel prisms) held together by cementing substance, and surrounded by an enamel sheath. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)Tooth Exfoliation: Physiologic loss of the primary dentition. (Zwemer, Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Tooth Avulsion: Partial or complete displacement of a tooth from its alveolar support. It is commonly the result of trauma. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p312)Fused Teeth: Two teeth united during development by the union of their tooth germs; the teeth may be joined by the enamel of their crowns, by their root dentin, or by both.Cuspid: The third tooth to the left and to the right of the midline of either jaw, situated between the second INCISOR and the premolar teeth (BICUSPID). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p817)Tooth Calcification: The process whereby calcium salts are deposited in the dental enamel. The process is normal in the development of bones and teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p43)Bicuspid: One of the eight permanent teeth, two on either side in each jaw, between the canines (CUSPID) and the molars (MOLAR), serving for grinding and crushing food. The upper have two cusps (bicuspid) but the lower have one to three. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p822)Tooth Ankylosis: Solid fixation of a tooth resulting from fusion of the cementum and alveolar bone, with obliteration of the periodontal ligament. It is uncommon in the deciduous dentition and very rare in permanent teeth. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dental Pulp: A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth Erosion: Progressive loss of the hard substance of a tooth by chemical processes that do not involve bacterial action. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p296)Tooth Socket: A hollow part of the alveolar process of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE where each tooth fits and is attached via the periodontal ligament.Tooth Replantation: Reinsertion of a tooth into the alveolus from which it was removed or otherwise lost.Maxilla: One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.Dentin: The hard portion of the tooth surrounding the pulp, covered by enamel on the crown and cementum on the root, which is harder and denser than bone but softer than enamel, and is thus readily abraded when left unprotected. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth Resorption: Resorption of calcified dental tissue, involving demineralization due to reversal of the cation exchange and lacunar resorption by osteoclasts. There are two types: external (as a result of tooth pathology) and internal (apparently initiated by a peculiar inflammatory hyperplasia of the pulp). (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p676)Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Dentition: The teeth collectively in the dental arch. Dentition ordinarily refers to the natural teeth in position in their alveoli. Dentition referring to the deciduous teeth is DENTITION, PRIMARY; to the permanent teeth, DENTITION, PERMANENT. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Root Canal Therapy: A treatment modality in endodontics concerned with the therapy of diseases of the dental pulp. For preparatory procedures, ROOT CANAL PREPARATION is available.Odontometry: Measurement of tooth characteristics.Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Tooth Demineralization: A tooth's loss of minerals, such as calcium in hydroxyapatite from the tooth matrix, caused by acidic exposure. An example of the occurrence of demineralization is in the formation of dental caries.Dentition, Permanent: The 32 teeth of adulthood that either replace or are added to the complement of deciduous teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Dental Restoration, Permanent: A restoration designed to remain in service for not less than 20 to 30 years, usually made of gold casting, cohesive gold, or amalgam. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Anodontia: Congenital absence of the teeth; it may involve all (total anodontia) or only some of the teeth (partial anodontia, hypodontia), and both the deciduous and the permanent dentition, or only teeth of the permanent dentition. (Dorland, 27th ed)Tooth Preparation, Prosthodontic: The selected form given to a natural tooth when it is reduced by instrumentation to receive a prosthesis (e.g., artificial crown or a retainer for a fixed or removable prosthesis). The selection of the form is guided by clinical circumstances and physical properties of the materials that make up the prosthesis. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239)Periodontal Ligament: The fibrous CONNECTIVE TISSUE surrounding the TOOTH ROOT, separating it from and attaching it to the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS).Alveolar Process: The thickest and spongiest part of the maxilla and mandible hollowed out into deep cavities for the teeth.Age Determination by Teeth: A means of identifying the age of an animal or human through tooth examination.Neuromuscular Diseases: A general term encompassing lower MOTOR NEURON DISEASE; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; and certain MUSCULAR DISEASES. Manifestations include MUSCLE WEAKNESS; FASCICULATION; muscle ATROPHY; SPASM; MYOKYMIA; MUSCLE HYPERTONIA, myalgias, and MUSCLE HYPOTONIA.Arthropathy, Neurogenic: Chronic progressive degeneration of the stress-bearing portion of a joint, with bizarre hypertrophic changes at the periphery. It is probably a complication of a variety of neurologic disorders, particularly TABES DORSALIS, involving loss of sensation, which leads to relaxation of supporting structures and chronic instability of the joint. (Dorland, 27th ed)Hypotrichosis: Presence of less than the normal amount of hair. (Dorland, 27th ed)Anaplasma marginale: A species of gram-negative bacteria and causative agent of severe bovine ANAPLASMOSIS. It is the most pathogenic of the ANAPLASMA species.Anaplasmosis: A disease of cattle caused by parasitization of the red blood cells by bacteria of the genus ANAPLASMA.

Strategies to improve the quality of oral health care for frail and dependent older people. (1/199)

The dental profile of the population of most industrialised countries is changing. For the first time in at least a century most elderly people in the United Kingdom will soon have some of their own natural teeth. This could be beneficial for the frail and dependent elderly, as natural teeth are associated with greater dietary freedom of choice and good nutrition. There may also be problems including high levels of dental disease associated with poor hygiene and diet. New data from a national oral health survey in Great Britain is presented. The few dentate elderly people in institutions at the moment have poor hygiene and high levels of dental decay. If these problems persist as dentate younger generations get older, the burden of care will be substantial. Many dental problems in elderly people are preventable or would benefit from early intervention. Strategies to approach these problems are presented.  (+info)

An exploration of oral health beliefs and attitudes of Chinese in West Yorkshire: a qualitative investigation. (2/199)

This qualitative study explores oral health beliefs and attitudes among Chinese resident in West Yorkshire using six focus groups differentiated by age and gender. Focus group discussions took place in community settings led by trained Chinese facilitators. All groups believed that they were susceptible to dental disease, and that bleeding gums and total tooth loss were 'normal'; apart from the elderly, tooth loss was seen as undesirable. The elderly and adult groups believed in traditional remedies and claimed that preventive oral health measures were ineffective. These groups lacked faith in dentists, and for them cost, language difficulties and lack of awareness were the main reported barriers to accessing dental services. Traditional Chinese oral health beliefs remain influential for the elderly and adult UK Chinese. In contrast, teenagers thought that toothbrushing and sugar restriction would help to prevent dental diseases. The appropriateness of the focus group and interview methods for exploring oral health beliefs for the Chinese are discussed, as are implications of the reported intergenerational differences for oral health promotion strategy in the UK.  (+info)

High-altitude illness induced by tooth root infection. (3/199)

High-altitude illness may occur after recent pulmonary infection, but high-altitude illness after root canal therapy has not been described previously. A 44-year-old man is presented who skied to a 3333 m high peak in the Eastern Alps one day after he had undergone root canal therapy because of a tooth root infection. After 4 hours above 3000 m severe symptoms of high-altitude illness, including pulmonary oedema, developed. His condition improved after immediate descent. The next day he presented with local and general signs of infection which were successfully treated with gingival incisions and antibiotics. In conclusion, acute tooth root infection and root canal therapy may induce high-altitude illness at an altitude just above 3000 m.  (+info)

Possibilities of preventing osteoradionecrosis during complex therapy of tumors of the oral cavity. (4/199)

In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of tumors of the head and neck. Their successful treatment is one of the greatest challenges for physicians dealing with oncotherapy. An organic part of the complex therapy is preoperative or postoperative irradiation. Application of this is accompanied by a lower risk of recurrences, and by a higher proportion of cured patients. Unfortunately, irradiation also has a disadvantage: the development of osteoradionecrosis, a special form of osteomyelitis, in some patients (mainly in those cases where irradiation occurs after bone resection or after partial removal of the periosteum). Once the clinical picture of this irradiation complication has developed, its treatment is very difficult. A significant result or complete freedom from complaints can be attained only rarely. Attention must therefore be focussed primarily on prevention, and the oral surgeon, the oncoradiologist and the patient too can all do much to help prevent the occurrence of osteoradionecrosis. Through coupling of an up-to-date, functional surgical attitude with knowledge relating to modern radiology and radiation physics, the way may be opened to forestall this complication that is so difficult to cure.  (+info)

Oral health of patients scheduled for elective abdominal aortic correction with prosthesis. (5/199)

OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the frequency of potential oral foci of infection in patients scheduled for elective abdominal aortic surgery. DESIGN: prospective clinical study. MATERIALS: oral health and dentures of 50 patients (33 males and 17 females, mean age 65 years) were examined before aortic surgery. CHIEF OUTCOME MEASURES: radiographic and clinical examination with special emphasis on identifying acute and chronic oral and ontogenic conditions which may contribute to aortic prosthesis infection. RESULTS: eighty-two per cent of the patients had some oral infection foci. The mean number of remaining teeth in the cohort was 9.3, and 21% of these were potential infectious foci (62% in the patients). Twenty-six per cent of the patients suffered from oral Candida infection. Seventy-four per cent of the patients had total or partial dentures, 45% of which were ill-fitting and needed repair. CONCLUSIONS: oral infectious foci occur frequently in patients needing aortic surgery. Untreated foci may contribute to aortic prosthesis infection. Preoperative oral evaluation and elimination of intraoral infection is recommended for patients scheduled for abdominal aortic repair.  (+info)

Heavy metal poisoning in glass worker characterised by severe. (6/199)

The paper presents the clinical description of the masticatory organ and biochemical assessment of dental tissue in a patient employed in a glassworks for 20 years. During 12 years the patient has suffered baldness ("Alopecia areata") and atypical extensive and non-healing cutaneous lesions. Dental examination revealed changes typical of chronic poisoning by cadmium and bismuth compounds.  (+info)

Persistence of deciduous molars in subjects with agenesis of the second premolars. (7/199)

The purpose of the present study was to investigate persistent primary second molars in a group of young people in their late twenties with agenesis of one or two second premolars. In 1982-83 it was decided, in connection with the orthodontic evaluation of 25 patients, to allow 35 primary molars (one or two in each patient) to remain in situ. All patients had mixed dentitions and agenesis of one or two premolars. The primary teeth were generally in good condition, although root resorption and infra-occlusion (compensated by occlusal composite onlays) occurred. In 1997, 18 of the 25 patients with a total of 26 retained primary molars were reexamined, comprising a clinical examination for exfoliation, extraction, loosening, and ankylosis, and a radiographic examination for root resorption, tooth morphology (crown and root), and alveolar bone contour. The examination showed that the degree of root resorption was unaltered in 20 of the 26 primary molars. In the permanent dentitions, where these primary molars persisted, there were no morphological deviations. Three of the six remaining primary molars had been extracted and three showed extensive resorption. In three of the 26 primary molars the infra-occlusion had worsened. The present study shows that persistence of primary second molars in subjects with agenesis of one or two premolars, and normal morphology of the permanent dentition can be an acceptable, semi-permanent solution for the patient. Whether this could also be an acceptable long-term solution will be shown by follow-up studies.  (+info)

Understanding the dental need and care during pregnancy: a review. (8/199)

This paper reviews the oral and dental lesions that are seen during pregnancy. Trimester approach should be adopted in the management of the pregnant patients. A good dental preventive programme is essential. The significance of prescribing fluoride supplements and the use of dental radiography during pregnancy is also briefly reviewed.  (+info)

  • With the progression of the disease, they may not be restricted to the lower areas and even affect the upper regions such as the thighs, arms and hands. (primehealthchannel.com)
  • In many cases, a lot of these problems can be avoided-brushing teeth, buying chew toys and taking your pup for regular check-ups can make a big difference to their dental health. (bowwowinsurance.com.au)
  • In this article we'll give you more info about the dental problems you're likely to encounter, the signs and symptoms and what they mean, and we'll share the best ways to avoid any tooth or gum trouble in the future. (bowwowinsurance.com.au)
  • Sometimes, however, a chipped tooth is not always visible to the naked eye, so look out for symptoms such as pain when biting or even chewing. (floridaindependent.com)
  • Expression of the gene does occur in women to a lesser extent, leading to disease of variable severity. (faqs.org)
  • In 266 patients with CMT1A, a cluster of eight cutaneous transcripts differentiates disease severity with a sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 76.1%, respectively. (nih.gov)
  • The clinical presentation of periodontal disease can vary widely depending on the severity of inflammation and extent of plaque and calculus accumulation on individual affected teeth. (petwave.com)
  • It can also increase your risk of a stroke or heart attack, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (healthline.com)
  • She wanted to see if calcifications seen on X-rays over a period of 13 years are associated with the onset of stroke and/or cardiovascular diseases. (dentistry.co.uk)
  • Methods- We enrolled 711 subjects with a mean age of 66±9 years and no history of stroke or myocardial infarction in the Oral Infections and Vascular Disease Epidemiology Study. (ahajournals.org)
  • Blyton F, Ryan MM, Ouvrier RA, Burns J. Muscle cramp in pediatric Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A: prevalence and predictors. (medscape.com)
  • Both endogenous (intrinsic) acid and exogenous (extrinsic) sources of acids are responsible for the increasing incidence and high prevalence of tooth erosion and associated tooth sensitivity observed in many countries, in both children and adults [ 1 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • A recent systematic review found a median prevalence of 24% for tooth erosion in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and a median prevalence of 32.5% for GERD in adult patients who had tooth erosion [ 7 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Estimates of prevalence vary between races and geographic regions, with a marked increase in the occurrence of periodontal disease with advancing age. (nih.gov)
  • However, despite this prevalence, approximately only three percent seek treatment for their gum disease. (perio.org)
  • According to Samuel Low, DDS, MS, Associate Dean and professor of periodontology at the University of Florida College of Dentistry, and President of the American Academy of Periodontology, the discrepancy between the prevalence of gum disease and the lack of treatment can likely be blamed on a lack of understanding of the effect periodontal disease can have on overall health. (perio.org)
  • Early- and late-onset forms occur with 'on and off' painful spasmodic muscular contractions that can be disabling when the disease activates. (wikipedia.org)
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease usually becomes apparent in adolescence or early adulthood, but onset may occur anytime from early childhood through late adulthood. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Early onset of the disease can be associated with a rapidly progressive course, ultimately leading to loss of ambulation, quadriplegia, respiratory compromise and premature death. (businesswire.com)
  • Notably, initiation of ASO treatment after disease onset restored myelination, MNCV, and CMAP almost to levels seen in WT animals. (jci.org)
  • 5 Service of Neurology, University Hospital 'Marqués de Valdecilla (IDIVAL)', University of Cantabria, and 'Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED)', Santander, Spain. (nih.gov)
  • Primary care providers can educate their patients with chronic diseases about their increased risk for tooth loss, and screen and refer then for dental care. (cdc.gov)
  • Besides their negative impact on oral function and dietary habits, these conditions are also thought to be related to chronic diseases of ageing," LaMonte added, in the paper published in the Journal of the American Heart Association. (hindustantimes.com)
  • Arora, the Edith J. Baerwald Professor of Environmental Medicine and Public Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, has found that abnormalities in teeth correspond to conditions such as autism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, cancer, and Lou Gehrig's disease or ALS. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The teeth loosen, chronic bad breath ensues and the teeth may fall out or require extraction by a dentist, according to the University of Michigan Health System. (livestrong.com)
  • Taking good care of one's teeth is one of the smartest investments a person can make in their health, helping to ensure that the teeth will remain strong, healthy, and white for a lifetime. (faqs.org)
  • Kidney disease impacts your oral health as well. (colgate.com)
  • In order to help distinguish between fact and fallacy regarding periodontal disease, the AAP has identified and addressed below some common misconceptions about oral health. (perio.org)
  • Our analysis of iron deposits in teeth as a method for retrospective determination of exposure is just one application: we believe teeth have the potential to help track the impact of pollution on health globally," Arora said. (medindia.net)
  • John H. Weisburger, senior member of the American Health Foundation, a private biomedical research center in Valhalla, N.Y., says tea also contains fluoride, which may protect against dental disease. (baltimoresun.com)
  • You want to stop gum disease and save and protect your dental health! (gingivitiskiller.com)
  • 1,2 The relationship between oral health, specifically periodontal disease, and CVD has been a subject of mounting research in recent years 3-10 and is both biologically plausible and supported by data on transient bacteremia and elevated inflammatory markers. (ahajournals.org)
  • Based on nerve conduction velocities, the disease can be divided into demyelinating CMT (CMT1), axonal CMT (CMT2) and intermediate CMT. (genome.jp)
  • Cats can also suffer from oral odontoclastic resorptive lesions - called FORL - which is a relatively new but relatively common feline syndrome of unknown origin that involves reabsporption of the cat's teeth. (petwave.com)
  • Therefore, as a responsible pet owner, it is your responsibility to make sure that your cat's teeth remain healthy. (pethealthandcare.com)
  • You should check your cat's teeth regularly to make sure that they are clean and healthy. (pethealthandcare.com)