Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Mummies: Bodies preserved either by the ancient Egyptian technique or due to chance under favorable climatic conditions.Burial: The act or ceremony of putting a corpse into the ground or a vault, or into the sea; or the inurnment of CREMAINS.Mortuary Practice: Activities associated with the disposition of the dead. It excludes cultural practices such as funeral rites.PaintingsArchaeology: The scientific study of past societies through artifacts, fossils, etc.History, Ancient: The period of history before 500 of the common era.Forensic Anthropology: Scientific study of human skeletal remains with the express purpose of identification. This includes establishing individual identity, trauma analysis, facial reconstruction, photographic superimposition, determination of time interval since death, and crime-scene recovery. Forensic anthropologists do not certify cause of death but provide data to assist in determination of probable cause. This is a branch of the field of physical anthropology and qualified individuals are certified by the American Board of Forensic Anthropology. (From Am J Forensic Med Pathol 1992 Jun;13(2):146)Endospore-Forming Bacteria: A group of rods or cocci whose taxonomic affinities are uncertain. They form endospores, thick-walled bodies formed within the vegetative cells of certain bacteria, able to withstand adverse environmental conditions for prolonged periods.Dissection: The separation and isolation of tissues for surgical purposes, or for the analysis or study of their structures.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Embalming: Process of preserving a dead body to protect it from decay.Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.Ligaments, Articular: Fibrous cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE that attach bones to each other and hold together the many types of joints in the body. Articular ligaments are strong, elastic, and allow movement in only specific directions, depending on the individual joint.Tendons: Fibrous bands or cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE at the ends of SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS that serve to attach the MUSCLES to bones and other structures.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Models, Anatomic: Three-dimensional representation to show anatomic structures. Models may be used in place of intact animals or organisms for teaching, practice, and study.Maxillary Artery: A branch of the external carotid artery which distributes to the deep structures of the face (internal maxillary) and to the side of the face and nose (external maxillary).Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Ulnar Artery: The larger of the two terminal branches of the brachial artery, beginning about one centimeter distal to the bend of the elbow. Like the RADIAL ARTERY, its branches may be divided into three groups corresponding to their locations in the forearm, wrist, and hand.Ligaments: Shiny, flexible bands of fibrous tissue connecting together articular extremities of bones. They are pliant, tough, and inextensile.Tissue Donors: Individuals supplying living tissue, organs, cells, blood or blood components for transfer or transplantation to histocompatible recipients.Thyroid Cartilage: The largest cartilage of the larynx consisting of two laminae fusing anteriorly at an acute angle in the midline of the neck. The point of fusion forms a subcutaneous projection known as the Adam's apple.Wrist Joint: The joint that is formed by the distal end of the RADIUS, the articular disc of the distal radioulnar joint, and the proximal row of CARPAL BONES; (SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; triquetral bone).Musculocutaneous Nerve: A major nerve of the upper extremity. The fibers of the musculocutaneous nerve originate in the lower cervical spinal cord (usually C5 to C7), travel via the lateral cord of the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to the upper arm, elbow, and forearm.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Surgery, Computer-Assisted: Surgical procedures conducted with the aid of computers. This is most frequently used in orthopedic and laparoscopic surgery for implant placement and instrument guidance. Image-guided surgery interactively combines prior CT scans or MRI images with real-time video.Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.Graft Survival: The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Lunate Bone: A moon-shaped carpal bone which is located between the SCAPHOID BONE and TRIQUETRUM BONE.Temporal Bone: Either of a pair of compound bones forming the lateral (left and right) surfaces and base of the skull which contains the organs of hearing. It is a large bone formed by the fusion of parts: the squamous (the flattened anterior-superior part), the tympanic (the curved anterior-inferior part), the mastoid (the irregular posterior portion), and the petrous (the part at the base of the skull).Bone Screws: Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.Joint Capsule: The sac enclosing a joint. It is composed of an outer fibrous articular capsule and an inner SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE.Collateral Ligaments: A number of ligaments on either side of, and serving as a radius of movement of, a joint having a hingelike movement. They occur at the elbow, knee, wrist, metacarpo- and metatarsophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal, and distal interphalangeal joints of the hands and feet. (Stedman, 25th ed)Anatomic Variation: Peculiarities associated with the internal structure, form, topology, or architecture of organisms that distinguishes them from others of the same species or group.Cricoid Cartilage: The small thick cartilage that forms the lower and posterior parts of the laryngeal wall.Neck Muscles: The neck muscles consist of the platysma, splenius cervicis, sternocleidomastoid(eus), longus colli, the anterior, medius, and posterior scalenes, digastric(us), stylohyoid(eus), mylohyoid(eus), geniohyoid(eus), sternohyoid(eus), omohyoid(eus), sternothyroid(eus), and thyrohyoid(eus).Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Connective Tissue: Tissue that supports and binds other tissues. It consists of CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS embedded in a large amount of EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX.Tissue and Organ Procurement: The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.SculptureEncyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Prince Edward Island: An island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence constituting a province of Canada in the eastern part of the country. It is very irregular in shape with many deep inlets. Its capital is Charlottetown. Discovered by the French in 1534 and originally named Ile Saint-Jean, it was renamed in 1799 in honor of Prince Edward, fourth son of George III and future father of Queen Victoria. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p981 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p433)Climatic Processes: Characteristic events occurring in the ATMOSPHERE during the interactions and transformation of various atmospheric components and conditions.New Zealand: A group of islands in the southwest Pacific. Its capital is Wellington. It was discovered by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642 and circumnavigated by Cook in 1769. Colonized in 1840 by the New Zealand Company, it became a British crown colony in 1840 until 1907 when colonial status was terminated. New Zealand is a partly anglicized form of the original Dutch name Nieuw Zeeland, new sea land, possibly with reference to the Dutch province of Zeeland. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p842 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p378)History, 16th Century: Time period from 1501 through 1600 of the common era.Clergy: Persons ordained for religious duties, who serve as leaders and perform religious services.Taste: The ability to detect chemicals through gustatory receptors in the mouth, including those on the TONGUE; the PALATE; the PHARYNX; and the EPIGLOTTIS.Genu Varum: An outward slant of the thigh in which the knees are wide apart and the ankles close together. Genu varum can develop due to skeletal and joint dysplasia (e.g., OSTEOARTHRITIS; Blount's disease); and malnutrition (e.g., RICKETS; FLUORIDE POISONING).Firesetting Behavior: A compulsion to set fires.Holidays: Days commemorating events. Holidays also include vacation periods.Tooth, Nonvital: A tooth from which the dental pulp has been removed or is necrotic. (Boucher, Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Post and Core Technique: Use of a metal casting, usually with a post in the pulp or root canal, designed to support and retain an artificial crown.Tooth Preparation, Prosthodontic: The selected form given to a natural tooth when it is reduced by instrumentation to receive a prosthesis (e.g., artificial crown or a retainer for a fixed or removable prosthesis). The selection of the form is guided by clinical circumstances and physical properties of the materials that make up the prosthesis. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239)Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.
  • The planned impeachment trial of Donald Trump after he leaves office would be our own version of the Cadaver Synod . (jonathanturley.org)
  • While some may be looking longingly at the Potomac for their own Cadaver Synod, Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other Democrats have stated that their primary interest is in the possible disqualification of Trump from holding future federal office. (jonathanturley.org)
  • This did happen before but that precedent is only slightly better than the Cadaver Synod. (jonathanturley.org)
  • Quite possibly one of the most morbid of these stories from the early Church is the Cadaver Synod. (ucatholic.com)
  • The Cadaver Synod, known in Latin as the Synodus Horrenda , was the posthumous ecclesiastical trial of Pope Formosus. (ucatholic.com)
  • After the Cadaver Synod, public opinion turned against Pope Stephen VI. (ucatholic.com)
  • Following his death, Pope Theodore II and John IX convened their own synods to null the Cadaver Synod and restore Formosus' name. (ucatholic.com)
  • However, Pope Sergius III who served as a judge in the Cadaver Synod, overturned their rulings to reaffirm the conviction of Formosus and had an epitaph inscribed on Pope Stephen VI's tomb to restore his name. (ucatholic.com)
  • With the help of handlers and fully trained cadaver dogs, human remains can be found following clandestine burials, natural disasters or missing persons searches. (jenjdanna.com)
  • I also shed new light on less common and less investigated gestes funéraires, including plural tombs, secondary burials, and funerary body manipulations resulting in apparently inexplicable bone arrangements. (dur.ac.uk)
  • Tombs II and III had not been robbed and contained, among other treasures, ceremonial military equipment, bronze utensils, silver tableware, gold wreaths, two gold larnakes (caskets) in Tomb II and a silver funerary urn in Tomb III. (medsci.org)
  • Ancient human remains probably present a different and fainter scent profile t han more recently deceased cadavers, especially as decades turn into centuries and then millenniums. (newsflash.one)
  • Whether the cadaver is on the surface, buried underground or under water, a dog's nose is powerful enough to pick up the scent and trace it back to its source. (genreith.de)
  • All of the dogs used in this project have been "cross-trained", that is trained in both the discipline of finding and indicating on live human scent and also on post-mortem (cadaver) scent. (genreith.de)
  • Three other monuments are those of Cardinal Matteo d'Acquasparta (Matthew of Acquasparta) at the Santa Maria in Aracoeli, the tomb of Bishop Gonsalvi (1298) and that of Cardinal Gonsalvo (1299) (both located at the Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore), all sculpted by Giovanni de Cosma, the youngest of the Cosmati family lineage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Saint Peter's Basilica contains yet another monument, the tomb of Pope Innocent III. (wikipedia.org)
  • Drawings in this gallery offer rare insight into Michelangelo's careful preparations on paper for the New Sacristy, or Medici tombs, at the Basilica of San Lorenzo (1519-34) in Florence, before taking his chisel to the marble block. (clevelandart.org)
  • The flow of mud and water was so powerful that it damaged nearly 1,800 tombs - expelling caskets from their graves and sending some of them tumbling down a hillside. (wlrn.org)
  • The Catacombs is a large network of tombs in pre-Searing Ascalon . (guildwars.com)
  • Help appreciated as the second dub is somewhere in old catacombs' nameless tombs and requires either massive effort (not gonna happen) or luck to be found. (blogspot.com)
  • The iconography is regionally distinct: the depiction of vermin on these cadavers is more commonly found on the European mainland, and especially in the German regions. (wikipedia.org)
  • He may have prepared the tomb for himself, with vermin crawling on his carved skeletal corpse, but never used it. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is usually placed immediately above or close to the actual burial vault or grave , although very occasionally the tomb is constructed within it. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, burial of the corpse/ cadaver/carcass is a great honor to its owner: the human soul who left the human corpse to return to Barsakh from which it came originally, but this time carrying its deeds with it, while leaving the corpse to return to its original state as well: dust. (ahl-alquran.com)
  • By using the burial evidence from Predynastic Egypt as a case study, I also contribute to the advancement of the archaeothanatological method, originally developed in the European temperate environment, by providing new insights into the taphonomy of cadavers decomposing in dry and hot climates. (dur.ac.uk)
  • Yet there are also other varieties, such as cadaver imagery on incised slabs and monumental brasses (including the so-called "shroud brasses"), of which many can still be found in England. (wikipedia.org)
  • All that was left was a bit of dirt, the stone slabs of the tomb and the cracked limestone of the ridge. (newsflash.one)
  • The tomb dates from a period of societal anxiety over death, as plague , war and religious conflicts ravaged Europe. (wikipedia.org)
  • Their brutal moments equal the grotesque design of the band's logo, not leaving anyone clean from the gruesome music, with hints to more to 'Tomb of the Mutilated' from Cannibal Corpse rather many critics' choice 'Hammer Smashed Face' while the lyrics translator reference themes from Deicide or Morbid Angel. (thehorrortimes.com)
  • As a first-year medical student Maya attends anatomy lab to dissect a corpse or in medical jargon cadaver to learn more about human body from a dead person to understand a living one. (booksie.com)
  • But not many people sign up to allow their body to use as a cadaver in the anatomy lab. (booksie.com)
  • The term came to end with Maya scoring highest in Anatomy, thanks to the cadaver. (booksie.com)
  • Cadaver tombs could be double deckers or single - Richard Fleming's is a fine example of the double-decker with the gisant style representation atop the cadaverous one, while the sadly battered and worn cadaver tomb in York Minster, in the west aisle of the north trancept, is an example of the single-decker, with deceased represented only as a decayed corpse. (wordpress.com)
  • Lenin's cadaver was packed in ice to slow the decay, and by June the scientists finally succeeded in "stabilizing" the body. (neatorama.com)
  • Every Monday and Friday, the mausoleum is closed and a senior official of the institute's "body brigade" (most of whom log 20 years or more on the job before they are allowed to touch the corpse) removes Lenin's clothing and examines the cadaver for any signs of wear and tear. (neatorama.com)
  • After dissecting the body for a week, Maya felt that the cadaver was trying to communicate with her. (booksie.com)
  • is it not amazing, gaining knowledge from a body and soul of a cadaver. (booksie.com)
  • I understand from the lab director that in living will you requested that the ashes from cremation of body parts be buried and your tomb stone shall read ' Kept His Life Simple," said Maya looking at the Cadaver's heart placed away from the body, for a moment she thought the cadaver's heart was pulsating, perhaps it was all her imagination. (booksie.com)
  • Always has been, from body snatchers to tomb raiders. (londonist.com)
  • Cadaver dogs can not only locate actual human remains, but also the location in which a corpse or body parts may have previously been stored by tracking down residual scents. (genreith.de)
  • How much times takes a body to express cadavar odour which may be smelled by cadaver dogs? (genreith.de)
  • The Cadaver stone depicts the decomposing body of a young woman with numerous reptiles and creatures feeding off the corpse. (headstonesymbols.co.uk)
  • France also has a long history of cadaver tombs, though not as many examples or varieties survive as in England. (wikipedia.org)
  • The following images from the collections of the Rare Book Room at the New York Academy of Medicine 's Center for the History of Medicine offer a glimpse at some of the loveliest - and strangest - of these dynamic cadavers. (flavorwire.com)
  • 3 Apr 2014 San Diego Natural History Museum adds 'The Discovery of King Tut' exhibition to its roster for 2015.Valley of the Kings: Tombs and Treasures of Egypt's Greatest Pharaohs, The Complete. (lotusyogamontclair.com)
  • Open Tomb hails from New Zealand and plays an excruciatingly slow style of doom. (cadavergarden.com)
  • Superlynx er en trio fra Oslo, som hovedsaklig fokuserer på doom og psykedelia. (heavymetal.no)
  • Cadaver Putrefacto delivers a full of assault in content and style, complete with extreme guttural vocals, phenomenal blistering speed accompanied by sinister chords, while the forth track "Gerontofilia" echoes of doom, yet all of it appealing to old-school fans. (thehorrortimes.com)
  • Most members of their trade die soon by traps, ancient guardians of the tombs or blades of adventurers. (tibia.com)
  • Desperate and alone, they search for the fabled Water City, where secret tombs are rumored to store precious water beneath the city's streets. (blogspot.com)