Maxillary Sinus: The air space located in the body of the MAXILLARY BONE near each cheek. Each maxillary sinus communicates with the middle passage (meatus) of the NASAL CAVITY on the same side.Maxilla: One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.Maxillary Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the MAXILLARY SINUS. In many cases, it is caused by an infection of the bacteria HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE; STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE; or STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS.Maxillary Sinus Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MAXILLARY SINUS. They represent the majority of paranasal neoplasms.Maxillary Nerve: The intermediate sensory division of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The maxillary nerve carries general afferents from the intermediate region of the face including the lower eyelid, nose and upper lip, the maxillary teeth, and parts of the dura.Maxillary Artery: A branch of the external carotid artery which distributes to the deep structures of the face (internal maxillary) and to the side of the face and nose (external maxillary).Maxillary Neoplasms: Cancer or tumors of the MAXILLA or upper jaw.Maxillary DiseasesIncisor: Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)Palatal Expansion Technique: An orthodontic method used for correcting narrow or collapsed maxillary arches and functional cross-bite. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry),Cuspid: The third tooth to the left and to the right of the midline of either jaw, situated between the second INCISOR and the premolar teeth (BICUSPID). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p817)Dental Arch: The curve formed by the row of TEETH in their normal position in the JAW. The inferior dental arch is formed by the mandibular teeth, and the superior dental arch by the maxillary teeth.Molar: The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)Tooth, Impacted: A tooth that is prevented from erupting by a physical barrier, usually other teeth. Impaction may also result from orientation of the tooth in an other than vertical position in the periodontal structures.Cephalometry: The measurement of the dimensions of the HEAD.Tooth Eruption, Ectopic: An abnormality in the direction of a TOOTH ERUPTION.Bicuspid: One of the eight permanent teeth, two on either side in each jaw, between the canines (CUSPID) and the molars (MOLAR), serving for grinding and crushing food. The upper have two cusps (bicuspid) but the lower have one to three. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p822)Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Tooth Movement: Orthodontic techniques used to correct the malposition of a single tooth.Paranasal Sinus Diseases: Diseases affecting or involving the PARANASAL SINUSES and generally manifesting as inflammation, abscesses, cysts, or tumors.Tooth Crown: The upper part of the tooth, which joins the lower part of the tooth (TOOTH ROOT) at the cervix (TOOTH CERVIX) at a line called the cementoenamel junction. The entire surface of the crown is covered with enamel which is thicker at the extremity and becomes progressively thinner toward the cervix. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p216)Malocclusion, Angle Class III: Malocclusion in which the mandible is anterior to the maxilla as reflected by the first relationship of the first permanent molar (mesioclusion).Odontometry: Measurement of tooth characteristics.Dental Models: Presentation devices used for patient education and technique training in dentistry.Tooth Root: The part of a tooth from the neck to the apex, embedded in the alveolar process and covered with cementum. A root may be single or divided into several branches, usually identified by their relative position, e.g., lingual root or buccal root. Single-rooted teeth include mandibular first and second premolars and the maxillary second premolar teeth. The maxillary first premolar has two roots in most cases. Maxillary molars have three roots. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p690)Palate: The structure that forms the roof of the mouth. It consists of the anterior hard palate (PALATE, HARD) and the posterior soft palate (PALATE, SOFT).Alveolar Process: The thickest and spongiest part of the maxilla and mandible hollowed out into deep cavities for the teeth.Tooth, Unerupted: A normal developing tooth which has not yet perforated the oral mucosa or one that fails to erupt in the normal sequence or time interval expected for the type of tooth in a given gender, age, or population group.Malocclusion: Such malposition and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth as to interfere with the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)Orthodontic Appliances: Devices used for influencing tooth position. Orthodontic appliances may be classified as fixed or removable, active or retaining, and intraoral or extraoral. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p19)Maxillary Osteotomy: Surgery of the upper jaw bone usually performed to correct upper and lower jaw misalignment.Orthodontic Appliance Design: The planning, calculation, and creation of an apparatus for the purpose of correcting the placement or straightening of teeth.Extraoral Traction Appliances: Extraoral devices for applying force to the dentition in order to avoid some of the problems in anchorage control met with in intermaxillary traction and to apply force in directions not otherwise possible.Maxillary Fractures: Fractures of the upper jaw.Facial Bones: The facial skeleton, consisting of bones situated between the cranial base and the mandibular region. While some consider the facial bones to comprise the hyoid (HYOID BONE), palatine (HARD PALATE), and zygomatic (ZYGOMA) bones, MANDIBLE, and MAXILLA, others include also the lacrimal and nasal bones, inferior nasal concha, and vomer but exclude the hyoid bone. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p113)Maxillofacial Development: The process of growth and differentiation of the jaws and face.Palate, Hard: The anteriorly located rigid section of the PALATE.Tooth Extraction: The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Denture, Complete, Upper: A complete denture replacing all the natural maxillary teeth and associated maxillary structures. It is completely supported by the oral tissue and underlying maxillary bone.Malocclusion, Angle Class II: Malocclusion in which the mandible is posterior to the maxilla as reflected by the relationship of the first permanent molar (distoclusion).Tooth Apex: The tip or terminal end of the root of a tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p62)Radiography, Panoramic: Extraoral body-section radiography depicting an entire maxilla, or both maxilla and mandible, on a single film.Dental Pulp Cavity: The space in a tooth bounded by the dentin and containing the dental pulp. The portion of the cavity within the crown of the tooth is the pulp chamber; the portion within the root is the pulp canal or root canal.Tooth Eruption: The emergence of a tooth from within its follicle in the ALVEOLAR PROCESS of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE into the ORAL CAVITY. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Vertical Dimension: The length of the face determined by the distance of separation of jaws. Occlusal vertical dimension (OVD or VDO) or contact vertical dimension is the lower face height with the teeth in centric occlusion. Rest vertical dimension (VDR) is the lower face height measured from a chin point to a point just below the nose, with the mandible in rest position. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p250)Orthodontics, Corrective: The phase of orthodontics concerned with the correction of malocclusion with proper appliances and prevention of its sequelae (Jablonski's Illus. Dictionary of Dentistry).Dentition, Mixed: The complement of teeth in the jaws after the eruption of some of the permanent teeth but before all the deciduous teeth are absent. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Orthodontic Retainers: Orthodontic appliances, fixed or removable, used to maintain teeth in corrected positions during the period of functional adaptation following corrective treatment. These appliances are also used to maintain the positions of the teeth and jaws gained by orthodontic procedures. (From Zwemer, Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p263)Jaw, Edentulous: The total absence of teeth from either the mandible or the maxilla, but not both. Total absence of teeth from both is MOUTH, EDENTULOUS. Partial absence of teeth in either is JAW, EDENTULOUS, PARTIALLY.Orthodontic Anchorage Procedures: Attachment of orthodontic devices and materials to the MOUTH area for support and to provide a counterforce to orthodontic forces.Osteotomy, Le Fort: Transverse sectioning and repositioning of the maxilla. There are three types: Le Fort I osteotomy for maxillary advancement or the treatment of maxillary fractures; Le Fort II osteotomy for the treatment of maxillary fractures; Le Fort III osteotomy for the treatment of maxillary fractures with fracture of one or more facial bones. Le Fort III is often used also to correct craniofacial dysostosis and related facial abnormalities. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p1203 & p662)Zygoma: Either of a pair of bones that form the prominent part of the CHEEK and contribute to the ORBIT on each side of the SKULL.Anodontia: Congenital absence of the teeth; it may involve all (total anodontia) or only some of the teeth (partial anodontia, hypodontia), and both the deciduous and the permanent dentition, or only teeth of the permanent dentition. (Dorland, 27th ed)Root Resorption: Resorption in which cementum or dentin is lost from the root of a tooth owing to cementoclastic or osteoclastic activity in conditions such as trauma of occlusion or neoplasms. (Dorland, 27th ed)Dentition, Permanent: The 32 teeth of adulthood that either replace or are added to the complement of deciduous teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: Computed tomography modalities which use a cone or pyramid-shaped beam of radiation.Tooth Fractures: Break or rupture of a tooth or tooth root.Dental Implantation, Endosseous: Insertion of an implant into the bone of the mandible or maxilla. The implant has an exposed head which protrudes through the mucosa and is a prosthodontic abutment.Dental Occlusion: The relationship of all the components of the masticatory system in normal function. It has special reference to the position and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth for the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p556, p472)Orthodontic Wires: Wires of various dimensions and grades made of stainless steel or precious metal. They are used in orthodontic treatment.Denture Design: The plan, delineation, and location of actual structural elements of dentures. The design can relate to retainers, stress-breakers, occlusal rests, flanges, framework, lingual or palatal bars, reciprocal arms, etc.Tooth, Supernumerary: An extra tooth, erupted or unerupted, resembling or unlike the other teeth in the group to which it belongs. Its presence may cause malposition of adjacent teeth or prevent their eruption.Malocclusion, Angle Class I: Malocclusion in which the mandible and maxilla are anteroposteriorly normal as reflected by the relationship of the first permanent molar (i.e., in neutroclusion), but in which individual teeth are abnormally related to each other.Orthodontics, Interceptive: Recognition and elimination of potential irregularities and malpositions in the developing dentofacial complex.Tooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Photography, Dental: Photographic techniques used in ORTHODONTICS; DENTAL ESTHETICS; and patient education.Orthognathic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed to repair or correct the skeletal anomalies of the jaw and its associated dental and facial structures (e.g. CLEFT PALATE).Molar, Third: The aftermost permanent tooth on each side in the maxilla and mandible.Tooth, Deciduous: The teeth of the first dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.Dental Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of dental prostheses in general or a specific dental prosthesis. It does not include DENTURE DESIGN. The framework usually consists of metal.Skull Base: The inferior region of the skull consisting of an internal (cerebral), and an external (basilar) surface.Alveolar Ridge Augmentation: Preprosthetic surgery involving rib, cartilage, or iliac crest bone grafts, usually autologous, or synthetic implants for rebuilding the alveolar ridge.Lip: Either of the two fleshy, full-blooded margins of the mouth.Nasal Cavity: The proximal portion of the respiratory passages on either side of the NASAL SEPTUM. Nasal cavities, extending from the nares to the NASOPHARYNX, are lined with ciliated NASAL MUCOSA.Chin: The anatomical frontal portion of the mandible, also known as the mentum, that contains the line of fusion of the two separate halves of the mandible (symphysis menti). This line of fusion divides inferiorly to enclose a triangular area called the mental protuberance. On each side, inferior to the second premolar tooth, is the mental foramen for the passage of blood vessels and a nerve.Paranasal Sinuses: Air-filled spaces located within the bones around the NASAL CAVITY. They are extensions of the nasal cavity and lined by the ciliated NASAL MUCOSA. Each sinus is named for the cranial bone in which it is located, such as the ETHMOID SINUS; the FRONTAL SINUS; the MAXILLARY SINUS; and the SPHENOID SINUS.Tooth Socket: A hollow part of the alveolar process of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE where each tooth fits and is attached via the periodontal ligament.Dental Implants: Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.Nasal Bone: Either one of the two small elongated rectangular bones that together form the bridge of the nose.Crowns: A prosthetic restoration that reproduces the entire surface anatomy of the visible natural crown of a tooth. It may be partial (covering three or more surfaces of a tooth) or complete (covering all surfaces). It is made of gold or other metal, porcelain, or resin.Tooth, Artificial: A fabricated tooth substituting for a natural tooth in a prosthesis. It is usually made of porcelain or plastic.Root Canal Preparation: Preparatory activities in ROOT CANAL THERAPY by partial or complete extirpation of diseased pulp, cleaning and sterilization of the empty canal, enlarging and shaping the canal to receive the sealing material. The cavity may be prepared by mechanical, sonic, chemical, or other means. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p1700)Tooth Mobility: Horizontal and, to a lesser degree, axial movement of a tooth in response to normal forces, as in occlusion. It refers also to the movability of a tooth resulting from loss of all or a portion of its attachment and supportive apparatus, as seen in periodontitis, occlusal trauma, and periodontosis. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p507 & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p313)Dentigerous Cyst: Most common follicular odontogenic cyst. Occurs in relation to a partially erupted or unerupted tooth with at least the crown of the tooth to which the cyst is attached protruding into the cystic cavity. May give rise to an ameloblastoma and, in rare instances, undergo malignant transformation.Periapical Diseases: Diseases of the PERIAPICAL TISSUE surrounding the root of the tooth, which is distinguished from DENTAL PULP DISEASES inside the TOOTH ROOT.Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PARANASAL SINUSES.Orthodontic Extrusion: Orthodontic movement in the coronal direction achieved by outward tension on the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT. It does not include the operative procedure that CROWN LENGTHENING involves.Oral Surgical Procedures: Surgical procedures used to treat disease, injuries, and defects of the oral and maxillofacial region.Oral Surgical Procedures, Preprosthetic: Surgery necessary for a denture to rest on a firm base, free from marked osseous protuberances or undercuts, and devoid of interfering muscle attachments, excess mucoperiosteum, hyperplasias, and fibrous or papillary growths.Tooth Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the teeth.Open Bite: A condition in which certain opposing teeth fail to establish occlusal contact when the jaws are closed.Esthetics, Dental: Skills, techniques, standards, and principles used to improve the art and symmetry of the teeth and face to improve the appearance as well as the function of the teeth, mouth, and face. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p108)Diastema: An abnormal opening or fissure between two adjacent teeth.Pulpitis: Inflammation of the DENTAL PULP, usually due to bacterial infection in dental caries, tooth fracture, or other conditions causing exposure of the pulp to bacterial invasion. Chemical irritants, thermal factors, hyperemic changes, and other factors may also cause pulpitis.Anatomic Variation: Peculiarities associated with the internal structure, form, topology, or architecture of organisms that distinguishes them from others of the same species or group.Radiography, Bitewing: Technique involving the passage of X-rays through oral structures to create a film record while a central tab or wing of dental X-ray film is being held between upper and lower teeth.Dental Pulp Necrosis: Death of pulp tissue with or without bacterial invasion. When the necrosis is due to ischemia with superimposed bacterial infection, it is referred to as pulp gangrene. When the necrosis is non-bacterial in origin, it is called pulp mummification.Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in one or more of the PARANASAL SINUSES.Activator Appliances: Loose-fitting removable orthodontic appliances which redirect the pressures of the facial and masticatory muscles onto the teeth and their supporting structures to produce improvements in tooth arrangements and occlusal relations.Dental Stress Analysis: The description and measurement of the various factors that produce physical stress upon dental restorations, prostheses, or appliances, materials associated with them, or the natural oral structures.Tooth, Nonvital: A tooth from which the dental pulp has been removed or is necrotic. (Boucher, Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Retrognathia: A physical misalignment of the upper (maxilla) and lower (mandibular) jaw bones in which either or both recede relative to the frontal plane of the forehead.Sinus Floor Augmentation: Guided BONE TRANSPLANTATION of the MAXILLARY SINUS surface with a BONE SUBSTITUTE grafting. It increases the bone volume at the site of the DENTAL IMPLANT and helps stabilize it.Post and Core Technique: Use of a metal casting, usually with a post in the pulp or root canal, designed to support and retain an artificial crown.Sella Turcica: A bony prominence situated on the upper surface of the body of the sphenoid bone. It houses the PITUITARY GLAND.Face: The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.Gingival NeoplasmsJaw: Bony structure of the mouth that holds the teeth. It consists of the MANDIBLE and the MAXILLA.Radiography, Dental: Radiographic techniques used in dentistry.Orthodontic Appliances, Functional: Loose, usually removable intra-oral devices which alter the muscle forces against the teeth and craniofacial skeleton. These are dynamic appliances which depend on altered neuromuscular action to effect bony growth and occlusal development. They are usually used in mixed dentition to treat pediatric malocclusions. (ADA, 1992)Tooth Preparation, Prosthodontic: The selected form given to a natural tooth when it is reduced by instrumentation to receive a prosthesis (e.g., artificial crown or a retainer for a fixed or removable prosthesis). The selection of the form is guided by clinical circumstances and physical properties of the materials that make up the prosthesis. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239)Dental Occlusion, Centric: Contact between opposing teeth during a person's habitual bite.Tooth Migration: The movement of teeth into altered positions in relationship to the basal bone of the ALVEOLAR PROCESS and to adjoining and opposing teeth as a result of loss of approximating or opposing teeth, occlusal interferences, habits, inflammatory and dystrophic disease of the attaching and supporting structures of the teeth. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Dental Articulators: Mechanical devices that simulate the temporomandibular joints and jaws to which maxillary and mandibular casts are attached. The entire assembly attempts to reproduce the movements of the mandible and the various tooth-to-tooth relationships that accompany those movements.Jaw Relation Record: A registration of any positional relationship of the mandible in reference to the maxillae. These records may be any of the many vertical, horizontal, or orientation relations. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry)Ethmoid Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the ETHMOID SINUS. It may present itself as an acute (infectious) or chronic (allergic) condition.Nose: A part of the upper respiratory tract. It contains the organ of SMELL. The term includes the external nose, the nasal cavity, and the PARANASAL SINUSES.Radiography, Dental, Digital: A rapid, low-dose, digital imaging system using a small intraoral sensor instead of radiographic film, an intensifying screen, and a charge-coupled device. It presents the possibility of reduced patient exposure and minimal distortion, although resolution and latitude are inferior to standard dental radiography. A receiver is placed in the mouth, routing signals to a computer which images the signals on a screen or in print. It includes digitizing from x-ray film or any other detector. (From MEDLINE abstracts; personal communication from Dr. Charles Berthold, NIDR)Root Canal Obturation: Phase of endodontic treatment in which a root canal system that has been cleaned is filled through use of special materials and techniques in order to prevent reinfection.Oroantral Fistula: A fistula between the maxillary sinus and the oral cavity.Orthodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the prevention and correction of dental and oral anomalies (malocclusion).Dens in Dente: Anomaly of the tooth, found chiefly in upper lateral incisors. It is characterized by invagination of the enamel at the incisal edge.Alveolar Bone Loss: Resorption or wasting of the tooth-supporting bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS) in the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE.Tooth Cervix: The constricted part of the tooth at the junction of the crown and root or roots. It is often referred to as the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), the line at which the cementum covering the root of a tooth and the enamel of the tooth meet. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p530, p433)Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Orthodontic Space Closure: Therapeutic closure of spaces caused by the extraction of teeth, the congenital absence of teeth, or the excessive space between teeth.Frontal Bone: The bone that forms the frontal aspect of the skull. Its flat part forms the forehead, articulating inferiorly with the NASAL BONE and the CHEEK BONE on each side of the face.Fused Teeth: Two teeth united during development by the union of their tooth germs; the teeth may be joined by the enamel of their crowns, by their root dentin, or by both.Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the ear and its parts, the nose and nasal cavity, or the throat, including surgery of the adenoids, tonsils, pharynx, and trachea.Jaw, Edentulous, Partially: Absence of teeth from a portion of the mandible and/or maxilla.Root Canal Filling Materials: Materials placed inside a root canal for the purpose of obturating or sealing it. The materials may be gutta-percha, silver cones, paste mixtures, or other substances. (Dorland, 28th ed, p631 & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p187)Dental Materials: Materials used in the production of dental bases, restorations, impressions, prostheses, etc.Skull: The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.Prognathism: A condition marked by abnormal protrusion of the mandible. (Dorland, 27th ed)Radiographic Magnification: Use of optic and geometric techniques to enhance radiographic image quality and interpretation. It includes use of microfocal X-ray tubes and intensifying fluoroscopic screens.Anesthesia, Dental: A range of methods used to reduce pain and anxiety during dental procedures.Tooth Avulsion: Partial or complete displacement of a tooth from its alveolar support. It is commonly the result of trauma. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p312)Denture, Partial, Removable: A partial denture designed and constructed to be removed readily from the mouth.Smiling: A facial expression which may denote feelings of pleasure, affection, amusement, etc.Dental Pulp: A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth Attrition: The wearing away of a tooth as a result of tooth-to-tooth contact, as in mastication, occurring only on the occlusal, incisal, and proximal surfaces. It is chiefly associated with aging. It is differentiated from TOOTH ABRASION (the pathologic wearing away of the tooth substance by friction, as brushing, bruxism, clenching, and other mechanical causes) and from TOOTH EROSION (the loss of substance caused by chemical action without bacterial action). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p86)Dental Implantation: The grafting or inserting of a prosthetic device of alloplastic material into the oral tissue beneath the mucosal or periosteal layer or within the bone. Its purpose is to provide support and retention to a partial or complete denture.Periodontal Ligament: The fibrous CONNECTIVE TISSUE surrounding the TOOTH ROOT, separating it from and attaching it to the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS).Serial Extraction: The selective extraction of deciduous teeth during the stage of mixed dentition in accordance with the shedding and eruption of the teeth. It is done over an extended period to allow autonomous adjustment to relieve crowding of the dental arches during the eruption of the lateral incisors, canines, and premolars, eventually involving the extraction of the first premolar teeth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Orbit: Bony cavity that holds the eyeball and its associated tissues and appendages.Cleft Lip: Congenital defect in the upper lip where the maxillary prominence fails to merge with the merged medial nasal prominences. It is thought to be caused by faulty migration of the mesoderm in the head region.Periapical Periodontitis: Inflammation of the PERIAPICAL TISSUE. It includes general, unspecified, or acute nonsuppurative inflammation. Chronic nonsuppurative inflammation is PERIAPICAL GRANULOMA. Suppurative inflammation is PERIAPICAL ABSCESS.Facial Asymmetry: Congenital or acquired asymmetry of the face.Overbite: A malocclusion in which maxillary incisor and canine teeth project over the mandiblar teeth excessively. The overlap is measured perpendicular to the occlusal plane and is also called vertical overlap. When the overlap is measured parallel to the occlusal plane it is referred to as overjet.Orthodontic Brackets: Small metal or ceramic attachments used to fasten an arch wire. These attachments are soldered or welded to an orthodontic band or cemented directly onto the teeth. Bowles brackets, edgewise brackets, multiphase brackets, ribbon arch brackets, twin-wire brackets, and universal brackets are all types of orthodontic brackets.Denture, Partial, Fixed: A partial denture attached to prepared natural teeth, roots, or implants by cementation.Dental Pulp Test: Investigations conducted on the physical health of teeth involving use of a tool that transmits hot or cold electric currents on a tooth's surface that can determine problems with that tooth based on reactions to the currents.Piezosurgery: The use of HIGH-ENERGY SHOCK WAVES, in the frequency range of 20-30 kHz, to cut through mineralized tissue.Dentition: The teeth collectively in the dental arch. Dentition ordinarily refers to the natural teeth in position in their alveoli. Dentition referring to the deciduous teeth is DENTITION, PRIMARY; to the permanent teeth, DENTITION, PERMANENT. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Rhinometry, Acoustic: Diagnostic measurement of the nose and its cavity through acoustic reflections. Used to measure nasal anatomical landmarks, nasal septal deviation, and nasal airway changes in response to allergen provocation tests (NASAL PROVOCATION TESTS).Administration, Buccal: Administration of a soluble dosage form between the cheek and gingiva. It may involve direct application of a drug onto the buccal mucosa, as by painting or spraying.Cranial Sutures: A type of fibrous joint between bones of the head.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Dental Enamel: A hard thin translucent layer of calcified substance which envelops and protects the dentin of the crown of the tooth. It is the hardest substance in the body and is almost entirely composed of calcium salts. Under the microscope, it is composed of thin rods (enamel prisms) held together by cementing substance, and surrounded by an enamel sheath. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)Forensic Dentistry: The application of dental knowledge to questions of law.Denture, Complete: A denture replacing all natural teeth and associated structures in both the maxilla and mandible.Dental Fistula: An abnormal passage in the oral cavity on the gingiva.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Dental Prosthesis Retention: Holding a DENTAL PROSTHESIS in place by its design, or by the use of additional devices or adhesives.Retrograde Obturation: Procedure that involves the removal of infectious products from a root canal space through use of special instruments and fillings. This procedure is performed when root canal treatment fails.Tooth Injuries: Traumatic or other damage to teeth including fractures (TOOTH FRACTURES) or displacements (TOOTH LUXATION).Epoxy Resins: Polymeric resins derived from OXIRANES and characterized by strength and thermosetting properties. Epoxy resins are often used as dental materials.Patient Care Planning: Usually a written medical and nursing care program designed for a particular patient.Dental Restoration Failure: Inability or inadequacy of a dental restoration or prosthesis to perform as expected.Jaw Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the jaw.Fibroma, Ossifying: A benign central bone tumor, usually of the jaws (especially the mandible), composed of fibrous connective tissue within which bone is formed.Apicoectomy: Excision of the apical portion of a tooth through an opening made in the overlying labial, buccal, or palatal alveolar bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)Stainless Steel: Stainless steel. A steel containing Ni, Cr, or both. It does not tarnish on exposure and is used in corrosive environments. (Grant & Hack's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Cleft Palate: Congenital fissure of the soft and/or hard palate, due to faulty fusion.Tooth Replantation: Reinsertion of a tooth into the alveolus from which it was removed or otherwise lost.Trigeminal Nerve: The 5th and largest cranial nerve. The trigeminal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve. The larger sensory part forms the ophthalmic, mandibular, and maxillary nerves which carry afferents sensitive to external or internal stimuli from the skin, muscles, and joints of the face and mouth and from the teeth. Most of these fibers originate from cells of the TRIGEMINAL GANGLION and project to the TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS of the brain stem. The smaller motor part arises from the brain stem trigeminal motor nucleus and innervates the muscles of mastication.Age Determination by Teeth: A means of identifying the age of an animal or human through tooth examination.Tooth Discoloration: Any change in the hue, color, or translucency of a tooth due to any cause. Restorative filling materials, drugs (both topical and systemic), pulpal necrosis, or hemorrhage may be responsible. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p253)Mucocele: A retention cyst of the salivary gland, lacrimal sac, paranasal sinuses, appendix, or gallbladder. (Stedman, 26th ed)Tooth Ankylosis: Solid fixation of a tooth resulting from fusion of the cementum and alveolar bone, with obliteration of the periodontal ligament. It is uncommon in the deciduous dentition and very rare in permanent teeth. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Carticaine: A thiophene-containing local anesthetic pharmacologically similar to MEPIVACAINE.Titanium: A dark-gray, metallic element of widespread distribution but occurring in small amounts; atomic number, 22; atomic weight, 47.90; symbol, Ti; specific gravity, 4.5; used for fixation of fractures. (Dorland, 28th ed)Rotation: Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Dental Abutments: Natural teeth or teeth roots used as anchorage for a fixed or removable denture or other prosthesis (such as an implant) serving the same purpose.Mastication: The act and process of chewing and grinding food in the mouth.Root Canal Irrigants: Chemicals used mainly to disinfect root canals after pulpectomy and before obturation. The major ones are camphorated monochlorophenol, EDTA, formocresol, hydrogen peroxide, metacresylacetate, and sodium hypochlorite. Root canal irrigants include also rinsing solutions of distilled water, sodium chloride, etc.Frontal Sinus: One of the paired, but seldom symmetrical, air spaces located between the inner and outer compact layers of the FRONTAL BONE in the forehead.Mandibular DiseasesBite Force: The force applied by the masticatory muscles in dental occlusion.Gutta-Percha: Coagulated exudate isolated from several species of the tropical tree Palaquium (Sapotaceae). It is the trans-isomer of natural rubber and is used as a filling and impression material in dentistry and orthopedics and as an insulator in electronics. It has also been used as a rubber substitute.Palatal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PALATE, including those of the hard palate, soft palate and UVULA.Dental Implants, Single-Tooth: Devices, usually alloplastic, surgically inserted into or onto the jawbone, which support a single prosthetic tooth and serve either as abutments or as cosmetic replacements for missing teeth.Anatomic Landmarks: Reference points located by visual inspection, palpation, or computer assistance, that are useful in localizing structures on or within the human body.Orthodontic Appliances, Removable: Dental devices such as RETAINERS, ORTHODONTIC used to improve gaps in teeth and structure of the jaws. These devices can be removed and reinserted at will.Mandibular Condyle: The posterior process on the ramus of the mandible composed of two parts: a superior part, the articular portion, and an inferior part, the condylar neck.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Tooth DiseasesJaw Fixation Techniques: The stable placement of surgically induced fractures of the mandible or maxilla through the use of elastics, wire ligatures, arch bars, or other splints. It is used often in the cosmetic surgery of retrognathism and prognathism. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p636)Denture Retention: The retention of a denture in place by design, device, or adhesion.Dental Casting Technique: The process of producing a form or impression made of metal or plaster using a mold.
That is the total length of the alveolar arch is smaller than the tooth arch (the combined mesiodistal width of each tooth). ... Pericoronitis is an infection of the soft tissue that covers the crown of an impacted tooth and is usually caused by the normal ... Mandibular third molars are more commonly impacted than their maxillary counterparts. Some dentists believe that impacted teeth ... An impacted tooth is one that fails to erupt into the dental arch within the expected developmental window. Because impacted ...
Pharyngeal arches are formed during the fourth week. Each arch consists of a mesenchymal tissue covered on the outside by ... The maxillary and mandibular prominences are derived from the first arch. The maxillary prominence is initially located ... The six pharyngeal arches give rise to much of the skeletal and muscular tissue in the head and neck region. When the embryo is ... The first pharyngeal arch forms maxillary and mandibular processes. It is innervated by the trigeminal nerve and molds muscles ...
In this appliance the lip pads are used in the maxillary arch to allow the maxilla to grow. The mandibular arch does not have ... Acrylic Components Buccal Shield - They were about 2.5mm thick and their goal was to expand the soft tissue capsule in the back ... Lip Pads - They are tear drop shaped acrylic pads which were placed in the vestibule of the lower arch. Lingual Shield - This ... He believed that the perioral muscles had restraining effect on the dental arches and that the insertion of appliance expands ...
Fibrous enlargement is most common in areas of maxillary and mandibular tissues of both arches in the mouth. Phenotype and ... SOURCE 2) In some cases, there is re-growth after surgical removal of the excess gingival tissues, in others there is minimal. ... One type of procedure that can be executed is as follows: Removal of excess tissue under anesthesia through an internal bevel ... most likely due to the inability and difficulty of keeping the gingival margin and surrounding tissue clean due to the ...
... is usually used in an orthodontic treatment where one has a crowded maxillary or mandibular teeth in an arch. Lip ... for various purposes to correct a dentition by preventing the pressure from the soft tissue. ... Korn Lip Bumper is a maxillary lip bumper which was developed by Korn and Shapiro. This lip bumper is made up of .040in ... This lip bumper sits high in the maxillary vestibule and 2-3mm away from the attached gingiva. This type of bumper is often ...
... to stimulate an adjustment response of the maxillary sutures.Such an advancement would improve alignment of the dental arch. If ... the cheiloplasty might result in more normal anatomic relationships with minimal mobilization of facial tissues. It has two ...
Tooth supported expanders allow the forces to be applied directly to the teeth of maxillary arch instead of the tissue. The ... stated that Slow maxillary expansion was superior to Rapid maxillary expansion in expanding molar region of maxillary arch but ... These types are: 1) Tissue-borne 2) Tooth-borne 3) Slow Maxillary Expansion Type 4) Rapid Maxillary Expansion Type 5) Bone- ... These appliances can be used to achieve expansion in the maxillary arch, there is devices to mandibular expansion or lower ...
This allows maximal distal translation of the erupting canines.it is rarely indicated in the maxillary arch. In cases of class ... and the state of health of the investing tissues are factors that continually impact the occlusal guidance program. Sometimes ... This decision depends on the careful tooth size-arch length evaluation. The amount of crowding, the arch length requirements, ... It includes assessment of tooth mass, arch form, arch length, skeletal pattern, skeletal growth potential, orofacial ...
Cellulitis and abscess of oral soft tissues (528.4) Cysts of oral soft tissues (528.5) Diseases of lips (528.6) Leukoplakia of ... Anomalies of dental arch relationship (524.3) Anomalies of tooth position of fully erupted teeth (524.4) Malocclusion ... Major anomalies of jaw size maxillary hypoplasia (524.1) Anomalies of relationship of jaw to cranial base (524.2) ... Other specified diseases of hard tissues of teeth (521.81) Cracked tooth (522) Diseases of pulp and periapical tissues (523) ...
If the patient suffers with a constricted maxillary arch, a palatal expander would need to be used. However, with the matured ... "Periodontal effects of rapid maxillary expansion with tooth-tissue-borne and tooth-borne expanders: a computed tomography ... It is known that this anatomical bony complex limits the maxillary expansion posteriorly. Maxillary expansion does tend to open ... Babacan, H. (2006). "Rapid Maxillary Expansion and Surgically Assisted Rapid Maxillary Expansion Effects on Nasal Volume". ...
Contact with adjacent teeth in the same arch is referred to as interproximal contacts. The maxillary central incisors are one ... As in all cases of tooth development, the first hard tissue to begin forming is dentin, with enamel appearing immediately ... The right deciduous maxillary central incisor is known as "E", and the left one is known as "F". The permanent maxillary ... In the deciduous maxillary central incisor, endodontic treatment is less frequent. In the permanent maxillary central incisor, ...
... the maxillary (upper) or mandibular (lower) arch-or, more commonly, in both arches. As early as the 7th century BC, Etruscans ... This is to give the tissues a chance to recover, and wearing dentures at night is likened to sleeping in shoes. The main risk ... the distinction being whether they are used to replace missing teeth on the mandibular arch or on the maxillary arch. Patients ... The maxillary arch receives primary support from the horizontal hard palate and the posterior alveolar ridge crest. The larger ...
... throughout the summer in the mandibular arch. The maxillary arch received Hawley retainer. After a while, Viggo realized that ... Proponents of this view believed that Viscoelastic Properties of Muscle and stretching of soft tissues was the primary way of ... Turning the screw lead to the maxillary arch to move anteriorly and a back thrust of the mandible This type of activator was ... A feature of this appliance is Coffin Spring which is used in the maxillary arch which may help with expansion of the upper ...
Archer, Todd M. (September 2017). "Evaluation of a modified infraorbital approach for a maxillary nerve block for rhinoscopy ... It is generally considered or hypothesized that a more invasive surgery, with extensive tissue trauma and noxious stimuli, ... "Canine serum C-reactive protein as a quantitative marker of the inflammatory stimulus of aseptic elective soft tissue surgery ...
They can appear in any area of the dental arch and can affect any dental organ. Supernumerary teeth can be classified by shape ... The most common supernumerary tooth is a mesiodens, which is a malformed, peg-like tooth that occurs between the maxillary ... a disorganized mass of dental tissue) When classified by position, a supernumerary tooth may be referred to as a mesiodens, a ... This is done particularly if the mesiodens is positioned in the maxillary central incisor region. The traditional method of ...
The outer surface of the penis is mostly covered by small spines, but there is a broad band of nonspinous tissue. The papilla ( ... The zygomatic plate, the flattened front part of the zygomatic arch, is broad and develops a notch at its front end. The ... The nasal and premaxillary bones do not extend back beyond the point where the lacrimal, frontal, and maxillary bones meet. ... It is a large, coarse-furred, bright reddish, long-tailed species with a broad skull with widely spreading zygomatic arches. ...
Tongue crib is a removable applianced placed in the maxillary arch for the purpose of stopping the tongue thrusting habit. This ... part of maxilla is tipped downwards Posterior facial height equals 1/2 of anterior facial height Increased hard tissue Lower ... Man-Suk Baek and others evaluated long-term stability of anterior open bite by intrusion of maxillary posterior teeth. Their ... According to Proffit et al, surgical movement that involves maxillary impaction is the most stable surgical movement in the ...
Impacted type of fractures may be almost immobile and it is only by grasping the maxillary teeth and applying a little firm ... Lefort II and Lefort III (common) - Gross edema of soft tissue over the middle third of the face, bilateral circumorbital ... Lefort I - Slight swelling of the upper lip, ecchymosis is present in the buccal sulcus beneath each zygomatic arch, ... A Le Fort fracture of the skull is a classic transfacial fracture of the midface, involving the maxillary bone and surrounding ...
It is located on the mandibular arch of the mouth, and generally opposes the maxillary first molars and the maxillary 2nd ... It is widely accepted that there is a factor within the tissues of the first branchial arch that is necessary for the ... Maxillary canineEdit. Main article: Maxillary canine. The maxillary canine is the tooth located laterally from both maxillary ... Maxillary first molarEdit. Main article: Maxillary first molar. The maxillary first molar is the tooth located laterally from ...
The zygomatic arch usually fractures at its weakest point, 1.5 cm behind the zygomaticotemporal suture. Non-displaced or ... The upper and transverse maxillary bone has the zygomaticomaxillary and zygomaticotemporal sutures, while the lateral and ... Facial bruising, periorbital ecchymosis, soft tissue gas, swelling, trismus, altered mastication, diplopia, and ophthalmoplegia ... Swanson, E; Vercler, C; Yaremchuk, MJ; Gordon, CR (May 2012). "Modified Gillies approach for zygomatic arch fracture reduction ...
It had separate maxillary and mandibular labial bow wire. The appliance consists of parts below Acrylic - The acrylic in the ... The wire is 1mm away from palate, with the loop toward distal of the arch. It is designed to touch dorsal surface of tongue and ... The loops were designed to keep away soft tissue of cheeks to prevent the inhibitory influence of the muscle. Palatal Bar - The ... It was also used for treatment of narrow dental arches of Class I to stimulate tongue function and to increase the volume or ...
Dental factors − crowding, spacing, proclined maxillary anterior teeth. *Soft tissue factors − incompetent lips, lower lip trap ... Upper arch. *Teeth in occlusion. *Radiographs. The presence of dental disease precludes any active orthodontic treatment, even ... Soft tissue changes include elimination of lip trap and improved lip competence. It has also been postulated that tongue ... A controlled clinical trial of the effects of the Twin Block and Dynamax appliances on the hard and soft tissues. Eur J Orthod ...
Maxillary Incisor Position = Relationship of upper incisors to the N-A line. Average is 22 degrees and 4 mm. Mandibular Incisor ... He continued working with Angle after his graduation and worked on Ribbon Arch at the school. He is most-remember for his ... Steiner's Analysis consists of Skeletal, Dental and Soft Tissue Analysis. The skeletal component tries to related the upper and ... the lips should touch a line extending from the soft tissue contour of the cin to the middle of an S formed by lower border of ...
The atlas arch also resembles those of romeriids and, unlike other microsaurs, is unswollen. The trunk is elongate, with thin ... The fifth maxillary tooth is enlarged and resembles a canine. The skull of Hyloplesion superficially resembles that of the ... separated from the skull by a layer of connective tissue. Carroll, R. L.; Gaskill, P. (1978). "The Order Microsauria". Memoirs ...
Contact with adjacent teeth in the same arch is referred to as interproximal contacts. The maxillary central incisors are one ... the first hard tissue to begin forming is dentin, with enamel appearing immediately afterwards.[8][page needed] ... In the deciduous maxillary central incisor, endodontic treatment is less frequent. In the permanent maxillary central incisor, ... There are some minor differences between the deciduous maxillary central incisor and that of the permanent maxillary central ...
In humans, the cartilaginous bar of the mandibular arch is formed by what are known as Meckel's cartilages (right and left) ... while from the connective tissue covering the remainder of the cartilage the greater part of the mandible is ossified. ... a b The Gill Arches: Meckel's Cartilage, palaeos. Retrieved 4 December 2014. ... Originally it was the lower of two cartilages which supported the first branchial arch in early fish. Then it grew longer and ...
... it most frequently located on the anterior maxillary alveolar ridge. It has a female predilection. It is a tumor with no ... is a very rare benign soft tissue lesion of the neonate, ... Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2004; 128:585-586. This article on PubMed ... The tumor was attached by a large pedicleto the anterior maxillary ridge; the mass was firm in consistency and not tender to ... A 2 day old girl, born at 41 weeks gestation weighting 3,500kg, was referred with a growth in the anterior maxillary alveolus ...
View of implant wells and soft tissue sulci.. 164.. Integrated Abutment Crown™ being inserted. ... Bilateral Sinus Lifts with SynthoGraft™, Two Stage Full Arch Placement of Twelve Maxillary and Two Mandibular Implants, and ... Maxillary osteotomy being prepared with 2.0mm pilot bur rotating at 1100 RPM with external irrigation. ... Impression material being injected around the impression sleeves for the making of a full arch implant level transfer ...
FACIAL FORM VS ARCH FORM   dolicocephalic form --longer but narrower and deeper maxillary arch and palate. Brachy cephalic ... of the Brader arch is that it forms a superior dental arch form The primary determinants of arch form morphology are the tissue ... Brader recommended an arch guide with five arch forms. The selection of the proper arch form was based on arch width at the ... This includes -Arch correlation -Arch size -Arch length -where the arch to be measured -contact details -final determination of ...
Turning the jack lengthens a rod that pushes the shells outwards against the mouthpiece thus widening the maxillary arch ... Near the molars, an arch expander joins to the mouth piece. The arch expander has two telescoping shells with a threaded jack ... An alternate embodiment has the arch expander attaching directly to the palatal bone through screws placed through a grommet at ... An orthodontic arch expander joins to a mouthpiece proximate to the rear of the mouthpiece. The transparent mouthpiece has a ...
That is the total length of the alveolar arch is smaller than the tooth arch (the combined mesiodistal width of each tooth). ... Pericoronitis is an infection of the soft tissue that covers the crown of an impacted tooth and is usually caused by the normal ... Mandibular third molars are more commonly impacted than their maxillary counterparts. Some dentists believe that impacted teeth ... An impacted tooth is one that fails to erupt into the dental arch within the expected developmental window. Because impacted ...
Internal maxillary artery.  Mandibular nerve & its branches. Etiology Infected maxillary 3rd molars.  Infected needles or ... Stab incision given through skin & s/c tissue. If pus is not encountered, further deepening of surgical site done with sinus ... Buccal space associated with temporal space - Dumb bell shaped appearance due to lack of swelling over zygomatic arch. ... To decompress odematous tissues.  To allow better perfusion of blood, containing antibiotics & defensive elements.  To ...
In mice, tissue derived from neural crest in the cranium and branchial arches can be identified by embryological fate mapping, ... particularly the maxillary component and most of the mandibular component of the first branchial arch, and the distal part of ... BA1, branchial arch 1; BA2, branchial arch 2; BA3, branchial arch 3; C1, brachial (pharyngeal) cleft (groove) 1; C2, brachial ... Dashed lines demarcate the border of the cranial neural-crest-derived tissue. BA1-4, branchial arch 1-4; Di, diencephalon; GG, ...
Tissue Engineering and Platelet Derived Growth Factors: Evidence Based Therapy Platelet derived growth factors are now ... Bi-Directional Augmentation of Double-Arched Posterior Maxillary Vertical Defects Description:. Double-arched posterior ... Online Videos / Surgery / Sinus Lift / Bi-Directional Augmentation of Double-Arched Posterior Maxillary Vertical Defects ... Radiological Findings of the Post-Sinus Lift Maxillary Sinus: A Computerized Tomography Follow-Up. The purpose of this article ...
1.Basciftci FA, Uysal T, Buyukerkmen A, Demir A. The influence of extraction treatment on Holdaway soft-tissue measurements. ... Then, the maxillary incisor and mandibular dental arch images were captured using the Print Screen keyboard command and ... Maxillary arch size and shape in American blacks and whites. Angle Orthod 2000;4:297-302. [ Links ]. ... It may be concluded that the use of arch morphology as a diagnostic method to determine the shape of the maxillary central ...
For the maxillary arch implant placement was made at six weeks from the extractions (type 2 placement). Soft tissue healing ... M. Caneva, L. A. Salata, S. S. de Souza, E. Bressan, D. Botticelli, and N. P. Lang, "Hard tissue formation adjacent to implants ... M. Caneva, L. A. Salata, S. S. de Souza, E. Bressan, D. Botticelli, and N. P. Lang, "Hard tissue formation adjacent to implants ... Respect for the hard and soft tissues, the maintenance of a good oral hygiene together with the use of premium materials has ...
At first irreversible hydrocolloid impressions of maxillary and mandibular arches were obtained to realize individual ... The appliance was well tolerated by patients and it guaranteed the health of the oral tissue but increased the dribbling habit ... At first a thick lower bite was made to produce an anterior open bite; then it was substituted by a thinner maxillary and ... In LNS patients the typical feature is loss of tissue from biting themselves with partial or complete amputation of fingers, ...
Of the 64 treated sites, 14 were in the maxillary arch and 50 were in the mandibular arch. Patients were recalled every 4 to 6 ... "FRC use in absence of tobacco smoking appears to have adverse effects on periodontal tissues," the authors concluded. "Given ... Site-associated variables included gingival recession depth, keratinized tissue (KT) width, and probing depth. ...
Palmar arches explanation free. What is Palmar arches? Meaning of Palmar arches medical term. What does Palmar arches mean? ... Looking for online definition of Palmar arches in the Medical Dictionary? ... maxillary arch. The curved composite structure of the natural dentition and supporting tissues of the upper jaw (maxillary and ... palmar arch. See: deep palmar arch; superficial palmar arch. pharyngeal arch. Branchial arch.. pharyngopalatine arch. The ...
Rapid maxillary expansion (RME) is an effective treatment option that has been widely used to eliminate transversal deficiency ... Haas AJ (1961) Rapid expansion of the maxillary dental arch and nasal cavity by opening the midpalatal suture. Angle Orthod 31( ... Immediate effects of rapid maxillary expansion on the naso-maxillary facial soft tissue using 3D stereophotogrammetry. Surgeon ... Soft tissue changes in the orofacial region after rapid maxillary expansion. A cone beam computed tomography study. Zeitschrift ...
A dental impression is classified as full arch upper maxillary, full arch lower mandibular, anterior, quadrant, or bite ... It was then placed into the mouth of the subject and pressed against the teeth and soft tissues. After five minutes, this was ... an exact replica of the reverse image of a dental arch or arches or area of a dental arch. ... Composite product for taking the impression of an edentulous arch. US20100304325 *. Jan 26, 2010. Dec 2, 2010. Fletcher Gayle J ...
Origin: Zygomatic arch and Maxilla Insertion: Angle and Ramus of Mandible. Orbicularis oculi Origin: Frontal and Maxillary ... Bones Insertion: Encircles orbit and inserts into tissue of the eyelid. Zygomaticus. Origin: Zygomatic Bone Insertion: Skin and ...
Despite this evidence, screw retention often isnt even considered in the maxillary arch, where screw access may compromise ... In addition, a growing body of literature demonstrates that peri-implant soft tissues respond more favorably to crowns that are ... 3M ESPE Retraction Capsule - A great impression starts with controlling tissue and moisture. Our capsules extra-fine tip ... Ann Arbor outlined the case of a 34-year-old woman seeking a restoration after implant placement at the site of the maxillary ...
The second pharyngeal arch tissue of the tongue migrates under the tongue as the lateral lingual swellings fuse. Taste buds of ... The lateral nasal prominences touch the maxillary prominences of arch 1 on both sides. ... There are 5 total, numbered 1-6 (there is no 5th arch in humans). They run cranial to caudal. The arches bulge into the pharynx ... It is the fate of ectodermal clefts 2-4, as Arch 2 overgrows all these spaces and closes around arch 4 (which gives rise to ...
Pharyngeal arches are formed during the fourth week. Each arch consists of a mesenchymal tissue covered on the outside by ... The maxillary and mandibular prominences are derived from the first arch. The maxillary prominence is initially located ... The six pharyngeal arches give rise to much of the skeletal and muscular tissue in the head and neck region. When the embryo is ... The first pharyngeal arch forms maxillary and mandibular processes. It is innervated by the trigeminal nerve and molds muscles ...
... is a non-invasive diagnostic imaging tool based on the detection of protons into the tissues. This imaging technique is ... The coil consisted of a single loop of 10 mm width and covered with sticky foam to be suitable for the adult maxillary arch. ... Anatomical Considerations on Hard Tissues. Hard tissues comprise all the tissues that show a mineralized component in their ... Despite the wide use of MRI as a diagnostic tool for soft tissues, its application for hard tissues (i.e., bone and teeth) ...
In this appliance the lip pads are used in the maxillary arch to allow the maxilla to grow. The mandibular arch does not have ... Acrylic Components Buccal Shield - They were about 2.5mm thick and their goal was to expand the soft tissue capsule in the back ... Lip Pads - They are tear drop shaped acrylic pads which were placed in the vestibule of the lower arch. Lingual Shield - This ... He believed that the perioral muscles had restraining effect on the dental arches and that the insertion of appliance expands ...
n. A tooth adapted for cutting or gnawing, located at the front of the mouth along the apex of the dental arch. n a chisel- ... Mouse teeth provide insights into tissue regeneration, cancer research. Panoramic radiograph showed impacted right maxillary ... 5 Anomalies in lateral incisor size may lead to disturbances in upper and lower arch length and occlusion and may also cause ... n incisivo; upper o maxillary central - incisivo central superior; lower o mandibular lateral - incisivo lateral inferior ...
line, fulcrum, cross arch,. n an imaginary line through the tooth-supported rest areas nearest to soft tissue-supported areas ... n the intersection of the midsagittal plane with the maxillary and mandibular dental arches. The center line divides the ... In anatomy, a long narrow band or streak that is distinct from the surrounding tissues by colour or texture.. base line The ... n a bluish-black patch on the gingival tissues, usually about 1 mm from the gingival crest. Caused by the deposition of fine ...
Patients with narrow maxillary arches and high palates could also be susceptible to snoring and sleep apnea. ... and excessive tissue at the back of the throat. Any oropharyngeal obstructions must be corrected surgically before fabricating ... The appliances depend on an adequate number of teeth for proper retention; ideally, 10 teeth on each arch and, preferably, ... Arch Intern Med, 165, 447-452, 2005. 3. Somers VK, White DP, Amin R, Abraham WT, Costa F, Culebras A, Daniels S, Floras JS, ...
The most common error was lack of exposure of all tissue stops followed by presence of voids and creases/irregularities on ... Clinical Evaluation of Maxillary Arch Complete Denture Impressions Made by Undergraduate Students in a Dental College * Rinu ... Results: It was found that 97.2% of students performed at least one detectable error during making of maxillary arch final ... Conclusion: There is high possibility of including errors while making maxillary arch final impression by undergraduate dental ...
  • 3 Fischer K, Stenberg T.: Prospective 10-year cohort study based on a randomized controlled trial (RCT) on implant-supported full-arch maxillary prostheses. (straumann.com)
  • Fw: Prospective 10-year cohort study based on a randomized controlled trial (RCT) on implant-supported full-arch maxillary prostheses. (daz-forum.org)
  • This study shows that sandblasted and acid-etched implants offers predictable long-term results as support for full-arch maxillary prostheses. (daz-forum.org)
  • Site-associated variables included gingival recession depth, keratinized tissue (KT) width, and probing depth. (ada.org)
  • 2 The device of claim 1 wherein the device is adapted and configured to isolate a working field from gingival tissue. (sumobrain.com)
  • root вЂ" portion of the root covered by the gingival (gum) tissue. (docme.ru)
  • Note: Because the amount of tissue removed was greater than 1.5mm of gingival tissue, provisionals were placed at the time of laser gingivectomy to allow for healing and optimal aesthetic results upon delivery. (dentaltown.com)
  • 30 If a gingival smile is caused by a hypermobile lip, it would be a mistake to correct it with aggressive incisor intrusion or maxillary impaction surgery, because that would result in little or no incisor display at rest and thus make the patient look older. (jco-online.com)
  • Many studies have assessed the dental and skeletal effects of the expansion treatment but few studies evaluated soft tissue changes using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. (springermedizin.de)
  • This study aims to compare soft tissue changes after RME in prepubertal and postpubertal subjects using CBCT images. (springermedizin.de)
  • The null hypothesis of this study is there is no difference between prepubertal and postpubertal patients in soft tissue changes after RME treatment. (springermedizin.de)
  • No significant differences were observed in soft tissue alar base, nostril width, nostril height, and nasolabial angle. (springermedizin.de)
  • Some significant changes in facial soft tissues were observed after RME treatment but there were no significant differences between prepubertal and postpubertal subjects. (springermedizin.de)
  • Altorkat Y, Khambay BS, McDonald JP, Cross DL, Brocklebank LM, Ju XV (2016) Immediate effects of rapid maxillary expansion on the naso-maxillary facial soft tissue using 3D stereophotogrammetry. (springermedizin.de)
  • In addition, a growing body of literature demonstrates that peri-implant soft tissues respond more favorably to crowns that are screw-retained rather than cement-retained. (ada.org)
  • Acrylic Components Buccal Shield - They were about 2.5mm thick and their goal was to expand the soft tissue capsule in the back. (wikipedia.org)
  • This imaging technique is remarkable because of high spatial resolution, strong soft tissue contrast and specificity, and good depth penetration. (springer.com)
  • The primary advantage of MRI is to allow for obtaining cross-sectional anatomical information of the organs due to an excellent soft tissue contrast and excellent depth penetration. (springer.com)
  • A balanced soft tissue appearance and an esthetic smile are virtually the greatest passion of patients and orthodontists. (intechopen.com)
  • Fig. 3: After soft tissue diode laser recontouring at 1.5W continuous pulse. (dentaltown.com)
  • Cutaneous manifestations include soft-tissue atrophy, telangiectasia, and extremity ulcerations. (brainscape.com)
  • Soft tissue contour changes were evaluated in 20 patients who underwent immediate implant placement with provisional restoration. (bvsalud.org)
  • No significant differences were observed between baseline and 1 year after implant placement in soft tissue contour measurements and the Pink Esthetic Score. (bvsalud.org)
  • It was shown that the use of immediate single-tooth implants with immediate restoration resulted in the maintenance of the soft tissue contour and esthetics when compared to pretreatment independently from the soft tissue phenotype. (bvsalud.org)
  • However, these hard tissue changes did not imply soft tissue changes and the variables related to the soft profile were not statistically significantly different between the groups. (curehunter.com)
  • A stent was placed in the defect to prevent the effects of soft tissue. (ac.ir)
  • Above the soft palate, about even with the palatine and lingual tonsils lie two similar masses of tissue called the Adenoids . (doctorspiller.com)
  • A retrospective cephalometric study was undertaken to determine the soft tissue profile changes at least 6 months postretention. (quintpub.com)
  • Solid variants have a variable radiologic appearance, which ranges from that of a completely cystic aneurysmal bone cyst to a moth-eaten appearance with cortical destruction and soft-tissue extension. (medscape.com)
  • The lesion may extend into the adjacent vertebral body, violating the intervertebral disk and causing vertebral collapse and/or extension into the spinal canal, adjacent ribs, and paravertebral soft tissues. (medscape.com)
  • It may mimic a sarcoma in the ribs, scapula, or sternum, especially when associated with a large soft-tissue component. (medscape.com)
  • Improved soft tissue thickness will decrease risk of tissue dehiscence and provide a better quality of tissue for flap repositioning and suturing. (facialartdentalforum.com)
  • In this video, Dr. H. Ryan Kazemi demonstrates use of soft brush technique in mobilization of soft tissue flap without periosteal incisions to achieve tensionless closure. (facialartdentalforum.com)
  • Dr Pikos has extensive experience in implant surgery and hard and soft tissue grafting procedures. (adi.org.uk)
  • Since 1990, he has been teaching advanced bone and soft tissue grafting courses with alumni that now number more than 2400 from all 50 states and 32 countries. (adi.org.uk)
  • This clinical-based presentation will feature a CBCT-based sequential diagnostic protocol including the latest hard and soft tissue grafting techniques for single tooth to full arch implant reconstruction. (adi.org.uk)
  • Understand the application and protocols of current hard and soft tissue grafting techniques for maxillary alveolar ridge augmentation. (adi.org.uk)
  • Even though patients come to us mainly to improve their smiles, the orthodontic literature contains more studies on skeletal structure than on soft-tissue structure, and the smile still receives relatively little attention. (jco-online.com)
  • 1. Soft tissue hyperplasia. (docplayer.net)
  • A fibrous or flabby ridge is a superficial area of mobile soft tissue affecting the maxillary or mandibular alveolar ridges. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare the skeletal, dental, and soft-tissue treatment effects of nonextraction therapy using the modified C-palatal plate (MCPP) to those of premolar extraction (PE) treatment in adult patients with Class II malocclusion. (bvsalud.org)
  • Therefore, four PE may be recommended when greater improvement of incisor position and soft-tissue profile is required. (bvsalud.org)
  • 8 Craniofacial characteristics associated with OSA include maxillo-mandibular skeletal morphology, cranial base, hyoid position, tongue volume, head position, and upper airway soft tissue size. (allenpress.com)
  • Both the OM and OM 30 views will identify these fractures, along with the associated soft tissue swelling over the zygomatic eminence and opacification or an air-fluid level in the maxillary sinus. (imageinterpretation.co.uk)
  • This is all the soft tissue you must manuver around in order to get your view. (studentdoctor.net)
  • Big thick neck probably correlates with a LOT of soft tissue on the inside. (studentdoctor.net)
  • Soft tissue LOVES to collapse when you put the patient to sleep. (studentdoctor.net)
  • A skeletal and soft tissue cephalometric points are marked on the created 3D-computer model of skull. (russianpatents.com)
  • A combination thereof enables performing the 3D-cephalometric analysis of bone and soft tissues. (russianpatents.com)
  • Conventional approaches to full-arch fixed rehabilitation of edentulous or soon-to-be edentulous patients involve staged treatments, including tooth removal, bone and soft-tissue grafting, placement of dental implants, and delayed restoration. (cdeworld.com)
  • The use of a treatment material (tissue conditioner) to re-establish tone and health to irritated oral soft tissue, usually applied to the edentulous alveolar ridge. (bioportfolio.com)
  • An alternate embodiment has the arch expander attaching directly to the palatal bone through screws placed through a grommet at the end of each shell by an orthodontist or oral surgeon. (google.com.au)
  • Adkins MD, Nanda RS, Currier GF (1990) Arch perimeter changes on rapid palatal expansion. (springermedizin.de)
  • Otton (1992) - Capped Frankel Appliance Owen (1985) - Modified functional regulator for Vertical Maxillary Excess Chate (1986) - Angulation of Cross Wires was changed Kingston - He modified the buccal shields Haynes (1986) - He modified appliance to have continuous buccolabial shield palatal acrylic support. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1934 Auxhausen performed a Le Fort I osteotomy mobilization for open bite correction (Axhausen, 1934), but only in 1952, in the USA, Converse described his cases operated by maxillary osteotomy and large vestibular and palatal elevation for Le Fort I osteotomy combined with midpalatal osteotomy (Converse, 1952). (scribd.com)
  • OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to analyze initial displacement and stress distribution of the maxillofacial complex during dentoskeletal maxillary protraction with various appliance designs placed on the palatal region by using three-dimensional finite element analysis. (bvsalud.org)
  • Type E), and Class III palatal plate intraoral traction with RME (Type F). In Types A, B, C, and D, maxillary protraction alone was performed, whereas in Types E and F, transverse expansion was performed simultaneously with maxillary protraction. (bvsalud.org)
  • CONCLUSIONS: The palatal plate served as an effective skeletal anchor for use with the facemask in maxillary protraction. (bvsalud.org)
  • In contrast, the intraoral use of Class III palatal plates showed minimal skeletal and dental effects in maxillary protraction. (bvsalud.org)
  • In addition, palatal expansion with the protraction force showed minimal effect on the forward movement of the maxillary complex. (bvsalud.org)
  • We are committed to research and scientific evidence in the field of implant dentistry and oral tissue regeneration. (straumann.com)
  • The goal of this webinar is to discuss the steps of full arch anatomical guide based implant surgery planning. (carestreamdental.com)
  • During the first clinical visit, the three O-Ring Abutments were removed from their implants, and three 2.0mm impression posts and corresponding acrylic sleeves were inserted for the making of a full arch implant-level transfer impression. (bicon.com)
  • During the first clinical visit, after the clinical evaluation and consult, the patient's four Locator abutments were removed and a full arch implant-level transfer impression was made along with a tooth shade and an initial occlusal registration, for the fabrication of a Gothic Arch plate and stylus. (bicon.com)
  • Full maxillary reconstruction with NobelActive implants in combination with a precision-milled fixed NobelProcera Implant Bridge Titanium. (nobelbiocare.com)
  • In this video, Dr. H. Ryan Kazemi demonstrates complete reconstruction of a severely atrophic maxilla in a patient planned for full-arch implant placement. (facialartdentalforum.com)
  • This treatment demonstrates the clinical techniques for fabricating and inserting maxillary and mandibular telescopic TRINIA® prostheses with Universal Abutment copings each supported by two 4.5 x 8.0mm and two 5.0 x 6.0mm Bicon SHORT® Implants for a sixty-eight-year-old male patient. (bicon.com)
  • 5 In a 10-year retrospective study of 150 consecutive patients treated with full-arch fixed prostheses, the same survival rate resulted for restorations with four versus six implants. (cdeworld.com)
  • Thus, after a general introduction about basic principles of MRI, bone-specific MRI sequences, and anatomical and chemical compositions of hard tissues, this review mainly emphasizes all the progresses that have been made on ultrashort MRI acquisitions of such tissues in terms of sequence development, possible clinical translations, and related strengths and weaknesses. (springer.com)
  • Clinical intraoral examination revealed maxillary peg laterals that presented with previously prepped full-coverage crowns, no restorative crowns present. (dentaltown.com)
  • Intra-oral clinical Examination of the patient revealed poorly resorbed Maxillary & Mandibular Ridges. (jscholaronline.org)
  • Depending on the tissue types that are affected and where the lesion is located, clinical signs and history can aid in determining the diagnosis. (animaldentalcenter.com)
  • Optical-thermal simulation of human tonsillar tissue irradiation: clinical implications. (childrenshospital.org)
  • During surgical procedure would ask the Oral Surgeon to do limited alveoloplasty in maxillary right and left quadrants to compensate for bone that has erupted down with over eruption of bicuspids. (uiowa.edu)
  • Surgical devices and methods are provided for anchoring tissue to bone, and more particularly methods and devices are provided for preventing over-insertion of. (patents.com)
  • A curved surgical fastener for anchoring medical devices to tissue includes a curved member having a proximal end, a distal end, and a tissue penetrating end. (patents.com)
  • Surgical options for correction of hemifacial atrophy include alloplastic implants, free dermis/fat grafts, fat injections, and fasciocutaneous free tissue flaps. (brainscape.com)
  • In the case of neoplasia, dependent on the type and extent of tissue involvement, the surgical margins are predicated on whether the attempt is at palliation of symptoms or curative excision. (animaldentalcenter.com)
  • These arches contribute to the physical appearance of the embryo because they are the main components that build the face and neck. (wikipedia.org)
  • e) A sagittal view of an E9.5 mouse embryo showing routes of NCC migration into the pharyngeal arches and developing face from the distinct rhombomeres (r) of the hindbrain, mesencephalon (midbrain) and prosencephalon (forebrain). (els.net)
  • The narrowing may be the result of obesity with deposits of adipose tissue adjacent to the upper airway, adenotonsillar hypertrophy (especially in children), mandibular deficiency (overjet/retrognathia or relative micrognathia), elongated palate, large uvula, or macroglossia. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Many organs develop through inductive interactions between adjacent tissue layers mediated by signaling molecules including sonic hedgehog (SHH) and members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family. (swarthmore.edu)
  • are often expressed in adjacent tissue layers, such a signaling loop may be a general feature of organogenesis. (swarthmore.edu)
  • Each arch consists of a mesenchymal tissue covered on the outside by ectoderm and on the inside by epithelium of endodermal origin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Initially, pharyngeal grooves consist of four bars of mesenchymal tissue that separate pharyngeal nerves. (wikipedia.org)
  • Schematics of neural crest development from the establishment of the neural border containing the neural crest progenitors within the neuroectoderm (a, b), epithelial-mesenchymal transformation and migration of NCC (neural crest cells) (d) and the migration routes taken by NCC to reach the developing face and pharyngeal arches (e). (c) The mechanisms of Treacher Collin's syndrome. (els.net)
  • Recent research has shown this ring of lymphoid tissue is an important part of the immune system and in any case usually shrinks as the child passes the age of ten. (orthotropics.com)
  • They are, in fact, only a part of a ring of lymphoid tissue that lines your entire throat. (doctorspiller.com)
  • These complete the tonsillar ring , so called because the palatine tonsils, lingual tonsils and adenoids form a complete ring of lymphoid tissue surrounding the throat. (doctorspiller.com)
  • While the patient waited, the impressions were poured and the stone models articulated for the fabrication of a maxillary stylus and mandibular tracing plate to facilitate the registration of the patient's centric relation utilizing the Gothic arch occlusal registration tracing. (bicon.com)
  • This article presents a prosthetic rehabilitation of a very old patient, presenting a serious bone atrophy associated with a maxillary flabby ridge, whose dentures accelerated the bone resorption because of their poor fitting, lack of retention and wrong occlusal contacts. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • The objective of my study will be to assess and compare between two different approaches for placement of self- inflating osmotic tissue expanders used as preparatory surgery before alveol. (bioportfolio.com)
  • To overcome these issues, new MRI techniques, such as sweep imaging with Fourier transformation (SWIFT), ultrashort echo time (UTE) imaging, and zero echo time (ZTE) imaging, have been developed for hard tissues imaging with promising results reported. (springer.com)
  • In this video, Dr. H. Ryan Kazemi demonstrates a bi-directional vertical bone augmentation technique to develop sites that not only support the implants but also improve tissue harmony for enhanced aesthetics, function, and longevity. (dentalxp.com)