Cell growth support structures composed of BIOCOMPATIBLE MATERIALS. They are specially designed solid support matrices for cell attachment in TISSUE ENGINEERING and GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION uses.
Organic polymeric materials which can be broken down by naturally occurring processes. This includes plastics created from bio-based or petrochemical-based materials.
Generating tissue in vitro for clinical applications, such as replacing wounded tissues or impaired organs. The use of TISSUE SCAFFOLDING enables the generation of complex multi-layered tissues and tissue structures.
Synthetic or natural materials, other than DRUGS, that are used to replace or repair any body TISSUES or bodily function.
Condition of having pores or open spaces. This often refers to bones, bone implants, or bone cements, but can refer to the porous state of any solid substance.
A group of thermoplastic or thermosetting polymers containing polyisocyanate. They are used as ELASTOMERS, as coatings, as fibers and as foams.
Polymers of organic acids and alcohols, with ester linkages--usually polyethylene terephthalate; can be cured into hard plastic, films or tapes, or fibers which can be woven into fabrics, meshes or velours.
The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.
Submicron-sized fibers with diameters typically between 50 and 500 nanometers. The very small dimension of these fibers can generate a high surface area to volume ratio, which makes them potential candidates for various biomedical and other applications.
A biocompatible polymer used as a surgical suture material.
Implants constructed of materials designed to be absorbed by the body without producing an immune response. They are usually composed of plastics and are frequently used in orthopedics and orthodontics.
Salts and esters of the 10-carbon monocarboxylic acid-decanoic acid.
Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.
Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).
Renewal or repair of lost bone tissue. It excludes BONY CALLUS formed after BONE FRACTURES but not yet replaced by hard bone.
Procedures for enhancing and directing tissue repair and renewal processes, such as BONE REGENERATION; NERVE REGENERATION; etc. They involve surgically implanting growth conducive tracks or conduits (TISSUE SCAFFOLDING) at the damaged site to stimulate and control the location of cell repopulation. The tracks or conduits are made from synthetic and/or natural materials and may include support cells and induction factors for CELL GROWTH PROCESSES; or CELL MIGRATION.
A continuous protein fiber consisting primarily of FIBROINS. It is synthesized by a variety of INSECTS and ARACHNIDS.
The mineral component of bones and teeth; it has been used therapeutically as a prosthetic aid and in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.
Materials fabricated by BIOMIMETICS techniques, i.e., based on natural processes found in biological systems.
Synthetic or natural materials for the replacement of bones or bone tissue. They include hard tissue replacement polymers, natural coral, hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, and various other biomaterials. The bone substitutes as inert materials can be incorporated into surrounding tissue or gradually replaced by original tissue.
Sharp instruments used for puncturing or suturing.
Manufacturing technology for making microscopic devices in the micrometer range (typically 1-100 micrometers), such as integrated circuits or MEMS. The process usually involves replication and parallel fabrication of hundreds or millions of identical structures using various thin film deposition techniques and carried out in environmentally-controlled clean rooms.
The forcing into the skin of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle, piercing the top skin layer.
Mutant strains of rats that produce little or no hair. Several different homozygous recessive mutations can cause hairlessness in rats including rnu/rnu (Rowett nude), fz/fz (fuzzy), shn/shn (shorn), and nznu/nznu (New Zealand nude). Note that while NUDE RATS are often hairless, they are most characteristically athymic.
The design or construction of objects greatly reduced in scale.

Embryonic stem cells cultured in biodegradable scaffold repair infarcted myocardium in mice. (1/1771)

Our previous findings demonstrated that directly injecting embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into ischemic region of the heart improved cardiac function in animals with experimental myocardial infarction (MI). Tissue engineering with stem cells may provide tissue creation and repair. This study was designed to investigate the effectiveness of grafting of ESC-seeded biodegradable patch on infarcted heart. MI in mice was induced by ligation of the left coronary artery. Mouse ESCs were seeded on polyglycolic-acid (PGA) material patches. Three days after culture, an ESC-seeded patch was transplanted on the surface of ischemic and peri-ischemic myocardium. Eight weeks after MI operation and patch transplantation, hemodynamics and cardiac function were evaluated in four (sham-operated, MI, MI + cell-free patch, and MI + ESC-patch) groups of mice. The blood pressure and left ventricular function were significantly reduced in the MI animals. Compared with MI alone and MI + cell-free patch groups, the animals received MI + ESC-seeded patches significantly improved blood pressure and ventricular function. The survival rate of the MI mice grafted with MI + ESC-seeded patches was markedly higher than that in MI alone or MI + cell-free patch animals. GFP-positive tissue was detected in infarcted area with grafting of ESC-seeded patch, which suggests the survivors of ESCs and possible myocardial regeneration. Our data demonstrate that grafting of ESC-seeded bioabsorbable patch can repair infarcted myocardium and improve cardiac function in MI mice. This novel approach of combining stem cells and biodegradable materials may provide a therapeutic modality for repairing injured heart.  (+info)

Instrumented fusion of thoracolumbar fracture with type I mineralized collagen matrix combined with autogenous bone marrow as a bone graft substitute: a four-case report. (2/1771)

In order to avoid the morbidity from autogenous bone harvesting, bone graft substitutes are being used more frequently in spinal surgery. There is indirect radiological evidence that bone graft substitutes are efficacious in humans. The purpose of this four-case study was to visually, manually, and histologically assess the quality of a fusion mass produced by a collagen hydroxyapatite scaffold impregnated with autologous bone marrow aspirate for posterolateral fusion. Four patients sustained an acute thoracolumbar fracture and were treated by short posterior segment fusion using the AO fixateur interne. Autologous bone marrow (iliac crest) impregnated hydroxyapatite-collagen scaffold was laid on the decorticated posterior elements. Routine implant removal was performed after a mean of 15.3 months (12-20). During this second surgery, fusion mass was assessed visually and manually. A bone biopsy was sent for histological analysis of all four cases. Fusion was confirmed in all four patients intraoperatively and sagittal stress testing confirmed mechanical adequacy of the fusion mass. Three out of the four (cases 2-4) had their implants removed between 12 and 15 months after the index surgery. All their histological cuts showed evidence of newly formed bone and presence of active membranous and/or enchondral ossification foci. The last patient (case 1) underwent implant removal at 20 months and his histological cuts showed mature bone, but no active ossification foci. This four-case report suggests that the fusion mass produced by a mineralized collagen matrix graft soaked in aspirated bone marrow is histologically and mechanically adequate in a thoracolumbar fracture model. A larger patient series and/or randomized controlled studies are warranted to confirm these initial results.  (+info)

Designer self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds for adult mouse neural stem cell 3-dimensional cultures. (3/1771)

Biomedical researchers have become increasingly aware of the limitations of conventional 2-dimensional tissue cell culture systems, including coated Petri dishes, multi-well plates and slides, to fully address many critical issues in cell biology, cancer biology and neurobiology, such as the 3-D microenvironment, 3-D gradient diffusion, 3-D cell migration and 3-D cell-cell contact interactions. In order to fully understand how cells behave in the 3-D body, it is important to develop a well-controlled 3-D cell culture system where every single ingredient is known. Here we report the development of a 3-D cell culture system using a designer peptide nanofiber scaffold with mouse adult neural stem cells. We attached several functional motifs, including cell adhesion, differentiation and bone marrow homing motifs, to a self-assembling peptide RADA16 (Ac-RADARADARADARADA-COHN2). These functionalized peptides undergo self-assembly into a nanofiber structure similar to Matrigel. During cell culture, the cells were fully embedded in the 3-D environment of the scaffold. Two of the peptide scaffolds containing bone marrow homing motifs significantly enhanced the neural cell survival without extra soluble growth and neurotrophic factors to the routine cell culture media. In these designer scaffolds, the cell populations with beta-Tubulin(+), GFAP(+) and Nestin(+) markers are similar to those found in cell populations cultured on Matrigel. The gene expression profiling array experiments showed selective gene expression, possibly involved in neural stem cell adhesion and differentiation. Because the synthetic peptides are intrinsically pure and a number of desired function cellular motifs are easy to incorporate, these designer peptide nanofiber scaffolds provide a promising controlled 3-D culture system for diverse tissue cells, and are useful as well for general molecular and cell biology.  (+info)

Prospects of micromass culture technology in tissue engineering. (4/1771)

Tissue engineering of bone and cartilage tissue for subsequent implantation is of growing interest in cranio- and maxillofacial surgery. Commonly it is performed by using cells coaxed with scaffolds. Recently, there is a controversy concerning the use of artificial scaffolds compared to the use of a natural matrix. Therefore, new approaches called micromass technology have been invented to overcome these problems by avoiding the need for scaffolds. Technically, cells are dissociated and the dispersed cells are then reaggregated into cellular spheres. The micromass technology approach enables investigators to follow tissue formation from single cell sources to organised spheres in a controlled environment. Thus, the inherent fundamentals of tissue engineering are better revealed. Additionally, as the newly formed tissue is devoid of an artificial material, it resembles more closely the in vivo situation. The purpose of this review is to provide an insight into the fundamentals and the technique of micromass cell culture used to study bone tissue engineering.  (+info)

Biological designer self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds significantly enhance osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and 3-D migration. (5/1771)

A class of self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds has been shown to be an excellent biological material for 3-dimension cell culture and stimulating cell migration into the scaffold, as well as for repairing tissue defects in animals. We report here the development of several peptide nanofiber scaffolds designed specifically for osteoblasts. We designed one of the pure self-assembling peptide scaffolds RADA16-I through direct coupling to short biologically active motifs. The motifs included osteogenic growth peptide ALK (ALKRQGRTLYGF) bone-cell secreted-signal peptide, osteopontin cell adhesion motif DGR (DGRGDSVAYG) and 2-unit RGD binding sequence PGR (PRGDSGYRGDS). We made the new peptide scaffolds by mixing the pure RAD16 and designer-peptide solutions, and we examined the molecular integration of the mixed nanofiber scaffolds using AFM. Compared to pure RAD16 scaffold, we found that these designer peptide scaffolds significantly promoted mouse pre-osteoblast MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation. Moreover, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin secretion, which are early and late markers for osteoblastic differentiation, were also significantly increased. We demonstrated that the designer, self-assembling peptide scaffolds promoted the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1. Under the identical culture medium condition, confocal images unequivocally demonstrated that the designer PRG peptide scaffold stimulated cell migration into the 3-D scaffold. Our results suggest that these designer peptide scaffolds may be very useful for promoting bone tissue regeneration.  (+info)

In vitro chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells in recombinant silk-elastinlike hydrogels. (6/1771)

PURPOSE: In this study the chondrocytic differentiation and cartilage matrix accumulation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were investigated after encapsulation in a genetically engineered silk-elastinlike protein polymer SELP-47 K as an injectable matrix for delivery of cell-based therapeutics. MATERIALS AND METHODS: hMSCs were encapsulated in SELP-47 K and cultured for 4 weeks in chondrogenic medium with or without transforming growth factor-beta3 (TGF). Chondrogenic differentiation was evaluated by histological, RNA and biochemical analyses for the expression of cartilage extracellular matrix components. RESULTS: Histological and immunohistochemical staining revealed that the cells acquired a rounded morphology and were embedded in significant amounts of chondrogenic extracellular matrix. Reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR showed an up-regulation in aggrecan, type II and type X collagen and SOX9 in presence of TGF-beta3. By day 28, constructs cultured in the presence of TGF-beta3 exhibited significant increase in sulfated glycosaminoglycan and total collagen content up to 65 and 300%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that SELP-47 K hydrogel can be used as a scaffold for encapsulation and chondrogenesis of hMSCs. The ability to use recombinant techniques to precisely control SELP structure enables the investigation of injectable protein polymer scaffolds for soft-tissue engineering with varied physicochemical properties.  (+info)

Porous silk scaffolds can be used for tissue engineering annulus fibrosus. (7/1771)

There is no optimal treatment for symptomatic degenerative disc disease which affects millions of people worldwide. One novel approach would be to form a patch or tissue replacement to repair the annulus fibrosus (AF) through which the NP herniates. As the optimal scaffold for this has not been defined the purpose of this study was to determine if porous silk scaffolds would support AF cell attachment and extracellular matrix accumulation and whether chemically decorating the scaffold with RGD peptide, which has been shown to enhance attachment for other cell types, would further improve AF cell attachment and tissue formation. Annulus fibrosus cells were isolated from bovine caudal discs and seeded into porous silk scaffolds. The percent cell attachment was quantified and the cell morphology and distribution within the scaffold was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The cell-seeded scaffolds were grown for up to 8 weeks and evaluated for gene expression, histological appearance and matrix accumulation. AF cells attach to porous silk scaffolds, proliferate and synthesize and accumulate extracellular matrix as demonstrated biochemically and histologically. Coupling the silk scaffold with RGD-peptides did not enhance cell attachment nor tissue formation but did affect cell morphology. As well, the cells had higher levels of type II collagen and aggrecan gene expression when compared to cells grown on the non-modified scaffold, a feature more in keeping with cells of the inner annulus. Porous silk is an appropriate scaffold on which to grow AF cells. Coupling RGD peptide to the scaffold appears to influence AF cell phenotype suggesting that it may be possible to select an appropriate scaffold that favours inner annulus versus outer annulus differentiation which will be important for tissue engineering an intervertebral disc.  (+info)

An overview of tissue engineering approaches for management of spinal cord injuries. (8/1771)

Severe spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to devastating neurological deficits and disabilities, which necessitates spending a great deal of health budget for psychological and healthcare problems of these patients and their relatives. This justifies the cost of research into the new modalities for treatment of spinal cord injuries, even in developing countries. Apart from surgical management and nerve grafting, several other approaches have been adopted for management of this condition including pharmacologic and gene therapy, cell therapy, and use of different cell-free or cell-seeded bioscaffolds. In current paper, the recent developments for therapeutic delivery of stem and non-stem cells to the site of injury, and application of cell-free and cell-seeded natural and synthetic scaffolds have been reviewed.  (+info)

Tissue scaffolds, also known as bioactive scaffolds or synthetic extracellular matrices, refer to three-dimensional structures that serve as templates for the growth and organization of cells in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. These scaffolds are designed to mimic the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) found in biological tissues, providing a supportive environment for cell attachment, proliferation, differentiation, and migration.

Tissue scaffolds can be made from various materials, including naturally derived biopolymers (e.g., collagen, alginate, chitosan, hyaluronic acid), synthetic polymers (e.g., polycaprolactone, polylactic acid, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)), or a combination of both. The choice of material depends on the specific application and desired properties, such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, mechanical strength, and porosity.

The primary functions of tissue scaffolds include:

1. Cell attachment: Providing surfaces for cells to adhere, spread, and form stable focal adhesions.
2. Mechanical support: Offering a structural framework that maintains the desired shape and mechanical properties of the engineered tissue.
3. Nutrient diffusion: Ensuring adequate transport of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products throughout the scaffold to support cell survival and function.
4. Guided tissue growth: Directing the organization and differentiation of cells through spatial cues and biochemical signals.
5. Biodegradation: Gradually degrading at a rate that matches tissue regeneration, allowing for the replacement of the scaffold with native ECM produced by the cells.

Tissue scaffolds have been used in various applications, such as wound healing, bone and cartilage repair, cardiovascular tissue engineering, and neural tissue regeneration. The design and fabrication of tissue scaffolds are critical aspects of tissue engineering, aiming to create functional substitutes for damaged or diseased tissues and organs.

Biodegradable plastics are a type of plastic that can be broken down naturally by microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi, into water, carbon dioxide, and biomass under specific conditions. This process of breakdown is known as biodegradation. The term "biodegradable" does not necessarily mean that the plastic will break down quickly or safely in all environments, and it is important to note that some plastics marketed as biodegradable may still take a long time to degrade and can still have negative impacts on the environment if not disposed of properly.

Biodegradable plastics are often made from renewable resources such as corn starch, sugarcane, or other plant-based materials, although some may also be made from petroleum-based materials. They are designed to break down more quickly and safely than traditional plastics, which can take hundreds of years to degrade and can persist in the environment, causing harm to wildlife and ecosystems.

Biodegradable plastics have potential applications in a variety of industries, including packaging, agriculture, and medical devices. However, it is important to consider the specific conditions required for biodegradation and the potential impacts on the environment when using these materials.

Tissue engineering is a branch of biomedical engineering that combines the principles of engineering, materials science, and biological sciences to develop functional substitutes for damaged or diseased tissues and organs. It involves the creation of living, three-dimensional structures that can restore, maintain, or improve tissue function. This is typically accomplished through the use of cells, scaffolds (biodegradable matrices), and biologically active molecules. The goal of tissue engineering is to develop biological substitutes that can ultimately restore normal function and structure in damaged tissues or organs.

Biocompatible materials are non-toxic and non-reacting substances that can be used in medical devices, tissue engineering, and drug delivery systems without causing harm or adverse reactions to living tissues or organs. These materials are designed to mimic the properties of natural tissues and are able to integrate with biological systems without being rejected by the body's immune system.

Biocompatible materials can be made from a variety of substances, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. The specific properties of these materials, such as their mechanical strength, flexibility, and biodegradability, are carefully selected to meet the requirements of their intended medical application.

Examples of biocompatible materials include titanium used in dental implants and joint replacements, polyethylene used in artificial hips, and hydrogels used in contact lenses and drug delivery systems. The use of biocompatible materials has revolutionized modern medicine by enabling the development of advanced medical technologies that can improve patient outcomes and quality of life.

In the context of medical terminology, "porosity" is not a term that is frequently used to describe human tissues or organs. However, in dermatology and cosmetics, porosity refers to the ability of the skin to absorb and retain moisture or topical treatments.

A skin with high porosity has larger pores and can absorb more products, while a skin with low porosity has smaller pores and may have difficulty absorbing products. It is important to note that this definition of porosity is not a medical one but is instead used in the beauty industry.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Polyurethanes" are not a medical term. They are a type of polymer that is used in a variety of industrial and consumer products, including foam cushions, insulation, and packaging materials. Polyurethanes are created through a chemical reaction between diisocyanates and polyols. While they have many applications in the medical field, such as in the production of medical devices and equipment, they are not a medical term themselves.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Polyesters" is not a medical term. It is a term used in materials science and textile industry to describe a type of synthetic fiber made from polymers characterized by the presence of ester groups in their main chain. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to help with those instead!

I'm happy to help! However, I must clarify that "materials testing" is not a medical term per se. It is a term used in various fields, including engineering and materials science, to describe the process of subjecting materials to different tests to evaluate their properties and performance under various conditions.

In the context of medical devices or implants, materials testing may refer to the evaluation of the physical and mechanical properties of materials used in their construction. These tests can include assessments of strength, durability, biocompatibility, and other factors that are critical to ensuring the safety and efficacy of medical devices.

Medical device manufacturers must comply with regulatory standards for materials testing to ensure that their products meet specific requirements for performance, safety, and quality. These standards may vary depending on the type of device, its intended use, and the country or region in which it will be marketed and sold.

Nanofibers are defined in the medical field as fibrous structures with extremely small diameters, typically measuring between 100 nanometers to 1 micrometer. They can be made from various materials such as polymers, ceramics, or composites and have a high surface area-to-volume ratio, which makes them useful in a variety of biomedical applications. These include tissue engineering, drug delivery, wound healing, and filtration. Nanofibers can be produced using different techniques such as electrospinning, self-assembly, and phase separation.

Polyglycolic acid (PGA) is a synthetic polymer of glycolic acid, which is commonly used in surgical sutures. It is a biodegradable material that degrades in the body through hydrolysis into glycolic acid, which can be metabolized and eliminated from the body. PGA sutures are often used for approximating tissue during surgical procedures due to their strength, handling properties, and predictable rate of absorption. The degradation time of PGA sutures is typically around 60-90 days, depending on factors such as the size and location of the suture.

Absorbable implants are medical devices that are designed to be placed inside the body during a surgical procedure, where they provide support, stabilization, or other functions, and then gradually break down and are absorbed by the body over time. These implants are typically made from materials such as polymers, proteins, or ceramics that have been engineered to degrade at a controlled rate, allowing them to be resorbed and eliminated from the body without the need for a second surgical procedure to remove them.

Absorbable implants are often used in orthopedic, dental, and plastic surgery applications, where they can help promote healing and support tissue regeneration. For example, absorbable screws or pins may be used to stabilize fractured bones during the healing process, after which they will gradually dissolve and be absorbed by the body. Similarly, absorbable membranes may be used in dental surgery to help guide the growth of new bone and gum tissue around an implant, and then be resorbed over time.

It's important to note that while absorbable implants offer several advantages over non-absorbable materials, such as reduced risk of infection and improved patient comfort, they may also have some limitations. For example, the mechanical properties of absorbable materials may not be as strong as those of non-absorbable materials, which could affect their performance in certain applications. Additionally, the degradation products of absorbable implants may cause local inflammation or other adverse reactions in some patients. As with any medical device, the use of absorbable implants should be carefully considered and discussed with a qualified healthcare professional.

Decanoates are a type of esterified form of certain drugs or medications, particularly in the case of testosterone. The decanoate ester is attached to the testosterone molecule to create a longer-acting formulation. Testosterone decanoate is a slow-release form of testosterone that is used as a replacement therapy for individuals who have low levels of natural testosterone. It is administered through intramuscular injection and has a duration of action of approximately 2-3 weeks.

Other medications may also be available in decanoate ester form, but testosterone decanoate is one of the most commonly used. As with any medication or treatment plan, it's important to consult with a healthcare provider to determine the best course of action based on individual needs and medical history.

Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a type of electron microscopy that uses a focused beam of electrons to scan the surface of a sample and produce a high-resolution image. In SEM, a beam of electrons is scanned across the surface of a specimen, and secondary electrons are emitted from the sample due to interactions between the electrons and the atoms in the sample. These secondary electrons are then detected by a detector and used to create an image of the sample's surface topography. SEM can provide detailed images of the surface of a wide range of materials, including metals, polymers, ceramics, and biological samples. It is commonly used in materials science, biology, and electronics for the examination and analysis of surfaces at the micro- and nanoscale.

In the context of medical definitions, polymers are large molecules composed of repeating subunits called monomers. These long chains of monomers can have various structures and properties, depending on the type of monomer units and how they are linked together. In medicine, polymers are used in a wide range of applications, including drug delivery systems, medical devices, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Some examples of polymers used in medicine include polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and biodegradable polymers such as polylactic acid (PLA) and polycaprolactone (PCL).

Bone regeneration is the biological process of new bone formation that occurs after an injury or removal of a portion of bone. This complex process involves several stages, including inflammation, migration and proliferation of cells, matrix deposition, and mineralization, leading to the restoration of the bone's structure and function.

The main cells involved in bone regeneration are osteoblasts, which produce new bone matrix, and osteoclasts, which resorb damaged or old bone tissue. The process is tightly regulated by various growth factors, hormones, and signaling molecules that promote the recruitment, differentiation, and activity of these cells.

Bone regeneration can occur naturally in response to injury or surgical intervention, such as fracture repair or dental implant placement. However, in some cases, bone regeneration may be impaired due to factors such as age, disease, or trauma, leading to delayed healing or non-union of the bone. In these situations, various strategies and techniques, including the use of bone grafts, scaffolds, and growth factors, can be employed to enhance and support the bone regeneration process.

Guided Tissue Regeneration (GTR) is a surgical procedure used in periodontics and implant dentistry that aims to regenerate lost periodontal tissues, such as the alveolar bone, cementum, and periodontal ligament, which have been destroyed due to periodontal disease or trauma. The goal of GTR is to restore the architectural and functional relationship between the teeth and their supporting structures.

The procedure involves placing a barrier membrane between the tooth root and the surrounding soft tissues, creating a protected space that allows the periodontal tissues to regenerate. The membrane acts as a physical barrier, preventing the rapid growth of epithelial cells and fibroblasts from the soft tissue into the defect area, while allowing the slower-growing cells derived from the periodontal ligament and bone to repopulate the space.

There are two main types of membranes used in GTR: resorbable and non-resorbable. Resorbable membranes are made of materials that degrade over time, eliminating the need for a second surgical procedure to remove them. Non-resorbable membranes, on the other hand, must be removed after a period of healing.

GTR has been shown to be effective in treating intrabony defects, furcation involvements, and ridge augmentations, among other applications. However, the success of GTR depends on various factors, including the patient's overall health, the size and location of the defect, and the surgeon's skill and experience.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Silk" is not a medical term. Silk is a natural protein fiber, mainly composed of fibroin and produced by certain insect larvae to form cocoons. It's commonly used in textiles and other industries for its softness, smoothness, and strength. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I'd be happy to help with those instead!

Dura Mater: The tough, outer membrane that covers the brain and spinal cord.

Hydroxyapatite: A naturally occurring mineral form of calcium apatite, also known as dahllite, with the formula Ca5(PO4)3(OH), is the primary mineral component of biological apatites found in bones and teeth.

Therefore, "Durapatite" isn't a recognized medical term, but it seems like it might be a combination of "dura mater" and "hydroxyapatite." If you meant to ask about a material used in medical or dental applications that combines properties of both dura mater and hydroxyapatite, please provide more context.

Biomimetic materials are synthetic or natural substances that mimic the chemical, physical, and biological properties of living systems or tissues. These materials are designed to interact with cells, tissues, and organs in ways that resemble the body's own structures and processes. They can be used in a variety of medical applications, including tissue engineering, drug delivery, and medical devices.

Biomimetic materials may be composed of polymers, ceramics, metals, or composites, and they can be designed to have specific properties such as mechanical strength, biocompatibility, and degradability. They may also incorporate bioactive molecules, such as growth factors or drugs, to promote healing or prevent infection.

The goal of using biomimetic materials is to create medical solutions that are more effective, safer, and more compatible with the body than traditional synthetic materials. By mimicking the body's own structures and processes, these materials can help to reduce inflammation, promote tissue regeneration, and improve overall patient outcomes.

Bone substitutes are materials that are used to replace missing or damaged bone in the body. They can be made from a variety of materials, including natural bone from other parts of the body or from animals, synthetic materials, or a combination of both. The goal of using bone substitutes is to provide structural support and promote the growth of new bone tissue.

Bone substitutes are often used in dental, orthopedic, and craniofacial surgery to help repair defects caused by trauma, tumors, or congenital abnormalities. They can also be used to augment bone volume in procedures such as spinal fusion or joint replacement.

There are several types of bone substitutes available, including:

1. Autografts: Bone taken from another part of the patient's body, such as the hip or pelvis.
2. Allografts: Bone taken from a deceased donor and processed to remove any cells and infectious materials.
3. Xenografts: Bone from an animal source, typically bovine or porcine, that has been processed to remove any cells and infectious materials.
4. Synthetic bone substitutes: Materials such as calcium phosphate ceramics, bioactive glass, and polymer-based materials that are designed to mimic the properties of natural bone.

The choice of bone substitute material depends on several factors, including the size and location of the defect, the patient's medical history, and the surgeon's preference. It is important to note that while bone substitutes can provide structural support and promote new bone growth, they may not have the same strength or durability as natural bone. Therefore, they may not be suitable for all applications, particularly those that require high load-bearing capacity.

In the context of medicine, "needles" are thin, sharp, and typically hollow instruments used in various medical procedures to introduce or remove fluids from the body, administer medications, or perform diagnostic tests. They consist of a small-gauge metal tube with a sharp point on one end and a hub on the other, where a syringe is attached.

There are different types of needles, including:

1. Hypodermic needles: These are used for injections, such as intramuscular (IM), subcutaneous (SC), or intravenous (IV) injections, to deliver medications directly into the body. They come in various sizes and lengths depending on the type of injection and the patient's age and weight.
2. Blood collection needles: These are used for drawing blood samples for diagnostic tests. They have a special vacuum-assisted design that allows them to easily penetrate veins and collect the required amount of blood.
3. Surgical needles: These are used in surgeries for suturing (stitching) wounds or tissues together. They are typically curved and made from stainless steel, with a triangular or reverse cutting point to facilitate easy penetration through tissues.
4. Acupuncture needles: These are thin, solid needles used in traditional Chinese medicine for acupuncture therapy. They are inserted into specific points on the body to stimulate energy flow and promote healing.

It is essential to follow proper infection control procedures when handling and disposing of needles to prevent the spread of bloodborne pathogens and infectious diseases.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Microtechnology" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. Microtechnology generally refers to the development and application of technologies on a microscopic or tiny scale. It is used in various fields including engineering, physics, electronics, and materials science.

In the context of medicine, microtechnologies can be used in the development of medical devices, diagnostic tools, drug delivery systems, and other healthcare applications. For example, microfabrication techniques are used to create microfluidic devices for lab-on-a-chip applications, which can perform complex biochemical analyses for disease diagnosis or drug screening.

However, it's important to note that the application of microtechnologies in medicine is constantly evolving, and new developments and techniques are being explored all the time.

An "injection, intradermal" refers to a type of injection where a small quantity of a substance is introduced into the layer of skin between the epidermis and dermis, using a thin gauge needle. This technique is often used for diagnostic or research purposes, such as conducting allergy tests or administering immunizations in a way that stimulates a strong immune response. The injection site typically produces a small, raised bump (wheal) that disappears within a few hours. It's important to note that intradermal injections should be performed by trained medical professionals to minimize the risk of complications.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Rats, Hairless" is not a recognized medical term or condition. The term "hairless rat" typically refers to a specific breed of domesticated rats, also known as "Smooth-haired Rats" or "Naked Rats," which have a genetic mutation that results in the absence of fur. They are often kept as pets and are used in laboratory research. If you're looking for information on a specific medical condition or term, please provide it, and I would be happy to help.

"Miniaturization" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, in a broader context, it refers to the process of creating smaller versions of something, usually with the aim of improving functionality, efficiency, or ease of use. In medicine, this concept can be applied to various fields such as medical devices, surgical techniques, and diagnostic tools.

For instance, in interventional radiology, miniaturization refers to the development of smaller and less invasive catheters, wires, and other devices used during minimally invasive procedures. This allows for improved patient outcomes, reduced recovery time, and lower risks of complications compared to traditional open surgical procedures.

Similarly, in pathology, miniaturization can refer to the use of smaller tissue samples or biopsies for diagnostic testing, which can reduce the need for more invasive procedures while still providing accurate results.

Overall, while "miniaturization" is not a medical term per se, it reflects an ongoing trend in medicine towards developing more efficient and less invasive technologies and techniques to improve patient care.

... scaffolds are used in bone tissue engineering to mimic the natural extracellular matrix of the bones. The bone tissue ... "Ligament tissue engineering using synthetic biodegradable fiber scaffolds". Tissue Engineering. 5 (5): 443-52. doi:10.1089/ten. ... Using silk scaffolds as a guide for growth for bone tissue regeneration, Kim et al. observed complete bone union after 8 weeks ... These scaffolds can be used to deliver bioactive agents that promote tissue regeneration. These bioactive materials should ...
... often involves the use of cells placed on tissue scaffolds in the formation of new viable tissue for a ... Another form of scaffold is decellularized tissue. This is a process where chemicals are used to extracts cells from tissues, ... Cell-Based Bone Tissue Engineering Clinical Tissue Engineering Center State of Ohio Initiative for Tissue Engineering (National ... tissue-inducing substances, and a cells + matrix approach (often referred to as a scaffold). Tissue engineering has also been ...
Microfluidic scaffolds for tissue engineering. Nature Materials (2007) vol. 6 pp. 908-915 v t e v t e (All articles with ...
"Bioprinting of tissue engineering scaffolds". Journal of Tissue Engineering. 9: 2041731418802090. doi:10.1177/2041731418802090 ... "Scaffold-free, Label-free, and Nozzle-free Magnetic Levitational Bioassembler for Rapid Formative Biofabrication of 3D Tissues ... the tissues are conditioned using cell culturing systems to further strengthen the tissue for self-support. Skipping the cell ... This removes the necessity of creating a scaffold for support since the cells are printed in a suspended state. As microgravity ...
"Chitin scaffolds in tissue engineering". Int J Mol Sci. 12 (3): 1876-87. doi:10.3390/ijms12031876. PMC 3111639. PMID 21673928. ... Additionally, keeping in mind the size and shape of the final tissue, the potential of the physical dimensions of the tissue of ... Similarly, whole organs can be decellularized to create 3-D ECM scaffolds. These scaffolds can then be re-cellularized in an ... the ECM biomaterial retains some characteristics of the original tissue. The ECM tissues can be harvested from varying stages ...
Microfluidic scaffolds for tissue engineering. Nature Materials (2007) vol. 6 pp. 908-915 Bernard, Claude. Introduction à ...
Damaged cells grip to the scaffold and begin to rebuild missing bone and tissue through tiny holes in the scaffold. As tissue ... The goal of tissue engineering is to restore, replace, or regenerate damaged body tissue. Nano-scaffolds along with cells and ... Tissue engineering consists of the use of cells, scaffolds, and varying tissue architecture techniques to restore, replace, and ... Biomaterials within the nano-scaffold must facilitate and regulate cell and tissue activity, as in natural host tissue. ...
"Biodegradable Polymer Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering". Bio/Technology. 12 (7): 689-693. doi:10.1038/nbt0794-689. PMID 7764913 ... Macromolecules tend to be broken down by digestion and blocked by body tissues if they are injected or inhaled, so finding a ... He and the researchers in his lab have made advances in tissue engineering, such as the creation of engineered blood vessels ... He is a widely recognized and cited researcher in biotechnology, especially in the fields of drug delivery systems and tissue ...
The scaffold designed for tissue engineering is one of the most crucial components because it guides tissue construction, ... Biological scaffolds can be created from human donor tissue or from animals; however, animal tissue is often more popular since ... "Three-dimensional scaffolds for tissue engineering applications: role of porosity and pore size". Tissue Engineering Part B: ... fibrous scaffolds have a very small pore size that prevents the pervasion of cells within the scaffold. Hydrogel scaffolds are ...
Also as an example, the use of silicon nanowires in nanoporous materials to create scaffolds for synthetic tissues allows for ... "Macroporous nanowire nanoelectronic scaffolds for synthetic tissues". Nature Materials. 11 (11): 986-994. Bibcode:2012NatMa..11 ... a way to create a synthetic tissue structure that could be used to monitor the electrical activity of the cells on the scaffold ... A biointerface is the region of contact between a biomolecule, cell, biological tissue or living organism or organic material ...
PMID 17584904.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link) D.W. Hutmacher (2000). "Scaffolds in tissue ... S.W. Kim, H.-D. Jung, M.-H. Kang, H.-E. Kim, Y.-H. Koh, Y. Estrin (2013). "Fabrication of porous titanium scaffold with ... It has been shown that a macropore size of 200-500 µm is preferred for ingrowths of new bone tissues and transportation of body ... As a result of this imbalance, the starting bone density will be reduced, there will be tissue death and, eventually, implant ...
"Fibrochondrogenesis of free intraarticular small intestinal submucosa scaffolds". Tissue Engineering. 10 (1-2): 129-37. doi: ... bone and connective tissues. Overwhelming disorganization of cellular processes involved in the formation of cartilage and bone ... specialized cells that make up fibrous connective tissue, which plays a role in the formation of cellular structure and ... causing abnormal fibrous development of cartilage and related tissues. It is a lethal rhizomelic (malformations which result in ...
"Electrospun fine-textured scaffolds for heart tissue constructs". Biomaterials. 26 (26): 5330-5338. doi:10.1016/J.BIOMATERIALS. ... "Cardiac tissue structure-electric field interactions in polarizing the heart : 3d computer models and applications , WorldCat. ... She worked on cardiac cell and tissue engineering, optical mapping of arrhythmias, biomaterials, systems biology and ... Burton, Rebecca (2015). "Optical control of excitation waves in cardiac tissue". Nature Photonics. 9 (1): 813-816. Bibcode: ...
This interaction improves structural integrity to tissue scaffolds. Harmful roles that Type V collagen can play in the body. ... It is found within the dermal/epidermal junction, placental tissues, as well as in association with tissues containing type I ... It is also linked to fibrosis of the lungs, skin, kidneys, adipose tissue, and liver. Increases in Type V Collagen are ... Collagen proteins are often associated with the strengthening and support of many tissues including skin, bones, muscles, and ...
"Porous three-dimensional carbon nanotube scaffolds for tissue engineering". Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A. ... These 3D graphene (all-carbon) scaffolds/foams have potential applications in fields such as energy storage, filtration, ... "Fabrication and characterization of three-dimensional macroscopic all-carbon scaffolds". Carbon. 53: 90-100. doi:10.1016/j. ...
... the technique has been adopted in disparate fields such as tissue scaffolds, photonics, metal-matrix composites, dentistry, ... "Freeze casting of hydroxyapatite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering". Biomaterials. 27 (32): 5480-5489. arXiv:1710.04392. ... "Structure and mechanical properties of β-TCP scaffolds prepared by ice-templating with preset ice front velocities". Acta ... "On the development of ice-templated silicon carbide scaffolds for nature-inspired structural materials". Acta Materialia. 61 ( ...
"Porous three-dimensional carbon nanotube scaffolds for tissue engineering". Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A. ... These 3D graphene (all-carbon) scaffolds/foams have applications in several fields such as energy storage, filtration, thermal ... "Fabrication and characterization of three-dimensional macroscopic all-carbon scaffolds". Carbon. 53: 90-100. doi:10.1016/j. ... "Two-dimensional nanostructure-reinforced biodegradable polymeric nanocomposites for bone tissue engineering". Biomacromolecules ...
"Tissue regeneration in vivo within recombinant spidroin 1 scaffolds". Biomaterials. 33 (15): 3887-98. doi:10.1016/j. ... could be used in medicine without risk of biocompatibility issues and thus potentially lead to many new opportunities in tissue ...
... and scaffolds for studying tumor microenvironments. In 2021, he began studying 3D printing for tissue engineering and hydrogel ... Mikos founded the journals Tissue Engineering Part A, Tissue Engineering Part B: Review, and Tissue Engineering Part C: Methods ... "Advances in Tissue Engineering Short Course". tissue.rice.edu. Retrieved 2022-03-29. (Articles with short description, Short ... "Fabrication and Characterization of Electrospun Decellularized Muscle-Derived Scaffolds". Tissue Engineering Part C: Methods. ...
"Nanocomposite Scaffold for Chondrocyte Growth and Cartilage Tissue Engineering: Effects of Carbon Nanotube Surface ... Riverside have shown that carbon nanotubes and their polymer nanocomposites are suitable scaffold materials for bone tissue ... "Porous three-dimensional carbon nanotube scaffolds for tissue engineering". Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A. ... "Collagen-carbon nanotube composite materials as scaffolds in tissue engineering". Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part ...
"Porous three-dimensional carbon nanotube scaffolds for tissue engineering". Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part A. ... all-carbon scaffolds using single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes as building blocks. These scaffolds possess macro-, micro ... all-carbon scaffolds using single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes as building blocks. These scaffolds possess macro-, micro ... In tissue engineering, carbon nanotubes have been used as scaffolding for bone growth. Carbon nanotubes can serve as additives ...
... glycosaminoglycan scaffolds". Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine. 13 (2): 261-273. doi:10.1002/term.2789. ... PDGF is a required element in cellular division for fibroblasts, a type of connective tissue cell that is especially prevalent ... The addition of PDGF at specific time‐points has been shown to stabilise vasculature in collagen‐glycosaminoglycan scaffolds. ... During later maturation stages, PDGF signalling has been implicated in tissue remodelling and cellular differentiation, and in ...
"Tissue engineering of complex tooth structures on biodegradable polymer scaffolds". J Dent Res. 81 (10): 695-700. doi:10.1177/ ... Biopolymer methods in tissue engineering Hill, David J. (2012-05-10). "Toothless no more - Researchers using stem cells to grow ... Tooth regeneration is a stem cell based regenerative medicine procedure in the field of tissue engineering and stem cell ...
Radisic developed a flexible shape-memory scaffold for minimally invasive delivery of functional tissues. The scaffold utilizes ... Biomimetic approach to cardiac tissue engineering: oxygen carriers and channeled scaffolds. Tissue Engineering, 12(8), pp. 2077 ... e18 Flexible shape-memory scaffold for minimally invasive delivery of functional tissues M Montgomery, S Ahadian, LD Huyer, ML ... "Flexible shape-memory scaffold for minimally invasive delivery of functional tissues". Nature Materials. 16 (10): 1038-1046. ...
Tissue engineering is the process of putting together scaffolds, cells, and biologically active molecules to make functional ... Hu, Jiang; Ma, Peter X. (2011). "Nano-Fibrous Tissue Engineering Scaffolds Capable of Growth Factor Delivery". Pharmaceutical ... including tissue engineering scaffolds, wipes, wound dressings, and barrier materials. Microfluidic spinning technology is used ... and submicron-sized fibrous scaffolds from polymer solutions that could be used as cell and tissue substrates. Hydrogel fibers ...
Gerhardt, Lutz-Christian (2010). "Bioactive Glass and Glass-Ceramic Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering". Materials. 3 (7): ... with foam-like scaffolds being introduced to maximize the interfacial area between the implant and body tissue. One issue that ... Resorbable ceramics are intended to gradually dissolve entirely, all the while new tissue grows in its stead. The architecture ... Historically, these were the "first generation" biomaterials used as replacements for missing or damaged tissues. One problem ...
... seeding of polymer scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering, cultivation parameters, and tissue construct characterization, ... The focus of her research is on engineering functional human tissues, by an integrated use of stem cells, biomaterial scaffolds ... "Dynamic cell seeding of polymer scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering". Biotechnology Progress. 14 (2): 193-202. doi: ... "Cardiac tissue engineering: Cell seeding, cultivation parameters, and tissue construct characterization". Biotechnology and ...
"Injectable matrices and scaffolds for drug delivery in tissue engineering". Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews. 59 (4-5): 263-273. ... The described behavior can be exploited in tissue engineering since the adhesion of cells is strongly dependent on the ... For instance, hydrogels made of proteins are used as scaffolds in knee replacement. In baking, thermoreversible glazes such as ... Promising areas of application are tissue engineering, liquid chromatography, drug delivery and bioseparation. Only a few ...
Scaffolds act as three-dimensional artificial templates in which the tissue targeted for reconstruction is cultured to grow ... Scaffolds are subject to harsh processing conditions during tissue culturing. These include mechanical stimulation to promote ... Current research is exploring the effectiveness of using various types of hydrogel scaffolds for tissue engineering and ... This high water content makes hydrogel more similar to living body tissues than any other material for tissue regeneration. ...
Yadid, Moran; Feiner, Ron; Dvir, Tal (18 March 2019). "Gold Nanoparticle-Integrated Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering and ... In tissue engineering, the key focus is on providing damaged organs with physicochemical cues to damaged organs for repair. ... The medical applications of biodegradable CPs are attractive to medical specialties such as tissue engineering and regenerative ... "Biodegradable synthetic polymers for tissue engineering". European Cells and Materials. 5: 1-16. doi:10.22203/eCM.v005a01. PMID ...
... porous biodegradable metals could be the potential materials for making hard tissue scaffolds. ... Biodegradable metal scaffolds have showed interesting mechanical property that was close to that of human bone with tailored ... The current promising fabrication technique for making scaffolds, such as computation-aided solid free-form method, can be ... Polymers have been widely chosen as tissue scaffolding material having a good combination of biodegradability, biocompatibility ...
In soft tissue defects that arise due to trauma, tumor resections and complex burns, a significant loss in adipose tissue ... Engineering 3D degradable pliable scaffolds for adipose tissue regeneration. Advancing cell-material interactions by ... The copolymer 3D scaffolds were further combined with knitted mesh and electrospun nanofibers to develop scaffolds with ... To fabricate even softer, and more hydrophilic 3D scaffolds, poly (ɛ-caprolactone-co-p-dioxanone) and a unique scaffold design ...
Furthermore, our proposed sequential morphological workflow was suitable to detect tissue sections with well-preserved hepatic ... 3 scaffolds; BDL: 3 scaffolds; PH: 2 scaffolds). The microscopic assessment resulted in the selection of 88 cell-free tissue ... Identification of tissue sections from decellularized liver scaffolds for repopulation experiments Heliyon. 2021 Feb 13;7(2): ... Subsequent microscopical examination served to identify tissue samples without cell remnants. (3) Only cell-free tissue ...
Artificial tissue scaffolds have become common for various therapies, and are widely studied in clinical research. A persistent ... Electronic Scaffolds Provide Real Time Monitoring of Living, Growing Tissue. August 28th, 2012 Medgadget Editors News ... Artificial tissue scaffolds have become common for various therapies, and are widely studied in clinical research. A persistent ... They grew cardiac, neural and muscle tissue around these electronic scaffolds and were able to probe the living environment in ...
URINARY BLADDER MATRIX TUBULAR SCAFFOLDS AS A TISSUE ENGINEERED VASCULAR ...
... Gelmi, Amy Linköping University, Department of Physics, ...
... tissue testing as well as development and manufacturing of transplantable tissues, scaffolds and organs, representing a ... CollPlant Announces Commercial Launch of BioInk Platform with Collink.3D™ for Use in 3D Bioprinting of Human Tissues, Scaffolds ... tissues and organ transplants. Made entirely from human-derived collagen, Collink.3D enables the production of scaffolds that ... Soft tissue bioprinted constructs using Collink.3D, demonstrating high resolution and elastic properties. ...
... August 10th, 2015 Medgadget Editors News ... Study in Advanced Healthcare Materials: Dissolvable Base Scaffolds Allow Tissue Penetration of High-Aspect-Ratio Flexible ... As pressure is applied to the block it dissolves, while the needle is pushed into the tissue below. This process continues as ... This allows a very thin and long needle to be pushed into tissue without causing it any damage.. ...
... along with the ability of these constructs to sustain the formation of new and functional tissue. Novel strategies and ... from the skin to cardiac tissue. This review critically focuses on opportunities to employ protein-graphene oxide structures ... The field of tissue engineering is constantly evolving as it aims to develop bioengineered and functional tissues and organs ... physiochemical and biological features for biomedical applications and have been successfully employed for optimizing scaffold ...
Bone Tissue Engineering Approaches and Challenges using Bioactive Ceramic Scaffolds. Publication Type : Book Chapter ... HomePublicationsBone Tissue Engineering Approaches and Challenges using Bioactive Ceramic Scaffolds ... where cells or growth factors are incorporated into a three-dimensional scaffold to mimic native tissue architecture and ... "Bone Tissue Engineering Approaches and Challenges using Bioactive Ceramic Scaffolds", Nova publishers, 2011, pp. 45-74. ...
A main challenge of Tissue engineering is to create sustainable scaffolds that provide optimal biological properties to mimic ... The aim of this project is to develop RGD modified alginate bioinks for creating 3D-printed scaffolds for bone tissue ... SubjectsTissue engineering, Three-dimensional printing, Biomedical materials, Enginyeria de teixits, Impressió 3D, Teixits -- ...
This article discusses the THUNDER imaging of natural electrospun scaffolds for tissue engineering applications to study their ... Finding new Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering High-Resolution Imaging of Bioengineered Materials Tissue engineers use ... Scaffold architecture can be tailored to specific tissue engineering applications. Characterizing scaffold morphology and ... Often the basis for these materials are cells which are cultured on scaffolds [2]. The engineered tissues can be used to repair ...
Polyester-based ink platform with tunable bioactivity for 3D printing of tissue engineering scaffolds S. Ji, K. Dube, J. P. ... Polyester-based ink platform with tunable bioactivity for 3D printing of tissue engineering scaffolds† ... using 3D printed scaffolds from HP5GP. Scaffolds were functionalized with azide-Heparin (az-Heparin) to bind and deliver bone ... This sample group significantly enhanced osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs as compared to unfunctionalized scaffolds ...
Particularly, injectable scaffolds injected or extruded at low viscosity may be ideal scaffolds for bone repair or for delivery ... Similar systems can also be utilized with extended applications in other areas, including repairing different tissue defects ... of drugs or cells to injured tissue. Such an approach is minimally invasive and is capable of filling complex 3D defects of ...
Although graphene/stem cell-based tissue engineering has recently emerged and has promisingly and progressively been utilized ... Graphene scaffolds in progressive nanotechnology/stem cell-based tissue engineering of the nervous system O. Akhavan, J. Mater ... Graphene scaffolds in progressive nanotechnology/stem cell-based tissue engineering of the nervous system ... Although graphene/stem cell-based tissue engineering has recently emerged and has promisingly and progressively been utilized ...
Optimization of additively manufactured polymer scaffolds for bone tissue engineering * Referent: Prof. Dr. Patrick Dondl ... The result of the optimization procedure is a scaffold porosity distribution which maximizes the stiffness of the scaffold and ... is a rapidly emerging technology that has the potential to produce personalized scaffolds for tissue engineering applications ... To mitigate this, shape or topology optimization can be a useful tool to design a scaffold architecture that matches the ...
Scaffolds (biology), Stem cells, strength, Tissue, Tissue engineered constructs, Tissue regeneration, unclassified drug ... Composite Scaffolds for in Situ Monitoring of Bone Tissue Regeneration by MRI", Tissue Engineering - Part A, vol. 20, pp. 2783- ... Publisher : Tissue Engineering - Part A. Source : Tissue Engineering - Part A, Mary Ann Liebert Inc., Volume 20, Number 19-20, ... Composite Scaffolds for in Situ Monitoring of Bone Tissue Regeneration by MRI. Publication Type : Journal Article ...
Stephanie Willerth in conversation about combining stem cells and biomaterial scaffolds for constructing tissues Discussion , ... Stephanie Willerth in conversation about combining stem cells and biomaterial scaffolds for constructing tissues ... along with the methods for confirming tissue function. The field of tissue engineering has also advanced significantly in ... The revised StemBook chapter article can be viewed here (in the Tissue Engineering chapter) and the co-published review article ...
Even so, scientists in the field have just recently begun to utilise them as building blocks for tissue engineering scaffolds. ... Specifically, as they mimic important properties of tissues such as bone and cartilage they are ideal for orthopaedic tissue ... sulfated-polysaccharide-based scaffolds hold great promise for a number of tissue engineering applications. ... The clinical studies reviewed herein paint a promising picture heralding a brave new world for orthopaedic tissue engineering. ...
... can be used to create tissue-specific three-dimensional scaffolds with controlled porosity and pore geometry. Directly ... the authors explore the scaffold pattern fabrication and mineralization processes. Two scaffold pattern materials are tested [ ... The scaffold patterns are then mineralized with a biocompatible ceramic (hydroxyapatite). A heat treatment is then used to ... The result is a biocompatible ceramic scaffold composed of hollow tubes, which may promote attachment of endothelial cells and ...
Osteogenic and antibacterial scaffolds of silk fibroin/Ce-doped ZnO for bone tissue engineering ... Osteogenic and antibacterial scaffolds of silk fibroin/Ce-doped ZnO for bone tissue engineering. International Journal of ... The composite scaffolds were characterized by using FT-IR and micro-CT techniques while mechanical stability was determined ... The porosity of composite scaffolds was found to be in the range of 50%-66% with an appreciable degradation rate. These novel ...
Surgically discarded adipose tissue is not only an abundant source of multipotent adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs) but ... In this chapter, we describe the methods developed in our lab to decellularize human adipose tissue and to further process it ... decellularized adipose tissue (DAT) provides a cell-supportive platform that is conducive to adipogenesis. While DAT can be ... it can also be used as an ECM source for the fabrication of an array of other scaffold formats including adipose ECM-derived ...
While many tissue engineering strategies focus on repair of single tissues, orthopedic injuries often occur at the interface ... Finally, chapter 6 adapts the CG scaffold system to provide a pathway towards engineering the TBJ. 3D scaffolds with coincident ... and osteochondral tissue. Chapter 2 quantifies the role CG scaffold relative density plays in directing tenocyte bioactivity ... Modern tissue engineering requires the design of new biomaterials permitting simultaneous control of microstructural, ...
The first indigenously developed tissue engineering scaffold from mammalian organs, an animal-derived Class D Biomedical Device ... Indeed, the scaffold modulated or mitigated the scarring reactions in subcutaneous, skeletal muscle, and cardiac tissues. ... The first indigenously developed tissue engineering scaffold from mammalian organs, an animal-derived Class D Biomedical Device ... Indian Drugs Controller approves first indigenously developed animal-derived tissue engineering scaffold for healing skin ...
Williamson, M. and Black, R.A. and Kielty, C.M. (2006) PCL-PU composite vascular scaffold production for vascular tissue ... PCL-PU composite vascular scaffold production for vascular tissue engineering: attachment, proliferation and bioactivity of ... These data confirm the potential of this novel composite scaffold in vascular tissue engineering. ... The composite scaffold may also deliver bioactive molecules. Active trypsin, used as a test molecule, had a defined 48 h ...
Augmented and Magnetically-Aligned Type I Collagen-GAG Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Tyler Novak, Tyler Novak ... "Augmented and Magnetically-Aligned Type I Collagen-GAG Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering." Proceedings of the ASME ... Parametric Finite Element Analysis of Physical Stimuli Resulting From Mechanical Stimulation of Tissue Engineered Cartilage J ... Novel Technique for Online Characterization of Cartilaginous Tissue Properties J Biomech Eng (September,2011) ...
Aligned Polymer Scaffolds in Periodontal Tissue Engineering- Dalal Alotaibi Filename: Aligned Polymer Scaffolds in Periodontal ... Alotaibi, Dalal (2014) Aligned Polymer Scaffolds in Periodontal Tissue Engineering. PhD thesis, University of Sheffield. ... Tissue Engineering- Dalal Alotaibi.pdf Licence: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial- ...
Engineered scaffolds for tissue-engineering should be designed to match the stiffness and strength of healthy tissues while ... Design and Dynamic Culture of 3D Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering. Read at Gc ... In this work, we have used 3D-ploting technique to produce poly-LLactide (PLLA) macroporous scaffolds with two different pore ... Canine chondrocytes cells were seeded onto the scaffolds with different topologies, and the constructs were cultured for up to ...
The main tissue engineering approach to grow a complex 3D tissue is to provide a 3D environment or scaffold for the cells to ... far less progress has been made in developing tissue engineering solutions for neural tissue (such as brain tissue and ... Once the liquid matrix is washed away, the cured pattern remains and can be used as a tissue engineering scaffold. For this ... The slow progress in neural tissue engineering is partly due to the complex structure of the neural tissue itself; e.g. the ...

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