Contamination of the air by tobacco smoke.
'Smoke' is a complex mixture of gases, fine particles, and volatile compounds, generally produced by combustion of organic substances, which can contain harmful chemicals known to have adverse health effects.
The presence of contaminants or pollutant substances in the air (AIR POLLUTANTS) that interfere with human health or welfare, or produce other harmful environmental effects. The substances may include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; or volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.
A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain NICOTINE and other biologically active chemicals; its dried leaves are used for SMOKING.
Any substance in the air which could, if present in high enough concentration, harm humans, animals, vegetation or material. Substances include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; and volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.
The aggregate business enterprise of agriculture, manufacture, and distribution related to tobacco and tobacco-derived products.
The contamination of indoor air.
The N-glucuronide conjugate of cotinine is a major urinary metabolite of NICOTINE. It thus serves as a biomarker of exposure to tobacco SMOKING. It has CNS stimulating properties.
Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.
Contamination of bodies of water (such as LAKES; RIVERS; SEAS; and GROUNDWATER.)
Powdered or cut pieces of leaves of NICOTIANA TABACUM which are inhaled through the nose, chewed, or stored in cheek pouches. It includes any product of tobacco that is not smoked.
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.
Particles of any solid substance, generally under 30 microns in size, often noted as PM30. There is special concern with PM1 which can get down to PULMONARY ALVEOLI and induce MACROPHAGE ACTIVATION and PHAGOCYTOSIS leading to FOREIGN BODY REACTION and LUNG DISEASES.
Contamination of the air, bodies of water, or land with substances that are harmful to human health and the environment.
Plants or plant parts which are harmful to man or other animals.
Nitrogen oxide (NO2). A highly poisonous gas. Exposure produces inflammation of lungs that may only cause slight pain or pass unnoticed, but resulting edema several days later may cause death. (From Merck, 11th ed) It is a major atmospheric pollutant that is able to absorb UV light that does not reach the earth's surface.
The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.
Tobacco used to the detriment of a person's health or social functioning. Tobacco dependence is included.
A highly toxic, colorless, nonflammable gas. It is used as a pharmaceutical aid and antioxidant. It is also an environmental air pollutant.
Gases, fumes, vapors, and odors escaping from the cylinders of a gasoline or diesel internal-combustion engine. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Substances and products derived from NICOTIANA TABACUM.
Ending the TOBACCO habits of smoking, chewing, or snuff use.
Nicotine is highly toxic alkaloid. It is the prototypical agonist at nicotinic cholinergic receptors where it dramatically stimulates neurons and ultimately blocks synaptic transmission. Nicotine is also important medically because of its presence in tobacco smoke.
Respiratory tract diseases are a broad range of medical conditions that affect the nose, throat, windpipe, and lungs, impairing breathing and oxygen uptake, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pneumonia, bronchitis, influenza, tuberculosis, and sleep apnea.
The type species of TOBAMOVIRUS which causes mosaic disease of tobacco. Transmission occurs by mechanical inoculation.
The unstable triatomic form of oxygen, O3. It is a powerful oxidant that is produced for various chemical and industrial uses. Its production is also catalyzed in the ATMOSPHERE by ULTRAVIOLET RAY irradiation of oxygen or other ozone precursors such as VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS and NITROGEN OXIDES. About 90% of the ozone in the atmosphere exists in the stratosphere (STRATOSPHERIC OZONE).
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents by inhaling them.
Collection, analysis, and interpretation of data about the frequency, distribution, and consequences of disease or health conditions, for use in the planning, implementing, and evaluating public health programs.
Exposure of the female parent, human or animal, to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals that may affect offspring. It includes pre-conception maternal exposure.
Discontinuation of the habit of smoking, the inhaling and exhaling of tobacco smoke.
*My apologies, but "Restaurants" are not a medical term and do not have a medical definition.*
A major group of unsaturated cyclic hydrocarbons containing two or more rings. The vast number of compounds of this important group, derived chiefly from petroleum and coal tar, are rather highly reactive and chemically versatile. The name is due to the strong and not unpleasant odor characteristic of most substances of this nature. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed, p96)
A large or important municipality of a country, usually a major metropolitan center.
Carbon monoxide (CO). A poisonous colorless, odorless, tasteless gas. It combines with hemoglobin to form carboxyhemoglobin, which has no oxygen carrying capacity. The resultant oxygen deprivation causes headache, dizziness, decreased pulse and respiratory rates, unconsciousness, and death. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
The consequences of exposing the FETUS in utero to certain factors, such as NUTRITION PHYSIOLOGICAL PHENOMENA; PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS; DRUGS; RADIATION; and other physical or chemical factors. These consequences are observed later in the offspring after BIRTH.
Relating to the size of solids.
A class of compounds that contain a -NH2 and a -NO radical. Many members of this group have carcinogenic and mutagenic properties.
Use of TOBACCO (Nicotiana tabacum L) and TOBACCO PRODUCTS.
Adverse effect upon bodies of water (LAKES; RIVERS; seas; groundwater etc.) caused by CHEMICAL WATER POLLUTANTS.
The status of health in urban populations.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).
The act or practice of calling public attention to a product, service, need, etc., especially by paid announcements in newspapers, magazines, on radio, or on television. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Living facilities for humans.
Acrolein is an unsaturated aldehyde (C3H4O), highly reactive, toxic and naturally occurring compound that can be found in certain foods, tobacco smoke and is produced as a result of environmental pollution or industrial processes.
A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.
Diseases of the respiratory system in general or unspecified or for a specific respiratory disease not available.
Place or physical location of work or employment.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.
Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.
The art or practice of preparing food. It includes the preparation of special foods for diets in various diseases.
Supplying a building or house, their rooms and corridors, with fresh air. The controlling of the environment thus may be in public or domestic sites and in medical or non-medical locales. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
A product of hard secondary xylem composed of CELLULOSE, hemicellulose, and LIGNANS, that is under the bark of trees and shrubs. It is used in construction and as a source of CHARCOAL and many other products.
The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.
The application of heat to raise the temperature of the environment, ambient or local, or the systems for accomplishing this effect. It is distinguished from HEAT, the physical property and principle of physics.
Agents that mimic neural transmission by stimulation of the nicotinic receptors on postganglionic autonomic neurons. Drugs that indirectly augment ganglionic transmission by increasing the release or slowing the breakdown of acetylcholine or by non-nicotinic effects on postganglionic neurons are not included here nor are the nonspecific cholinergic agonists.
Viscous materials composed of complex, high-molecular-weight compounds derived from the distillation of petroleum or the destructive distillation of wood or coal. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.
Noises, normal and abnormal, heard on auscultation over any part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT.
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.
Experimental devices used in inhalation studies in which a person or animal is either partially or completely immersed in a chemically controlled atmosphere.
A potent mutagen and carcinogen. It is a public health concern because of its possible effects on industrial workers, as an environmental pollutant, an as a component of tobacco smoke.
The products of chemical reactions that result in the addition of extraneous chemical groups to DNA.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
Activity involved in transfer of goods from producer to consumer or in the exchange of services.
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Compounds that accept electrons in an oxidation-reduction reaction. The reaction is induced by or accelerated by exposure to electromagnetic radiation in the spectrum of visible or ultraviolet light.
'Fires' is not a recognized medical term for a symptom, diagnosis, or condition in patients.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.
An area of recreation or hygiene for use by the public.
A process whereby representatives of a particular interest group attempt to influence governmental decision makers to accept the policy desires of the lobbying organization.
The state of the ATMOSPHERE over minutes to months.
Metals with high specific gravity, typically larger than 5. They have complex spectra, form colored salts and double salts, have a low electrode potential, are mainly amphoteric, yield weak bases and weak acids, and are oxidizing or reducing agents (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
A natural fuel formed by partial decomposition of vegetable matter under certain environmental conditions.
Decisions for determining and guiding present and future objectives from among alternatives.
Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Biphenyl compounds substituted in any position by one or more amino groups. Permitted are any substituents except fused rings.
Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
A white patch lesion found on a MUCOUS MEMBRANE that cannot be scraped off. Leukoplakia is generally considered a precancerous condition, however its appearance may also result from a variety of HEREDITARY DISEASES.
Inorganic oxides that contain nitrogen.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "California" is a place, specifically a state on the western coast of the United States, and not a medical term or concept. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.
A mixture of smoke and fog polluting the atmosphere. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.
PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.
AUTOMOBILES, trucks, buses, or similar engine-driven conveyances. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
Governmental levies on property, inheritance, gifts, etc.
Prohibition against tobacco smoking in specific areas to control TOBACCO SMOKE POLLUTION.
Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.
Substances or organisms which pollute the water or bodies of water. Use for water pollutants in general or those for which there is no specific heading.
Carcinogenic substances that are found in the environment.
Studies designed to examine associations, commonly, hypothesized causal relations. They are usually concerned with identifying or measuring the effects of risk factors or exposures. The common types of analytic study are CASE-CONTROL STUDIES; COHORT STUDIES; and CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDIES.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Chemical compounds which pollute the water of rivers, streams, lakes, the sea, reservoirs, or other bodies of water.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
All deaths reported in a given population.
Substances or energies, for example heat or light, which when introduced into the air, water, or land threaten life or health of individuals or ECOSYSTEMS.
A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.
The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.
The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Poland" is not a medical term or concept; it is a country located in Central Europe. If you have any questions about medical topics or definitions, I would be happy to help answer those!
Compounds consisting of two or more fused ring structures.
Any combustible hydrocarbon deposit formed from the remains of prehistoric organisms. Examples are petroleum, coal, and natural gas.
Factors that can cause or prevent the outcome of interest, are not intermediate variables, and are not associated with the factor(s) under investigation. They give rise to situations in which the effects of two processes are not separated, or the contribution of causal factors cannot be separated, or the measure of the effect of exposure or risk is distorted because of its association with other factors influencing the outcome of the study.
Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.
Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
A dark powdery deposit of unburned fuel residues, composed mainly of amorphous CARBON and some HYDROCARBONS, that accumulates in chimneys, automobile mufflers and other surfaces exposed to smoke. It is the product of incomplete combustion of carbon-rich organic fuels in low oxygen conditions. It is sometimes called lampblack or carbon black and is used in INK, in rubber tires, and to prepare CARBON NANOTUBES.
A polysymptomatic condition believed by clinical ecologists to result from immune dysregulation induced by common foods, allergens, and chemicals, resulting in various physical and mental disorders. The medical community has remained largely skeptical of the existence of this "disease", given the plethora of symptoms attributed to environmental illness, the lack of reproducible laboratory abnormalities, and the use of unproven therapies to treat the condition. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
A disease of chronic diffuse irreversible airflow obstruction. Subcategories of COPD include CHRONIC BRONCHITIS and PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA.
Relations of an individual, association, organization, hospital, or corporation with the publics which it must take into consideration in carrying out its functions. Publics may include consumers, patients, pressure groups, departments, etc.
Substances which pollute the soil. Use for soil pollutants in general or for which there is no specific heading.
Acidic water usually pH 2.5 to 4.5, which poisons the ecosystem and adversely affects plants, fishes, and mammals. It is caused by industrial pollutants, mainly sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides, emitted into the atmosphere and returning to earth in the form of acidic rain water.
Large natural streams of FRESH WATER formed by converging tributaries and which empty into a body of water (lake or ocean).
Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.
High temperature destruction of waste by burning with subsequent reduction to ashes or conversion to an inert mass.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
Air pollutants found in the work area. They are usually produced by the specific nature of the occupation.
Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.
Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.
Items used to aid in ending a TOBACCO habit.
Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.
A usually four-wheeled automotive vehicle designed for passenger transportation and commonly propelled by an internal-combustion engine using a volatile fuel. (Webster, 1973)
Created 1 January 1993 as a result of the division of Czechoslovakia into the Czech Republic and Slovakia.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.
Worthless, damaged, defective, superfluous or effluent material from industrial operations.
The motion of air currents.
Measurement of the maximum rate of airflow attained during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination. Common abbreviations are PEFR and PFR.
Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.
A transferase that catalyzes the addition of aliphatic, aromatic, or heterocyclic FREE RADICALS as well as EPOXIDES and arene oxides to GLUTATHIONE. Addition takes place at the SULFUR. It also catalyzes the reduction of polyol nitrate by glutathione to polyol and nitrite.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
An enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of acetyl groups from ACETYL-COA to arylamines. It can also catalyze acetyl transfer between arylamines without COENZYME A and has a wide specificity for aromatic amines, including SEROTONIN. However, arylamine N-acetyltransferase should not be confused with the enzyme ARYLALKYLAMINE N-ACETYLTRANSFERASE which is also referred to as SEROTONIN ACETYLTRANSFERASE.
Form in which product is processed or wrapped and labeled. PRODUCT LABELING is also available.
Drugs that bind to and activate nicotinic cholinergic receptors (RECEPTORS, NICOTINIC). Nicotinic agonists act at postganglionic nicotinic receptors, at neuroeffector junctions in the peripheral nervous system, and at nicotinic receptors in the central nervous system. Agents that function as neuromuscular depolarizing blocking agents are included here because they activate nicotinic receptors, although they are used clinically to block nicotinic transmission.
A liver microsomal cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase capable of biotransforming xenobiotics such as polycyclic hydrocarbons and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons into carcinogenic or mutagenic compounds. They have been found in mammals and fish. This enzyme, encoded by CYP1A1 gene, can be measured by using ethoxyresorufin as a substrate for the ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity.
A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.
A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.
Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.
Carboxyhemoglobin is a form of hemoglobin in which the heme group is chemically bonded to carbon monoxide, reducing its ability to transport oxygen and leading to toxic effects when present in high concentrations.
The clear, viscous fluid secreted by the SALIVARY GLANDS and mucous glands of the mouth. It contains MUCINS, water, organic salts, and ptylin.
Materials or phenomena which can provide energy directly or via conversion.
Elements, compounds, mixtures, or solutions that are considered severely harmful to human health and the environment. They include substances that are toxic, corrosive, flammable, or explosive.
The vapor state of matter; nonelastic fluids in which the molecules are in free movement and their mean positions far apart. Gases tend to expand indefinitely, to diffuse and mix readily with other gases, to have definite relations of volume, temperature, and pressure, and to condense or liquefy at low temperatures or under sufficient pressure. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "India" is not a medical term that can be defined in a medical context. It is a geographical location, referring to the Republic of India, a country in South Asia. If you have any questions related to medical topics or definitions, I would be happy to help with those!
The atmospheric properties, characteristics and other atmospheric phenomena especially pertaining to WEATHER or CLIMATE.
Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.
The tubular and cavernous organs and structures, by means of which pulmonary ventilation and gas exchange between ambient air and the blood are brought about.
Use of written, printed, or graphic materials upon or accompanying a product or its container or wrapper. It includes purpose, effect, description, directions, hazards, warnings, and other relevant information.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.
A disturbance in the prooxidant-antioxidant balance in favor of the former, leading to potential damage. Indicators of oxidative stress include damaged DNA bases, protein oxidation products, and lipid peroxidation products (Sies, Oxidative Stress, 1991, pxv-xvi).
The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
A glutathione transferase that catalyzes the conjugation of electrophilic substrates to GLUTATHIONE. This enzyme has been shown to provide cellular protection against redox-mediated damage by FREE RADICALS.
The relating of causes to the effects they produce. Causes are termed necessary when they must always precede an effect and sufficient when they initiate or produce an effect. Any of several factors may be associated with the potential disease causation or outcome, including predisposing factors, enabling factors, precipitating factors, reinforcing factors, and risk factors.
A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.
A sudden, audible expulsion of air from the lungs through a partially closed glottis, preceded by inhalation. It is a protective response that serves to clear the trachea, bronchi, and/or lungs of irritants and secretions, or to prevent aspiration of foreign materials into the lungs.
The larger air passages of the lungs arising from the terminal bifurcation of the TRACHEA. They include the largest two primary bronchi which branch out into secondary bronchi, and tertiary bronchi which extend into BRONCHIOLES and PULMONARY ALVEOLI.
A distribution function used to describe the occurrence of rare events or to describe the sampling distribution of isolated counts in a continuum of time or space.
7,8,8a,9a-Tetrahydrobenzo(10,11)chryseno (3,4-b)oxirene-7,8-diol. A benzopyrene derivative with carcinogenic and mutagenic activity.
Inflammation of the large airways in the lung including any part of the BRONCHI, from the PRIMARY BRONCHI to the TERTIARY BRONCHI.

The effect of cotinine or cigarette smoke co-administration on the formation of O6-methylguanine adducts in the lung and liver of A/J mice treated with 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) (1/2289)

4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), a tobacco-specific nitrosamine, induces lung adenomas in A/J mice, following a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. However, inhalation of tobacco smoke has not induced or promoted tumors in these mice. NNK-induced lung tumorigenesis is thought to involve O6-methylguanine (O6MeG) formation, leading to GC-->AT transitional mispairing and an activation of the K-ras proto-oncogene in the A/J mouse. NNK can be metabolized by several different cytochromes P450, resulting in a number of metabolites. Formation of the promutagenic DNA adduct O6MeG is believed to require metabolic activation of NNK by cytochrome P450-mediated alpha-hydroxylation of the methylene group adjacent to the N-nitroso nitrogen to yield the unstable intermediate, methanediazohydroxide. Nicotine, cotinine (the major metabolite of nicotine), and aqueous cigarette tar extract (ACTE) have all been shown to effectively inhibit metabolic activation of NNK to its mutagenic form, most likely due to competitive inhibition of the cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in alpha-hydroxylation of NNK. The objective of the current study was to monitor the effects of cotinine and cigarette smoke (CS) on the formation of O6MeG in target tissues of mice during the acute phase of NNK treatment. To test the effect of cotinine, mature female A/J mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of NNK (0, 2.5, 5, 7.5, or 10 mumole/mouse) with cotinine administered at a total dose of 50 mumole/mouse in 3 separate i.p. injections, administered 30 min before, immediately after, and 30 min after NNK treatment. To test the effect of whole smoke exposure on NNK-related O6MeG formation, mice were exposed to smoke generated from Kentucky 1R4F reference cigarettes at 0, 0.4, 0.6, or 0.8 mg wet total particulate matter/liter (WTPM/L) for 2 h, with a single i.p. injection of NNK (0, 3.75, or 7.5 mumole/mouse) midway through the exposure. Cigarette smoke alone failed to yield detectable levels of O6MeG. The number of O6MeG adducts following i.p. injection of NNK was significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in both lung and liver by cotinine and by cigarette smoke exposure. Our results demonstrate that NNK-induced O6MeG DNA adducts in A/J mice are significantly reduced when NNK is administered together with either cotinine, the major metabolite of nicotine, or the parental complex mixture, cigarette smoke.  (+info)

Evaluation of passive smoking by measuring urinary trans, trans-muconic acid and exhaled carbon monoxide levels. (2/2289)

No method has yet been established to evaluate the exposure to tobacco smoke in passive smoking (PS). We therefore conducted a study on the possibility that the levels of urinary trans, trans-muconic acid (MA) and the exhaled carbon monoxide (CO) could be indices of the passive exposure to tobacco smoke. The moderate correlation was observed between urinary MA levels and the number of consumed cigarettes per day in smokers. The mean urinary MA level of the PS (+) group was significantly higher than that with the PS (-) group. Among the PS (+) group, the mean MA level in the urine obtained in the afternoon was higher than that obtained in the morning. A high correlation was observed between the exhaled CO levels and the number of consumed cigarettes per day in smokers. Like the urinary MA level, the mean exhaled CO level in the PS (+) group, too, gave a significantly higher level than in the PS (-) group. Because the biological half life of MA (7.5 +/- 0.85 h) was longer than that of CO (3.0 +/- 0.36 h), the measurement of urinary MA level is recommended for evaluating the exposure of passive smoking. The measurement of exhaled CO levels is useful only for chain smokers and nonsmokers with PS just before measurement.  (+info)

The role of domestic factors and day-care attendance on lung function of primary school children. (3/2289)

The results of studies examining the relationship of domestic factors to lung function are contradictory. We therefore examined the independent effects of maternal smoking during pregnancy, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), the presence of a cat, type of heating and cooking used in the home and day-care attendance on lung function after controlling for socioeconomic status (SES). Nine hundred and eighty-nine children from 18 Montreal schools were studied between April 1990 and November 1992. Information on the child's health and exposure to domestic factors was collected by questionnaire. Spirometry was performed at school. The data were analysed by multiple linear regression with percent predicted FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC as dependent variables. In the overall sample (both sexes combined), cat in the home (regression coefficient, beta = -1.15, 95% confidence interval, CI: -2.26-(-)0.05) and electric baseboard units (beta = -1.26, 95% CI: -2.39-(-)0.13) were independently associated with a lower FEV1/FVC, while day-care attendance (beta = -2.05, 95% CI: -3.71-(-)0.40) significantly reduced FEV1. Household ETS was significantly associated with increasing level of FVC (beta = 2.86, 95% CI: +0.55 to +5.17). In boys but not girls, household ETS (beta = -2.13, 95% CI: -4.07-(-)0.19) and the presence of a cat (beta = -2.19, 95% CI: -3.94-(-)0.45) were associated with lower FEV1/FVC. By contrast, day-care attendance was associated with lower FEV1 (beta = -2.92, 95% CI: -5.27-(-)0.56) and FEV1/FVC (beta = -1.53, 95% CI: -2.73-(-)0.33) in girls only. In conclusion, the results provide evidence that domestic factors and day-care attendance primarily affected airway caliber and gender differences were apparent in the effects of these factors.  (+info)

Passive smoking and the risk of coronary heart disease--a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies. (4/2289)

BACKGROUND: The effect of passive smoking on the risk of coronary heart disease is controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis of the risk of coronary heart disease associated with passive smoking among nonsmokers. METHODS: We searched the Medline and Dissertation Abstracts Online data bases and reviewed citations in relevant articles to identify 18 epidemiologic (10 cohort and 8 case-control) studies that met prestated inclusion criteria. Information on the designs of the studies, the characteristics of the study subjects, exposure and outcome measures, control for potential confounding factors, and risk estimates was abstracted independently by three investigators using a standardized protocol. RESULTS: Overall, nonsmokers exposed to environmental smoke had a relative risk of coronary heart disease of 1.25 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.17 to 1.32) as compared with nonsmokers not exposed to smoke. Passive smoking was consistently associated with an increased relative risk of coronary heart disease in cohort studies (relative risk, 1.21; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.14 to 1.30), in case-control studies (relative risk, 1.51; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.26 to 1.81), in men (relative risk, 1.22; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.10 to 1.35), in women (relative risk, 1.24; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.15 to 1.34), and in those exposed to smoking at home (relative risk, 1.17; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.11 to 1.24) or in the workplace (relative risk, 1.11; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.00 to 1.23). A significant dose-response relation was identified, with respective relative risks of 1.23 and 1.31 for nonsmokers who were exposed to the smoke of 1 to 19 cigarettes per day and those who were exposed to the smoke of 20 or more cigarettes per day, as compared with nonsmokers not exposed to smoke (P=0.006 for linear trend). CONCLUSIONS: Passive smoking is associated with a small increase in the risk of coronary heart disease. Given the high prevalence of cigarette smoking, the public health consequences of passive smoking with regard to coronary heart disease may be important.  (+info)

Double exposure. Environmental tobacco smoke. (5/2289)

One study after another is finding strong associations between a variety of human illness and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). A 1986 report by the U.S. Surgeon General concluded that ETS is a cause of disease, including lung cancer, in healthy nonsmokers. Other reports have documented causal associations between ETS and lower respiratory tract infections, middle ear disease and exacerbation of asthma in children, heart disease, retardation of fetal growth, sudden infant death syndrome, and nasal sinus cancer. However, the findings from many of these studies remain controversial. A number of scientists remain skeptical about the association between ETS and serious illness in nonsmokers, charging that scientific journals either fail to publish pro-tobacco findings and meta-analyses or disregard those that are published. They also claim that many epidemiological studies declare causal associations based on marginal odds ratios.  (+info)

Health effects of passive smoking-10: Summary of effects of parental smoking on the respiratory health of children and implications for research. (6/2289)

BACKGROUND: Two recent reviews have assessed the effect of parental smoking on respiratory disease in children. METHODS: The results of the systematic quantitative review published as a series in Thorax are summarised and brought up to date by considering papers appearing on Embase or Medline up to June 1998. The findings are compared with those of the review published recently by the Californian Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Areas requiring further research are identified. RESULTS: Overall there is a very consistent picture with odds ratios for respiratory illnesses and symptoms and middle ear disease of between 1.2 and 1.6 for either parent smoking, the odds usually being higher in pre-school than in school aged children. For sudden infant death syndrome the odds ratio for maternal smoking is about 2. Significant effects from paternal smoking suggest a role for postnatal exposure to environmental tobacco smoke. Recent publications do not lead us to alter the conclusions of our earlier reviews. While essentially narrative rather than systematic and quantitative, the findings of the Californian EPA review are broadly similar. In addition they have reviewed studies of the effects of environmental tobacco smoke on children with cystic fibrosis and conclude from the limited evidence that there is a strong case for a relationship between parental smoking and admissions to hospital. They also review data from adults of the effects of acute exposure to environmental tobacco smoke under laboratory conditions which suggest acute effects on spirometric parameters rather than on bronchial hyperresponsiveness. It seems likely that such effects are also present in children. CONCLUSIONS: Substantial benefits to children would arise if parents stopped smoking after birth, even if the mother smoked during pregnancy. Policies need to be developed which reduce smoking amongst parents and protect infants and young children from exposure to environmental tobacco smoke. The weight of evidence is such that new prevalence studies are no longer justified. What are needed are studies which allow comparison of the effects of critical periods of exposure to cigarette smoke, particularly in utero, early infancy, and later childhood. Where longitudinal studies are carried out they should be analysed to look at the way in which changes in exposure are related to changes in outcome. Better still would be studies demonstrating reversibility of adverse effects, especially in asthmatic subjects or children with cystic fibrosis.  (+info)

Urinary cotinine and exposure to parental smoking in a population of children with asthma. (7/2289)

BACKGROUND: Studies of the effects of tobacco smoke often rely on reported exposure to cigarette smoke, a measure that is subject to bias. We describe here the relationship between parental smoking exposure as assessed by urinary cotinine excretion and lung function in children with asthma. METHODS: We studied 90 children 4-14 years of age, who reported a confirmed diagnosis or symptoms of asthma. In each child, we assessed baseline pulmonary function (spirometry) and bronchial responsiveness to carbachol stimulation. Urinary cotinine was measured by HPLC with ultraviolet detection. RESULTS: Urinary cotinine concentrations in the children were significantly correlated (P <0.001) with the number of cigarettes the parents, especially the mothers, smoked. Bronchial responsiveness to carbachol (but not spirometry test results) was correlated (P <0.03) with urinary cotinine in the children. CONCLUSION: Passive smoke exposure increases the bronchial responsiveness to carbachol in asthmatic children.  (+info)

Ischemic stroke risk and passive exposure to spouses' cigarette smoking. Melbourne Stroke Risk Factor Study (MERFS) Group. (8/2289)

OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the association between ischemic stroke risk and passive exposure to cigarette smoking. METHODS: Risk factors among 452 hospitalized cases of first-episode ischemic stroke were compared with 452 age- and sex-matched "neighbor-hood" controls. RESULTS: The risk of stroke was twice as high for subjects whose spouses smoked as for those whose spouses did not smoke (95% confidence interval = 1.3, 3.1), after adjustment for the subject's own smoking, heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, and education level. These results were confirmed when analysis was limited to those who never smoked. CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide evidence that spousal smoking may be a significant risk factor for ischemic stroke.  (+info)

Tobacco smoke pollution is not typically defined in medical terms, but it refers to the presence of tobacco smoke in indoor or outdoor environments, which can have negative effects on air quality and human health. It is also known as secondhand smoke or environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). This type of smoke is a mixture of sidestream smoke (the smoke given off by a burning cigarette) and mainstream smoke (the smoke exhaled by a smoker).

The medical community recognizes tobacco smoke pollution as a serious health hazard. It contains more than 7,000 chemicals, hundreds of which are toxic and about 70 that can cause cancer. Exposure to tobacco smoke pollution can cause a range of adverse health effects, including respiratory symptoms, lung cancer, heart disease, and stroke. In children, it can also lead to ear infections, asthma attacks, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

Therefore, many laws and regulations have been implemented worldwide to protect people from tobacco smoke pollution, such as smoking bans in public places and workplaces.

'Smoke' is not typically defined in a medical context, but it can be described as a mixture of small particles and gases that are released when something burns. Smoke can be composed of various components including carbon monoxide, particulate matter, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), benzene, toluene, styrene, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Exposure to smoke can cause a range of health problems, including respiratory symptoms, cardiovascular disease, and cancer.

In the medical field, exposure to smoke is often referred to as "secondhand smoke" or "passive smoking" when someone breathes in smoke from another person's cigarette, cigar, or pipe. This type of exposure can be just as harmful as smoking itself and has been linked to a range of health problems, including respiratory infections, asthma, lung cancer, and heart disease.

Air pollution is defined as the contamination of air due to the presence of substances or harmful elements that exceed the acceptable limits. These pollutants can be in the form of solid particles, liquid droplets, gases, or a combination of these. They can be released from various sources, including industrial processes, vehicle emissions, burning of fossil fuels, and natural events like volcanic eruptions.

Exposure to air pollution can have significant impacts on human health, contributing to respiratory diseases, cardiovascular issues, and even premature death. It can also harm the environment, damaging crops, forests, and wildlife populations. Stringent regulations and measures are necessary to control and reduce air pollution levels, thereby protecting public health and the environment.

Tobacco is not a medical term, but it refers to the leaves of the plant Nicotiana tabacum that are dried and fermented before being used in a variety of ways. Medically speaking, tobacco is often referred to in the context of its health effects. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), "tobacco" can also refer to any product prepared from the leaf of the tobacco plant for smoking, sucking, chewing or snuffing.

Tobacco use is a major risk factor for a number of diseases, including cancer, heart disease, stroke, lung disease, and various other medical conditions. The smoke produced by burning tobacco contains thousands of chemicals, many of which are toxic and can cause serious health problems. Nicotine, one of the primary active constituents in tobacco, is highly addictive and can lead to dependence.

Air pollutants are substances or mixtures of substances present in the air that can have negative effects on human health, the environment, and climate. These pollutants can come from a variety of sources, including industrial processes, transportation, residential heating and cooking, agricultural activities, and natural events. Some common examples of air pollutants include particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, ozone, carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

Air pollutants can cause a range of health effects, from respiratory irritation and coughing to more serious conditions such as bronchitis, asthma, and cancer. They can also contribute to climate change by reacting with other chemicals in the atmosphere to form harmful ground-level ozone and by directly absorbing or scattering sunlight, which can affect temperature and precipitation patterns.

Air quality standards and regulations have been established to limit the amount of air pollutants that can be released into the environment, and efforts are ongoing to reduce emissions and improve air quality worldwide.

A Tobacco Industry is a commercial sector involved in the cultivation, production, manufacturing, marketing, and distribution of tobacco and tobacco-related products. This can include growers who produce tobacco leaves, manufacturers who process the leaves into various forms (such as cigarettes, chewing tobacco, or snuff), and companies that market and distribute these products to consumers. It is important to note that the tobacco industry has been associated with significant health risks, as the use of tobacco products can lead to a range of serious health problems, including cancer, heart disease, and lung disease.

Indoor air pollution refers to the contamination of air within buildings and structures due to presence of particles, gases, or biological materials that can harmfully affect the health of occupants. These pollutants can originate from various sources including cooking stoves, heating systems, building materials, furniture, tobacco products, outdoor air, and microbial growth. Some common indoor air pollutants include particulate matter, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and mold. Prolonged exposure to these pollutants can cause a range of health issues, from respiratory problems to cancer, depending on the type and level of exposure. Effective ventilation, air filtration, and source control are some of the strategies used to reduce indoor air pollution.

Cotinine is the major metabolite of nicotine, which is formed in the body after exposure to tobacco smoke or other sources of nicotine. It is often used as a biomarker for nicotine exposure and can be measured in various biological samples such as blood, urine, saliva, and hair. Cotinine has a longer half-life than nicotine, making it a more reliable indicator of long-term exposure to tobacco smoke or nicotine products.

Smoking is not a medical condition, but it's a significant health risk behavior. Here is the definition from a public health perspective:

Smoking is the act of inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning tobacco that is commonly consumed through cigarettes, pipes, and cigars. The smoke contains over 7,000 chemicals, including nicotine, tar, carbon monoxide, and numerous toxic and carcinogenic substances. These toxins contribute to a wide range of diseases and health conditions, such as lung cancer, heart disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and various other cancers, as well as adverse reproductive outcomes and negative impacts on the developing fetus during pregnancy. Smoking is highly addictive due to the nicotine content, which makes quitting smoking a significant challenge for many individuals.

Water pollution is defined medically as the contamination of water sources by harmful or sufficient amounts of foreign substances (pathogens, chemicals, toxic compounds, etc.) which tend to interfere with its normal functioning and can have negative effects on human health. Such pollutants can find their way into water bodies through various means including industrial waste disposal, agricultural runoff, oil spills, sewage and wastewater discharges, and accidental chemical releases, among others.

Exposure to polluted water can lead to a range of health issues, from minor problems like skin irritation or stomach upset, to severe conditions such as neurological disorders, reproductive issues, cancer, and even death in extreme cases. It also poses significant risks to aquatic life, disrupting ecosystems and leading to the decline or extinction of various species. Therefore, maintaining clean and safe water supplies is critical for both human health and environmental preservation.

Smokeless tobacco is a type of tobacco that is not burned or smoked. It's often called "spit" or "chewing" tobacco. The most common forms of smokeless tobacco in the United States are snuff and chewing tobacco. Snuff is a finely ground tobacco that can be dry or moist. Dry snuff is sniffed or taken through the nose, while moist snuff is placed between the lower lip or cheek and gum. Chewing tobacco is plugs, leaves, or twists of tobacco that are chewed or sucked on.

Smokeless tobacco contains nicotine, which is addictive. When you use smokeless tobacco, the nicotine is absorbed through the lining of your mouth and goes directly into your bloodstream. This can lead to a rapid increase in nicotine levels in your body, which can make it harder to quit using tobacco.

Smokeless tobacco also contains harmful chemicals that can cause cancer of the mouth, esophagus, and pancreas. It can also cause other health problems, such as gum disease, tooth decay, and precancerous lesions in the mouth. Using smokeless tobacco can also increase your risk of developing heart disease and having a stroke.

Environmental exposure refers to the contact of an individual with any chemical, physical, or biological agent in the environment that can cause a harmful effect on health. These exposures can occur through various pathways such as inhalation, ingestion, or skin contact. Examples of environmental exposures include air pollution, water contamination, occupational chemicals, and allergens. The duration and level of exposure, as well as the susceptibility of the individual, can all contribute to the risk of developing an adverse health effect.

Particulate Matter (PM) refers to the mixture of tiny particles and droplets in the air that are solid or liquid in nature. These particles vary in size, with some being visible to the naked eye while others can only be seen under a microscope. PM is classified based on its diameter:

* PM10 includes particles with a diameter of 10 micrometers or smaller. These particles are often found in dust, pollen, and smoke.
* PM2.5 includes particles with a diameter of 2.5 micrometers or smaller. These fine particles are produced from sources such as power plants, industrial processes, and vehicle emissions. They can also come from natural sources like wildfires.

Exposure to particulate matter has been linked to various health problems, including respiratory issues, cardiovascular disease, and premature death. The smaller the particle, the deeper it can penetrate into the lungs, making PM2.5 particularly harmful to human health.

Environmental pollution is the introduction or presence of harmful substances, energies, or objects in the environment that can cause adverse effects on living organisms and ecosystems. These pollutants can be in the form of chemical, physical, or biological agents that contaminate air, water, soil, or noise levels, exceeding safe limits established by environmental regulations.

Examples of environmental pollution include:

1. Air pollution: The presence of harmful substances such as particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the air that can cause respiratory and other health problems.
2. Water pollution: Contamination of water sources with chemicals, heavy metals, pathogens, or other pollutants that can harm aquatic life and make the water unsafe for human consumption or recreational use.
3. Soil pollution: The presence of harmful substances such as heavy metals, pesticides, and industrial waste in soil that can reduce soil fertility, contaminate crops, and pose a risk to human health.
4. Noise pollution: Excessive noise levels from transportation, industrial activities, or other sources that can cause stress, sleep disturbances, and hearing loss in humans and animals.
5. Light pollution: The excessive use of artificial light that can disrupt ecosystems, affect human circadian rhythms, and contribute to energy waste.

Environmental pollution is a significant global health issue that requires urgent attention and action from governments, industries, and individuals to reduce pollutant emissions, promote sustainable practices, and protect the environment for future generations.

'Toxic plants' refer to those species of plants that contain toxic substances capable of causing harmful effects or adverse health reactions in humans and animals when ingested, touched, or inhaled. These toxins can cause a range of symptoms from mild irritation to serious conditions such as organ failure, paralysis, or even death depending on the plant, the amount consumed, and the individual's sensitivity to the toxin.

Toxic plants may contain various types of toxins, including alkaloids, glycosides, proteins, resinous substances, and essential oils. Some common examples of toxic plants include poison ivy, poison oak, nightshade, hemlock, oleander, castor bean, and foxglove. It is important to note that some parts of a plant may be toxic while others are not, and the toxicity can also vary depending on the stage of growth or environmental conditions.

If you suspect exposure to a toxic plant, it is essential to seek medical attention immediately and, if possible, bring a sample of the plant for identification.

Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a gaseous air pollutant and respiratory irritant. It is a reddish-brown toxic gas with a pungent, choking odor. NO2 is a major component of smog and is produced from the combustion of fossil fuels in vehicles, power plants, and industrial processes.

Exposure to nitrogen dioxide can cause respiratory symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, and difficulty breathing, especially in people with asthma or other respiratory conditions. Long-term exposure has been linked to the development of chronic lung diseases, including bronchitis and emphysema. NO2 also contributes to the formation of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), which can penetrate deep into the lungs and cause additional health problems.

Environmental monitoring is the systematic and ongoing surveillance, measurement, and assessment of environmental parameters, pollutants, or other stressors in order to evaluate potential impacts on human health, ecological systems, or compliance with regulatory standards. This process typically involves collecting and analyzing data from various sources, such as air, water, soil, and biota, and using this information to inform decisions related to public health, environmental protection, and resource management.

In medical terms, environmental monitoring may refer specifically to the assessment of environmental factors that can impact human health, such as air quality, water contamination, or exposure to hazardous substances. This type of monitoring is often conducted in occupational settings, where workers may be exposed to potential health hazards, as well as in community-based settings, where environmental factors may contribute to public health issues. The goal of environmental monitoring in a medical context is to identify and mitigate potential health risks associated with environmental exposures, and to promote healthy and safe environments for individuals and communities.

Tobacco Use Disorder is a clinical diagnosis described in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), used by healthcare professionals to diagnose mental health conditions. It is defined as a problematic pattern of tobacco use leading to clinically significant impairment or distress, as manifested by at least two of the following, occurring within a 12-month period:

1. Tobacco is often taken in larger amounts or over a longer period than was intended.
2. There is a persistent desire or unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control tobacco use.
3. A great deal of time is spent on activities necessary to obtain or use tobacco, or recover from its effects.
4. Craving, or a strong desire or urge to use tobacco, occurs.
5. Recurrent tobacco use results in a failure to fulfill major role obligations at work, school, or home.
6. Important social, occupational, or recreational activities are given up or reduced because of tobacco use.
7. Tobacco use is continued despite knowledge of having a persistent or recurrent physical or psychological problem that is likely to have been caused or exacerbated by tobacco.
8. Tolerance, as defined by either of the following:
a. A need for markedly increased amounts of tobacco to achieve intoxication or desired effect.
b. Markedly diminished effect with continued use of the same amount of tobacco.
9. Characteristic withdrawal syndrome for tobacco, or tobacco is taken to relieve or avoid withdrawal symptoms.

The diagnosis excludes nicotine withdrawal that is a normal response to the cessation of tobacco use, intoxication, or substance/medication-induced disorders. Tobacco Use Disorder can be further specified as mild, moderate, or severe based on the number of criteria met.

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is not a medical term per se, but it's an important chemical compound with implications in human health and medicine. Here's a brief definition:

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is a colorless gas with a sharp, pungent odor. It is primarily released into the atmosphere as a result of human activities such as the burning of fossil fuels (like coal and oil) and the smelting of metals. SO2 is also produced naturally during volcanic eruptions and some biological processes.

In medical terms, exposure to high levels of sulfur dioxide can have adverse health effects, particularly for people with respiratory conditions like asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). SO2 can irritate the eyes, nose, throat, and lungs, causing coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, and a tight feeling in the chest. Prolonged exposure to elevated levels of SO2 may exacerbate existing respiratory issues and lead to decreased lung function.

Regulations are in place to limit sulfur dioxide emissions from industrial sources to protect public health and reduce air pollution.

'Vehicle Emissions' is not a term typically used in medical definitions. However, in a broader context, it refers to the gases and particles released into the atmosphere by vehicles such as cars, trucks, buses, and airplanes. The main pollutants found in vehicle emissions include carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Exposure to these pollutants can have negative health effects, including respiratory symptoms, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Therefore, vehicle emissions are a significant public health concern.

Tobacco products are defined as any items that contain tobacco, including but not limited to cigarettes, cigars, pipe tobacco, snuff, chewing tobacco, and electronic nicotine delivery systems (such as e-cigarettes). These products can be smoked, smokeless, or heated and involve the inhalation or ingestion of tobacco or its derivatives. They are known to cause addiction due to their nicotine content and can lead to a variety of serious health problems, including cancer, heart disease, and lung disease.

Tobacco use cessation is the process of discontinuing the use of tobacco products, such as cigarettes, cigars, smokeless tobacco, and electronic cigarettes. This is often a critical component of treatment for tobacco-related diseases and conditions, as well as a key strategy for preventing tobacco-related illnesses and premature death.

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a combination of behavioral support and medication as the most effective approach to tobacco use cessation. Behavioral support may include counseling, group therapy, and self-help materials, while medication can include nicotine replacement therapies (such as gum, lozenges, patches, inhalers, or nasal sprays), as well as prescription medications such as bupropion and varenicline.

Tobacco use cessation is a challenging process that often requires multiple attempts before successful long-term abstinence is achieved. However, with the right support and resources, many tobacco users are able to quit successfully and improve their health outcomes.

Nicotine is defined as a highly addictive psychoactive alkaloid and stimulant found in the nightshade family of plants, primarily in tobacco leaves. It is the primary component responsible for the addiction to cigarettes and other forms of tobacco. Nicotine can also be produced synthetically.

When nicotine enters the body, it activates the release of several neurotransmitters such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin, leading to feelings of pleasure, stimulation, and relaxation. However, with regular use, tolerance develops, requiring higher doses to achieve the same effects, which can contribute to the development of nicotine dependence.

Nicotine has both short-term and long-term health effects. Short-term effects include increased heart rate and blood pressure, increased alertness and concentration, and arousal. Long-term use can lead to addiction, lung disease, cardiovascular disease, and reproductive problems. It is important to note that nicotine itself is not the primary cause of many tobacco-related diseases, but rather the result of other harmful chemicals found in tobacco smoke.

Respiratory tract diseases refer to a broad range of medical conditions that affect the respiratory system, which includes the nose, throat (pharynx), windpipe (trachea), bronchi, bronchioles, and lungs. These diseases can be categorized into upper and lower respiratory tract infections based on the location of the infection.

Upper respiratory tract infections affect the nose, sinuses, pharynx, and larynx, and include conditions such as the common cold, flu, sinusitis, and laryngitis. Symptoms often include nasal congestion, sore throat, cough, and fever.

Lower respiratory tract infections affect the trachea, bronchi, bronchioles, and lungs, and can be more severe. They include conditions such as pneumonia, bronchitis, and tuberculosis. Symptoms may include cough, chest congestion, shortness of breath, and fever.

Respiratory tract diseases can also be caused by allergies, irritants, or genetic factors. Treatment varies depending on the specific condition and severity but may include medications, breathing treatments, or surgery in severe cases.

Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is not typically considered in the context of medical definitions, as it's primarily known for its impact on plants rather than humans or animals. However, I will provide the botanical definition for your interest.

Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that infects a wide range of plants, including tobacco, tomatoes, cucumbers, and many ornamental plants. The virus is named after its initial discovery in tobacco plants, which exhibit symptoms such as mosaic patterns of light and dark green on the leaves, leaf curling, and stunted growth. TMV is highly contagious and can be spread through mechanical means, such as touching infected plants or using contaminated tools. It's also one of the most well-studied viruses due to its impact on agriculture and its historical significance in early virology research.

Ozone (O3) is not a substance that is typically considered a component of health or medicine in the context of human body or physiology. It's actually a form of oxygen, but with three atoms instead of two, making it unstable and reactive. Ozone is naturally present in the Earth's atmosphere, where it forms a protective layer in the stratosphere that absorbs harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun.

However, ozone can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on human health depending on its location and concentration. At ground level or in indoor environments, ozone is considered an air pollutant that can irritate the respiratory system and aggravate asthma symptoms when inhaled at high concentrations. It's important to note that ozone should not be confused with oxygen (O2), which is essential for human life and breathing.

Inhalation exposure is a term used in occupational and environmental health to describe the situation where an individual breathes in substances present in the air, which could be gases, vapors, fumes, mist, or particulate matter. These substances can originate from various sources, such as industrial processes, chemical reactions, or natural phenomena.

The extent of inhalation exposure is determined by several factors, including:

1. Concentration of the substance in the air
2. Duration of exposure
3. Frequency of exposure
4. The individual's breathing rate
5. The efficiency of the individual's respiratory protection, if any

Inhalation exposure can lead to adverse health effects, depending on the toxicity and concentration of the inhaled substances. Short-term or acute health effects may include irritation of the eyes, nose, throat, or lungs, while long-term or chronic exposure can result in more severe health issues, such as respiratory diseases, neurological disorders, or cancer.

It is essential to monitor and control inhalation exposures in occupational settings to protect workers' health and ensure compliance with regulatory standards. Various methods are employed for exposure assessment, including personal air sampling, area monitoring, and biological monitoring. Based on the results of these assessments, appropriate control measures can be implemented to reduce or eliminate the risks associated with inhalation exposure.

Epidemiological monitoring is the systematic and ongoing collection, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of health data pertaining to a specific population or community, with the aim of identifying and tracking patterns of disease or injury, understanding their causes, and informing public health interventions and policies. This process typically involves the use of surveillance systems, such as disease registries, to collect data on the incidence, prevalence, and distribution of health outcomes of interest, as well as potential risk factors and exposures. The information generated through epidemiological monitoring can help to identify trends and emerging health threats, inform resource allocation and program planning, and evaluate the impact of public health interventions.

"Maternal exposure" is a medical term that refers to the contact or interaction of a pregnant woman with various environmental factors, such as chemicals, radiation, infectious agents, or physical environments, which could potentially have an impact on the developing fetus. This exposure can occur through different routes, including inhalation, ingestion, dermal contact, or even transplacentally. The effects of maternal exposure on the fetus can vary widely depending on the type, duration, and intensity of the exposure, as well as the stage of pregnancy at which it occurs. It is important to monitor and minimize maternal exposure to potentially harmful substances or environments during pregnancy to ensure the best possible outcomes for both the mother and developing fetus.

Smoking cessation is the process of discontinuing tobacco smoking. This can be achieved through various methods such as behavioral modifications, counseling, and medication. The goal of smoking cessation is to improve overall health, reduce the risk of tobacco-related diseases, and enhance quality of life. It is a significant step towards preventing lung cancer, heart disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other serious health conditions.

I believe there might be a misunderstanding in your question. "Restaurants" are establishments where food and drinks are prepared and served to customers for a profit. They are part of the hospitality industry, not a medical term or concept. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help!

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of organic compounds characterized by the presence of two or more fused benzene rings. They are called "polycyclic" because they contain multiple cyclic structures, and "aromatic" because these structures contain alternating double bonds that give them distinctive chemical properties and a characteristic smell.

PAHs can be produced from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Natural sources include wildfires, volcanic eruptions, and the decomposition of organic matter. Anthropogenic sources include the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal, oil, and gasoline, as well as tobacco smoke, grilled foods, and certain industrial processes.

PAHs are known to be environmental pollutants and can have harmful effects on human health. They have been linked to an increased risk of cancer, particularly lung, skin, and bladder cancers, as well as reproductive and developmental toxicity. PAHs can also cause skin irritation, respiratory problems, and damage to the immune system.

PAHs are found in a variety of environmental media, including air, water, soil, and food. They can accumulate in the food chain, particularly in fatty tissues, and have been detected in a wide range of foods, including meat, fish, dairy products, and vegetables. Exposure to PAHs can occur through inhalation, ingestion, or skin contact.

It is important to limit exposure to PAHs by avoiding tobacco smoke, reducing consumption of grilled and smoked foods, using ventilation when cooking, and following safety guidelines when working with industrial processes that produce PAHs.

I believe there may be a misunderstanding in your question. "Cities" is not a medical term or concept, but rather a geographical and sociopolitical one referring to large, densely populated urban areas. If you're looking for information about health-related topics associated with cities, I would be happy to help! For example, there are many public health issues that are closely linked to city living, such as air pollution, infectious diseases, and chronic conditions like obesity and heart disease. Please let me know if you have any specific questions in mind!

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless, and tasteless gas that is slightly less dense than air. It is toxic to hemoglobic animals when encountered in concentrations above about 35 ppm. This compound is a product of incomplete combustion of organic matter, and is a major component of automobile exhaust.

Carbon monoxide is poisonous because it binds to hemoglobin in red blood cells much more strongly than oxygen does, forming carboxyhemoglobin. This prevents the transport of oxygen throughout the body, which can lead to suffocation and death. Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include headache, dizziness, weakness, nausea, vomiting, confusion, and disorientation. Prolonged exposure can lead to unconsciousness and death.

Carbon monoxide detectors are commonly used in homes and other buildings to alert occupants to the presence of this dangerous gas. It is important to ensure that these devices are functioning properly and that they are placed in appropriate locations throughout the building. Additionally, it is essential to maintain appliances and heating systems to prevent the release of carbon monoxide into living spaces.

"Prenatal exposure delayed effects" refer to the adverse health outcomes or symptoms that become apparent in an individual during their development or later in life, which are caused by exposure to certain environmental factors or substances while they were still in the womb. These effects may not be immediately observable at birth and can take weeks, months, years, or even decades to manifest. They can result from maternal exposure to various agents such as infectious diseases, medications, illicit drugs, tobacco smoke, alcohol, or environmental pollutants during pregnancy. The delayed effects can impact multiple organ systems and may include physical, cognitive, behavioral, and developmental abnormalities. It is important to note that the risk and severity of these effects can depend on several factors, including the timing, duration, and intensity of the exposure, as well as the individual's genetic susceptibility.

In the context of medical and health sciences, particle size generally refers to the diameter or dimension of particles, which can be in the form of solid particles, droplets, or aerosols. These particles may include airborne pollutants, pharmaceutical drugs, or medical devices such as nanoparticles used in drug delivery systems.

Particle size is an important factor to consider in various medical applications because it can affect the behavior and interactions of particles with biological systems. For example, smaller particle sizes can lead to greater absorption and distribution throughout the body, while larger particle sizes may be filtered out by the body's natural defense mechanisms. Therefore, understanding particle size and its implications is crucial for optimizing the safety and efficacy of medical treatments and interventions.

Nitrosamines are a type of chemical compound that are formed by the reaction between nitrous acid (or any nitrogen oxide) and secondary amines. They are often found in certain types of food, such as cured meats and cheeses, as well as in tobacco products and cosmetics.

Nitrosamines have been classified as probable human carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Exposure to high levels of nitrosamines has been linked to an increased risk of cancer, particularly in the digestive tract. They can also cause DNA damage and interfere with the normal functioning of cells.

In the medical field, nitrosamines have been a topic of concern due to their potential presence as contaminants in certain medications. For example, some drugs that contain nitrofurantoin, a medication used to treat urinary tract infections, have been found to contain low levels of nitrosamines. While the risk associated with these low levels is not well understood, efforts are underway to minimize the presence of nitrosamines in medications and other products.

Tobacco use is the act of consuming or ingesting tobacco products, such as cigarettes, cigars, pipes, chewing tobacco, and snuff. The primary active chemical in tobacco is nicotine, which is highly addictive and can have serious health consequences.

When tobacco is smoked, nicotine is rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream and travels to the brain, where it activates the release of neurotransmitters like dopamine, leading to feelings of pleasure and relaxation. However, smoking also exposes the user to a range of harmful chemicals and toxins that can cause serious health problems, including cancer, heart disease, lung disease, and stroke.

Chewing tobacco and snuff can also lead to nicotine addiction and are associated with an increased risk of oral cancer, gum disease, and other health issues. Overall, tobacco use is a major public health concern and is responsible for millions of preventable deaths each year worldwide.

Chemical water pollution is the contamination of water bodies (such as lakes, rivers, oceans, and groundwater) with harmful chemicals or substances that negatively impact water quality and pose a threat to human health, aquatic life, and the environment. These chemical pollutants can come from various sources, including industrial and agricultural activities, waste disposal, oil spills, and chemical accidents. Examples of chemical pollutants include heavy metals (such as mercury, lead, and cadmium), pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other hazardous substances. These chemicals can have toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic effects on living organisms and can disrupt ecosystems, leading to decreased biodiversity and impaired ecological functions.

Urban health is a branch of public health that focuses on the unique health challenges and disparities faced by urban populations. It encompasses the physical, mental, and social well-being of people living in urban areas, which are characterized by high population density, diverse cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds, and unique environmental exposures.

Urban health addresses a range of issues, including infectious diseases, chronic conditions, injuries, violence, and mental health disorders, as well as the social determinants of health such as housing, education, income, and access to healthcare services. It also considers the impact of urbanization on health, including the effects of pollution, noise, crowding, and lack of green spaces.

The goal of urban health is to promote health equity and improve the overall health outcomes of urban populations by addressing these challenges through evidence-based interventions, policies, and programs that are tailored to the unique needs of urban communities.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by inflammation and narrowing of the airways, leading to symptoms such as wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath, and chest tightness. The airway obstruction in asthma is usually reversible, either spontaneously or with treatment.

The underlying cause of asthma involves a combination of genetic and environmental factors that result in hypersensitivity of the airways to certain triggers, such as allergens, irritants, viruses, exercise, and emotional stress. When these triggers are encountered, the airways constrict due to smooth muscle spasm, swell due to inflammation, and produce excess mucus, leading to the characteristic symptoms of asthma.

Asthma is typically managed with a combination of medications that include bronchodilators to relax the airway muscles, corticosteroids to reduce inflammation, and leukotriene modifiers or mast cell stabilizers to prevent allergic reactions. Avoiding triggers and monitoring symptoms are also important components of asthma management.

There are several types of asthma, including allergic asthma, non-allergic asthma, exercise-induced asthma, occupational asthma, and nocturnal asthma, each with its own set of triggers and treatment approaches. Proper diagnosis and management of asthma can help prevent exacerbations, improve quality of life, and reduce the risk of long-term complications.

Advertising is a form of communication used to promote or sell products, services, or ideas. In the medical field, advertising is often used by healthcare providers, hospitals, and pharmaceutical companies to reach potential patients or customers. Advertisements may appear in various media formats, such as television, radio, print, online platforms, and outdoor displays.

In the context of medical advertising, it is essential to ensure that all information presented is accurate, balanced, and not misleading. The advertising of prescription medications directly to consumers is regulated by government agencies, such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States, to ensure that the benefits and risks of the medication are clearly communicated.

Healthcare providers may also engage in advertising to promote their services or expertise. This can include listing their qualifications, areas of specialization, and patient testimonials. However, healthcare providers must adhere to ethical guidelines and avoid making exaggerated claims about their abilities or the outcomes that patients can expect.

Overall, medical advertising plays an essential role in informing the public about available healthcare options and promoting healthy behaviors. Still, it is crucial to ensure that all advertisements are truthful, transparent, and adhere to ethical standards.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "housing" is not a term that has a medical definition. In a general sense, housing refers to a place where someone lives, such as a house or apartment. If you have any questions related to healthcare, medicine, or health-related topics, I would be happy to try to help answer them.

Acrolein is an unsaturated aldehyde with the chemical formula CH2CHCHO. It is a colorless liquid that has a distinct unpleasant odor and is highly reactive. Acrolein is produced by the partial oxidation of certain organic compounds, such as glycerol and fatty acids, and it is also found in small amounts in some foods, such as coffee and bread.

Acrolein is a potent irritant to the eyes, nose, and throat, and exposure to high levels can cause coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath. It has been shown to have toxic effects on the lungs, heart, and nervous system, and prolonged exposure has been linked to an increased risk of cancer.

In the medical field, acrolein is sometimes used as a laboratory reagent or as a preservative for biological specimens. However, due to its potential health hazards, it must be handled with care and appropriate safety precautions should be taken when working with this compound.

"Public policy" is not a medical term, but rather a term used in the field of politics, government, and public administration. It refers to a course or principle of action adopted or proposed by a government, party, business, or organization to guide decisions and achieve specific goals related to public health, safety, or welfare.

However, in the context of healthcare and medicine, "public policy" often refers to laws, regulations, guidelines, and initiatives established by government entities to promote and protect the health and well-being of the population. Public policies in healthcare aim to ensure access to quality care, reduce health disparities, promote public health, regulate healthcare practices and industries, and address broader social determinants of health. Examples include Medicaid and Medicare programs, laws mandating insurance coverage for certain medical procedures or treatments, and regulations governing the safety and efficacy of drugs and medical devices.

Respiratory disorders are a group of conditions that affect the respiratory system, including the nose, throat (pharynx), windpipe (trachea), bronchi, lungs, and diaphragm. These disorders can make it difficult for a person to breathe normally and may cause symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, and chest pain.

There are many different types of respiratory disorders, including:

1. Asthma: A chronic inflammatory disease that causes the airways to become narrow and swollen, leading to difficulty breathing.
2. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): A group of lung diseases, including emphysema and chronic bronchitis, that make it hard to breathe.
3. Pneumonia: An infection of the lungs that can cause coughing, chest pain, and difficulty breathing.
4. Lung cancer: A type of cancer that forms in the tissues of the lungs and can cause symptoms such as coughing, chest pain, and shortness of breath.
5. Tuberculosis (TB): A bacterial infection that mainly affects the lungs but can also affect other parts of the body.
6. Sleep apnea: A disorder that causes a person to stop breathing for short periods during sleep.
7. Interstitial lung disease: A group of disorders that cause scarring of the lung tissue, leading to difficulty breathing.
8. Pulmonary fibrosis: A type of interstitial lung disease that causes scarring of the lung tissue and makes it hard to breathe.
9. Pleural effusion: An abnormal accumulation of fluid in the space between the lungs and chest wall.
10. Lung transplantation: A surgical procedure to replace a diseased or failing lung with a healthy one from a donor.

Respiratory disorders can be caused by a variety of factors, including genetics, exposure to environmental pollutants, smoking, and infections. Treatment for respiratory disorders may include medications, oxygen therapy, breathing exercises, and lifestyle changes. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to treat the disorder.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "workplace" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. The term "workplace" generally refers to a place where people work or carry out their jobs. It could be an office, a factory, a construction site, a retail store, or any other location where work-related activities take place.

If you're looking for a term related to health or medicine that describes a physical location, some examples might include "healthcare facility," "clinic," "hospital," "operating room," or "examination room." If you could provide more context or clarify what you're looking for, I'd be happy to help further!

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

Lung neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the lung tissue. These tumors can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Malignant lung neoplasms are further classified into two main types: small cell lung carcinoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma. Lung neoplasms can cause symptoms such as cough, chest pain, shortness of breath, and weight loss. They are often caused by smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke, but can also occur due to genetic factors, radiation exposure, and other environmental carcinogens. Early detection and treatment of lung neoplasms is crucial for improving outcomes and survival rates.

Carcinogens are agents (substances or mixtures of substances) that can cause cancer. They may be naturally occurring or man-made. Carcinogens can increase the risk of cancer by altering cellular DNA, disrupting cellular function, or promoting cell growth. Examples of carcinogens include certain chemicals found in tobacco smoke, asbestos, UV radiation from the sun, and some viruses.

It's important to note that not all exposures to carcinogens will result in cancer, and the risk typically depends on factors such as the level and duration of exposure, individual genetic susceptibility, and lifestyle choices. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classifies carcinogens into different groups based on the strength of evidence linking them to cancer:

Group 1: Carcinogenic to humans
Group 2A: Probably carcinogenic to humans
Group 2B: Possibly carcinogenic to humans
Group 3: Not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans
Group 4: Probably not carcinogenic to humans

This information is based on medical research and may be subject to change as new studies become available. Always consult a healthcare professional for medical advice.

"Cooking" is not a medical term, but it generally refers to the process of preparing and cooking food. In a medical or nutritional context, "cooking" may refer to the application of heat to food in order to make it safe and more palatable to eat, as well as to improve its nutritional value and digestibility.

Cooking can also have an impact on the nutrient content of food. For example, cooking certain vegetables can increase their bioavailability, or the amount of a nutrient that is available for absorption by the body. On the other hand, cooking some foods at high temperatures or for long periods of time can lead to the loss of certain nutrients, such as vitamins C and B.

It's important to note that the way food is cooked can also affect its safety. For example, undercooked meat, poultry, and seafood can harbor harmful bacteria, such as Salmonella and E. coli, which can cause foodborne illness. It's essential to cook these foods thoroughly to reduce the risk of infection.

In summary, while "cooking" is not a medical term, it has important implications for food safety, nutrition, and digestion.

Ventilation, in the context of medicine and physiology, refers to the process of breathing, which is the exchange of air between the lungs and the environment. It involves both inspiration (inhaling) and expiration (exhaling). During inspiration, air moves into the lungs, delivering oxygen to the alveoli (air sacs) where gas exchange occurs. Oxygen is taken up by the blood and transported to the body's cells, while carbon dioxide, a waste product, is expelled from the body during expiration.

In a medical setting, ventilation may also refer to the use of mechanical devices, such as ventilators or respirators, which assist or replace the breathing process for patients who are unable to breathe effectively on their own due to conditions like respiratory failure, sedation, neuromuscular disorders, or injuries. These machines help maintain adequate gas exchange and prevent complications associated with inadequate ventilation, such as hypoxia (low oxygen levels) and hypercapnia (high carbon dioxide levels).

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Wood" is not a medical term. It is a common name for various hard, fibrous tissues that make up the trunks and branches of trees and shrubs, as well as a term used for a wide range of items made from these materials. If you have any medical concerns or questions, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

Environmental health is a branch of public health that focuses on the study of how environmental factors, including physical, chemical, and biological factors, impact human health and disease. It involves the assessment, control, and prevention of environmental hazards in order to protect and promote human health and well-being.

Environmental health encompasses a wide range of issues, such as air and water quality, food safety, waste management, housing conditions, occupational health and safety, radiation protection, and climate change. It also involves the promotion of healthy behaviors and the development of policies and regulations to protect public health from environmental hazards.

The goal of environmental health is to create safe and healthy environments that support human health and well-being, prevent disease and injury, and promote sustainable communities. This requires a multidisciplinary approach that involves collaboration between various stakeholders, including policymakers, researchers, healthcare providers, community organizations, and the public.

In the context of medical terminology, "heating" generally refers to the application of heat to an area of the body for therapeutic purposes. This can be done using various methods such as hot packs, heating pads, warm compresses, or even heated wax. The goal of applying heat is to increase blood flow, reduce pain and muscle spasms, and promote healing in the affected area. It's important to note that excessive heating or application of heat to sensitive areas should be avoided, as it can lead to burns or other injuries.

Ganglionic stimulants are a type of medication that act on the ganglia, which are clusters of nerve cells located outside the central nervous system. These medications work by stimulating the ganglia, leading to an increase in the transmission of nerve impulses and the activation of various physiological responses.

Ganglionic stimulants were once used in the treatment of conditions such as asthma, bronchitis, and cardiovascular disease. However, their use has largely been discontinued due to the development of safer and more effective treatments. These medications can have significant side effects, including increased heart rate and blood pressure, dizziness, headache, and in rare cases, seizures and coma.

It's important to note that the medical community no longer recommends the use of ganglionic stimulants due to their potential for serious harm. If you have any questions about medications or treatments for a particular condition, it's best to consult with a qualified healthcare professional.

"Tars" is not a recognized medical term. However, "tarso-" is a prefix in anatomy that refers to the ankle or hind part of an organ. For example, the tarsal bones are the bones that make up the ankle and the rear part of the foot. Additionally, tarsus can refer to the thickened portion of the eyelid which contains the eyelashes. It is important to ensure you have the correct term when seeking medical information.

A lung is a pair of spongy, elastic organs in the chest that work together to enable breathing. They are responsible for taking in oxygen and expelling carbon dioxide through the process of respiration. The left lung has two lobes, while the right lung has three lobes. The lungs are protected by the ribcage and are covered by a double-layered membrane called the pleura. The trachea divides into two bronchi, which further divide into smaller bronchioles, leading to millions of tiny air sacs called alveoli, where the exchange of gases occurs.

Respiratory sounds are the noises produced by the airflow through the respiratory tract during breathing. These sounds can provide valuable information about the health and function of the lungs and airways. They are typically categorized into two main types: normal breath sounds and adventitious (or abnormal) breath sounds.

Normal breath sounds include:

1. Vesicular breath sounds: These are soft, low-pitched sounds heard over most of the lung fields during quiet breathing. They are produced by the movement of air through the alveoli and smaller bronchioles.
2. Bronchovesicular breath sounds: These are medium-pitched, hollow sounds heard over the mainstem bronchi and near the upper sternal border during both inspiration and expiration. They are a combination of vesicular and bronchial breath sounds.

Abnormal or adventitious breath sounds include:

1. Crackles (or rales): These are discontinuous, non-musical sounds that resemble the crackling of paper or bubbling in a fluid-filled container. They can be heard during inspiration and are caused by the sudden opening of collapsed airways or the movement of fluid within the airways.
2. Wheezes: These are continuous, musical sounds resembling a whistle. They are produced by the narrowing or obstruction of the airways, causing turbulent airflow.
3. Rhonchi: These are low-pitched, rumbling, continuous sounds that can be heard during both inspiration and expiration. They are caused by the vibration of secretions or fluids in the larger airways.
4. Stridor: This is a high-pitched, inspiratory sound that resembles a harsh crowing or barking noise. It is usually indicative of upper airway narrowing or obstruction.

The character, location, and duration of respiratory sounds can help healthcare professionals diagnose various respiratory conditions, such as pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and bronchitis.

Occupational exposure refers to the contact of an individual with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents as a result of their job or occupation. This can include exposure to hazardous substances such as chemicals, heavy metals, or dusts; physical agents such as noise, radiation, or ergonomic stressors; and biological agents such as viruses, bacteria, or fungi.

Occupational exposure can occur through various routes, including inhalation, skin contact, ingestion, or injection. Prolonged or repeated exposure to these hazards can increase the risk of developing acute or chronic health conditions, such as respiratory diseases, skin disorders, neurological damage, or cancer.

Employers have a legal and ethical responsibility to minimize occupational exposures through the implementation of appropriate control measures, including engineering controls, administrative controls, personal protective equipment, and training programs. Regular monitoring and surveillance of workers' health can also help identify and prevent potential health hazards in the workplace.

An Atmosphere Exposure Chamber (AEC) is a controlled environment chamber that is designed to expose materials, products, or devices to specific atmospheric conditions for the purpose of testing their durability, performance, and safety. These chambers can simulate various environmental factors such as temperature, humidity, pressure, and contaminants, allowing researchers and manufacturers to evaluate how these factors may affect the properties and behavior of the materials being tested.

AECs are commonly used in a variety of industries, including automotive, aerospace, electronics, and medical devices, to ensure that products meet regulatory requirements and industry standards for performance and safety. For example, an AEC might be used to test the durability of a new aircraft material under extreme temperature and humidity conditions, or to evaluate the performance of a medical device in a contaminated environment.

The design and operation of AECs are subject to various regulations and standards, such as those established by organizations like the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), and the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). These standards ensure that AECs are designed and operated in a consistent and controlled manner, allowing for accurate and reliable test results.

DNA adducts are chemical modifications or alterations that occur when DNA molecules become attached to or bound with certain harmful substances, such as toxic chemicals or carcinogens. These attachments can disrupt the normal structure and function of the DNA, potentially leading to mutations, genetic damage, and an increased risk of cancer and other diseases.

DNA adducts are formed when a reactive molecule from a chemical agent binds covalently to a base in the DNA molecule. This process can occur either spontaneously or as a result of exposure to environmental toxins, such as those found in tobacco smoke, certain industrial chemicals, and some medications.

The formation of DNA adducts is often used as a biomarker for exposure to harmful substances, as well as an indicator of potential health risks associated with that exposure. Researchers can measure the levels of specific DNA adducts in biological samples, such as blood or urine, to assess the extent and duration of exposure to certain chemicals or toxins.

It's important to note that not all DNA adducts are necessarily harmful, and some may even play a role in normal cellular processes. However, high levels of certain DNA adducts have been linked to an increased risk of cancer and other diseases, making them a focus of ongoing research and investigation.

A cross-sectional study is a type of observational research design that examines the relationship between variables at one point in time. It provides a snapshot or a "cross-section" of the population at a particular moment, allowing researchers to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition and identify potential risk factors or associations.

In a cross-sectional study, data is collected from a sample of participants at a single time point, and the variables of interest are measured simultaneously. This design can be used to investigate the association between exposure and outcome, but it cannot establish causality because it does not follow changes over time.

Cross-sectional studies can be conducted using various data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, or medical examinations. They are often used in epidemiology to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition in a population and to identify potential risk factors that may contribute to its development. However, because cross-sectional studies only provide a snapshot of the population at one point in time, they cannot account for changes over time or determine whether exposure preceded the outcome.

Therefore, while cross-sectional studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying potential associations between variables, further research using other study designs, such as cohort or case-control studies, is necessary to establish causality and confirm any findings.

Prevalence, in medical terms, refers to the total number of people in a given population who have a particular disease or condition at a specific point in time, or over a specified period. It is typically expressed as a percentage or a ratio of the number of cases to the size of the population. Prevalence differs from incidence, which measures the number of new cases that develop during a certain period.

I am not aware of a specific medical definition for the term "marketing." In general, marketing refers to the activities involved in promoting, selling, and distributing a product or service. This can include market research, product development, advertising, public relations, sales, and customer service. Marketing is used in many industries, including healthcare, to connect with and engage customers, build brand awareness, and increase sales.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "seasons" is not a term that has a medical definition. Seasons refer to the four divisions of the year (spring, summer, autumn or fall, and winter) based on the position of the earth in its orbit around the sun. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to try to help answer those!

Photochemical oxidants refer to chemical compounds that are formed as a result of a photochemical reaction, which involves the absorption of light. These oxidants are often highly reactive and can cause oxidative damage to living cells and tissues.

In the context of environmental science, photochemical oxidants are primarily associated with air pollution and the formation of ozone (O3) and other harmful oxidizing agents in the atmosphere. These pollutants are formed when nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) react in the presence of sunlight, particularly ultraviolet (UV) radiation.

Photochemical oxidation can also occur in biological systems, such as within cells, where reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be generated by the absorption of light by certain molecules. These ROS can cause damage to cellular components, such as DNA, proteins, and lipids, and have been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Overall, photochemical oxidants are a significant concern in both environmental and health contexts, and understanding the mechanisms of their formation and effects is an important area of research.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Fires" is not a medical term that I am aware of. In a general context, a fire refers to the rapid oxidation of a material in the chemical process of combustion, releasing heat, light, and various reaction products. If you are asking about a specific medical term or condition, could you please provide more context or clarify your question? I'm here to help!

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Urban Population" is not a medical term. It is a demographic term used to describe the portion of a country's population that lives in areas classified as urban. The United Nations defines an urban area as a city, town, or other agglomeration with a population of 20,000 or more. However, the specific definition can vary by country and organization.

In contrast, medical terms typically refer to conditions, diseases, symptoms, treatments, or healthcare-related concepts. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to help if I can!

"Public facilities" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. However, in a broader context, public facilities generally refer to buildings, services, and infrastructure that are owned and operated by local, state, or federal government agencies for the use of the general public. These can include parks, libraries, community centers, public restrooms, transportation systems (such as buses, trains, and subways), and other similar establishments.

While not a medical definition per se, public facilities can have implications for public health and accessibility. For example, accessible public facilities are essential for individuals with disabilities to fully participate in community life. Public restrooms that are clean, well-maintained, and equipped with necessary amenities (such as grab bars and accessible sinks) can help prevent the spread of infectious diseases and ensure that all members of the community have equal access to these facilities. Similarly, public transportation systems that are safe, reliable, and accessible can improve overall community health by providing individuals with greater mobility and access to healthcare services, employment opportunities, and other essential resources.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "lobbying" is not a term that has a medical definition. Lobbying refers to the act of attempting to influence decisions made by legislators or other officials in favor of specific causes or outcomes. It is commonly used to describe advocacy efforts by various interest groups, including healthcare organizations and pharmaceutical companies, to shape health policy and regulations. However, it is not a medical term with a specific clinical meaning.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "weather" is not a medical term. Weather refers to the state of the atmosphere at a particular place and time, including factors such as temperature, humidity, cloudiness, precipitation, and wind. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to try to help answer those for you!

Heavy metals are a group of elements with a specific gravity at least five times greater than that of water. They include metals such as mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As), chromium (Cr), thallium (Tl), and lead (Pb). These metals are considered toxic when they accumulate in the body beyond certain levels, interfering with various biological processes and causing damage to cells, tissues, and organs.

Heavy metal exposure can occur through various sources, including occupational exposure, contaminated food, water, or air, and improper disposal of electronic waste. Chronic exposure to heavy metals has been linked to several health issues, such as neurological disorders, kidney damage, developmental problems, and cancer. Monitoring and controlling exposure to these elements is essential for maintaining good health and preventing potential adverse effects.

I apologize for any confusion, but "coal" is not a medical term. Coal is a black or brownish-black sedimentary rock that is formed from the accumulation and preservation of plant materials, usually in a swamp environment. It is commonly used as a fuel source due to its high carbon content. If you have any questions about medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to help answer them.

"Social control policies" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, in a broader social context, social control policies refer to the strategies and measures implemented by society or its institutions to regulate, manage, and shape the behavior of individuals or groups in order to maintain social order, conformity, and cohesion.

In the field of public health, social control policies may refer to interventions aimed at changing behaviors that pose risks to individual or community health, such as tobacco control policies, alcohol regulation measures, or food safety regulations. These policies are designed to promote healthy behaviors, prevent disease and injury, and protect vulnerable populations from harm.

It's worth noting that the concept of social control can be controversial, as it raises questions about individual autonomy, privacy, and social justice. Therefore, the development and implementation of social control policies should involve careful consideration of ethical principles and community engagement to ensure that they are fair, effective, and respectful of human rights.

A biological marker, often referred to as a biomarker, is a measurable indicator that reflects the presence or severity of a disease state, or a response to a therapeutic intervention. Biomarkers can be found in various materials such as blood, tissues, or bodily fluids, and they can take many forms, including molecular, histologic, radiographic, or physiological measurements.

In the context of medical research and clinical practice, biomarkers are used for a variety of purposes, such as:

1. Diagnosis: Biomarkers can help diagnose a disease by indicating the presence or absence of a particular condition. For example, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a biomarker used to detect prostate cancer.
2. Monitoring: Biomarkers can be used to monitor the progression or regression of a disease over time. For instance, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels are monitored in diabetes patients to assess long-term blood glucose control.
3. Predicting: Biomarkers can help predict the likelihood of developing a particular disease or the risk of a negative outcome. For example, the presence of certain genetic mutations can indicate an increased risk for breast cancer.
4. Response to treatment: Biomarkers can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a specific treatment by measuring changes in the biomarker levels before and after the intervention. This is particularly useful in personalized medicine, where treatments are tailored to individual patients based on their unique biomarker profiles.

It's important to note that for a biomarker to be considered clinically valid and useful, it must undergo rigorous validation through well-designed studies, including demonstrating sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and clinical relevance.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

Aminobiphenyl compounds are a group of chemical substances that contain two phenyl rings linked by a single carbon-nitrogen bond. The amino group (-NH2) is attached to one of the phenyl rings.

These compounds have been historically used in the manufacture of dyes and were also used as rubber accelerators. However, they have been largely phased out due to their carcinogenic properties. Exposure to certain aminobiphenyl compounds has been associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer in humans.

It is important to note that the medical definition of 'aminobiphenyl compounds' generally refers to their chemical structure and potential health hazards, rather than a specific medical condition or treatment.

Public health is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "the art and science of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting human health through organized efforts of society." It focuses on improving the health and well-being of entire communities, populations, and societies, rather than individual patients. This is achieved through various strategies, including education, prevention, surveillance of diseases, and promotion of healthy behaviors and environments. Public health also addresses broader determinants of health, such as access to healthcare, housing, food, and income, which have a significant impact on the overall health of populations.

A cohort study is a type of observational study in which a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure are followed up over time to determine the incidence of a specific outcome or outcomes. The cohort, or group, is defined based on the exposure status (e.g., exposed vs. unexposed) and then monitored prospectively to assess for the development of new health events or conditions.

Cohort studies can be either prospective or retrospective in design. In a prospective cohort study, participants are enrolled and followed forward in time from the beginning of the study. In contrast, in a retrospective cohort study, researchers identify a cohort that has already been assembled through medical records, insurance claims, or other sources and then look back in time to assess exposure status and health outcomes.

Cohort studies are useful for establishing causality between an exposure and an outcome because they allow researchers to observe the temporal relationship between the two. They can also provide information on the incidence of a disease or condition in different populations, which can be used to inform public health policy and interventions. However, cohort studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, and they may be subject to bias if participants are not representative of the population or if there is loss to follow-up.

Leukoplakia is a medical term used to describe a white or gray patch that develops on the mucous membranes lining the inside of the mouth. These patches are typically caused by excessive cell growth and cannot be easily scraped off. Leukoplakia is often associated with long-term tobacco use, including smoking and chewing tobacco, as well as alcohol consumption. While most cases of leukoplakia are benign, a small percentage can develop into oral cancer, so it's essential to have any suspicious patches evaluated by a healthcare professional.

Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are a group of highly reactive gases, primarily composed of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). They are formed during the combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal, oil, gas, or biomass, and are emitted from various sources, including power plants, industrial boilers, transportation vehicles, and residential heating systems. Exposure to NOx can have adverse health effects, particularly on the respiratory system, and contribute to the formation of harmful air pollutants like ground-level ozone and fine particulate matter.

"California" is a geographical location and does not have a medical definition. It is a state located on the west coast of the United States, known for its diverse landscape including mountains, beaches, and forests. However, in some contexts, "California" may refer to certain medical conditions or situations that are associated with the state, such as:

* California encephalitis: a viral infection transmitted by mosquitoes that is common in California and other western states.
* California king snake: a non-venomous snake species found in California and other parts of the southwestern United States, which can bite and cause allergic reactions in some people.
* California roll: a type of sushi roll that originated in California and is made with avocado, cucumber, and crab meat, which may pose an allergy risk for some individuals.

It's important to note that these uses of "California" are not medical definitions per se, but rather descriptive terms that refer to specific conditions or situations associated with the state.

'Smog' is not a term used in medical definitions. It is a combination of the words "smoke" and "fog" and refers to a type of air pollution typically formed when vehicle emissions, industrial processes, and other sources release large amounts of fine particles and gases (such as nitrogen oxides or ground-level ozone) into the air. These pollutants then react in the presence of sunlight to form smog.

However, exposure to high levels of smog can have negative health effects, particularly for people with respiratory conditions such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Smog can irritate the eyes, nose, throat, and lungs, causing symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, and chest pain. Long-term exposure to smog has been linked to more serious health problems, including heart disease, lung cancer, and premature death.

Government regulation in the context of medicine refers to the rules, guidelines, and laws established by government agencies to control, monitor, and standardize various aspects of healthcare. These regulations are designed to protect patients, promote public health, ensure quality of care, and regulate the healthcare industry. Examples of government regulation in medicine include:

1. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations for drug approval, medical device clearance, and food safety.
2. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) regulations for healthcare reimbursement, quality measures, and program eligibility.
3. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations for workplace safety in healthcare settings.
4. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations to minimize environmental impacts from healthcare facilities and pharmaceutical manufacturing.
5. State medical boards' regulations for licensing, disciplining, and monitoring physicians and other healthcare professionals.
6. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations for patient privacy and data security.
7. Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) regulations for laboratory testing quality and standards.
8. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) regulations to prevent deceptive or unfair trade practices in healthcare marketing and advertising.
9. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) guidelines for evidence-based practice and patient safety.
10. Public Health Service Act (PHSA) regulations related to infectious diseases, bioterrorism preparedness, and substance abuse treatment.

Genetically modified plants (GMPs) are plants that have had their DNA altered through genetic engineering techniques to exhibit desired traits. These modifications can be made to enhance certain characteristics such as increased resistance to pests, improved tolerance to environmental stresses like drought or salinity, or enhanced nutritional content. The process often involves introducing genes from other organisms, such as bacteria or viruses, into the plant's genome. Examples of GMPs include Bt cotton, which has a gene from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis that makes it resistant to certain pests, and golden rice, which is engineered to contain higher levels of beta-carotene, a precursor to vitamin A. It's important to note that genetically modified plants are subject to rigorous testing and regulation to ensure their safety for human consumption and environmental impact before they are approved for commercial use.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Motor Vehicles" is not a term that typically has a medical definition. It is a general term used to describe vehicles that are powered by a motor or engine and are designed for land transportation. This would include cars, trucks, motorcycles, buses, and other similar types of vehicles.

However, in a legal context, a "motor vehicle" may have a specific definition that varies by jurisdiction. For example, in some places, the definition might only include vehicles that are intended for use on public roads, excluding things like golf carts or construction equipment.

If you're looking for a medical term related to motor vehicles, there are many that could apply, such as "motor vehicle accident," "whiplash injury," or "traumatic brain injury due to motor vehicle collision." But the term "motor vehicles" itself does not have a specific medical definition.

Risk assessment in the medical context refers to the process of identifying, evaluating, and prioritizing risks to patients, healthcare workers, or the community related to healthcare delivery. It involves determining the likelihood and potential impact of adverse events or hazards, such as infectious diseases, medication errors, or medical devices failures, and implementing measures to mitigate or manage those risks. The goal of risk assessment is to promote safe and high-quality care by identifying areas for improvement and taking action to minimize harm.

A case-control study is an observational research design used to identify risk factors or causes of a disease or health outcome. In this type of study, individuals with the disease or condition (cases) are compared with similar individuals who do not have the disease or condition (controls). The exposure history or other characteristics of interest are then compared between the two groups to determine if there is an association between the exposure and the disease.

Case-control studies are often used when it is not feasible or ethical to conduct a randomized controlled trial, as they can provide valuable insights into potential causes of diseases or health outcomes in a relatively short period of time and at a lower cost than other study designs. However, because case-control studies rely on retrospective data collection, they are subject to biases such as recall bias and selection bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, it is important to carefully design and conduct case-control studies to minimize these potential sources of bias.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Taxes" is not a medical term. It refers to a compulsory financial charge or levy imposed on individuals or entities by a governmental authority to fund various public expenditures and services. If you have any medical questions or terms you would like defined, I'd be happy to help!

A smoke-free policy is a set of rules or regulations that prohibit smoking in a specific area or organization-wide, with the goal of protecting people from the harmful effects of secondhand smoke. These policies can apply to various settings such as workplaces, hospitals, schools, restaurants, and public places. The ultimate aim of a smoke-free policy is to reduce exposure to tobacco smoke, promote healthier living environments, and encourage smoking cessation. Smoke-free policies are evidence-based interventions that have been shown to significantly improve indoor air quality, decrease the prevalence of respiratory symptoms, and lower the risk of cardiovascular diseases among non-smoking individuals.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Industry" is a general term that refers to a specific branch of economic activity, or a particular way of producing goods or services. It is not a medical term with a defined meaning within the field of medicine.

However, if you are referring to the term "industrious," which can be used to describe someone who is diligent and hard-working, it could be applied in a medical context to describe a patient's level of engagement and effort in their own care. For example, a patient who is conscientious about taking their medications as prescribed, following through with recommended treatments, and making necessary lifestyle changes to manage their condition might be described as "industrious" by their healthcare provider.

Water pollutants refer to any substances or materials that contaminate water sources and make them unsafe or unsuitable for use. These pollutants can include a wide range of chemicals, microorganisms, and physical particles that can have harmful effects on human health, aquatic life, and the environment as a whole. Examples of water pollutants include heavy metals like lead and mercury, industrial chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dioxins, agricultural runoff containing pesticides and fertilizers, sewage and wastewater, oil spills, and microplastics. Exposure to water pollutants can cause a variety of health problems, ranging from minor irritations to serious illnesses or even death in extreme cases. Additionally, water pollution can have significant impacts on the environment, including harming or killing aquatic life, disrupting ecosystems, and reducing biodiversity.

Carcinogens are agents that can cause cancer. According to the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), environmental carcinogens refer to "cancer-causing agents that people encounter in their daily lives, including substances or exposures in air, water, food, and in the workplace." These carcinogens can increase the risk of cancer by damaging DNA or interfering with cellular processes that control growth.

Examples of environmental carcinogens include:

* Air pollution: Certain pollutants in the air, such as diesel exhaust particles and secondhand smoke, have been linked to an increased risk of lung cancer.
* Radon: A naturally occurring radioactive gas that can accumulate in homes and other buildings, radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States.
* UV radiation: Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun or tanning beds can lead to skin cancer.
* Certain chemicals: Some chemicals found in the workplace or in consumer products, such as asbestos, benzene, and vinyl chloride, have been linked to an increased risk of cancer.
* Infectious agents: Certain viruses, bacteria, and parasites can increase the risk of cancer. For example, human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major cause of cervical cancer, and hepatitis B and C viruses are leading causes of liver cancer.

It's important to note that exposure to environmental carcinogens does not guarantee that a person will develop cancer. The risk depends on many factors, including the level and duration of exposure, as well as individual susceptibility. However, reducing exposure to these agents can help reduce the overall risk of cancer.

Epidemiologic studies are investigations that seek to understand the distribution, patterns, and determinants of health and disease within a population. These studies aim to identify the frequency and occurrence of diseases or health-related events, as well as the factors that contribute to their occurrence. This information is used to develop public health policies and interventions to prevent or control diseases and promote overall health.

There are several types of epidemiologic studies, including:

1. Descriptive studies: These studies describe the characteristics of a population and the distribution of a disease or health-related event within that population. They do not typically investigate causes or risk factors.
2. Analytical studies: These studies examine the relationship between exposures (risk factors) and outcomes (diseases or health-related events). There are two main types of analytical studies: observational studies and experimental studies.
3. Observational studies: In these studies, researchers observe and collect data on a population without intervening or manipulating any variables. There are several types of observational studies, including cohort studies, case-control studies, and cross-sectional studies.
4. Cohort studies: These studies follow a group of people (a cohort) over time to see if they develop a particular disease or health-related event. Researchers collect data on exposures and outcomes at multiple points in time.
5. Case-control studies: These studies compare people with a specific disease or health-related event (cases) to people without the disease or event (controls). Researchers then look back in time to see if there are any differences in exposures between the two groups.
6. Cross-sectional studies: These studies collect data on exposures and outcomes at a single point in time. They are useful for estimating the prevalence of a disease or health-related event, but they cannot establish causality.
7. Experimental studies: In these studies, researchers manipulate variables to see if they have an effect on a particular outcome. The most common type of experimental study is a randomized controlled trial (RCT), in which participants are randomly assigned to receive either the intervention being tested or a control group.

Epidemiologic studies can provide valuable insights into the causes and consequences of diseases and health-related events, as well as potential interventions to prevent or treat them. However, they must be carefully designed and conducted to minimize bias and confounding, and their results should be interpreted with caution.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Chemical water pollutants refer to harmful chemicals or substances that contaminate bodies of water, making them unsafe for human use and harmful to aquatic life. These pollutants can come from various sources, including industrial and agricultural runoff, sewage and wastewater, oil spills, and improper disposal of hazardous materials.

Examples of chemical water pollutants include heavy metals (such as lead, mercury, and cadmium), pesticides and herbicides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and petroleum products. These chemicals can have toxic effects on aquatic organisms, disrupt ecosystems, and pose risks to human health through exposure or consumption.

Regulations and standards are in place to monitor and limit the levels of chemical pollutants in water sources, with the aim of protecting public health and the environment.

Logistic models, specifically logistic regression models, are a type of statistical analysis used in medical and epidemiological research to identify the relationship between the risk of a certain health outcome or disease (dependent variable) and one or more independent variables, such as demographic factors, exposure variables, or other clinical measurements.

In contrast to linear regression models, logistic regression models are used when the dependent variable is binary or dichotomous in nature, meaning it can only take on two values, such as "disease present" or "disease absent." The model uses a logistic function to estimate the probability of the outcome based on the independent variables.

Logistic regression models are useful for identifying risk factors and estimating the strength of associations between exposures and health outcomes, adjusting for potential confounders, and predicting the probability of an outcome given certain values of the independent variables. They can also be used to develop clinical prediction rules or scores that can aid in decision-making and patient care.

Mortality, in medical terms, refers to the state or condition of being mortal; the quality or fact of being subject to death. It is often used in reference to the mortality rate, which is the number of deaths in a specific population, divided by the size of that population, per a given time period. This can be used as a measure of the risk of death among a population.

Environmental pollutants are defined as any substances or energy (such as noise, heat, or light) that are present in the environment and can cause harm or discomfort to humans or other living organisms, or damage the natural ecosystems. These pollutants can come from a variety of sources, including industrial processes, transportation, agriculture, and household activities. They can be in the form of gases, liquids, solids, or radioactive materials, and can contaminate air, water, and soil. Examples include heavy metals, pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), particulate matter, and greenhouse gases.

It is important to note that the impact of environmental pollutants on human health and the environment can be acute (short-term) or chronic (long-term) and it depends on the type, concentration, duration and frequency of exposure. Some common effects of environmental pollutants include respiratory problems, cancer, neurological disorders, reproductive issues, and developmental delays in children.

It is important to monitor, control and reduce the emissions of these pollutants through regulations, technology advancements, and sustainable practices to protect human health and the environment.

I am not aware of a specific medical definition for the term "China." Generally, it is used to refer to:

1. The People's Republic of China (PRC), which is a country in East Asia. It is the most populous country in the world and the fourth largest by geographical area. Its capital city is Beijing.
2. In a historical context, "China" was used to refer to various dynasties and empires that existed in East Asia over thousands of years. The term "Middle Kingdom" or "Zhongguo" (中国) has been used by the Chinese people to refer to their country for centuries.
3. In a more general sense, "China" can also be used to describe products or goods that originate from or are associated with the People's Republic of China.

If you have a specific context in which you encountered the term "China" related to medicine, please provide it so I can give a more accurate response.

The odds ratio (OR) is a statistical measure used in epidemiology and research to estimate the association between an exposure and an outcome. It represents the odds that an event will occur in one group versus the odds that it will occur in another group, assuming that all other factors are held constant.

In medical research, the odds ratio is often used to quantify the strength of the relationship between a risk factor (exposure) and a disease outcome. An OR of 1 indicates no association between the exposure and the outcome, while an OR greater than 1 suggests that there is a positive association between the two. Conversely, an OR less than 1 implies a negative association.

It's important to note that the odds ratio is not the same as the relative risk (RR), which compares the incidence rates of an outcome in two groups. While the OR can approximate the RR when the outcome is rare, they are not interchangeable and can lead to different conclusions about the association between an exposure and an outcome.

I believe you may have mixed up the terms "medicine" and "commerce." Commerce is a broad term that refers to the buying and selling of goods and services. It is not typically used in a medical context, so it does not have a specific medical definition. However, I can provide you with some related terms that might be helpful:

1. Medical commerce: This term generally refers to the business aspects of healthcare, such as the buying and selling of medical supplies, equipment, and services. It may also refer to the economic relationships between various stakeholders in the healthcare system, including providers, insurers, pharmaceutical companies, and patients.
2. Telemedicine commerce: This term specifically refers to the use of technology to facilitate remote consultations and transactions between healthcare providers and patients. Examples include online appointment scheduling, virtual consultations, and electronic prescribing.
3. Medical tourism: This is a form of commerce where people travel to other countries to receive medical treatment or procedures that may be less expensive or more accessible than in their home country. It can also refer to the business of providing medical services to international patients.
4. Healthcare marketing: This term refers to the activities and strategies used by healthcare organizations to promote their products, services, and brands to potential customers. It includes advertising, public relations, social media, content marketing, and other tactics designed to build awareness, generate leads, and drive sales.

I hope this information is helpful! Let me know if you have any further questions or concerns.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Poland" is not a medical term. It is a country in Central Europe. If you have any questions about medical conditions or terminology, I would be happy to help answer those!

Medical definitions typically focus on the relevance of a term to medicine or healthcare, so here's a medical perspective on polycyclic compounds:

Polycyclic compounds are organic substances that contain two or more chemical rings in their structure. While not all polycyclic compounds are relevant to medicine, some can have significant medical implications. For instance, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a type of polycyclic compound that can be found in tobacco smoke and certain types of air pollution. PAHs have been linked to an increased risk of cancer, particularly lung cancer, due to their ability to damage DNA.

Another example is the class of drugs called steroids, which include hormones like cortisol and sex hormones like testosterone and estrogen. These compounds are polycyclic because they contain several interconnected rings in their structure. Steroid medications are used to treat a variety of medical conditions, including inflammation, asthma, and Addison's disease.

In summary, while not all polycyclic compounds are relevant to medicine, some can have important medical implications, either as harmful environmental pollutants or as useful therapeutic agents.

Fossil fuels are not a medical term, but rather a term used in the field of earth science and energy production. They refer to fuels formed by natural processes such as anaerobic decomposition of buried dead organisms. The age of the organisms and their resulting fossil fuels is typically millions of years, and sometimes even hundreds of millions of years.

There are three main types of fossil fuels: coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Coal is primarily composed of carbon and hydrogen, and it is formed from the remains of plants that lived hundreds of millions of years ago in swamps and peat bogs. Petroleum, also known as crude oil, is a liquid mixture of hydrocarbons and other organic compounds, formed from the remains of marine organisms such as algae and zooplankton. Natural gas is primarily composed of methane and other light hydrocarbons, and it is found in underground reservoirs, often in association with petroleum deposits.

Fossil fuels are a major source of energy for transportation, heating, and electricity generation, but their combustion also releases large amounts of carbon dioxide and other pollutants into the atmosphere, contributing to climate change and air pollution.

Regression analysis is a statistical technique used in medicine, as well as in other fields, to examine the relationship between one or more independent variables (predictors) and a dependent variable (outcome). It allows for the estimation of the average change in the outcome variable associated with a one-unit change in an independent variable, while controlling for the effects of other independent variables. This technique is often used to identify risk factors for diseases or to evaluate the effectiveness of medical interventions. In medical research, regression analysis can be used to adjust for potential confounding variables and to quantify the relationship between exposures and health outcomes. It can also be used in predictive modeling to estimate the probability of a particular outcome based on multiple predictors.

In medical terms, "dust" is not defined as a specific medical condition or disease. However, generally speaking, dust refers to small particles of solid matter that can be found in the air and can come from various sources, such as soil, pollen, hair, textiles, paper, or plastic.

Exposure to certain types of dust, such as those containing allergens, chemicals, or harmful pathogens, can cause a range of health problems, including respiratory issues like asthma, allergies, and lung diseases. Prolonged exposure to certain types of dust, such as silica or asbestos, can even lead to serious conditions like silicosis or mesothelioma.

Therefore, it is important for individuals who work in environments with high levels of dust to take appropriate precautions, such as wearing masks and respirators, to minimize their exposure and reduce the risk of health problems.

"Soot" is not typically considered a medical term, but it does have relevance to public health and medicine due to its potential health effects. Soot is a general term for the fine black or brown particles that are produced when materials burn, such as in fires, industrial processes, or vehicle emissions. It is made up of a complex mixture of substances, including carbon, metals, and other organic compounds.

Inhaling soot can lead to respiratory problems, cardiovascular issues, and cancer. This is because the tiny particles can penetrate deep into the lungs and even enter the bloodstream, causing inflammation and damage to tissues. Prolonged exposure or high concentrations of soot can have more severe health effects, particularly in vulnerable populations such as children, the elderly, and those with pre-existing medical conditions.

Environmental Illness (EI) is a condition in which individuals report experiencing various symptoms that they believe are caused or worsened by exposure to specific environmental factors. These factors can include chemicals, allergens, pollutants, or other substances present in the air, water, or food. The symptoms of EI can vary widely and may include headaches, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, respiratory problems, skin irritations, and gastrointestinal issues.

It's important to note that while some people may be more sensitive than others to environmental factors, the term "Environmental Illness" is not recognized as a formal medical diagnosis by major medical organizations such as the American Medical Association or the World Health Organization. Instead, the symptoms of EI are often attributed to other conditions, such as allergies, asthma, or chemical sensitivities.

In some cases, individuals with EI may be diagnosed with a related condition called Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS), which is characterized by heightened sensitivity to chemicals and other environmental factors. However, MCS is also not recognized as a formal medical diagnosis by many major medical organizations.

Overall, while some people may experience symptoms that they believe are caused by exposure to environmental factors, it's important to consult with a healthcare provider for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive lung disease characterized by the persistent obstruction of airflow in and out of the lungs. This obstruction is usually caused by two primary conditions: chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Chronic bronchitis involves inflammation and narrowing of the airways, leading to excessive mucus production and coughing. Emphysema is a condition where the alveoli (air sacs) in the lungs are damaged, resulting in decreased gas exchange and shortness of breath.

The main symptoms of COPD include progressive shortness of breath, chronic cough, chest tightness, wheezing, and excessive mucus production. The disease is often associated with exposure to harmful particles or gases, such as cigarette smoke, air pollution, or occupational dusts and chemicals. While there is no cure for COPD, treatments can help alleviate symptoms, improve quality of life, and slow the progression of the disease. These treatments may include bronchodilators, corticosteroids, combination inhalers, pulmonary rehabilitation, and, in severe cases, oxygen therapy or lung transplantation.

I apologize, but "Public Relations" is not a term that has a medical definition. Public relations is a field of study and practice that focuses on managing the spread of information between an individual or an organization and the public. It involves building and maintaining a positive reputation, handling crises, and fostering relationships with various stakeholders.

If you have any questions related to healthcare or medicine, I'd be happy to help. Just let me know!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "soil pollutants" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. Soil pollution refers to the presence or accumulation of hazardous substances, chemicals, or other pollutants in soil that can have negative effects on plant life, human health, and the environment.

However, if you're asking about potential health effects of exposure to soil pollutants, it could include a variety of symptoms or diseases, depending on the specific pollutant. For example, exposure to lead-contaminated soil can lead to developmental delays in children, while exposure to certain pesticides or industrial chemicals can cause neurological problems, respiratory issues, and even cancer.

If you have more specific information about a particular substance or context, I may be able to provide a more precise answer.

Acid rain is a form of precipitation, including rain, snow, and fog, that has a pH level less than 5.6 and contains high levels of sulfuric and nitric acids. These acidic compounds are formed primarily when sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) are emitted into the atmosphere from human sources such as coal-fired power plants, industrial processes, and transportation vehicles. When these pollutants mix with water, oxygen, and other chemicals in the atmosphere, they form acidic compounds that can fall to the earth as acid rain, harming both natural ecosystems and man-made structures.

The term "acid rain" was first coined in the 1960s by scientists studying the effects of air pollution on the environment. Acid rain can have a number of negative impacts on the environment, including damaging forests, lakes, and streams; harming aquatic life; eroding buildings, monuments, and sculptures; and contributing to respiratory problems in humans and animals.

To mitigate the effects of acid rain, many countries have implemented regulations aimed at reducing emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides from industrial sources and power plants. These efforts have helped to reduce the severity of acid rain in some areas, but the problem remains a significant concern in many parts of the world.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Rivers" is not a medical term or concept. It is a geographical term referring to large, flowing bodies of water that usually empty into a sea or an ocean. If you have any medical questions or terms you would like defined, I'd be happy to help!

Health policy refers to a set of decisions, plans, and actions that are undertaken to achieve specific healthcare goals within a population. It is formulated by governmental and non-governmental organizations with the objective of providing guidance and direction for the management and delivery of healthcare services. Health policies address various aspects of healthcare, including access, financing, quality, and equity. They can be designed to promote health, prevent disease, and provide treatment and rehabilitation services to individuals who are sick or injured. Effective health policies require careful consideration of scientific evidence, ethical principles, and societal values to ensure that they meet the needs of the population while being fiscally responsible.

'Incineration' is not typically used as a medical term, but it does have relevance to the field of medicine and public health. It generally refers to the process of destroying something, usually waste, through extreme heat and combustion. In the medical context, incineration is often discussed in relation to the disposal of healthcare waste, including infectious materials, sharps, and pharmaceutical products. Proper incineration can help reduce the volume of waste, destroy harmful components, and prevent the spread of infection. However, it's important to note that improper incineration practices can also release toxic emissions into the environment, posing risks to public health.

Socioeconomic factors are a range of interconnected conditions and influences that affect the opportunities and resources a person or group has to maintain and improve their health and well-being. These factors include:

1. Economic stability: This includes employment status, job security, income level, and poverty status. Lower income and lack of employment are associated with poorer health outcomes.
2. Education: Higher levels of education are generally associated with better health outcomes. Education can affect a person's ability to access and understand health information, as well as their ability to navigate the healthcare system.
3. Social and community context: This includes factors such as social support networks, discrimination, and community safety. Strong social supports and positive community connections are associated with better health outcomes, while discrimination and lack of safety can negatively impact health.
4. Healthcare access and quality: Access to affordable, high-quality healthcare is an important socioeconomic factor that can significantly impact a person's health. Factors such as insurance status, availability of providers, and cultural competency of healthcare systems can all affect healthcare access and quality.
5. Neighborhood and built environment: The physical conditions in which people live, work, and play can also impact their health. Factors such as housing quality, transportation options, availability of healthy foods, and exposure to environmental hazards can all influence health outcomes.

Socioeconomic factors are often interrelated and can have a cumulative effect on health outcomes. For example, someone who lives in a low-income neighborhood with limited access to healthy foods and safe parks may also face challenges related to employment, education, and healthcare access that further impact their health. Addressing socioeconomic factors is an important part of promoting health equity and reducing health disparities.

Occupational air pollutants refer to harmful substances present in the air in workplaces or occupational settings. These pollutants can include dusts, gases, fumes, vapors, or mists that are produced by industrial processes, chemical reactions, or other sources. Examples of occupational air pollutants include:

1. Respirable crystalline silica: A common mineral found in sand, stone, and concrete that can cause lung disease and cancer when inhaled in high concentrations.
2. Asbestos: A naturally occurring mineral fiber that was widely used in construction materials and industrial applications until the 1970s. Exposure to asbestos fibers can cause lung diseases such as asbestosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma.
3. Welding fumes: Fumes generated during welding processes can contain harmful metals such as manganese, chromium, and nickel that can cause neurological damage and respiratory problems.
4. Isocyanates: Chemicals used in the production of foam insulation, spray-on coatings, and other industrial applications that can cause asthma and other respiratory symptoms.
5. Coal dust: Fine particles generated during coal mining, transportation, and handling that can cause lung disease and other health problems.
6. Diesel exhaust: Emissions from diesel engines that contain harmful particulates and gases that can cause respiratory and cardiovascular problems.

Occupational air pollutants are regulated by various government agencies, including the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in the United States, to protect workers from exposure and minimize health risks.

Lung diseases refer to a broad category of disorders that affect the lungs and other structures within the respiratory system. These diseases can impair lung function, leading to symptoms such as coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, and wheezing. They can be categorized into several types based on the underlying cause and nature of the disease process. Some common examples include:

1. Obstructive lung diseases: These are characterized by narrowing or blockage of the airways, making it difficult to breathe out. Examples include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, bronchiectasis, and cystic fibrosis.
2. Restrictive lung diseases: These involve stiffening or scarring of the lungs, which reduces their ability to expand and take in air. Examples include idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, sarcoidosis, and asbestosis.
3. Infectious lung diseases: These are caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites that infect the lungs. Examples include pneumonia, tuberculosis, and influenza.
4. Vascular lung diseases: These affect the blood vessels in the lungs, impairing oxygen exchange. Examples include pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hypertension, and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH).
5. Neoplastic lung diseases: These involve abnormal growth of cells within the lungs, leading to cancer. Examples include small cell lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, and mesothelioma.
6. Other lung diseases: These include interstitial lung diseases, pleural effusions, and rare disorders such as pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM).

It is important to note that this list is not exhaustive, and there are many other conditions that can affect the lungs. Proper diagnosis and treatment of lung diseases require consultation with a healthcare professional, such as a pulmonologist or respiratory therapist.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Linear Models" is actually a term from the field of statistics and machine learning, rather than medicine. A linear model is a type of statistical model that is used to analyze the relationship between two or more variables. In a linear model, the relationship between the dependent variable (the outcome or result) and the independent variable(s) (the factors being studied) is assumed to be linear, meaning that it can be described by a straight line on a graph.

The equation for a simple linear model with one independent variable (x) and one dependent variable (y) looks like this:

y = β0 + β1*x + ε

In this equation, β0 is the y-intercept or the value of y when x equals zero, β1 is the slope or the change in y for each unit increase in x, and ε is the error term or the difference between the actual values of y and the predicted values of y based on the linear model.

Linear models are widely used in medical research to study the relationship between various factors (such as exposure to a risk factor or treatment) and health outcomes (such as disease incidence or mortality). They can also be used to adjust for confounding variables, which are factors that may influence both the independent variable and the dependent variable, and thus affect the observed relationship between them.

Tobacco use cessation products are a type of pharmacological or nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) designed to help individuals stop using tobacco products, such as cigarettes, cigars, and smokeless tobacco. These products include:

1. Nicotine gum: A chewing gum that delivers nicotine to the body through the lining of the mouth.
2. Nicotine lozenges: Similar to nicotine gum, but in the form of a small tablet that dissolves slowly in the mouth.
3. Nicotine patch: A transdermal patch that delivers a steady dose of nicotine through the skin.
4. Nicotine inhaler: A device that looks like a cigarette and delivers nicotine vapor to be inhaled.
5. Nicotine nasal spray: A spray that delivers nicotine through the nostrils.
6. Non-nicotine prescription medications: Such as bupropion (Zyban) and varenicline (Chantix), which help reduce cravings and withdrawal symptoms.

These products are intended to help manage nicotine dependence and make it easier for individuals to quit tobacco use by alleviating the unpleasant symptoms of withdrawal. It is important to note that these products should be used as part of a comprehensive cessation plan, which may also include counseling and behavioral support.

Child welfare is a broad term that refers to the overall well-being and protection of children. It encompasses a range of services and interventions aimed at promoting the physical, emotional, social, and educational development of children, while also protecting them from harm, abuse, and neglect. The medical definition of child welfare may include:

1. Preventive Services: Programs and interventions designed to strengthen families and prevent child maltreatment, such as home visiting programs, parent education classes, and family support services.
2. Protective Services: Interventions that aim to protect children from harm, abuse, or neglect, including investigations of reports of maltreatment, removal of children from dangerous situations, and provision of alternative care arrangements.
3. Family Reunification Services: Efforts to reunite children with their families when it is safe and in the best interest of the child, such as family therapy, parent-child visitation, and case management services.
4. Permanency Planning: The development of long-term plans for children who cannot safely return to their families, including adoption, guardianship, or other permanent living arrangements.
5. Foster Care Services: Provision of temporary care for children who cannot safely remain in their own homes, including placement with foster families, group homes, or residential treatment facilities.
6. Child Health and Development Services: Programs that promote the physical, emotional, and developmental well-being of children, such as health screenings, immunizations, mental health services, and early intervention programs for children with special needs.
7. Advocacy and Policy Development: Efforts to promote policies and practices that support the well-being and protection of children, including advocating for laws and regulations that protect children's rights and ensure their safety and well-being.

I believe there might be a bit of confusion in your question as "automobiles" is a general term used to describe wheeled motor vehicles for transportation, and it's not typically a medical term with its own specific definition. However, I can provide you with some automobile-related terms that have medical implications:

1. **Driving fitness**: This refers to the physical and mental abilities required to operate a vehicle safely. Various medical conditions or treatments can impact driving fitness, such as seizure disorders, sleep apnea, certain medications, or alcohol/substance use disorders.
2. **Driving simulator**: A device used in research and rehabilitation settings that presents a realistic driving environment for assessing and training individuals with various medical conditions or disabilities affecting their ability to drive.
3. **Adaptive automobile equipment**: Devices designed to assist people with disabilities in operating vehicles, such as hand controls, wheelchair lifts, or pedal extensions.
4. **Transportation disadvantage**: A situation where an individual's medical condition, disability, or lack of access to suitable transportation limits their ability to obtain necessary healthcare services.
5. **Motor vehicle crash (MVC) outcomes**: Medical consequences resulting from motor vehicle crashes, including injuries and fatalities. These outcomes are often studied in public health and injury prevention research.

If you have a specific medical term or concept related to automobiles that you would like me to define or explain, please provide more details, and I will be happy to help.

The Czech Republic is a country located in Central Europe. It is not a medical term or concept, so it does not have a specific medical definition. However, like any other country, the Czech Republic has its own healthcare system and medical facilities that provide various health services to its population. The Czech Republic is known for its high-quality healthcare and medical education, with many institutions being recognized worldwide.

The term "Theoretical Models" is used in various scientific fields, including medicine, to describe a representation of a complex system or phenomenon. It is a simplified framework that explains how different components of the system interact with each other and how they contribute to the overall behavior of the system. Theoretical models are often used in medical research to understand and predict the outcomes of diseases, treatments, or public health interventions.

A theoretical model can take many forms, such as mathematical equations, computer simulations, or conceptual diagrams. It is based on a set of assumptions and hypotheses about the underlying mechanisms that drive the system. By manipulating these variables and observing the effects on the model's output, researchers can test their assumptions and generate new insights into the system's behavior.

Theoretical models are useful for medical research because they allow scientists to explore complex systems in a controlled and systematic way. They can help identify key drivers of disease or treatment outcomes, inform the design of clinical trials, and guide the development of new interventions. However, it is important to recognize that theoretical models are simplifications of reality and may not capture all the nuances and complexities of real-world systems. Therefore, they should be used in conjunction with other forms of evidence, such as experimental data and observational studies, to inform medical decision-making.

I'm happy to help, but I need to clarify that "residence characteristics" is not a commonly used medical term. It is more related to the field of public health or epidemiology. However, if you are asking for the characteristics of a residence that could be relevant to medical or health research, they might include:

1. Housing type (single-family home, apartment, mobile home, etc.)
2. Age and condition of the housing unit
3. Presence of environmental hazards (lead paint, asbestos, radon, etc.)
4. Quality of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems
5. Access to clean water and sanitation facilities
6. Safety features (smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detectors, etc.)
7. Presence of pests (rodents, cockroaches, bed bugs, etc.)
8. Neighborhood characteristics (crime rates, access to healthy food options, walkability, etc.)

These factors can all have an impact on the health outcomes of individuals and communities, and are often studied in public health research.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "industrial waste" is not a term that has a medical definition. Industrial waste is a term used to describe waste produced by industrial activities, such as manufacturing, mining, and construction. It can include a wide variety of materials, including chemicals, metals, soil, and water. Proper management and disposal of industrial waste are important for protecting the environment and public health. If you have any questions related to healthcare or medical terminology, I'd be happy to try to help answer those!

"Air movements" is not a medical term or concept. It generally refers to the movement or circulation of air, which can occur naturally (such as through wind) or mechanically (such as through fans or ventilation systems). In some contexts, it may refer specifically to the movement of air in operating rooms or other controlled environments for medical purposes. However, without more specific context, it is difficult to provide a precise definition or medical interpretation of "air movements."

Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) is a measurement of how quickly a person can exhale air from their lungs. It is often used as a quick test to assess breathing difficulties in people with respiratory conditions such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). PEFR is measured in liters per minute (L/min) and the highest value obtained during a forceful exhalation is recorded as the peak expiratory flow rate. Regular monitoring of PEFR can help to assess the severity of an asthma attack or the effectiveness of treatment.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "parents" is not a term that has a medical definition. In general usage, parents are the two people (typically) who bring up and care for a child, or who have given birth to or adopted a child. They are responsible for the child's housing, food, clothing, education, and medical care. Is there a specific medical or healthcare-related context you had in mind? I would be happy to help further if I can.

Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a group of enzymes involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds. They facilitate the conjugation of these compounds with glutathione, a tripeptide consisting of cysteine, glutamic acid, and glycine, which results in more water-soluble products that can be easily excreted from the body.

GSTs play a crucial role in protecting cells against oxidative stress and chemical injury by neutralizing reactive electrophilic species and peroxides. They are found in various tissues, including the liver, kidneys, lungs, and intestines, and are classified into several families based on their structure and function.

Abnormalities in GST activity have been associated with increased susceptibility to certain diseases, such as cancer, neurological disorders, and respiratory diseases. Therefore, GSTs have become a subject of interest in toxicology, pharmacology, and clinical research.

"Sex factors" is a term used in medicine and epidemiology to refer to the differences in disease incidence, prevalence, or response to treatment that are observed between males and females. These differences can be attributed to biological differences such as genetics, hormones, and anatomy, as well as social and cultural factors related to gender.

For example, some conditions such as autoimmune diseases, depression, and osteoporosis are more common in women, while others such as cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer are more prevalent in men. Additionally, sex differences have been observed in the effectiveness and side effects of various medications and treatments.

It is important to consider sex factors in medical research and clinical practice to ensure that patients receive appropriate and effective care.

Arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) is a group of enzymes involved in the metabolism of aromatic amines, which are found in a variety of substances including tobacco smoke, certain drugs, and environmental contaminants. NAT catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A to the aromatic amine, which can help to detoxify these compounds and make them more water-soluble for excretion. There are two main forms of NAT in humans, known as NAT1 and NAT2, which have different tissue distributions and substrate specificities. Variations in NAT activity due to genetic polymorphisms can affect individual susceptibility to certain chemical exposures and diseases, including cancer.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Product Packaging" is not a medical term. Product packaging generally refers to the process of designing and producing containers or wrapping for a product. This is typically a term used in the context of consumer goods, retail, and industrial manufacturing, rather than in medicine. In medicine, terms like "medication packaging" or "pharmaceutical packaging" might be used to refer to the specific ways that medications are packaged for distribution and use.

Nicotinic agonists are substances that bind to and activate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which are ligand-gated ion channels found in the nervous system of many organisms, including humans. These receptors are activated by the endogenous neurotransmitter acetylcholine and the exogenous compound nicotine.

When a nicotinic agonist binds to the receptor, it triggers a conformational change that leads to the opening of an ion channel, allowing the influx of cations such as calcium, sodium, and potassium. This ion flux can depolarize the postsynaptic membrane and generate or modulate electrical signals in excitable tissues, such as neurons and muscles.

Nicotinic agonists have various therapeutic and recreational uses, but they can also produce harmful effects, depending on the dose, duration of exposure, and individual sensitivity. Some examples of nicotinic agonists include:

1. Nicotine: A highly addictive alkaloid found in tobacco plants, which is the prototypical nicotinic agonist. It is used in smoking cessation therapies, such as nicotine gum and patches, but it can also lead to dependence and various health issues when consumed through smoking or vaping.
2. Varenicline: A medication approved for smoking cessation that acts as a partial agonist of nAChRs. It reduces the rewarding effects of nicotine and alleviates withdrawal symptoms, helping smokers quit.
3. Rivastigmine: A cholinesterase inhibitor used to treat Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia. It increases the concentration of acetylcholine in the synaptic cleft, enhancing its activity at nicotinic receptors and improving cognitive function.
4. Succinylcholine: A neuromuscular blocking agent used during surgical procedures to induce paralysis and facilitate intubation. It acts as a depolarizing nicotinic agonist, causing transient muscle fasciculations followed by prolonged relaxation.
5. Curare and related compounds: Plant-derived alkaloids that act as competitive antagonists of nicotinic receptors. They are used in anesthesia to induce paralysis and facilitate mechanical ventilation during surgery.

In summary, nicotinic agonists are substances that bind to and activate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, leading to various physiological responses. These compounds have diverse applications in medicine, from smoking cessation therapies to treatments for neurodegenerative disorders and anesthesia. However, they can also pose risks when misused or abused, as seen with nicotine addiction and the potential side effects of certain medications.

Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 is an enzyme that is part of the cytochrome P450 family, which are a group of enzymes involved in the metabolism of drugs and other xenobiotics (foreign substances) in the body. Specifically, CYP1A1 is found primarily in the liver and lungs and plays a role in the metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are chemicals found in tobacco smoke and are produced by the burning of fossil fuels and other organic materials.

CYP1A1 also has the ability to activate certain procarcinogens, which are substances that can be converted into cancer-causing agents (carcinogens) within the body. Therefore, variations in the CYP1A1 gene may influence an individual's susceptibility to cancer and other diseases.

The term "P-450" refers to the fact that these enzymes absorb light at a wavelength of 450 nanometers when they are combined with carbon monoxide, giving them a characteristic pink color. The "CYP" stands for "cytochrome P," and the number and letter designations (e.g., 1A1) indicate the specific enzyme within the family.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "organizational policy" is not a medical term. It falls under the broader category of management or administrative terminology.

An organizational policy generally refers to a formal statement or set of guidelines that outline an organization's approved course of action or conduct regarding various matters. These policies guide decision-making and help ensure consistent action across the organization. They can cover a wide range of topics, including (but not limited to) employee behavior, data security, patient care standards, and operational procedures.

In a healthcare setting, organizational policies play a crucial role in maintaining quality of care, ensuring patient safety, and complying with relevant laws and regulations.

Health surveys are research studies that collect data from a sample population to describe the current health status, health behaviors, and healthcare utilization of a particular group or community. These surveys may include questions about various aspects of health such as physical health, mental health, chronic conditions, lifestyle habits, access to healthcare services, and demographic information. The data collected from health surveys can be used to monitor trends in health over time, identify disparities in health outcomes, develop and evaluate public health programs and policies, and inform resource allocation decisions. Examples of national health surveys include the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).

Respiratory Function Tests (RFTs) are a group of medical tests that measure how well your lungs take in and exhale air, and how well they transfer oxygen and carbon dioxide into and out of your blood. They can help diagnose certain lung disorders, measure the severity of lung disease, and monitor response to treatment.

RFTs include several types of tests, such as:

1. Spirometry: This test measures how much air you can exhale and how quickly you can do it. It's often used to diagnose and monitor conditions like asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other lung diseases.
2. Lung volume testing: This test measures the total amount of air in your lungs. It can help diagnose restrictive lung diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis or sarcoidosis.
3. Diffusion capacity testing: This test measures how well oxygen moves from your lungs into your bloodstream. It's often used to diagnose and monitor conditions like pulmonary fibrosis, interstitial lung disease, and other lung diseases that affect the ability of the lungs to transfer oxygen to the blood.
4. Bronchoprovocation testing: This test involves inhaling a substance that can cause your airways to narrow, such as methacholine or histamine. It's often used to diagnose and monitor asthma.
5. Exercise stress testing: This test measures how well your lungs and heart work together during exercise. It's often used to diagnose lung or heart disease.

Overall, Respiratory Function Tests are an important tool for diagnosing and managing a wide range of lung conditions.

Carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) is a form of hemoglobin that has bonded with carbon monoxide (CO), a colorless, odorless gas. Normally, hemoglobin in red blood cells binds with oxygen (O2) to carry it throughout the body. However, when exposed to CO, hemoglobin preferentially binds with it, forming carboxyhemoglobin, which reduces the amount of oxygen that can be carried by the blood. This can lead to hypoxia (lack of oxygen in tissues) and potentially serious medical consequences, including death. Carbon monoxide exposure can occur from sources such as smoke inhalation, vehicle exhaust, or faulty heating systems.

Saliva is a complex mixture of primarily water, but also electrolytes, enzymes, antibacterial compounds, and various other substances. It is produced by the salivary glands located in the mouth. Saliva plays an essential role in maintaining oral health by moistening the mouth, helping to digest food, and protecting the teeth from decay by neutralizing acids produced by bacteria.

The medical definition of saliva can be stated as:

"A clear, watery, slightly alkaline fluid secreted by the salivary glands, consisting mainly of water, with small amounts of electrolytes, enzymes (such as amylase), mucus, and antibacterial compounds. Saliva aids in digestion, lubrication of oral tissues, and provides an oral barrier against microorganisms."

"Energy-generating resources" is a broad term that refers to various methods and technologies used to convert different forms of energy into electricity or other useful forms. While there isn't a specific medical definition for this term, it is often discussed in the context of public health and environmental medicine due to its impact on air quality, climate change, and human health. Here are some examples of energy-generating resources:

1. Fossil fuels: These include coal, oil, and natural gas, which are non-renewable resources. They are burned to produce heat, which is then converted into electricity. The combustion process releases greenhouse gases and pollutants, contributing to climate change and air pollution-related health issues.
2. Nuclear power: This energy source involves the fission of atomic nuclei to generate heat, which is used to produce steam and drive turbines for electricity generation. While nuclear power itself does not emit greenhouse gases, it poses potential risks associated with radioactive waste disposal, accidents, and proliferation.
3. Renewable resources: These are sustainable energy sources that can be replenished naturally over time. Examples include solar power (photovoltaic or concentrated), wind power, hydroelectric power, geothermal energy, and biomass. These resources have lower environmental impacts and contribute less to air pollution and climate change compared to fossil fuels.
4. Hydrogen fuel cells: These devices convert chemical energy from hydrogen into electricity through an electrochemical reaction with oxygen or another oxidizing agent. They are clean energy sources, as the only byproducts are water and heat. However, the production of hydrogen can have environmental impacts depending on the method used (e.g., steam methane reforming vs. electrolysis powered by renewable energy).
5. Energy storage systems: While not a primary source of energy generation, energy storage technologies like batteries and capacitors play an essential role in optimizing the use of energy-generating resources. They can store excess energy produced during periods of low demand or high resource availability (e.g., solar power during the day) and release it during peak demand or resource scarcity, improving overall system efficiency and reducing the need for backup generation from fossil fuels.

In summary, "energy-generating resources" refer to various methods used to convert different forms of energy into electricity or other useful forms. The environmental and health impacts of these resources vary significantly, with renewable sources generally having lower impacts compared to fossil fuel-based options.

Hazardous substances, in a medical context, refer to agents that pose a risk to the health of living organisms. These can include chemicals, biological agents (such as bacteria or viruses), and physical hazards (like radiation). Exposure to these substances can lead to a range of adverse health effects, from acute symptoms like irritation and poisoning to chronic conditions such as cancer, neurological disorders, or genetic mutations.

The classification and regulation of hazardous substances are often based on their potential for harm, the severity of the associated health risks, and the conditions under which they become dangerous. These assessments help inform safety measures, exposure limits, and handling procedures to minimize risks in occupational, environmental, and healthcare settings.

In medical terms, gases refer to the state of matter that has no fixed shape or volume and expands to fill any container it is placed in. Gases in the body can be normal, such as the oxygen, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen that are present in the lungs and blood, or abnormal, such as gas that accumulates in the digestive tract due to conditions like bloating or swallowing air.

Gases can also be used medically for therapeutic purposes, such as in the administration of anesthesia or in the treatment of certain respiratory conditions with oxygen therapy. Additionally, measuring the amount of gas in the body, such as through imaging studies like X-rays or CT scans, can help diagnose various medical conditions.

I believe there may be a slight misunderstanding in your question. "Plant leaves" are not a medical term, but rather a general biological term referring to a specific organ found in plants.

Leaves are organs that are typically flat and broad, and they are the primary site of photosynthesis in most plants. They are usually green due to the presence of chlorophyll, which is essential for capturing sunlight and converting it into chemical energy through photosynthesis.

While leaves do not have a direct medical definition, understanding their structure and function can be important in various medical fields, such as pharmacognosy (the study of medicinal plants) or environmental health. For example, certain plant leaves may contain bioactive compounds that have therapeutic potential, while others may produce allergens or toxins that can impact human health.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "India" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country in South Asia, the second-most populous country in the world, known for its rich history, diverse culture, and numerous contributions to various fields including medicine. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to help answer them!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Meteorological Concepts" is quite broad and can refer to various ideas and phenomena related to the study of meteorology, which is the scientific discipline that deals with the atmosphere and its processes. Here are a few examples of meteorological concepts:

1. Air pressure: The force exerted by the weight of the air above a given point. It's usually measured in hectopascals (hPa), inches of mercury (inHg), or millibars (mbar).
2. Temperature: A measure of the warmth or coldness of an object or environment, often reported in degrees Celsius (°C) or Fahrenheit (°F).
3. Humidity: The amount of water vapor present in the air. Relative humidity is the ratio of the current water vapor content to the maximum possible content at a given temperature.
4. Precipitation: Any form of water that falls from the atmosphere and reaches the ground, including rain, snow, sleet, or hail.
5. Wind: The horizontal movement of air relative to the surface of the Earth. It's usually described in terms of its speed (measured in knots, miles per hour, or meters per second) and direction (often given as a compass bearing).
6. Clouds: Visible masses of water droplets or ice crystals suspended in the atmosphere. They form due to the condensation of atmospheric water vapor and are classified based on their appearance, altitude, and other characteristics.
7. Fronts: Boundaries between different air masses that have distinct temperature and humidity properties. These boundaries can lead to various weather phenomena, such as precipitation and severe thunderstorms.
8. Air pollution: The presence of harmful substances in the atmosphere, often resulting from human activities like industrial processes or transportation.
9. Weather forecasting: The use of scientific principles, observations, and computer models to predict future weather conditions.
10. Climate: The long-term average of weather patterns and conditions in a specific region, typically over a period of 30 years or more.

These are just a few examples of meteorological concepts. There are many more aspects of atmospheric science that could be explored, such as the study of tornadoes, hurricanes, and other extreme weather events.

Health promotion is the process of enabling people to increase control over their health and its determinants, and to improve their health. It moves beyond a focus on individual behavior change to include social and environmental interventions that can positively influence the health of individuals, communities, and populations. Health promotion involves engaging in a wide range of activities, such as advocacy, policy development, community organization, and education that aim to create supportive environments and personal skills that foster good health. It is based on principles of empowerment, participation, and social justice.

The Respiratory System is a complex network of organs and tissues that work together to facilitate the process of breathing, which involves the intake of oxygen and the elimination of carbon dioxide. This system primarily includes the nose, throat (pharynx), voice box (larynx), windpipe (trachea), bronchi, bronchioles, lungs, and diaphragm.

The nostrils or mouth take in air that travels through the pharynx, larynx, and trachea into the lungs. Within the lungs, the trachea divides into two bronchi, one for each lung, which further divide into smaller tubes called bronchioles. At the end of these bronchioles are tiny air sacs known as alveoli where the exchange of gases occurs. Oxygen from the inhaled air diffuses through the walls of the alveoli into the bloodstream, while carbon dioxide, a waste product, moves from the blood to the alveoli and is exhaled out of the body.

The diaphragm, a large muscle that separates the chest from the abdomen, plays a crucial role in breathing by contracting and relaxing to change the volume of the chest cavity, thereby allowing air to flow in and out of the lungs. Overall, the Respiratory System is essential for maintaining life by providing the body's cells with the oxygen needed for metabolism and removing waste products like carbon dioxide.

Product labeling, in the context of medicine or healthcare, refers to the information that is required by law to be present on the packaging of a pharmaceutical product or medical device. This information typically includes:

1. The name of the product, often with an active ingredient listed separately.
2. A description of what the product is used for (indications).
3. Dosage instructions and route of administration.
4. Warnings about potential side effects, contraindications, and precautions.
5. The name and address of the manufacturer or distributor.
6. The expiration date or storage conditions, if applicable.
7. Any other relevant information, such as whether the product is subject to additional monitoring.

The purpose of product labeling is to provide accurate and standardized information to healthcare professionals and patients about the safe and effective use of a medical product. It helps to ensure that the product is used appropriately, reducing the risk of adverse events or misuse.

Water microbiology is not a formal medical term, but rather a branch of microbiology that deals with the study of microorganisms found in water. It involves the identification, enumeration, and characterization of bacteria, viruses, parasites, and other microscopic organisms present in water sources such as lakes, rivers, oceans, groundwater, drinking water, and wastewater.

In a medical context, water microbiology is relevant to public health because it helps to assess the safety of water supplies for human consumption and recreational activities. It also plays a critical role in understanding and preventing waterborne diseases caused by pathogenic microorganisms that can lead to illnesses such as diarrhea, skin infections, and respiratory problems.

Water microbiologists use various techniques to study water microorganisms, including culturing, microscopy, genetic analysis, and biochemical tests. They also investigate the ecology of these organisms, their interactions with other species, and their response to environmental factors such as temperature, pH, and nutrient availability.

Overall, water microbiology is a vital field that helps ensure the safety of our water resources and protects public health.

Oxidative stress is defined as an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (free radicals) and the body's ability to detoxify them or repair the damage they cause. This imbalance can lead to cellular damage, oxidation of proteins, lipids, and DNA, disruption of cellular functions, and activation of inflammatory responses. Prolonged or excessive oxidative stress has been linked to various health conditions, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, and aging-related diseases.

In the context of medicine, risk is the probability or likelihood of an adverse health effect or the occurrence of a negative event related to treatment or exposure to certain hazards. It is usually expressed as a ratio or percentage and can be influenced by various factors such as age, gender, lifestyle, genetics, and environmental conditions. Risk assessment involves identifying, quantifying, and prioritizing risks to make informed decisions about prevention, mitigation, or treatment strategies.

"Age factors" refer to the effects, changes, or differences that age can have on various aspects of health, disease, and medical care. These factors can encompass a wide range of issues, including:

1. Physiological changes: As people age, their bodies undergo numerous physical changes that can affect how they respond to medications, illnesses, and medical procedures. For example, older adults may be more sensitive to certain drugs or have weaker immune systems, making them more susceptible to infections.
2. Chronic conditions: Age is a significant risk factor for many chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and arthritis. As a result, age-related medical issues are common and can impact treatment decisions and outcomes.
3. Cognitive decline: Aging can also lead to cognitive changes, including memory loss and decreased decision-making abilities. These changes can affect a person's ability to understand and comply with medical instructions, leading to potential complications in their care.
4. Functional limitations: Older adults may experience physical limitations that impact their mobility, strength, and balance, increasing the risk of falls and other injuries. These limitations can also make it more challenging for them to perform daily activities, such as bathing, dressing, or cooking.
5. Social determinants: Age-related factors, such as social isolation, poverty, and lack of access to transportation, can impact a person's ability to obtain necessary medical care and affect their overall health outcomes.

Understanding age factors is critical for healthcare providers to deliver high-quality, patient-centered care that addresses the unique needs and challenges of older adults. By taking these factors into account, healthcare providers can develop personalized treatment plans that consider a person's age, physical condition, cognitive abilities, and social circumstances.

Glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTP1) is a member of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) family, which are enzymes involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds. GSTs catalyze the conjugation of reduced glutathione to these electrophilic compounds, facilitating their excretion from the body.

GSTP1 is primarily found in the cytosol of cells and has a high affinity for a variety of substrates, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic amines, and certain chemotherapeutic drugs. It plays an essential role in protecting cells against oxidative stress and chemical-induced damage.

Polymorphisms in the GSTP1 gene have been associated with altered enzyme activity and susceptibility to various diseases, including cancer, neurological disorders, and respiratory diseases. The most common polymorphism in GSTP1 is a single nucleotide substitution (Ile105Val), which has been shown to reduce the enzyme's catalytic activity and increase the risk of developing certain types of cancer.

Causality is the relationship between a cause and a result, where the cause directly or indirectly brings about the result. In the medical context, causality refers to determining whether an exposure (such as a drug, infection, or environmental factor) is the cause of a specific outcome (such as a disease or adverse event). Establishing causality often involves evaluating epidemiological data, laboratory studies, and clinical evidence using established criteria, such as those proposed by Bradford Hill. It's important to note that determining causality can be complex and challenging, particularly when there are multiple potential causes or confounding factors involved.

A confidence interval (CI) is a range of values that is likely to contain the true value of a population parameter with a certain level of confidence. It is commonly used in statistical analysis to express the uncertainty associated with estimates derived from sample data.

For example, if we calculate a 95% confidence interval for the mean height of a population based on a sample of individuals, we can say that we are 95% confident that the true population mean height falls within the calculated range. The width of the confidence interval gives us an idea of how precise our estimate is - narrower intervals indicate more precise estimates, while wider intervals suggest greater uncertainty.

Confidence intervals are typically calculated using statistical formulas that take into account the sample size, standard deviation, and level of confidence desired. They can be used to compare different groups or to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions in medical research.

A cough is a reflex action that helps to clear the airways of irritants, foreign particles, or excess mucus or phlegm. It is characterized by a sudden, forceful expulsion of air from the lungs through the mouth and nose. A cough can be acute (short-term) or chronic (long-term), and it can be accompanied by other symptoms such as chest pain, shortness of breath, or fever. Coughing can be caused by various factors, including respiratory infections, allergies, asthma, environmental pollutants, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchitis. In some cases, a cough may be a symptom of a more serious underlying condition, such as heart failure or lung cancer.

"Bronchi" are a pair of airways in the respiratory system that branch off from the trachea (windpipe) and lead to the lungs. They are responsible for delivering oxygen-rich air to the lungs and removing carbon dioxide during exhalation. The right bronchus is slightly larger and more vertical than the left, and they further divide into smaller branches called bronchioles within the lungs. Any abnormalities or diseases affecting the bronchi can impact lung function and overall respiratory health.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but Poisson Distribution is actually a statistical concept rather than a medical term. Here's a general definition:

Poisson Distribution is a discrete probability distribution that expresses the probability of a given number of events occurring in a fixed interval of time or space, as long as these events occur with a known average rate and independently of each other. It is often used in fields such as physics, engineering, economics, and medical research to model rare events or low-probability phenomena.

In the context of medical research, Poisson Distribution might be used to analyze the number of adverse events that occur during a clinical trial, the frequency of disease outbreaks in a population, or the rate of successes or failures in a series of experiments.

Bronchitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the bronchi, which are the large airways that lead to the lungs. This inflammation can cause a variety of symptoms, including coughing, wheezing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath. Bronchitis can be either acute or chronic.

Acute bronchitis is usually caused by a viral infection, such as a cold or the flu, and typically lasts for a few days to a week. Symptoms may include a productive cough (coughing up mucus or phlegm), chest discomfort, and fatigue. Acute bronchitis often resolves on its own without specific medical treatment, although rest, hydration, and over-the-counter medications to manage symptoms may be helpful.

Chronic bronchitis, on the other hand, is a long-term condition that is characterized by a persistent cough with mucus production that lasts for at least three months out of the year for two consecutive years. Chronic bronchitis is typically caused by exposure to irritants such as cigarette smoke, air pollution, or occupational dusts and chemicals. It is often associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which includes both chronic bronchitis and emphysema.

Treatment for chronic bronchitis may include medications to help open the airways, such as bronchodilators and corticosteroids, as well as lifestyle changes such as smoking cessation and avoiding irritants. In severe cases, oxygen therapy or lung transplantation may be necessary.

Fine Particle POLLUTION. Figure 1. (tobacco smoke: 10 to 1000 nm; virus particles: 3 to 50 nm; bacteria: 30 to 30000 nm; ... lower size of tobacco smoke 10 nm Shortest extreme ultraviolet wavelength or longest X-ray wavelength 11 nm - the average half- ... cooking oil smoke: 30 to 30000 nm; wood smoke: 7 to 3000 nm) Introduction to the Electromagnetic Spectrum and Spectroscopy ... 30 nm - lower size of cooking oil smoke 32 nm - the average half-pitch of a memory cell manufactured at around the 2009-2010 ...
Fine Particle POLLUTION. Figure 1. (tobacco smoke: 10 to 1000 nm; virus particles: 3 to 50 nm; bacteria: 30 to 30000 nm; ... lower size of tobacco smoke 10 nm - the average half-pitch of a memory cell manufactured circa 2016 -2017 13 nm - the length of ... cooking oil smoke: 30 to 30000 nm; wood smoke: 7 to 3000 nm) Stryer, Lubert (1988). Biochemistry. San Francisco: W.H. Freeman. ... diameter of tobacco mosaic virus (Generally, viruses range in size from 20 nm to 450 nm.)[citation needed] 20 nm - Length of a ...
"Effect of cigarette butt pollution on marine life". Archived from the original on 18 September 2012. Hackendahl NC, Sereda CW ( ... "Tobacco Smoke and Involuntary Smoking". International Agency for Research on Cancer. 2004. Archived from the original (PDF) on ... Drope J, Chapman S (2001). "Tobacco industry efforts at discrediting scientific knowledge of environmental tobacco smoke: a ... attitudes and behaviours related to smoking and second-hand smoke: a pilot study". Tobacco Control. 18 (2): 156-158. doi: ...
Risk factors include exposure to tobacco smoke, dust, and other air pollution. Treatment of acute bronchitis typically involves ... Tobacco smoking is the most common cause, with a number of other factors such as air pollution and genetics playing a smaller ... Most cases of chronic bronchitis are caused by tobacco smoking. Chronic bronchitis in young adults who smoke is associated with ... Risk factors include exposure to tobacco smoke, dust, and other air pollutants. A small number of cases are due to bacteria ...
Risk factors include exposure to tobacco smoke, dust, and other air pollution. A small number of cases are due to high levels ... To help the bronchial tree heal faster and not make bronchitis worse, smokers should quit smoking completely. Salbutamol is not ... Prevention is by not smoking and avoiding other lung irritants. Frequent hand washing and flu vaccination may also be ... Prevention is by not smoking and avoiding other lung irritants. Frequent hand washing may also be protective. Furthermore, an ...
This figure excludes effects of indoor air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke exposure. On a national and regional scale ... Background pollution occurs in areas not directly affected by pollution sources. The Canadian Constitution does not clearly ... Air pollution is a concern in British Columbia, Canada because of its effects on health and visibility. Air quality is ... Recent air pollution research in Canada and other jurisdictions was summarized by Health Canada in October 2003 in its report ...
"Characterization of airborne particles emitted by an electrically heated tobacco smoking system". Environmental Pollution. 240 ... Heated tobacco products, Tobacco products, Products introduced in 2014, Philip Morris brands, Tobacco smoke carcinogens). ... tobacco stick product, loose-leaf tobacco vaporizer (LLTV), tobacco vaporizer, or T-vapor. "WHO Report on the Global Tobacco ... electrically heated tobacco system, non-combusted cigarette, non-combusted tobacco product, tobacco heating cigarette, tobacco ...
Health, CDC's Office on Smoking and (2018-05-09). "Smoking and Tobacco Use; Fact Sheet; Secondhand Smoke". Smoking and Tobacco ... Indoor air pollution is a major health hazard in developing countries and is commonly referred to as "household air pollution" ... Secondhand smoke is tobacco smoke which affects people other than the 'active' smoker. Second-hand tobacco smoke includes both ... Common sources of carbon monoxide are tobacco smoke, space heaters using fossil fuels, defective central heating furnaces and ...
Broyde has studied the damage caused to DNA by sunlight, air pollution, tobacco smoke and barbecued foods. Elected to Sigma Xi ...
This can be due to tobacco smoking, indoor air pollution or outdoor air pollution. ACOS presents with features of both asthma ... The risk factors for ACO are also incompletely understood, but tobacco smoke is known to be a major risk factor. ACO presents ... ACO presents in adulthood, usually after the age of 40 (after there has been significant tobacco smoke or other toxic fumes ... a significant exposure history to tobacco smoke (defined as a greater than 10 pack year history)(or significant exposure to ...
... and outdoor air pollution (1-2%). Tobacco smoke is a complex mixture of more than 5,300 identified chemicals. The most ... industrial smoke and tobacco smoke were identified as sources of dozens of carcinogens, including benzo[a]pyrene, tobacco- ... Lung cancer is largely caused by tobacco smoke. Risk estimates for lung cancer in the United States indicate that tobacco smoke ... Tobacco Smoke and Involuntary Smoking. IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans. Vol. 83. ...
Connections exist between acrolein gas in the smoke from tobacco cigarettes and the risk of lung cancer. Acrolein is one of ... Acrolein was identified as one of the chemicals involved in the 2019 Kim Kim River toxic pollution incident. ... segregation of tobacco smoke toxicants. Food Chem Toxicol. 2011 Nov;49(11):2921-33. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2011.07.019. Epub 2011 ... Sidestream smoke measurements and assessment of second-hand smoke emission factors". Atmos Environ. 44 (1): 8-14. Bibcode: ...
Environmental tobacco smoke is considered to be a leading contributor to indoor air pollution, since exposure to second and ... Large concerns about air quality include environmental tobacco smoke, air pollution by forms of chemical waste, and other ... Tobacco smoke particles and indoor air quality (ToPIQ) - the protocol of a new study. J Occup Med Toxicol. 2011 Dec 21;6:35. ... Tobacco smoke contains over 60 carcinogens, where 18% are known human carcinogens. Exposure to these chemicals can lead to ...
Risk factors for lung diseases include tobacco use, including second hand smoke, pollution, exposure to hazardous fumes, and ...
... ing may be caused by air pollution including tobacco smoke, particulate matter, irritant gases, and dampness in a home. ... Chronic bronchitis is often the cause of "smoker's cough". The tobacco smoke causes inflammation, secretion of mucus into the ... Most of the time, irregular coughing is caused by a respiratory tract infection but can also be triggered by choking, smoking, ... May be treated by quitting smoking. May also be caused by pneumoconiosis and long-term fume inhalation. In people with ...
The asthma risk caused by gas stove exposure is similar in magnitude to that caused by secondhand smoke from tobacco. Stoves ... Tabuchi, Hiroko (June 17, 2023). "Study Compares Gas Stove Pollution to Secondhand Cigarette Smoke". The New York Times. ... to more than that found in secondhand tobacco smoke. The first gas stove was developed in 1802 by Zachäus Winzler (de), but ... Mitigating indoor particulate pollution can involve running a range hood, opening a kitchen window, and running an air purifier ...
These are subsequently inhaled during tobacco smoking. While mercury is a constituent of tobacco smoke, studies have largely ... In 2002, several lakes in Norway were found to have a poor state of mercury pollution, with an excess of 1 μg/g of mercury in ... "Hazardous Compounds in Tobacco Smoke". International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 8 (12): 613-628. doi: ... The tobacco plant readily absorbs and accumulates heavy metals such as mercury from the surrounding soil into its leaves. ...
Additionally, environmental exposures such as air pollution and maternal tobacco smoking can increase an individual's chances ... is higher risk of allergic rhinitis in those who have early exposure to foods or formula or heavy exposure to cigarette smoking ...
The main risk factors for developing CRDs are: tobacco smoking, indoor and outdoor air pollution, allergens, and occupational ... They include age, gender, genetics, exposure to air pollution, and behaviors such as smoking, unhealthy diet and physical ... caused by smoking tobacco Diabetes mellitus type 2 Noise-induced hearing loss Lower back pain caused by too little exercise ... raising taxes on tobacco, and legislating to curb smoking in public places. The World Health Organization is the specialized ...
Whiting co-sponsored legislation to ban smoking tobacco products in public places, the first of its kind in Oregon. Whiting was ... She wrote and helped to pass legislation that banned chlorofluorocarbon pollution that contributes to the depletion of the ... a co-sponsor of the Oregon Bottle Bill, an effort intended to curb litter and pollution that first passed in 1971. Whiting co- ...
PAHs are among the complex suite of contaminants in tobacco smoke and particulate air pollution and may contribute to ... people who smoke tobacco products, or who are exposed to second-hand smoke, are among the most highly exposed groups; tobacco ... Human exposure varies across the globe and depends on factors such as smoking rates, fuel types in cooking, and pollution ... Lower-temperature combustion, such as tobacco smoking or wood-burning, tends to generate low molecular weight PAHs, whereas ...
Studies have shown that pollution levels for smoking areas indoors are higher than levels found on busy roadways, in closed ... Tobacco smoking is the practice of burning tobacco and ingesting the resulting smoke. The smoke may be inhaled, as is done with ... Passive smoking is the inhalation of tobacco smoke by individuals who are not actively smoking. This smoke is known as second- ... Smoking is the most common method of consuming tobacco, and tobacco is the most common substance smoked. The agricultural ...
The most common cause of lung cancer is long-term exposure to tobacco smoke. Lung cancer in non-smokers, who account for ... approximately 15% of cases, is often attributed to a combination of genetic factors, radon gas, asbestos, and air pollution. ...
Humans may absorb nickel directly from tobacco smoke and skin contact with jewelry, shampoos, detergents, and coins. A less ... Environmental concentrations may be increased by human pollution. For example, nickel-plated faucets may contaminate water and ... Rieuwerts, John (2015). The Elements of Environmental Pollution. London and New York: Earthscan Routledge. p. 255. ISBN 978-0- ...
... of infant deaths to tobacco-smoking mothers, considered adopting a smoking ban for pregnant women in 2006 with the aim of ... women due to the health risks posed by the consumption of fish contaminated with methylmercury through industrial pollution. ... The use of tobacco products or exposure to secondhand smoke during pregnancy has been linked to low birth weight. Governor Mike ... "Some Legislators Want To Ban Pregnant Women From Smoking". (14 June 2006). The Hometown Channel. Retrieved 31 July 2006.[dead ...
... see table of tobacco-related DNA damages in Tobacco smoking). Other causes include radon, exposure to secondhand smoke, ... and air pollution. Genetics can also play a role as a family history of lung cancer can contribute to an increased risk of ... It is closely correlated with a history of tobacco smoking, more so than most other types of lung cancer. According to the ... Smoking is by far the leading risk factor for lung cancer. Cigarette smoke contains more than 6,000 components, many of which ...
... residential thirdhand smoke pollution and exposure". BMJ Tobacco Control. 20 (1): e1. doi:10.1136/tc.2010.037382. PMC 3666918. ... Third-hand smoke is contamination by tobacco smoke that lingers following the extinguishing of a cigarette, cigar, or other ... Environmental tobacco smoke can oxidize with environmental nitrous acid to create carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines ( ... First-hand smoke refers to what is inhaled into the smoker's own lungs, while second-hand smoke is a mixture of exhaled smoke ...
At Berkeley, Winkelstein did pioneering research on the link between tobacco smoke and cervical cancer. It took over two ... During his time in Buffalo, Winkelstein studied the health impact of the city's air pollution, successfully separating the ... effect of pollution from other confounding social and environmental factors, and also contributed greatly to the understanding ...
The most common cause of COPD is tobacco smoking. Other risk factors include indoor and outdoor air pollution including dust, ... but it is often smoked in combination with tobacco or on its own by tobacco smokers. Higher use however has shown a decline in ... Other types of tobacco smoke, such as from cigar, pipe, water-pipe and hookah use, also confer a risk. Water-pipe or hookah ... Air pollution and the increase in cigarette smoking in Great Britain at the start of the 20th century led to high rates of ...
The same survey found that 80% of youth agreed that smoking should be banned from public places. Under the new Tobacco Law of ... diseases and neurodevelopment disorders among youth are common due to significant exposure to outdoor and indoor air pollution ... July 1, 2005). "LAW ON TOBACCO CONTROL" (PDF). Physicians for a Smoke-Free Canada. Chairman of the State Great Hural of ... metals, tobacco smoke and other chemical toxins. Mongolia has been ruled by various nomadic empires, the Qing dynasty and the ...
Health, CDC's Office on Smoking and. "CDC - Fact Sheet - Secondhand Smoke - Smoking & Tobacco Use". Smoking and Tobacco Use -us ... Indoor pollution such as tobacco smoking is responsible to lung cancer. Outdoor air pollution also increases the risk of lung ... Indoor air pollution, caused by kerosene space heaters, cooking, wall paints, second hand smoke and more, are also known to ... Due to air pollution causing more than one effect it is hard to attribute a condition only to air pollution or to say how much ...
... smoke MeSH G03.850.460.100.340.680 - tobacco smoke pollution MeSH G03.850.460.100.900 - vehicle emissions MeSH G03.850.460.200 ... air pollution MeSH G03.850.460.100.080 - air pollution, indoor MeSH G03.850.460.100.110 - air pollution, radioactive MeSH ... water pollution MeSH G03.850.460.790.410 - water pollution, chemical MeSH G03.850.460.790.410.050 - acid rain MeSH G03.850. ... 460.790.460 - water pollution, radioactive MeSH G03.850.490.250 - age factors MeSH G03.850.490.250.100 - age of onset MeSH ...
Tobacco Smoke Pollution ✖ Remove constraint Subject: Tobacco Smoke Pollution Story Section Secondary Smoking, Individual Rights ... Office on Smoking and Health. United States. Public Health Service. Office of the Surgeon General Date: 1986 Publisher: United ... 1. The Health Consequences of Involuntary Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General ... and Public Space ✖ Remove constraint Story Section: Secondary Smoking, Individual Rights, and Public Space Year 1986 ✖ Remove ...
Through the smokescreen : a critique of environmental tobacco smoke, a review of the literature by the Tobacco Institute of New ... Series: Smoking and tobacco control monographs ; 9Material type: Text; Format: print Publication details: Bethesda : U.S. Dept ... Series: Smoking and tobacco control monograph ; 4 , NIH publication ; no. 93-3605Material type: Text; Format: print Publication ... Towards a smoke-free health service : report of a seminar, London, UK, on Worlds 2nd No-Tobacco Day, 31 May 1989. by Hurst, ...
Indoor air pollution has the same negative effects as environmental pollution. Sources include mold, pesticides and more. Find ... Tobacco smoke. *Household products and pesticides. *Gases such as radon and carbon monoxide ... We usually think of air pollution as being outdoors, but the air in your house or office could also be polluted. Sources of ... Most people feel better as soon as they remove the source of the pollution. However, some pollutants can cause diseases that ...
Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is the mixture of smoke that comes from the burning end of a ... ETS is often referred to as secondhand smoke and exposure to ETS is often called passive smoking. In general, childrens lungs ... In addition to environmental tobacco smoke, other sources of combustion products include ... as well as smoke exhaled by the smoker. It is a complex mixture of over 4,000 compounds, more than 40 of which are known to ...
Air pollution; Air pollutants; Aerosols; Environmental pollution; Tobacco smoke; Dusts; Agricultural industry ... Specific topics related to air pollution, including environmental tobacco smoke, plant antigens, and windblown agricultural ... Air pollution is a heterogeneous mix of suspended solids, liquids, and gases. Even in the absence of human activity, aerosols ... Traditionally, however, the term air pollution refers to the human impact of biomass and fossil fuel combustion primarily from ...
Tobacco Industry, Tobacco Smoke Pollution/statistics & numerical data, Tobacco Use Disorder/epidemiology/prevention & control, ... Prevalence of smoking and other smoking related behaviors reported by the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS) in four Peruvian ... LR: 20151119; CI: Copyright 2007; JID: 9211652; 0 (Tobacco Smoke Pollution); 2007/04/11 [received]; 2007/09/05 [accepted]; 2007 ... LR: 20151119; JID: 100968562; 0 (Tobacco Smoke Pollution); OID: NLM: PMC2604866; 2008/12/15 [aheadofprint]; epublish ...
Categories: Tobacco Smoke Pollution Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, ...
Secondhand smoke from smoking tobacco is a primary contributor to indoor air pollution. Other potential sources of indoor air ... High levels of smoke (e.g., from cooking and combustion sources, tobacco, incense, and candles). Long- term travelers and ... see Wildfire Smoke Factsheet: Protect Your Lungs from Wildfire Smoke or Ash [PDF]). Respirators are specifically designed to ... Although air pollution has decreased in many parts of the world, it represents a major and growing health problem for the ...
Teach patients how to avoid asthma triggers such as tobacco smoke, mold, pet dander, and outdoor air pollution. ... and elsewhere and can include tobacco smoke, mold, outdoor air pollution, and infections linked to influenza, cold-like ... "Despite the fact that outdoor air quality has improved, weve reduced two common asthma triggers-secondhand smoke and smoking ... Improving indoor air quality for people with asthma through measures such as smoke-free air laws and policies, healthy schools ...
Meanwhile, air pollution, tobacco smoke and chemicals are driving the burden of NCDs. An estimated 28% of all premature deaths ... Meanwhile, air pollution, tobacco smoke and chemicals are burdening NCDs. All these are exacerbated by climate change which ... Reduce tobacco use and exposure to second-hand smoke with full implementation of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco ... 13% of young adolescent girls use tobacco products in Africa. *About 22,000 women die every year in Africa from tobacco-related ...
tobacco smoke, and *indoor and outdoor air pollution. Asthma can be controlled by taking medication and avoiding triggers that ... Air pollution is a leading environmental threat to human health. Particles in the air like dust, dirt, soot, and smoke are one ... Tobacco use is the single most preventable cause of death and disease in the United States. Smoking harms nearly every organ of ... Traffic-related air pollution is a major cause of unhealthy air quality, especially in urban areas. Many health problems have ...
Air pollution. *Tobacco smoke. *Exercise. *Cold air or changes in the weather, such as temperature or humidity ...
Fine Particle POLLUTION. Figure 1. (tobacco smoke: 10 to 1000 nm; virus particles: 3 to 50 nm; bacteria: 30 to 30000 nm; ... lower size of tobacco smoke 10 nm Shortest extreme ultraviolet wavelength or longest X-ray wavelength 11 nm - the average half- ... cooking oil smoke: 30 to 30000 nm; wood smoke: 7 to 3000 nm) Introduction to the Electromagnetic Spectrum and Spectroscopy ... 30 nm - lower size of cooking oil smoke 32 nm - the average half-pitch of a memory cell manufactured at around the 2009-2010 ...
... and tobacco industry affiliation of the authors, electronic databases were searched; 43 individual studies met the inclusion ... To examine the relationship between smoking and Alzheimers disease (AD) after controlling for study design, quality, secular ... Smoking / adverse effects* * Tobacco Smoke Pollution / adverse effects* Substances * Tobacco Smoke Pollution ... Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for Alzheimers Disease: an analysis controlling for tobacco industry affiliation J ...
The ordinance aims to protect people from the negative health impacts of secondhand smoke; however, it has wide exemptions ... became the first subnational government in Japan to implement an ordinance for the prevention of exposure to secondhand-smoke ... Tobacco / adverse effects* * Tobacco Smoke Pollution / legislation & jurisprudence* * Tobacco Smoke Pollution / prevention & ... The smoke-free efforts of Kanagawa could facilitate smoke-free action by other subnational and national governments for ...
tobacco smoke pollution. *workplace. *smoking-caused disease. *national capacity building. *prevalence. *environmental tobacco ... Secondhand tobacco smoke: an occupational hazard for smoking and non-smoking bar and nightclub employees ... Secondhand tobacco smoke: an occupational hazard for smoking and non-smoking bar and nightclub employees ... Objective To assess exposure of bar and nightclub employees to secondhand smoke, including non-smoking and smoking employees. ...
The impact of Michigans Dr Ron Davis smoke-free air law on levels of cotinine, tobacco-specific lung carcinogen and severity ... The impact of Michigans Dr Ron Davis smoke-free air law on levels of cotinine, tobacco-specific lung carcinogen and severity ... Objective To determine the impact on bar employees health and exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) before and after the ... Michigan Department of Community Health, Tobacco Control Program, Lansing, Michigan, USA. *Correspondence to Dr Teri Wilson, ...
avoiding air pollution, including secondhand tobacco smoke. According to the authors of the report, these steps could prevent ... According to the authors, reduced social interactions are as much of a risk factor for dementia as smoking and inactivity. ...
Tobacco smoke in itself is a very dangerous form of air pollution. ... Tobacco is harmful in all its forms. It kills over 8 million people every year. Tobacco smoking and second-hand smoke can cause ... Tobacco has a negative impact on lung health. Tobacco smoking is the primary cause for lung cancer, responsible for over two ... Tobacco smoke contains over 7000 chemicals, at least 69 of which are known to cause cancer. Second-hand smoke exposure at home ...
Task Force recommends smoke-free policies to reduce secondhand smoke exposure and tobacco use. Read effectiveness and economic ... Fine particulate air pollution in restaurants and bars according to smoking policy in Charleston, South Carolina. Journal of ... MeSH terms: tobacco or smoking or tobacco use disorder or tobacco industry) ... Title or Abstract words: smoke-free or smokefree or secondhand smoke or tobacco smoke ...
Do not smoke tobacco or other products, because smoking puts even more pollution into the air. ... Do not add to indoor pollution. When smoke levels are high, do not use anything that burns, such as candles and fireplaces. Do ... What is Wildfire Smoke and Can it Make Me Sick?. Wildfire smoke is a mix of gases and fine particles from burning vegetation, ... Wildfire smoke can make anyone sick. Even someone who is healthy can get sick if there is enough smoke in the air. Breathing in ...
Air pollution can have negative effects on pregnancy, potentially leading to preterm birth, a low birth weight, or stillbirth. ... indoor and outdoor pollution from fire and smoke, including tobacco smoke *occupational hazards, such as working outdoors, ... Air pollution comes in many forms and can be indoors or outdoors. Some types of air pollution include: *outdoor air pollution ... People who live in polluted areas, who live with individuals who smoke, or who worry about air pollution can discuss these ...
Avoiding tobacco smoke, pollution, and certain viruses (such as RSV) may help prevent asthma.2,3,4 ... 2020, February 27). Fact Sheet - Health Effects of Secondhand Smoke - Smoking & Tobacco Use. Smoking and Tobacco Use; CDC. ... 3. The Links Between Air Pollution and Childhood Asthma. (2018, October 22). United States Environmental Protection Agency. ... https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/secondhand_smoke/health_effects/index.htm ...
Exposure to tobacco smoke and air pollution increases the risk of allergy. ...
  • COPD may also be caused by industrial fumes or other air pollution. (cdc.gov)
  • Other risk factors include exposure to indoor and outdoor air pollution and occupational dusts and fumes. (who.int)
  • In addition to the ones listed, other work aspects cited in reports of occupational asthma include smoke and fumes, physical conditions such as poor ventilation, vapors and gases, and other unidentified substances. (concentra.com)
  • Some contributors, besides smoking and being overweight, include family tendency, low birth weight, and exposure to exhaust fumes or other forms of pollution as well as chemicals used in certain occupations such as hair dressing or farming. (senioranswers.org)
  • In fact, recent studies show that half of COPD cases worldwide are caused by non-tobacco related risks, like air pollution, occupational exposure to fumes or gases, and passive smoke inhalation. (indiatimes.com)
  • Additionally, youth tobacco prevention/cessation programs need to focus attention on water-pipe smoking in order to further dispel the myth that water-pipe smoking is a safe alternative to cigarette smoking. (who.int)
  • 2013. γ-Tocopherol-rich supplementation additively improves vascular endothelial function during smoking cessation. . (oregonstate.edu)
  • Explore IASLC's catalog of Atlases, staging resources, new and archived guidelines, tobacco cessation materials for providers and patients, and other vital multidisciplinary tools available to IASLC members and other interested users. (iaslc.org)
  • Many cases of COPD are preventable by avoidance or early cessation of smoking. (who.int)
  • Medicare will pay for counseling to prevent tobacco use and smoking, as well as, tobacco-use cessation counseling. (senioranswers.org)
  • Particles in the air like dust, dirt, soot, and smoke are one kind of air pollution called particulate matter. (cdc.gov)
  • She said, "Our findings indicate that lowering levels of particulate matter air pollution, even in a relatively clean country like the United States, may reduce the number of people developing dementia in late life. (earth.com)
  • He suggests, "This work suggests that particulate matter air pollution from agriculture and wildfires might be more neurotoxic compared with other sources. (earth.com)
  • Zhang mentions, "In our study, we used a sophisticated prediction model… to estimate the levels of source-specific particulate matter air pollution at participants' residential addresses. (earth.com)
  • Logistic regression showed that youth were 11.0 times more likely to be currently smoking cigarettes if they currently smoked water pipes. (who.int)
  • Youth were also 11.0 times more likely to be current water-pipe smokers if they currently smoked cigarettes. (who.int)
  • This includes smoking shisha, which is more popular among young people than cigarettes. (who.int)
  • And of course, no one should smoke cigarettes or other tobacco products around you. (kidshealth.org)
  • Stop smoking cigarettes, because when the air passages are narrowed, breathing is more difficult. (senioranswers.org)
  • The same programs and policies that lower prevalence also reduce the number of cigarettes smoked each day and motivate quitting," Giovino stated. (sciencedaily.com)
  • The report also reveals that increases in excise taxes on cigarettes have consistently been proven to be effective in both preventing smoking and causing people to quit, but these taxes range from a high of $3.46 in Rhode Island to a low of just 7 cents in South Carolina. (sciencedaily.com)
  • In fact, the burning of one mosquito coil in a closed room can produce pollution levels comparable to 100 cigarettes. (indiatimes.com)
  • Quit smoking traditional cigarettes, e-cigarettes and vaping. (dmc.org)
  • Despite the fact that outdoor air quality has improved, we've reduced two common asthma triggers-secondhand smoke and smoking in general-asthma is increasing," said Paul Garbe, D.V.M., M.P.H, chief of CDC's Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Branch. (cdc.gov)
  • Improving indoor air quality for people with asthma through measures such as smoke-free air laws and policies, healthy schools and workplaces. (cdc.gov)
  • Teach patients how to avoid asthma triggers such as tobacco smoke, mold, pet dander, and outdoor air pollution. (cdc.gov)
  • Tobacco smoking and second-hand smoke can cause lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and tuberculosis. (who.int)
  • Tobacco also exacerbates asthma, which restricts activity and contributes to disability. (who.int)
  • Use a freestanding indoor air filter with particle removal to help protect people with heart disease, asthma or other respiratory conditions and the elderly and children from the effects of wildfire smoke. (cdc.gov)
  • Avoiding tobacco smoke , pollution , and certain viruses (such as RSV) may help prevent asthma. (aafa.org)
  • Finally, passive smoke exposure is a risk factor for the development of asthma in children. (medscape.com)
  • The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recognizes that fragrances can cause asthma -- it's right there in the same breath as their statement on secondhand tobacco smoke. (immuneweb.org)
  • Tobacco smoke is a common asthma trigger. (concentra.com)
  • Being exposed to your triggers - for example, pet dander, exercise, or smoke - can lead to an asthma flare-up and coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath. (hopkinsallchildrens.org)
  • If outdoor air pollution is a trigger for your asthma, running the air conditioner can help. (hopkinsallchildrens.org)
  • Other irritants include wood and tobacco smoke, the smell given off by paint or gas, and air pollution. (kidshealth.org)
  • Conclusions Occupational exposure to secondhand smoke, assessed by air nicotine, resulted in elevated concentrations of hair nicotine among non-smoking and smoking bar and nightclub employees. (bmj.com)
  • Exposure to indoor and outdoor air pollution, as well as occupational gases and dusts, are additional risk factors. (medgadget.com)
  • Ahrens W, Jockel KH, Patzak W, Elsner G: Alcohol, smoking and occupational factors in cancer of larynx: a case control study. (aaem.pl)
  • indoor and outdoor air pollution. (cdc.gov)
  • Children are particularly vulnerable to the effects of air pollution because their bodies are still developing and they breathe more rapidly than adults, causing them to absorb proportionately more pollutants, according to the report. (kqed.org)
  • Pollutants of indoor air such as mould, dampness, heating/cooking emissions and tobacco smoke can be found everywhere. (efanet.org)
  • Car exhaust, smoke and even dust are all examples of these pollutants. (theenvironmentalblog.org)
  • Avoid environmental pollutants such as secondhand smoke, outdoor air pollution, chemicals in the home and workplace and radon. (senioranswers.org)
  • 3.Long-term exposure to air pollution: The respiratory tract has direct exposure to external surroundings and is more vulnerable to pollutants in the air. (indiatimes.com)
  • Among them are tobacco smoke, radon, and. (iaslc.org)
  • Cairo, Egypt, 31 May, 2019 ‒ On this World No Tobacco Day, the World Health Organization (WHO) is calling on people to quit tobacco smoking and say no to second-hand smoke to protect their lungs. (who.int)
  • Additionally, tobacco smoking is the leading cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a condition where the build-up of pus-filled mucus in the lungs results in a painful cough and agonising breathing difficulties. (who.int)
  • Furthermore, tuberculosis damages the lungs and reduces lung function, which is further exacerbated by tobacco smoking. (who.int)
  • These masks will not protect your lungs from smoke. (cdc.gov)
  • Smoke from wildfires contains particulates that can be inhaled into your lungs, cause irritation of the eyes, nose or throat, coughing, shortness of breath, and chest pain, and can also aggravate chronic heart and lung conditions. (timesgazette.com)
  • Wildfire smoke can have on the lungs, especially for older adults, pregnant women, children, and people with preexisting respiratory and heart conditions. (foxcitieschamber.com)
  • Keeping lungs healthy involves breathing in less smoke, germs and harmful chemicals. (senioranswers.org)
  • Cigarette smoke causes chronic inflammation and swelling in the lungs, which leads to chronic bronchitis. (senioranswers.org)
  • 4.Indoor air pollution: Chulhas and biogas are still widely used in different parts of the country and in poorly ventilated homes exposure to this smoke has proved to have detrimental damage to the lungs. (indiatimes.com)
  • In this study, we investigated the effects of exposure of mice to waterpipe smoke on oxidative stress in lungs and liver and the effects of selenium administration before smoke exposure on the oxidative stress. (who.int)
  • Malondialdehyde and nitric oxide levels were significantly higher in the lungs and liver, while the activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase-1, and catalase were significantly lower in the waterpipe smoke group when compared to control mice. (who.int)
  • Histological examinations of lungs and liver confirmed the protective actions of selenium against the effects of exposure to waterpipe smoke. (who.int)
  • In conclusion, exposure of mice to waterpipe smoke-induced oxidative stress in lungs and liver. (who.int)
  • Kanagawa Prefecture became the first subnational government in Japan to implement an ordinance for the prevention of exposure to secondhand-smoke in public facilities. (nih.gov)
  • For more health information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, visit Protect Yourself from Wildfire Smoke. (timesgazette.com)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Tobacco use in the United States. (aaem.pl)
  • Although there are good reasons for environmental regulation and clean-up, the most cost-effective method of cancer prevention is tobacco control. (ncuih.org)
  • he was previously chief of the Epidemiology Branch in the Office on Smoking and Health of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (sciencedaily.com)
  • El Día Mundial Sin Tabaco 2019 se centra en el tabaco y la salud pulmonar. (bvsalud.org)
  • Exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS) was one of the leading risk factors for deaths globally in 2019, accounting for approximately 1.3 million deaths and contributing to 37 million Disability-Adjusted life years (DALYs), with 11.2% of the burden in children under the age of 5 years. (tobaccoatlas.org)
  • The major risk factors for chronic respiratory diseases include tobacco smoke and other forms of indoor air pollution, allergens, household chemicals and outdoor pollution. (who.int)
  • Conclusions The reduction in the SHS biomarkers cotinine and NNAL and reported improvement in respiratory health demonstrates that the Michigan smoke-free workplace law is protecting bar employee health. (bmj.com)
  • Effects of a restrictive workplace smoking policy. (aaem.pl)
  • Wildfire smoke can harm you in multiple ways. (cdc.gov)
  • This fact sheet tells you how you can protect your health and be safe if you are exposed to wildfire smoke. (cdc.gov)
  • What is Wildfire Smoke and Can it Make Me Sick? (cdc.gov)
  • Wildfire smoke is a mix of gases and fine particles from burning vegetation, building materials, and other materials. (cdc.gov)
  • Wildfire smoke can make anyone sick. (cdc.gov)
  • Older adults, pregnant women, children, and people with preexisting respiratory and heart conditions may be more likely to get sick if they breathe in wildfire smoke. (cdc.gov)
  • When a wildfire occurs in your area, watch for news or health warnings about smoke. (cdc.gov)
  • More than 16 percent comes from wildfire smoke. (kqed.org)
  • For the second time in three weeks, the wildfire smoke has created unhealthy conditions in Ohio, according to AirNow.gov. (timesgazette.com)
  • Adar points out, "These findings are quite timely given the increasing frequency of wildfire smoke in our communities. (earth.com)
  • Wildfire smoke , a pervasive stressor, is affecting many U.S. cities, with some witnessing over 30 days of smoky conditions annually. (earth.com)
  • Orienting funding through domestic, bilateral and multilateral channels towards evidence-based, cost-effective interventions to reduce risk factors, including tobacco use, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity and harmful use of alcohol, can reduce unnecessary expenditure on high-cost interventions, medicines and technologies. (who.int)
  • Seventy-seven percent perceived water-pipe smoking to be as harmful as or more harmful than cigarette smoking. (who.int)
  • Tobacco is harmful in all its forms. (who.int)
  • Raise awareness of the harmful effects of tobacco use and second-hand smoke exposure. (who.int)
  • Tobacco smoke contains harmful particles that are bad for you and the environment. (theenvironmentalblog.org)
  • Zhang further stresses the potential significance of this study for policymakers aiming to reduce harmful exposure to air pollution, thereby reducing dementia cases. (earth.com)
  • 80 countries around the world, and the World Health Organization posts historical data on outdoor air pollution in urban areas. (cdc.gov)
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic 2021 (RGTE) presents smoke-free legislation information for 195 countries and as of 2020, 1.8 billion people in 67 countries are covered by complete smoke-free indoor public places, workplaces, and public transport. (tobaccoatlas.org)
  • Towards a smoke-free health service : report of a seminar, London, UK, on World's 2nd No-Tobacco Day, 31 May 1989. (who.int)
  • Towards a smoke-free health service : the 2nd report : report of a seminar, London, UK, 1 October 1991. (who.int)
  • Towards a smoke-free health service : the 3rd report : report of a seminar, London, UK, 24 May 1993. (who.int)
  • Effects of smoking on the fetus, neonate, and child : proceedings of a symposium held on 9-11 July 1990 at the Ciba Foundation and sponsored by the UK Department of Health / edited by David Poswillo and Eva Alberman. (who.int)
  • Respiratory health effects of passive smoking : lung cancer and other disorders, the report of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (who.int)
  • Respiratory health effects of passive smoking : lung cancer and other disorders. (who.int)
  • Indoor air pollution can pose a serious health threat. (cdc.gov)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Further research is needed to determine the percentages, patterns, and health risks of water-pipe smoking and its relationship to cigarette smoking among all youth. (who.int)
  • Although air pollution has decreased in many parts of the world, it represents a major and growing health problem for the residents of some cities in certain industrializing countries. (cdc.gov)
  • Conversely, those with preexisting heart and lung disease, children, and older adults have an increased risk for adverse health effects from even short-term exposure to air pollution. (cdc.gov)
  • Air pollution is a leading environmental threat to human health. (cdc.gov)
  • The negative health effects from cigarette smoking account for an estimated 500,000 deaths, or nearly 1 of every 5 deaths, each year in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • Background In the absence of comprehensive smoking bans in public places, bars and nightclubs have the highest concentrations of secondhand tobacco smoke, posing a serious health risk for workers in these venues. (bmj.com)
  • Objective To determine the impact on bar employee's health and exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) before and after the implementation of Michigan's Dr Ron Davis smoke-free air law that went into effect on 1 May 2010, prohibiting smoking in places of work, including bars. (bmj.com)
  • Air pollution can affect the health of the pregnant person and the developing baby. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Passive smoking also causes significant effects on the lung health of adult nonsmokers, including reduced lung function, increased sputum production and cough, and chest discomfort. (medscape.com)
  • A fifth-decade follow-up study of the Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study cohort, which was first studied in 1968, found that heavy maternal smoking during childhood appears to predispose to spirometrically defined COPD in middle-age. (medscape.com)
  • So far, studies towards the effect of improved cookstoves on health and pollution reported variable findings. (nature.com)
  • Thirdhand smoke (THS) is an environmental contaminant that may cause adverse health effects in smokers and nonsmokers. (mdpi.com)
  • The report arrives one week ahead of the first global conference on air pollution and health, organized by WHO. (kqed.org)
  • Ohio Department of Health (ODH) Director Bruce Vanderhoff is once again encouraging Ohioans to be aware of possible health effects as smoke from Canadian wildfires is causing poor air quality in the state. (timesgazette.com)
  • It is important to take poor air quality seriously as exposure to smoke can cause health problems," Vanderhoff said. (timesgazette.com)
  • It remains in the air for hours after smoked tobacco has been extinguished and can cause or contribute to various adverse health effects in adults and children, even if exposed for a short time. (tobaccoatlas.org)
  • Gilmore A, Pomerleau J, McKee M, Rose R, Haerpfer CW, Rotman D, Tumanov S: Prevalence of smoking in 8 countries of the former Soviet Union: results from the living conditions, lifestyle and health study. (aaem.pl)
  • You already know smoking is bad for your health. (theenvironmentalblog.org)
  • And there are plenty of unwittingly and commonly used consumer products that can add substantially to air pollution and subsequent ill health, and cause debilitating and disabling effects. (immuneweb.org)
  • Built on data from the Health and Retirement Study, which has tracked almost 30,000 adults since 1992, Zhang and Adar's research found that elevated levels of particulate pollution. (earth.com)
  • The new report, "Cigarette Smoking Prevalence and Policies in the 50 States: An Era of Change -- the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation ImpacTeen Tobacco Chart Book," was presented at the National Conference on Tobacco or Health meeting in Phoenix. (sciencedaily.com)
  • States can reduce death and disease by reducing smoking prevalence," said Gary G. Giovino, Ph.D., professor and chair of the Department of Health Behavior in the UB School of Public Health and Health Professions and principal investigator on the report. (sciencedaily.com)
  • Waterpipe smoking is common in the Middle East populations and results in health problems. (who.int)
  • Air pollution contains some of the same carcinogens, ionising radiation, non-ionising radiation, ultraviolet. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • To evaluate personal exposure to secondhand smoke, hair nicotine concentrations were also measured for 625 non-smoking and 311 smoking employees (N=936). (bmj.com)
  • Results Median (IQR) air nicotine concentrations were 3.5 (1.5-8.5) μg/m 3 and 0.2 (0.1-0.7) μg/m 3 in smoking and smoke-free venues, respectively. (bmj.com)
  • Median (IQR) hair nicotine concentrations were 6.0 (1.6-16.0) ng/mg and 1.7 (0.5-5.5) ng/mg in smoking and non-smoking employees, respectively. (bmj.com)
  • After adjustment for age, sex, education, living with a smoker, hair treatment and region, a twofold increase in air nicotine concentrations was associated with a 30% (95% CI 23% to 38%) increase in hair nicotine concentrations in non-smoking employees and with a 10% (2% to 19%) increase in smoking employees. (bmj.com)
  • The high levels of airborne nicotine found in bars and nightclubs and the contribution of this exposure to employee hair nicotine concentrations support the need for legislation measures that ensure complete protection from secondhand smoke in these venues. (bmj.com)
  • 2015. Greater γ-tocopherol status during acute smoking abstinence with nicotine replacement therapy improved vascular endothelial function by decreasing 8-iso-15(S)-prostaglandin F2α. . (oregonstate.edu)
  • WHO report on the global tobacco epidemic 2021: Addressing new and emerging products. (tobaccoatlas.org)
  • Tobacco smoking is the primary cause for lung cancer, responsible for over two thirds of lung cancer deaths globally. (who.int)
  • Second-hand smoke exposure at home or in the work place also increases the risk of lung cancer. (who.int)
  • The risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is particularly high among individuals who start smoking at a young age, as tobacco smoke significantly slows lung development. (who.int)
  • Smoke can hurt your eyes, irritate your respiratory system, and worsen chronic heart and lung diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • Exposure to air pollution may affect lung development. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), or secondhand smoke, is increasingly recognized as the direct cause of lung disease in adults and children. (medscape.com)
  • In 2-week-old children of mothers who smoke, increased lung compliance has been observed. (medscape.com)
  • This led the authors to conclude that prenata l exposure to tobacco products negatively affects elastic properties of the fetal lung because 2 weeks of postnatal exposure was not thought to be enough to exert such an effect. (medscape.com)
  • Exposure to secondhand smoke can lead to lung cancer, acute and chronic coronary heart disease (CHD), and eye and nasal irritation in adults. (tobaccoatlas.org)
  • The Community Preventive Services Task Force (CPSTF) recommends smoke-free policies to reduce secondhand smoke exposure and tobacco use on the basis of strong evidence of effectiveness. (thecommunityguide.org)
  • The systematic review was conducted on behalf of the CPSTF by a team of specialists in systematic review methods, and in research, practice and policy related to reducing tobacco use and secondhand smoke exposure. (thecommunityguide.org)
  • Evidence shows persistent disparities in secondhand smoke exposure by ethnicity, education, and income level. (tobaccoatlas.org)
  • COPD is likely to increase in coming years due to higher smoking prevalence and aging populations in many countries. (who.int)
  • Dr. Wheaton] Most COPD in the United States is caused by tobacco smoke, although about a quarter of COPD patients have never smoked. (cdc.gov)
  • People with COPD who smoke are strongly encouraged to quit. (cdc.gov)
  • The primary cause of COPD is tobacco smoke. (who.int)
  • The primary cause of COPD is exposure to tobacco smoke (either active smoking or second-hand smoke). (who.int)
  • Due to rising smoking prevalence and ageing populations in many nations throughout the world, COPD prevalence is anticipated to rise in the near future. (medgadget.com)
  • The main contributor to COPD is smoking tobacco. (medgadget.com)
  • 1.Second-hand smoke: Being exposed to second-hand smoke also known as passive smoking can lead to COPD in adults. (indiatimes.com)
  • Furthermore, indoor air pollution due to burning of incense sticks, and burning of mosquito coils also contribute to COPD. (indiatimes.com)
  • If one or more family members smoked water pipes in the home, youth were 6.3 times more likely to be current water-pipe smokers. (who.int)
  • First, smokers should make every effort to quit smoking. (cdc.gov)
  • And in 2006-07, 66 percent of adults aged 30 or older in New Hampshire who had ever smoked said they had quit, while in West Virginia for the same age group, only 45 percent of smokers said they had quit. (sciencedaily.com)
  • The report also presents state-level analyses showing that in states with the lowest prevalence of smoking, the remaining smokers are less likely to show indicators of dependence and more likely to want to quit, compared to smokers in high prevalence states. (sciencedaily.com)
  • Specific topics related to air pollution, including environmental tobacco smoke, plant antigens, and windblown agricultur al dusts, are primarily addressed in other chapters. (cdc.gov)
  • The pernicious legacy of institutional racism has segregated communities of color in underserved neighborhoods in cities across the country - districts with poor-quality housing stock clustered near areas of heavy industry, transportation centers and other sources of air pollution. (nextcity.org)
  • The clinician should consider the following possible sources of indoor air pollution when eliciting information on exposures. (cdc.gov)
  • Travelers should be mindful of, and limit exposures to, outdoor and indoor air pollution and carbon monoxide ( Table 4-02 ). (cdc.gov)
  • With extensive experience, she presently spearheads several major studies focusing on how various pollution exposures affect cognitive aging and dementia . (earth.com)
  • Misclassification of smoking habits and passive smoking : a review of the evidence / Peter N. Lee. (who.int)
  • ETS is often referred to as secondhand smoke and exposure to ETS is often called passive smoking. (cdc.gov)
  • It is also referred to as passive smoking, environmental tobacco smoke, and tobacco smoke pollution. (tobaccoatlas.org)
  • Research also shows that the risks for CHD from passive smoking are essentially indistinguishable from active smoking. (tobaccoatlas.org)
  • Berthiller J, Sasco AJ: Smoking (active and passive) in relation on fertility medically assisted procreation and pregnancy. (aaem.pl)
  • Using random effects meta-analysis, 18 case control studies without tobacco industry affiliation yielded a non-significant pooled odds ratio of 0.91 (95% CI, 0.75-1.10), while 8 case control studies with tobacco industry affiliation yielded a significant pooled odds ratio of 0.86 (95% CI, 0.75-0.98) suggesting that smoking protects against AD. (nih.gov)
  • And to get help quitting smoking, they can call 1-800-QUIT-NOW or visit smokefree.gov online. (cdc.gov)
  • For both your sake and the sake of your natural surroundings, you may want to quit smoking. (theenvironmentalblog.org)
  • States should feel morally obligated to use a higher proportion of the revenues they receive from cigarette excise taxes and settlement payments to prevent smoking initiation, protect nonsmokers and help people who smoke to quit. (sciencedaily.com)
  • For parents with a low income or those from minority groups, other risk factors - such as exposure to racism and lack of access to quality food, good prenatal care, or safe homes - may intensify the effects of air pollution. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • State and local ordinances establish smoke-free standards for all, or for designated, indoor workplaces, indoor spaces, and outdoor public places. (thecommunityguide.org)
  • Private-sector smoke-free policies may ban all tobacco use on private property or restrict smoking to designated outdoor locations. (thecommunityguide.org)
  • Run an air conditioner if you have one, but keep the fresh-air intake closed and the filter clean to prevent outdoor smoke from getting inside. (cdc.gov)
  • If outdoor air pollution is a problem, running the air conditioner or an air cleaner can help. (kidshealth.org)
  • However, most of the time the disease is associated with those who indulge in the unhealthy habit of smoking. (indiatimes.com)
  • Though more research on the harm profile of second aerosol is needed, it is clear that these aerosols should be included in comprehensive smoke-free legislation in the same way as secondhand smoke. (tobaccoatlas.org)
  • Tobacco smoke contains over 7000 chemicals, at least 69 of which are known to cause cancer. (who.int)
  • Toxic waste dumps, mining activities, paper mills, military activities, agricultural chemicals, and urban pollution are common sources of carcinogen exposure on reservations and among the urban poor. (ncuih.org)
  • For example, tobacco smoke is a very complex mixture of chemicals, but at least 60 of those present are carcinogenic. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • Outcomes included household air pollution (PM 2.5 and CO), self-reported respiratory symptoms (with CCQ and MRC-breathlessness scale), chest infections, school absence and intervention acceptability. (nature.com)
  • High levels of air pollution and extreme hot and cold temperatures have been linked to increases in heart disease and deaths from heart attacks. (cdc.gov)
  • There is no way to predict who will or will not experience negative pregnancy outcomes, though experts do currently believe that exposure to air pollution increases the risk. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • In an animal model, tobacco exposure induced systemic and local responses, including elevation of plasma levels of C5a and brain-derived neurotrophic factor and increases in pulmonary tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-5, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, and the density of substance P-positive nerves along the bronchial epithelium. (medscape.com)
  • He said that while a combination of outreach programs, legislation, cigarette price increases and coverage for and access to stop-smoking treatments has been proven to work, the report nevertheless reveals that most states are not fully implementing these approaches to reduce smoking rates and protect nonsmokers. (sciencedaily.com)
  • Under President Donald Trump, the Environmental Protection Agency has proposed rolling back several key standards that limit air pollution, including the Clean Power Plan , clean car rules , and methane standards for oil and gas operations. (kqed.org)
  • According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which has developed a color-coded system, when the air quality index is orange or is more than 101 parts, certain groups may experience sensitivity to air pollution. (senioranswers.org)
  • One 2018 study established a correlation between exposure to air pollution and stillbirth. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Researchers have not yet identified all the potential effects of air pollution. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The content in this section focuses on the above potential sources of indoor air pollution. (cdc.gov)
  • The finding updates and replaces two previous CPSTF findings on smoke-free policies and smoking bans and restrictions . (thecommunityguide.org)
  • While these 67 countries (34%) show best practice levels in comprehensive smoke-free bans, there are still 37% of countries, and 38% of the world population, with partial smoke-free ban environments. (tobaccoatlas.org)
  • The remaining 56 countries (29%) fail to comprehensively protect people from secondhand smoke by having complete absence of or minimal smoking bans. (tobaccoatlas.org)
  • When smoke levels are high, do not use anything that burns, such as candles and fireplaces. (cdc.gov)
  • In conclusion, locally tailored implementation of improved cookstoves/heaters is acceptable and has considerable effects on respiratory symptoms and indoor pollution, yet mean PM 2.5 levels remain above WHO recommendations. (nature.com)
  • About 1.8 billion children, or 93 percent of the age group, are exposed to air pollution levels that exceed WHO safety guidelines, according to the new report. (kqed.org)
  • If you go jogging, avoid doing so around heavy traffic or on days of high air pollution levels. (theenvironmentalblog.org)
  • Do not add to the pollution levels. (immuneweb.org)
  • The report points out that even after four decades of tobacco control efforts, one-fifth of American adults still smoke and prevalence is especially high among populations with lower levels of education and income, Native Americans and those with psychiatric and substance abuse problems. (sciencedaily.com)
  • Innovative financing is needed, including through increased taxes on tobacco and alcohol. (who.int)
  • Cancer poses a huge disease burden, which could be reduced by adopting healthy lifestyles mainly composed of healthy diet, body weight, physical activity, limited alcohol consumption, and avoidance of smoking. (nature.com)
  • Exposure to air pollution correlates with a higher risk of pregnancy-related complications in the parent. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Scholars@Duke publication: Correlates of Prenatal and Early-Life Tobacco Smoke Exposure and Frequency of Common Gene Deletions in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. (duke.edu)
  • 100 nm - larger than 90% of the particles of wood smoke[citation needed] (ranges from 7 to 3000 nanometres) Lengths between 10−7 and 10−6 m (100 nm and 1 µm). (wikipedia.org)
  • If you have a central air-conditioning system, use high efficiency filters to capture fine particles from smoke. (timesgazette.com)
  • If you must smoke, do it outside to avoid bringing particles inside your home. (theenvironmentalblog.org)