Viscosity: The resistance that a gaseous or liquid system offers to flow when it is subjected to shear stress. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Blood Viscosity: The internal resistance of the BLOOD to shear forces. The in vitro measure of whole blood viscosity is of limited clinical utility because it bears little relationship to the actual viscosity within the circulation, but an increase in the viscosity of circulating blood can contribute to morbidity in patients suffering from disorders such as SICKLE CELL ANEMIA and POLYCYTHEMIA.Methylcellulose: Methylester of cellulose. Methylcellulose is used as an emulsifying and suspending agent in cosmetics, pharmaceutics and the chemical industry. It is used therapeutically as a bulk laxative.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Rheology: The study of the deformation and flow of matter, usually liquids or fluids, and of the plastic flow of solids. The concept covers consistency, dilatancy, liquefaction, resistance to flow, shearing, thixotrophy, and VISCOSITY.Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Hematocrit: The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.Erythrocyte Aggregation: The formation of clumps of RED BLOOD CELLS under low or non-flow conditions, resulting from the attraction forces between the red blood cells. The cells adhere to each other in rouleaux aggregates. Slight mechanical force, such as occurs in the circulation, is enough to disperse these aggregates. Stronger or weaker than normal aggregation may result from a variety of effects in the ERYTHROCYTE MEMBRANE or in BLOOD PLASMA. The degree of aggregation is affected by ERYTHROCYTE DEFORMABILITY, erythrocyte membrane sialylation, masking of negative surface charge by plasma proteins, etc. BLOOD VISCOSITY and the ERYTHROCYTE SEDIMENTATION RATE are affected by the amount of erythrocyte aggregation and are parameters used to measure the aggregation.Erythrocyte Deformability: Ability of ERYTHROCYTES to change shape as they pass through narrow spaces, such as the microvasculature.Lung Injury: Damage to any compartment of the lung caused by physical, chemical, or biological agents which characteristically elicit inflammatory reaction. These inflammatory reactions can either be acute and dominated by NEUTROPHILS, or chronic and dominated by LYMPHOCYTES and MACROPHAGES.Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung: A heterogeneous aggregate of at least three distinct histological types of lung cancer, including SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA; ADENOCARCINOMA; and LARGE CELL CARCINOMA. They are dealt with collectively because of their shared treatment strategy.Air Pollution: The presence of contaminants or pollutant substances in the air (AIR POLLUTANTS) that interfere with human health or welfare, or produce other harmful environmental effects. The substances may include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; or volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Homophobia: Differential treatment or unequal access to opportunities or services based on perceived homosexual preference or orientation.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Air Pollutants: Any substance in the air which could, if present in high enough concentration, harm humans, animals, vegetation or material. Substances include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; and volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A species of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria commonly isolated from clinical specimens (wound, burn, and urinary tract infections). It is also found widely distributed in soil and water. P. aeruginosa is a major agent of nosocomial infection.Cystic Fibrosis: An autosomal recessive genetic disease of the EXOCRINE GLANDS. It is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CYSTIC FIBROSIS TRANSMEMBRANE CONDUCTANCE REGULATOR expressed in several organs including the LUNG, the PANCREAS, the BILIARY SYSTEM, and the SWEAT GLANDS. Cystic fibrosis is characterized by epithelial secretory dysfunction associated with ductal obstruction resulting in AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION; chronic RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS; PANCREATIC INSUFFICIENCY; maldigestion; salt depletion; and HEAT PROSTRATION.Pseudomonas Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus PSEUDOMONAS.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Selection, Genetic: Differential and non-random reproduction of different genotypes, operating to alter the gene frequencies within a population.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Pseudomonas: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria widely distributed in nature. Some species are pathogenic for humans, animals, and plants.Methane: The simplest saturated hydrocarbon. It is a colorless, flammable gas, slightly soluble in water. It is one of the chief constituents of natural gas and is formed in the decomposition of organic matter. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Methylococcaceae: A family of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria utilizing only one-carbon organic compounds and isolated from in soil and water.Legal Guardians: A legal concept for individuals who are designated to act on behalf of persons who are considered incapable of acting in their own behalf, e.g., minors and persons found to be not mentally competent.Soil Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Climate Change: Any significant change in measures of climate (such as temperature, precipitation, or wind) lasting for an extended period (decades or longer). It may result from natural factors such as changes in the sun's intensity, natural processes within the climate system such as changes in ocean circulation, or human activities.Ice: The solid substance formed by the FREEZING of water.Climate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Mountaineering: A sport involving mountain climbing techniques.Altitude: A vertical distance measured from a known level on the surface of a planet or other celestial body.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Oximetry: The determination of oxygen-hemoglobin saturation of blood either by withdrawing a sample and passing it through a classical photoelectric oximeter or by electrodes attached to some translucent part of the body like finger, earlobe, or skin fold. It includes non-invasive oxygen monitoring by pulse oximetry.Altitude Sickness: Multiple symptoms associated with reduced oxygen at high ALTITUDE.Anoxia: Relatively complete absence of oxygen in one or more tissues.Urological Agents: Drugs used in the treatment of urogenital conditions and diseases such as URINARY INCONTINENCE; PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA; and ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Athletic Performance: Carrying out of specific physical routines or procedures by one who is trained or skilled in physical activity. Performance is influenced by a combination of physiological, psychological, and socio-cultural factors.Cardiac Output: The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).Athletes: Individuals who have developed skills, physical stamina and strength or participants in SPORTS or other physical activities.Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1, alpha subunit is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that is regulated by OXYGEN availability and is targeted for degradation by VHL TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN.Physical Endurance: The time span between the beginning of physical activity by an individual and the termination because of exhaustion.Anemia, Sickle Cell: A disease characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia, episodic painful crises, and pathologic involvement of many organs. It is the clinical expression of homozygosity for hemoglobin S.Sickle Cell Trait: The condition of being heterozygous for hemoglobin S.Alzheimer Disease: A degenerative disease of the BRAIN characterized by the insidious onset of DEMENTIA. Impairment of MEMORY, judgment, attention span, and problem solving skills are followed by severe APRAXIAS and a global loss of cognitive abilities. The condition primarily occurs after age 60, and is marked pathologically by severe cortical atrophy and the triad of SENILE PLAQUES; NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLES; and NEUROPIL THREADS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1049-57)Priapism: A prolonged painful erection that may lasts hours and is not associated with sexual activity. It is seen in patients with SICKLE CELL ANEMIA, advanced malignancy, spinal trauma; and certain drug treatments.Hemoglobin C Disease: A disease characterized by compensated hemolysis with a normal hemoglobin level or a mild to moderate anemia. There may be intermittent abdominal discomfort, splenomegaly, and slight jaundice.Osteonecrosis: Death of a bone or part of a bone, either atraumatic or posttraumatic.Hemoglobin, Sickle: An abnormal hemoglobin resulting from the substitution of valine for glutamic acid at position 6 of the beta chain of the globin moiety. The heterozygous state results in sickle cell trait, the homozygous in sickle cell anemia.
Because such blood cells carry oxygen from the lungs to the muscles, a higher concentration in the blood can improve an ... and viscosity; their high content of electron-dense fluorine atoms results in little intramolecular interaction and low surface ... capacity to serve as a blood substitute is determined principally by the pO2 gradients in the lung and at the target tissue. ... Stored RBCs are then reinfused, usually 1 to 7 days before a high-endurance event. As a significant amount of iron is removed ...
... for this include increased blood viscosity due to the high number of white blood cells circulating in the blood and a higher ... which leads to lung tissue damage as the second leading cause of fatalities. Pulmonary signs - Dyspnea and hypoxia with or ... is defined by a tremendously high blast cell count along with symptoms of decreased tissue perfusion. Leukostasis is associated ... For lung diseases such as pneumonia and tuberculosis, white blood cell count is very important for the diagnosis of the disease ...
This process of backscattering gives the liquid with these bubbles a high signal, which can be seen in the resulting image. ... Non-ionic dimers are favored for their low osmolarity and toxicity, but have a correspondingly higher price attached to their ... These microbubbles are composed of agitated saline solution, most of which are too large to pass through the lung capillaries. ... Contrast agents, enhance the radiodensity in a target tissue or structure. Contrast agents are commonly used to improve the ...
There are often distinct borders between healthy lung tissue and those parts of the lungs that have been affected by EIPH. ... In the case of EIPH, the numbers will be several magnitudes or more higher. The presence of high numbers of hemosiderophages ... Other contributing factors may include upper airway obstruction, increased blood viscosity, abnormalities of cardiac origin ( ... This theory proposes how high pulmonary venous pressures may lead to the capillary rupture and the tissue changes observed in ...
It uses a heart-lung machine to maintain perfusion to other body organs and tissues while the surgeon works in a bloodless ... Cooled blood usually has a higher viscosity, but the crystalloid solution used to prime the bypass tubing dilutes the blood. ... Other heart surgery factors related to mental damage may be events of hypoxia, high or low body temperature, abnormal blood ... lung transplantation, heart-lung transplantation) Repair of some large aneurysms (aortic aneurysms, cerebral aneurysms) ...
Small particles (particulate matter also known as PM 10 or PM 2.5 depending on size) can penetrate deeply into lung tissue and ... pump seizures due to high fuel viscosity at low temperature, increased injection pressure, elastomeric seal failures and fuel ... While petrodiesel's higher density results in higher greenhouse gas emissions per litre compared to gasoline, the 20-40% better ... However, due to the higher density, diesel offers a higher volumetric energy density at 35.86 MJ/L (128,700 BTU/US gal) vs. ...
This is normally very useful to match up blood supply level with tissue demand for nutrients. However, if enough tissue causes ... High spinal injuries may cause neurogenic shock. The classic symptoms include a slow heartrate due to loss of cardiac ... As this fluid is lost, the blood concentration and viscosity increase, causing sludging of the micro-circulation. The prolonged ... lungs and brain. The lack of blood to the renal system causes the characteristic low urine production. However the effects of ...
In contrast, common ravens living at higher latitudes in temperate regions experience high basal metabolic rates. A higher ... The diffusion of oxygen from the lungs into the blood stream 3. Oxygen-rich blood is transported to the peripheral tissues by ... These principles and laws include diffusion, blood viscosity,osmotic pressure, LaPlace's Law (Young-Laplace Equation), ... Ravens have a high metabolic rate that drives flight. Air flow is directed through the lungs via air sacs. The sacs are used to ...
Blood viscosity is the thickness of the blood and its resistance to flow as a result of the different components of the blood. ... This is a result of the left and right side of the heart working together to allow blood to flow continuously to the lungs and ... Blood vessels are needed to sustain life as all of the body's tissues rely on their functionality.[2]There are three major ... Higher proportions result in conditions such as dehydration or heart disease while lower proportions could lead to anemia and ...
In the VF tissue, HA plays a role of shear-thinner, affecting the tissue viscosity, space-filler, shock absorber, as well as ... a connection between higher hormone levels and higher HA content in males could exist in the human vocal fold tissue. Although ... George NA, de Mul FF, Qiu Q, Rakhorst G, Schutte HK (May 2008). "Depth-kymography: high-speed calibrated 3D imaging of human ... They vibrate, modulating the flow of air being expelled from the lungs during phonation. Open when breathing and vibrating for ...
After instillation into the lung, higher molecular weight hyaluronate appears to persist longer in the lung but if > 215 kD ... are provided by the high viscosity of the solution. Elasticity of the solution assists in absorbing mechanical stress and ... "Soft Tissue Fillers Approved by the Center for Devices and Radiological Health". U.S. Food and Drug Administration. 2015-07-27 ... It can bind to specific receptors for which it has a high affinity. The polyanionic form, commonly referred to as hyaluronan, ...
The absolute (dynamic) viscosity of water is higher (order of 100 times) than that of air. This increases the drag on an object ... Divers use high density materials such as lead for diving weighting systems and low density materials such as air in buoyancy ... The volume of gas in a non-rigid container (such as a diver's lungs or buoyancy compensation device), decreases as external ... Henry's law - as pressure increases the quantity of gas absorbed by the tissues of the human body increases. This mechanism is ...
Naftalan has a high viscosity, acidic reaction, high specific gravity (0.91 - 0.96), high boiling point (from 220 ° C and ... It also increases the lung ventilation. During treatment there is an increase in the blood of hemoglobin and erythrocytes. It ... It is also possible to cure diseases of the extraarticular tissues of the musculoskeletal system, nonspecific arthritis of ... higher). The congelation temperature is -20 ° C. When mixed with water, it gives a relatively stable emulsion. Naftalan has a ...
Fibrosis in the lung replaces functioning lung tissue with fibrous connective tissue. This can be due to a large variety of ... The highest expression of lung specific proteins are different surfactant proteins,[22] such as SFTPA1, SFTPB and SFTPC, and ... This is distinct from most higher vertebrates, who use a breathing system driven by negative pressure where the lungs are ... A rare type of specialised cell called a pulmonary ionocyte that is suggested may regulate mucus viscosity has been described.[ ...
Because the purpose of red blood cells is to transfer oxygen from the lungs to body tissues, a blood sample's hematocrit-the ... While in smaller vessels at the micro-circulation scale, viscosity is very high. With the increase in shear stress at the wall ... Additionally, a higher education in a parent has been put into account for a rise in mean hematocrit levels of the child. ... Since blood is non-Newtonian, the viscosity of the blood is in relation to the hematocrit, and as a function of shear rate. ...
Certain orange stars can also contain a high concentration of lithium. Those orange stars found to have a higher than usual ... while higher exposure can cause a buildup of fluid in the lungs, leading to pulmonary edema. The metal itself is a handling ... Lithium was first detected in human organs and fetal tissues in the late 19th century. In humans there are no defined lithium ... Lithium oxide is widely used as a flux for processing silica, reducing the melting point and viscosity of the material and ...
In animals with lungs, arterial blood carries oxygen from inhaled air to the tissues of the body, and venous blood carries ... allowing for a higher concentration of respiratory pigments without increasing viscosity or damaging blood filtering organs ... The word is derived from Middle English, which is derived from the Old English word blôd, which is akin to the Old High German ... Transplant Support- Lung, Heart/Lung, Heart MSN groups Mortensen SP, Dawson EA, Yoshiga CC, et al. (July 2005). "Limitations to ...
"The theory and applications of the exchange of inert gas at the lungs and tissues". Pharmacological Reviews. 3: 1-41. Schneiter ... In general, the higher the concentration gradient across the gas-exchanging surface, the faster the rate of diffusion across it ... Gas molecules move from a region in which they are at high concentration to one in which they are at low concentration. ... particularly its viscosity, temperature and hydrophobicity). φ is the concentration of the gas. x is the position across the ...
In the VF tissue, HA plays a role of shear-thinner, affecting the tissue viscosity, space-filler, shock absorber, as well as ... a connection between higher hormone levels and higher HA content in males could exist in the human vocal fold tissue. Although ... Lucero, J.C. (1995). "The minimum lung pressure to sustain vocal fold oscillation". Journal of the Acoustical Society of ... While the fibrous components are sparse, making the lamina propria structure loose, the hyaluronic acid (HA) content is high. ...
Specific gravity of the fluid - higher fluid density is more Pulsation. Variations[edit]. Hose pumps[edit]. Higher pressure ... especially in high pressure pumping, and decreases the efficiency of the pump dramatically and the high velocity of the slip ... It is also used in heart-lung machines to circulate blood during a bypass surgery, and in hemodialysis systems, as the pump ... Effectiveness is limited by liquid viscosity. Tubing[edit]. It is important to select tubing with appropriate chemical ...
Larger organs could explain the high BMR groups, along with their higher daily energy needs. Analyses such as these demonstrate ... Lung volume is also directly related to body mass in mammals (slope = 1.02). The lung has a volume of 63 ml for every kg of ... kinematic viscosity (viscosity/density) Notable Reynolds numbers: R < 0.5x106 = laminar flow threshold R > 2.0x106 = turbulent ... The muscle tissue itself maintains its contractile characteristics and does not vary depending on the size of the animal. ...
In 2010, researchers found bitter taste receptors in lung tissue, which cause airways to relax when a bitter substance is ... However, a high concentration of fatty acids in certain foods is generally considered inedible. To demonstrate that individuals ... The researchers note that the usual "creaminess and viscosity we associate with fatty foods is largely due to triglycerides", ... which tend to be higher in protein and lower in fiber and poisons than mature leaves. Amongst humans, various food processing ...
Other signs include coughing up blood (hemoptysis), high blood pressure in the lung (pulmonary hypertension), heart failure, ... alleles that result in lower circulating levels of the protein are associated with a threefold higher risk of end-stage lung ... Individuals with CF may develop overgrowth of the nasal tissue (nasal polyps) due to inflammation from chronic sinus infections ... Lieberman J (July 1968). "Dornase aerosol effect on sputum viscosity in cases of cystic fibrosis". JAMA. 205 (5): 312-3. doi: ...
... high work of breathing). The higher gas density also causes gas mixing within the lung to be less efficient, effectively ... Sound travels about 4.5 times faster in water than in air, and at a similarly higher speed in body tissues, and therefore the ... Factors which influence the work of breathing of an underwater breathing apparatus include density and viscosity of the gas, ... A high work of breathing may be partially compensated by a higher tolerance for carbon dioxide, and can eventually result in ...
This hydrogen bonding between HF molecules gives rise to high viscosity in the liquid phase and lower than expected pressure in ... high levels or in combination with skin contact can cause death from an irregular heartbeat or from fluid buildup in the lungs ... Hydrogen fluoride boils near room temperature, much higher than other hydrogen halides. Hydrogen fluoride is a highly dangerous ... Upon contact with moisture, including tissue, hydrogen fluoride immediately converts to hydrofluoric acid, which is highly ...
... is measured with various types of viscometers and rheometers. A rheometer is used for those fluids that cannot be defined by a single value of viscosity and therefore require more parameters to be set and measured than is the case for a viscometer. Close temperature control of the fluid is essential to acquire accurate measurements, particularly in materials like lubricants, whose viscosity can double with a change of the only 5 °C.. For some fluids, the viscosity is constant over a wide range of shear rates (Newtonian fluids). The fluids without a constant viscosity (non-Newtonian fluids) cannot be described by a single number. Non-Newtonian fluids exhibit a variety of different correlations between shear stress and shear rate.. One of the most common instruments for measuring kinematic viscosity is the glass capillary viscometer.. In ...
... solutions were patented as a semisynthetic substitute for tear-film.[8] Its molecular structure is predicated upon a base celluloid compound that is highly water-soluble. Post-application, celluloid attributes of good water solubility reportedly aid in visual clarity. When applied, a hypromellose solution acts to swell and absorb water, thereby expanding the thickness of the tear-film. Hypromellose augmentation therefore results in extended lubricant time presence on the cornea, which theoretically results in decreased eye irritation, especially in dry climates, home, or work environments.[9] On a molecular level, this polymer contains beta-linked D-glucose units that remain metabolically intact for days to weeks. On a manufacturing note, since hypromellose is a vegetarian substitute for gelatin, it is slightly more expensive to produce due to semisynthetic manufacturing processes. Aside from its widespread commercial and retail availability over the counter in a variety of ...
... is a thick fluid produced by animals which confers tissue protection in an acidic environment, such as in the stomach. Mucus that serves a protective function against acidic environments generally has a high viscosity, though the thickness and viscosity of the mucus layer can vary due to several factors. For example, alkaline mucus in the stomach increases in thickness when the stomach is distended. The pH level of the mucus also plays a role in its viscosity, as higher pH levels tend to alter the thickness of the mucus, making it less viscous. Because of this, invading agents such as Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium that causes stomach ulcers, can alter the pH of the mucus to make the mucus pliable enough to move through. Exposure to atmospheric air also tends to increase the pH level of alkaline mucus. In humans, alkaline mucus is present in several ...
The temperature dependence of liquid viscosity is the phenomenon by which liquid viscosity tends to decrease (or, alternatively, its fluidity tends to increase) as its temperature increases. This can be observed, for example, by watching how cooking oil appears to move more fluidly upon a frying pan after being heated by a stove. Kinematic viscosity can be estimated as a typical (thermal) velocity times the mean free path. A molecular view of liquids can be used for a qualitative picture of decrease in the shear (or bulk) viscosity of a simple fluid with temperature. As the temperature increases, the thermal velocity increases. However, much more important is the rapid decrease of the mean free path with temperature. The reason for this is that temperature increase releases more and more molecules to move around and interact with any given molecule. The actual process can be ...
Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) consist of bulky and asymmetric organic cations such as 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium, 1-alkylpyridinium, N-methyl-N-alkylpyrrolidinium and ammonium ions. Phosphonium cations are less common, but offer some advantageous properties.[23][24] A wide range of anions are employed, ranging from simple halides, which generally suffer high melting points, to inorganic anions such as tetrafluoroborate and hexafluorophosphate, and to large organic anions like bistriflimide, triflate or tosylate. There are also many potential uses of ionic liquids with simple non-halogenated organic anions such as formate, alkylsulfate, alkylphosphate or glycolate. The melting point of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate is about −80 °C (−112 °F) and it is a colorless liquid with high viscosity at room temperature. If a highly asymmetric cation is combined with a highly asymmetric anion, ...
The dynamic of fluid parcels is described with the help of Newton's second law. An accelerating parcel of fluid is subject to inertial effects. The Reynolds number is a dimensionless quantity which characterises the magnitude of inertial effects compared to the magnitude of viscous effects. A low Reynolds number (Re,,1) indicates that viscous forces are very strong compared to inertial forces. In such cases, inertial forces are sometimes neglected; this flow regime is called Stokes or creeping flow. In contrast, high Reynolds numbers (Re,,1) indicate that the inertial effects have more effect on the velocity field than the viscous (friction) effects. In high Reynolds number flows, the flow is often modeled as an inviscid flow, an approximation in which viscosity is completely neglected. Eliminating viscosity allows the Navier-Stokes equations to be simplified into the Euler equations. The integration of the ...
1\\&T=T_{0}\quad \implies \quad a_{\rm {T}}=1\,.\end{aligned}}} The superposition principle for complex dynamic moduli (G* = G' + i G'' ) at a fixed frequency ω is obtained similarly: G ′ ( ω , T ) = G ′ ( a T ω , T 0 ) G ″ ( ω , T ) = G ″ ( a T ω , T 0 ) . {\displaystyle {\begin{aligned}G'(\omega ,T)&=G'\left(a_{\rm {T}}\,\omega ,T_{0}\right)\\G''(\omega ,T)&=G''\left(a_{\rm {T}}\,\omega ,T_{0}\right).\end{aligned}}} A decrease in temperature increases the time characteristics while frequency characteristics decrease. For a polymer in solution or "molten" state the following relationship can be used to determine the shift factor: a T = η T η T 0 {\displaystyle a_{\rm {T}}={\frac {\eta _{\rm {T}}}{\eta _{\rm {T0}}}}} where ηT0 is the viscosity (non-Newtonian) during continuous flow at temperature T0 and ηT is the viscosity at temperature T. The time-temperature shift factor can also be described in terms of the activation energy (Ea). By ...
In mathematics, the Newtonian potential or Newton potential is an operator in vector calculus that acts as the inverse to the negative Laplacian, on functions that are smooth and decay rapidly enough at infinity. As such, it is a fundamental object of study in potential theory. In its general nature, it is a singular integral operator, defined by convolution with a function having a mathematical singularity at the origin, the Newtonian kernel Γ which is the fundamental solution of the Laplace equation. It is named for Isaac Newton, who first discovered it and proved that it was a harmonic function in the special case of three variables, where it served as the fundamental gravitational potential in Newton's law of universal gravitation. In modern potential theory, the Newtonian potential is instead thought of as an electrostatic potential. The Newtonian potential of a compactly supported integrable function ƒ is defined as the convolution u ( x ) = Γ ∗ f ( x ) = ∫ R d Γ ( x − y ) f ( y ...
In continuum mechanics, the Lamé parameters (also called the Lamé coefficients, Lamé constants or Lamé moduli) are two material-dependent quantities denoted by λ and μ that arise in strain-stress relationships.[1] In general, λ and μ are individually referred to as Lamé's first parameter and Lamé's second parameter, respectively. Other names are sometimes employed for one or both parameters, depending on context. For example, the parameter μ is referred to in fluid dynamics as the dynamic viscosity of a fluid(not the same units); whereas in the context of elasticity, μ is called the shear modulus,[2]:p.333 and is sometimes denoted by G instead of μ. Typically the notation G is seen paired with the use of Young's modulus, and the notation μ is paired with the use of λ. In homogeneous and isotropic materials, these define Hooke's law in 3D, ...
where Q is the flowrate of the formation (in units of volume per unit time), k is the permeability of the formation (typically in millidarcys), A is the cross-sectional area of the formation, μ is the viscosity of the fluid (typically in units of centipoise). ∂p/∂x represents the pressure change per unit length of the formation. This equation can also be solved for permeability and is used to measure it, forcing a fluid of known viscosity through a core of a known length and area, and measuring the pressure drop across the length of the core. Almost all oil reservoirs have a water zone below the oil leg, and some have also a gas cap above the oil leg. When the reservoir pressure drops due to oil production, water flows into the oil zone from below, and gas flows into the oil zone from above (if the gas cap exists), and we get a simultaneous flow and immiscible mixing of all fluid phases in the oil zone. The operator of the oil field may also ...
... is a central process in the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Tissue formation during embryonic development, wound healing and immune responses all require the orchestrated movement of cells in particular directions to specific locations. Cells often migrate in response to specific external signals, including chemical signals and mechanical signals. Errors during this process have serious consequences, including intellectual disability, vascular disease, tumor formation and metastasis. An understanding of the mechanism by which cells migrate may lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for controlling, for example, invasive tumour cells. Due to the highly viscous environment (low Reynolds number), cells need to permanently produce forces in order to move. Cells achieve active movement by very different mechanisms. Many less complex prokaryotic organisms (and sperm cells) use flagella or cilia to propel themselves. Eukaryotic cell ...
... (født 13. juni 1831, død 5. november 1879) var en skotsk fysiker og matematiker, best kjent for å ha regnet ut farten til elektromagnetiske bølger, og bevist at det var den samme hastigheten som lyset har.[1] Han viste at når partikler med elektrisk ladning endrer fart, som for eksempel når elektroner blir bremset opp, sendes det ut en form for elektromagnetiske bølger, som beveget seg med akkurat samme hastighet som synlig lys har. Slik påviste han at lys i realiteten er elektromagnetiske bølger. Maxwell satte sine ideer inn i matematisk form, og viste at elektriske felt bare kunne eksistere sammen med varierende magnetfelt, og magnetiske felt sammen med tilsvarende elektriske felt. Mesteparten av Maxwells kjente arbeid ble gjort på Cambridge, hvor han benyttet sine matematikkunnskaper innen geometri og algebra. Ved hjelp av dette kunne han demonstrere at elektriske og magnetiske soner forflyttet seg i bølger gjennom lufta. Dette offentliggjorde han i fire ...
... is a data processing technology for enhancing the resolution of reflection seismology images. Q is the anelastic attenuation factor or the seismic quality factor, a measure of the energy loss as the seismic wave moves. Seismic inverse Q-filtering employs a wave propagation reversal procedure that compensates for energy absorption and corrects wavelet distortion due to velocity dispersion. By compensating for amplitude attenuation with a model of the visco-elastic attenuation model type, seismic data can provide true relative-amplitude information for amplitude inversion and subsequent reservoir characterization. By correcting the phase distortion due to velocity dispersion, seismic data with enhanced vertical resolution can yield correct timings for lithological identification. However, Wang's outline of the subject is excellent and to follow his path, inverse Q filtering can be introduced based on the 1-D one-way propagation wave equation. He introduce this ...
Thus, NET formation must be tightly regulated in order to avoid NET-mediated tissue damage. Recent development of therapies ... causing lung injury. Moreover, NETs and its associated molecules are able to directly induce epithelial and endothelial cell ... causing lung injury. Moreover, NETs and its associated molecules are able to directly induce epithelial and endothelial cell ... The detrimental effect of excessive NET release is particularly important to lung diseases, because NETs can expand more easily ...
... in lung fluids. The researchers speculated that as particulates lodge in lung tissues they induce an increase in the production ... 7 Ways to Make Your Post-Workout High Last Longer , Fitness. May 28, 2015 at 2:15 am. […] sustained high, Bellace suggests ... which could presumably increase blood viscosity, leading to decreased tissue blood flow. They also measured a 400 percent jump ... higher levels of negative ions perform better on tests than those who arent. That is because negative ions promote oxygen flow ...
This result may explain the higher resistance rates commonly found in P. aeruginosa isolates from CF lungs compared with non-CF ... These systems of defense are poorly effective under conditions of increased viscosity and osmolarity, resulting in chronic lung ... heterogeneity of the deteriorating lung tissue, and frequently changing and prolonged (over a period of years) antibiotic ... High Frequency of Hypermutable Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis Lung Infection. By Antonio Oliver, Rafael Cantón, ...
Loss of lung tissue after lung surgery or certain chest-wall disturbances can produce cor pulmonale, as can neuromuscular ... High blood pressure in the blood vessels of the lungs (pulmonary hypertension) causes the enlargement of the right ventricle. ... In this sample, 28-day mortality rates were higher among patients with cor pulmonale (60%) than patients without (30%) (p , ... A contributing factor is chronic hypoxia, which stimulates erythropoiesis, thus increasing blood viscosity. Cigarette smoking ...
Stiffer tissues produce higher particle impaction rates under microgravity conditions while tissue viscosity has negligible ... The computational model simulates negative pressure breathing conditions in which applied tissue forces deform the lung ... Abstract: Many dams worldwide have been in service over 50 years and are located in high seismicity areas. The initial seismic ... Keywords: Brownian diffusion - Deep-lung deformation - Alveolar mechanics - Tissue mechanics - Biofluid mechanics - ...
Secondary polycythemia is caused by long-term exposure to low oxygen levels (for example, at high altitudes). Symptoms include ... recommended for some patients with primary polycythemia and higher risk of blood clot formation due to high blood viscosity. ... Other parts of the history may focus on a prior diagnosis of lung disease, heart disease, kidney or liver cancer, bleeding or ... In these conditions, oxygen is held on tightly by hemoglobin and is less readily released from hemoglobin to the tissues. The ...
The high level of EPO is compensatory to elevate hemoglobin levels to deliver an optimal amount of oxygen to the tissues. ... Excessive polycythemia, usually defined as hematocrit levels higher than 65-70%, may result in increased whole blood viscosity ... However, if the polycythemia is secondary to hypoxia, as in venous-to-arterial shunts or compromised lung and oxygenation, ... Increased red blood cell mass increases blood viscosity and decreases tissue perfusion. With impaired circulation to the ...
... can cause additional lung damage or injury to lung tissue and worsen any chronic condition, including lung cancers (lung tumor ... because of their much higher elevation (compared to the then prevailing sea level) exposed to much higher levels of erosion.. ... High blood pH (above 7.45) is called alkalosis. Severe alkalosis (when blood pH is more than 8) can also lead to death, as it ... CO2 also influences viscosity of blood…... Dr. K. P. Buteyko and his colleagues also found that CO2 controls and regulates ...
Hi, We read your newsflashes every day! We were wondering what the boiling point of water is at Base Camp and at the higher ... lungs and muscles. With increasing red blood cells ("hematocrit"), blood viscosity can increase to the point where profusion ( ... but rather how efficiently oxygen can be delivered to the necessary tissues including the brain, heart, ... These drugs include: Nifedipine for High Altitude Pulmonary Edema (HAPE), Decadron for High Altitude Cerebral Edema (HACE) and ...
High consumption of engine oil is almost always a symptom or consequence of another condition of even greater importance. This ... The optimum reference viscosity (not too low or high) is always desired. This "optimum" is pushed and pulled by numerous engine ... As a health hazard, NOx can potentially cause irritation and damage to lung tissue as well as paralysis. ... This leads not only to greater exhaust particulates but also to a higher percentage that are hydrocarbon, which is a byproduct ...
In general, emesis induction is unnecessary with high viscosity, low volatility products, i.e. most oils and greases. • High ... The clothing worn by process operators insulated from earth may develop static charges far higher (up to 100 times) than the ... NOTE: Injuries may not seem serious at first, but within a few hours tissue may become swollen, discoloured and extremely ... The lungs excrete inhaled solvents, so that. continued.... Rocol Copper Anti-Seize Spray Chemwatch Material Safety Data Sheet ...
Because such blood cells carry oxygen from the lungs to the muscles, a higher concentration in the blood can improve an ... and viscosity; their high content of electron-dense fluorine atoms results in little intramolecular interaction and low surface ... capacity to serve as a blood substitute is determined principally by the pO2 gradients in the lung and at the target tissue. ... Stored RBCs are then reinfused, usually 1 to 7 days before a high-endurance event. As a significant amount of iron is removed ...
This process of backscattering gives the liquid with these bubbles a high signal, which can be seen in the resulting image. ... Non-ionic dimers are favored for their low osmolarity and toxicity, but have a correspondingly higher price attached to their ... These microbubbles are composed of agitated saline solution, most of which are too large to pass through the lung capillaries. ... Contrast agents, enhance the radiodensity in a target tissue or structure. Contrast agents are commonly used to improve the ...
25 ] The contribution of changes in tissue viscosity to changes in Rrscannot be separated from the changes in airway resistance ... We studied a patient population with a high incidence of lung disease primarily because of smoking. Only 18 of the 66 ... it is possible that the responses to the volatile agents could be different in higher risk patients or in patients who develop ... and tissue viscosity. In this study, chest wall resistance should have been constant and the changes in Rrsrepresentative of ...
Effects were restricted to the bronchial and peribronchial regions with parenchymal lung of ovalbumin sensitised and challenged ... decline in lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness. The composition of, and mechanisms leading to, this increase in ... Due to the increased viscosity of this mixture, compared with paraformaldehyde, a higher pressure was required to attain the ... Lung tissue preparation for proteoglycan staining of frozen sections. Insufflation of the bronchial tree was performed using ...
Sickle cell crises may result due to the increased viscosity of the blood and the formation of blockages in the blood vessels. ... Initial symptoms of sickle cell disease tend to present in young children approximately six months to one year old, as the high ... When the rigid cells group together, they can disrupt the flow of oxygen and restrict the supply to tissues that require ... Researchers find link between negative emotions and higher opioid use in people with sickle cell disease ...
It has a high viscosity and osmotic tension and clots on exposure to air and to damaged tissue. It has an essential role in the ... blood which has passed through the capillaries of various tissues, except the lungs, and is found in the veins, the right ... postcapillary blood amount and higher blood flow in both tissue depths.. Microcirculation under an Elastic bandage during rest ... That which has passed through the capillaries of various tissues, except the lungs, and found in the veins, the right chambers ...
The progressive collapse of dependent lung tissue is retarded by "sighing" - the imposition of a supra-normal lung inflations ... A high σe does not necessarily reveal a bad automated positioning but a different one from the manual marking. Standard ... viscosity and a left-shift in the oxyhaemoglobin dissociation. and pulmonary hypertension, and ultimately ventricular failure. ... 2008). The S wave is usually two or three times higher than the ... blood, plasma and tissues. A key strength of PBPK models is. ...
Other functions include a lessening of scar tissue and a reduction in the viscosity of mucous in lungs and nasal passages. ... It is especially effective at digesting high fiber foods, which have a very high content of xylans, a complex polysaccharide ... Some ethnicities have much higher levels of lactose intolerance. Lactase is designed to hydrolyze (break down) milk sugar, ... Rice and potatoes contain the highest levels of starch. *Glucoamylase (FCC 20 AGU/g). Glucoamylase breaks down starch and is ...
Compounds with low viscosity, low surface tension, and high volatility have a higher risk of aspiration and subsequent ... aspiration of hydrocarbons can lead to direct injury of lung tissue.2-5 The viscosity, surface tension, and volatility of ... Viscosity is the measurement of a liquids resistance to flow. Volatility describes the tendency of a liquid to become a gas. ... Viscosity, surface tension, and volatility are three important physical properties used to assess the toxicity of liquid ...
33 but it is also present in all tissues and fluids of the body, such as skeletal tissues,27 heart valves,34 the lung,35-39 the ... but it may form aggregates with proteoglycans.21 HA encompasses a large volume of water giving solutions high viscosity, even ... As mentioned above, skin HA accounts for most of 50% of total body HA.30 The HA content of the dermis is significantly higher ... HA of high molecular size, usually in excess of 1,000 kDa, is present in intact tissues and is antiangiogenic and ...
This negative feedback mechanism ensures that RBC production is high enough to prevent anemia and maintain tissue oxygen supply ... lung, testis and brain. EPO production increases in response to tissue hypoxia, low arterial oxygen concentration and increased ... at adequate levels, but not so high as to lead to polycythemia, elevated blood viscosity and cardiovascular risks. ... 100-fold higher than those needed to stimulate EPO-dependent hematopoietic cells.25 In this respect, non-hematopoietic and ...
Results Pleural fluid viscosity was higher in patients with EPE with a highly significant difference (P , 0.01), and a cutoff ... first aim was to detect the prevalence of COPD among high-risk Egyptians Global using Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung ... and five patients had connective tissue disease (CTD)-associated effusion. Pleural fluid protein, albumin, lactic dehydrogenase ... pulmonary function testing was performed including measurement of lung volumes and lung flows using spirometry. Lung diffusion ...
... and decrease the viscosity of mucus in the lungs. Patients should begin to take quercetin upon the first signs of allergen ... of the absorbed quercetin was localized in the lung tissue, an added benefit to combat allergy and associated asthma (17). ... As one can notice from figure 2, fungal spores are high at all times except during times of snow cover (typically late Nov ... Trees with little or no visible flowers have a higher pollen count since they rely on the wind rather than insects for ...
Perhaps perfusion can also be used to circulate a high viscosity resin. Would this be sufficient for long term preservation? It ... Even tissue that is not protected from ice formation as a consequence of perfusion impairment will still be fixed through low ... Perfusion dehydration fixes elastin and preserves lung air-space dimensions. Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol 58, Issue 1 105 ... if the nine cryonics patients that were destroyed in the 1970s in Chatsworth had been chemically fixed there would be a higher ...
  • Cor pulmonale is an increase in bulk of the right ventricle of the heart, generally caused by chronic diseases or malfunction of the lungs. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Loss of lung tissue after lung surgery or certain chest-wall disturbances can produce cor pulmonale, as can neuromuscular diseases, such as muscular dystrophy . (thefreedictionary.com)
  • With this backdrop, we have chosen to explore what is known about the potential role of the microbiota (both gut and lung) and host interaction in regulating the pathogenesis of several important lung diseases. (jimmunol.org)
  • In our previous study in cell culture, we showed targeting specificity of a 180 nm, 4-layer DNA-built nanocarrier called 3DNA coupled with antibodies against intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), a glycoprotein overexpressed in the lungs in many diseases. (ibecbarcelona.eu)
  • The study of bacteria in small animal models is of high importance to a range of medical research fields, including infectious diseases, gut health and gene therapy. (plos.org)
  • Individuals who have conditions that affect the amount of oxygen they breathe in, such as lung diseases, may produce more EPO to try to compensate for the low oxygen level. (labcorp.com)
  • We also suspect that some neurodegenerative diseases may be caused by a local increase in viscosity in cells," says the author. (pap.pl)
  • Respiratory diseases are characterized by increased production of more dense mucus modified in viscosity and elasticity. (miracleii-4u.com)
  • But when conditions trigger the overproduction of NO as seen in the Netherlands study, the result is serious damage to the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels of the lungs. (nutritionreview.org)
  • This decrease in barometric pressure is the basic cause of all the hypoxia problems in high-altitude physiology because, as the baro-metric pressure decreases, the atmospheric oxygen partial pressure decreases proportionately, remaining at all times slightly less than 21 per cent of the total barometric pressure-P O 2 at sea level about 159 mm Hg, but at 50,000 feet only 18 mm Hg. (brainkart.com)
  • Renal and hepatic dysfunction can occur with long-standing decreases in tissue oxygen delivery, polycythemia, and high venous pressures. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • The researchers speculated that as particulates lodge in lung tissues they induce an increase in the production of nitric oxide (NO). Under normal conditions nitric oxide is an important neurotransmitter that aids numerous signaling pathways involved in motor learning, protein modification, arterial dilation and immune defense. (nutritionreview.org)
  • Up to an altitude of about 10,000 feet, even when air is breathed, the arterial oxygen saturation remains at least as high as 90 per cent. (brainkart.com)
  • Above 10,000 feet, the arterial oxygen saturation falls rapidly, as shown by the blue curve of the figure, until it is slightly less than 70 per cent at 20,000 feet and much less at still higher altitudes. (brainkart.com)
  • The coupling of solid tissue and fluid models requires subdivision of the arterial circulation into large and small arteries. (springer.com)
  • To investigate the effectiveness of the proposed model, temperature field evolutions are monitored at different points of the arterial tree and in the surrounding tissue layers. (springer.com)
  • However, treatment with phlebotomy is indicated for patients with hematocrits higher than 60%-65%, who may experience symptoms such as impaired alertness, dizziness, headaches, and compromised exercise tolerance, and who may face increased risk for thrombosis, strokes, myocardial infarction, and deep venous thrombosis. (medscape.com)
  • Initial symptoms of sickle cell disease tend to present in young children approximately six months to one year old, as the high concentration of foetal haemoglobin plays a protective role before this time. (news-medical.net)
  • 1) Patients with CF show symptoms in the lungs and upper airways but also in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and reproductive system. (hospitalpharmacyeurope.com)
  • High blood pressure fluctuations can also be one of the first symptoms of ischemic heart disease. (escardio.org)
  • In patients of gastroenteritis virus positive, 44.51% (211/474) had vomiting symptoms, higher than that of patients of gastroenteritis virus negative (34.13%, 315/923). (bvsalud.org)
  • All the symptoms of aging are in one way or another accompanied by a slow dehydration of our vital tissues associated with free-radical oxidative damage (22). (whale.to)
  • The researchers noted that these findings indicate that chronic exposure to diesel exhaust induces continuous inflammation and overproduction of mucus and phospholipids in the lung. (nutritionreview.org)
  • Japanese researchers evaluated the effects of serratiopeptidase (30 mg/day orally for four weeks) on the elasticity and viscosity of the nasal mucus in adult patients with chronic sinusitis. (miracleii-4u.com)
  • Serratiopeptidase reduced the viscosity of the mucus, improving the elimination of bronchopulmonary secretions. (miracleii-4u.com)
  • They also measured a 400 percent jump in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and a 350 percent increase in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in lung fluids. (nutritionreview.org)
  • Tumor cells are particularly prone to hypoxia due to their high density and poor vascularization limiting their oxygen supply. (termedia.pl)
  • In recent years, various nanosystems have been explored to specifically target tumor tissues, enhancing the efficacy of cancer treatment and minimizing the side effects. (ibecbarcelona.eu)
  • One possible explanation for the increase in cardiovascular-related deaths is that air pollution causes oxidative stress that, in turn, triggers an inflammatory response in the lungs that leads to the release of chemicals that impair heart function and blood pressure. (nutritionreview.org)
  • In this study we investigated the effect of activated clotting time level on the aortic cross-clamping triggers a systemic inflammatory response and it effects to lungs and heart. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Clinical studies show that serrapeptase induces fibrinolytic, anti-inflammatory and anti-edemic (prevents swelling and fluid retention) activity in a number of tissues, and that its anti-inflammatory effects are superior to other proteolytic enzymes. (miracleii-4u.com)
  • 5 These antiviral properties of glutathione are thought to help prevent increased viral loads and the subsequent massive release of inflammatory cells into the lungs seen with certain viral illnesses. (iherb.com)
  • Nitric oxide has been found to act as an anti-inflammatory, hormonal, antiseptic, and repair agent for the entire respiratory tract, bloodstream, digestion, and delicate lung tissues. (lifespa.com)
  • Although there are no case reports, if ingested, isophorone can probably be aspirated into the lungs, based on the physical properties (viscosity and surface tension) and the fact that some ketones have been shown to be readily aspirated. (intox.org)
  • Theory 2: Hypoxic events in body regions may increase the high metabolic activity of dividing blast cells and lead to an increase in cytokine production. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recent studies have established MSC exosomes (EXO), as one of the main therapeutic vectors of MSCs in mouse models of multifactorial chronic lung disease of preterm infants, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). (springer.com)
  • Following exposure, the researchers found that plasma levels of fibrinogen were elevated by 20 percent, which could presumably increase blood viscosity, leading to decreased tissue blood flow. (nutritionreview.org)
  • 13 ] Tracheal intubation can therefore serve as a stimulus to increase lung resistance and permit comparison of the bronchodilating ability of various anesthetics. (asahq.org)
  • This formulation had prolonged stability in serum and showed a dramatic increase in lung distribution: the specificity index was 424-fold above a matching IgG formulation, 144-fold more specific than observed for PLGA nanoparticles of similar size, polydispersity, ζ-potential and antibody valency, and its lung accumulation increased with the number of anti-ICAM molecules per particle. (ibecbarcelona.eu)
  • This can lead to an increase in the blood's thickness (viscosity) and sometimes to high blood pressure (hypertension), blood clots (thrombosis), heart attack, or stroke. (labcorp.com)
  • On the other hand, there might be a lesson to learn from the steady increase in reports of drug-induced lung disease in general. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Phys Rev Lett 2015) it was shown that only a 6-fold increase in viscosity (this really isn't much) is sufficient to stop the entire active transport in a cell," explains Dr Kwapiszewska. (pap.pl)
  • Since an increase in viscosity inhibits life processes in the cell then perhaps this can be used, for example, to create therapeutics against cancer cells. (pap.pl)
  • A statistically-significant increase in cumulative food consumption was recorded in male rats from the high-dose group throughout the study (weeks 1, 4, 8 and 12) and female rats of the high-dose group at weeks 4, 8 and 10. (inchem.org)
  • The most important feature of acclimatization to high altitude is an increase in the rate and depth of breathing . (encyclopedia.com)
  • In the human body, hyaluronic acid is found in the greatest concentrations in the skin, inside joints, within the eye sockets and in other tissues where it helps retain collagen , increase moisture, and provide elasticity and flexibility. (bewellhub.com)
  • The plasma membrane of erythrocytes show a cholesterol proportion above 30 %, higher than in an average cell, that makes plasma membrane less fluid, more stiff and more hydrophobe (less permeable). (uvigo.es)
  • No matter how much tap water we drink, we cannot seem to slow down the inevitable starvation of vital tissues for the fluid that is everywhere. (whale.to)
  • IMPLICATIONS: Awake patients with coronary artery disease underwent high thoracic epidural anesthesia. (lww.com)
  • The results show that the convection significantly influences the temperature distribution of the solid tissues in the vicinity of the arteries. (springer.com)
  • And all of these benefits stem from one simple ability: proteolytic enzymes facilitate the breakdown of rogue proteins in your bloodstream and in the soft tissues of your body. (jonbarron.org)
  • Once in the bloodstream, they help optimize your blood, plus they make their way to all of the tissues throughout your body, where they assist with intelligent, adaptive healing. (jonbarron.org)
  • Nasal breathing is engineered to drive NO into the blood-rich lower lobes of the lungs and then to the bloodstream for every cell of the body. (lifespa.com)
  • Chronic lung disease alters these factors. (jimmunol.org)
  • Many forms of chronic lung disease demonstrate exacerbations that drive disease progression and are poorly understood. (jimmunol.org)
  • Thus, the key to understanding the pathogenesis of chronic lung disease may reside in deciphering the complex interactions between the host, pathogen, and resident microbiota during stable disease and exacerbations. (jimmunol.org)
  • Asbestosis - Chronic lung disease caused by inhaling airborne asbestos fibers. (lsu.edu)
  • These complex communities of microbiota that inhabit environments such as the lung, skin, or gut are now appreciated for their role in maintaining organ, tissue, and immune homeostasis. (jimmunol.org)
  • The lung is an organ constantly exposed to microbiota either through inhalation or subclinical microaspiration from birth. (jimmunol.org)
  • They discovered that people living near major roads (and therefore exposed to higher levels of traffic-related air pollution) were more likely to die from cardiopulmonary disease or lung cancer than their rural peers, leading the authors to conclude that 'long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution may shorten life expectancy. (nutritionreview.org)
  • In the case of carbon dioxide, during exposure to very high altitudes, the alveolar P CO 2 falls from the sea-level value of 40 mm Hg to lower values. (brainkart.com)
  • Isophorone is not very volatile and exposure to high vapour concentrations would not likely occur unless isophorone is misted or heated. (intox.org)
  • The main mechanisms of lung defense against bacterial colonization are mucociliary clearance, polymorphonuclear neutrophil phagocytosis, and local production of antibacterial cationic peptides. (sciencemag.org)
  • Some tissues have developed adaptation mechanisms ensuring their function in reduced oxygen supply conditions, while other tissues, such as myocardium or brain cortex, are particularly sensitive to oxygen deficiencies. (termedia.pl)
  • This is the story of a discovery that may help to slow the dehydration and subsequent tissue damage that accompanies the aging process. (whale.to)
  • The world's leading enzyme manufacturers were shocked at the cost of the comprehensive formula but, unlike other manufacturers whose only concern is low costs and high margins, our number one priority is quality. (globalhealingcenter.com)
  • The Beta glucanase enzyme hydrolyzes these glucans, reducing viscosity and balancing natural peristalsis. (chemicalfreebody.com)
  • High efficiency of enzyme immobilization was achieved with undetectable leakage. (jove.com)
  • The composition of the lung microbiome is determined by elimination, immigration, and relative growth within its communities. (jimmunol.org)
  • The relationship between resident microbiota and this flagship innate response and the subsequent adaptive immune response in the lung is poorly understood. (jimmunol.org)
  • The microbiome of the lung has relatively less bacterial biomass when compared with the lower gastrointestinal tract yet displays considerable diversity. (jimmunol.org)
  • Bacterial lux signal was detected specifically in tumours of mice post IV-administration and bioluminescence correlated with the numbers of bacteria recovered from tissue. (plos.org)