Thromboplastin: Constituent composed of protein and phospholipid that is widely distributed in many tissues. It serves as a cofactor with factor VIIa to activate factor X in the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation.Factor VIIa: Activated form of factor VII. Factor VIIa activates factor X in the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation.Blood Coagulation: The process of the interaction of BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS that results in an insoluble FIBRIN clot.Factor VII: Heat- and storage-stable plasma protein that is activated by tissue thromboplastin to form factor VIIa in the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. The activated form then catalyzes the activation of factor X to factor Xa.Factor Xa: Activated form of factor X that participates in both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of blood coagulation. It catalyzes the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin in conjunction with other cofactors.Lipoproteins: Lipid-protein complexes involved in the transportation and metabolism of lipids in the body. They are spherical particles consisting of a hydrophobic core of TRIGLYCERIDES and CHOLESTEROL ESTERS surrounded by a layer of hydrophilic free CHOLESTEROL; PHOSPHOLIPIDS; and APOLIPOPROTEINS. Lipoproteins are classified by their varying buoyant density and sizes.Factor X: Storage-stable glycoprotein blood coagulation factor that can be activated to factor Xa by both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. A deficiency of factor X, sometimes called Stuart-Prower factor deficiency, may lead to a systemic coagulation disorder.Coagulants: Agents that cause clotting.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Blood Coagulation Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, that are involved in the blood coagulation process.Thrombin: An enzyme formed from PROTHROMBIN that converts FIBRINOGEN to FIBRIN.Hemostasis: The process which spontaneously arrests the flow of BLOOD from vessels carrying blood under pressure. It is accomplished by contraction of the vessels, adhesion and aggregation of formed blood elements (eg. ERYTHROCYTE AGGREGATION), and the process of BLOOD COAGULATION.Fibrin: A protein derived from FIBRINOGEN in the presence of THROMBIN, which forms part of the blood clot.Monocytes: Large, phagocytic mononuclear leukocytes produced in the vertebrate BONE MARROW and released into the BLOOD; contain a large, oval or somewhat indented nucleus surrounded by voluminous cytoplasm and numerous organelles.Cell-Derived Microparticles: Extracellular vesicles generated by the shedding of CELL MEMBRANE blebs.Endothelium, Vascular: Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.Thrombomodulin: A cell surface glycoprotein of endothelial cells that binds thrombin and serves as a cofactor in the activation of protein C and its regulation of blood coagulation.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Prothrombin: A plasma protein that is the inactive precursor of thrombin. It is converted to thrombin by a prothrombin activator complex consisting of factor Xa, factor V, phospholipid, and calcium ions. Deficiency of prothrombin leads to hypoprothrombinemia.Receptor, PAR-2: A G-protein-coupled, proteinase-activated receptor that is expressed in a variety of tissues including ENDOTHELIUM; LEUKOCYTES; and the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT. The receptor is activated by TRYPSIN, which cleaves off the N-terminal peptide from the receptor. The new N-terminal peptide is a cryptic ligand for the receptor. The uncleaved receptor can also be activated by the N-terminal peptide present on the activated THROMBIN RECEPTOR and by small synthetic peptides that contain the unmasked N-terminal sequence.Blood Coagulation Tests: Laboratory tests for evaluating the individual's clotting mechanism.Antithrombin III: A plasma alpha 2 glycoprotein that accounts for the major antithrombin activity of normal plasma and also inhibits several other enzymes. It is a member of the serpin superfamily.Umbilical Veins: Venous vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry oxygenated, nutrient-rich blood from the mother to the FETUS via the PLACENTA. In humans, there is normally one umbilical vein.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Anticoagulants: Agents that prevent clotting.Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation: A disorder characterized by procoagulant substances entering the general circulation causing a systemic thrombotic process. The activation of the clotting mechanism may arise from any of a number of disorders. A majority of the patients manifest skin lesions, sometimes leading to PURPURA FULMINANS.Factor IX: Storage-stable blood coagulation factor acting in the intrinsic pathway. Its activated form, IXa, forms a complex with factor VIII and calcium on platelet factor 3 to activate factor X to Xa. Deficiency of factor IX results in HEMOPHILIA B (Christmas Disease).Lipopolysaccharides: Lipid-containing polysaccharides which are endotoxins and important group-specific antigens. They are often derived from the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria and induce immunoglobulin secretion. The lipopolysaccharide molecule consists of three parts: LIPID A, core polysaccharide, and O-specific chains (O ANTIGENS). When derived from Escherichia coli, lipopolysaccharides serve as polyclonal B-cell mitogens commonly used in laboratory immunology. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Blood Platelets: Non-nucleated disk-shaped cells formed in the megakaryocyte and found in the blood of all mammals. They are mainly involved in blood coagulation.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Early Growth Response Protein 1: An early growth response transcription factor that has been implicated in regulation of CELL PROLIFERATION and APOPTOSIS.Serine Proteinase Inhibitors: Exogenous or endogenous compounds which inhibit SERINE ENDOPEPTIDASES.Factor VII Deficiency: An autosomal recessive characteristic or a coagulation disorder acquired in association with VITAMIN K DEFICIENCY. FACTOR VII is a Vitamin K dependent glycoprotein essential to the extrinsic pathway of coagulation.Hemostatics: Agents acting to arrest the flow of blood. Absorbable hemostatics arrest bleeding either by the formation of an artificial clot or by providing a mechanical matrix that facilitates clotting when applied directly to the bleeding surface. These agents function more at the capillary level and are not effective at stemming arterial or venous bleeding under any significant intravascular pressure.Receptor, PAR-1: A thrombin receptor subtype that couples to HETEROTRIMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS resulting in the activation of a variety of signaling mechanisms including decreased intracellular CYCLIC AMP, increased TYPE C PHOSPHOLIPASES and increased PHOSPHOLIPASE A2.Heparin: A highly acidic mucopolysaccharide formed of equal parts of sulfated D-glucosamine and D-glucuronic acid with sulfaminic bridges. The molecular weight ranges from six to twenty thousand. Heparin occurs in and is obtained from liver, lung, mast cells, etc., of vertebrates. Its function is unknown, but it is used to prevent blood clotting in vivo and vitro, in the form of many different salts.Protein C: A vitamin-K dependent zymogen present in the blood, which, upon activation by thrombin and thrombomodulin exerts anticoagulant properties by inactivating factors Va and VIIIa at the rate-limiting steps of thrombin formation.Factor XIa: Activated form of factor XI. In the intrinsic pathway, Factor XI is activated to XIa by factor XIIa in the presence of cofactor HMWK; (HIGH MOLECULAR WEIGHT KININOGEN). Factor XIa then activates factor IX to factor IXa in the presence of calcium.Blood Coagulation Disorders: Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of abnormalities in blood coagulation due to a variety of factors such as COAGULATION PROTEIN DISORDERS; BLOOD PLATELET DISORDERS; BLOOD PROTEIN DISORDERS or nutritional conditions.Carotid Artery Thrombosis: Blood clot formation in any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES. This may produce CAROTID STENOSIS or occlusion of the vessel, leading to TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBRAL INFARCTION; or AMAUROSIS FUGAX.Endothelial Cells: Highly specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that line the HEART; BLOOD VESSELS; and lymph vessels, forming the ENDOTHELIUM. They are polygonal in shape and joined together by TIGHT JUNCTIONS. The tight junctions allow for variable permeability to specific macromolecules that are transported across the endothelial layer.Fibrinolysis: The natural enzymatic dissolution of FIBRIN.Hirudins: Single-chain polypeptides of about 65 amino acids (7 kDa) from LEECHES that have a neutral hydrophobic N terminus, an acidic hydrophilic C terminus, and a compact, hydrophobic core region. Recombinant hirudins lack tyr-63 sulfation and are referred to as 'desulfato-hirudins'. They form a stable non-covalent complex with ALPHA-THROMBIN, thereby abolishing its ability to cleave FIBRINOGEN.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Hemophilia A: The classic hemophilia resulting from a deficiency of factor VIII. It is an inherited disorder of blood coagulation characterized by a permanent tendency to hemorrhage.Thrombophilia: A disorder of HEMOSTASIS in which there is a tendency for the occurrence of THROMBOSIS.Hemorrhagic Disorders: Spontaneous or near spontaneous bleeding caused by a defect in clotting mechanisms (BLOOD COAGULATION DISORDERS) or another abnormality causing a structural flaw in the blood vessels (HEMOSTATIC DISORDERS).Platelet Activation: A series of progressive, overlapping events, triggered by exposure of the PLATELETS to subendothelial tissue. These events include shape change, adhesiveness, aggregation, and release reactions. When carried through to completion, these events lead to the formation of a stable hemostatic plug.Fibrinopeptide A: Two small peptide chains removed from the N-terminal segment of the alpha chains of fibrinogen by the action of thrombin during the blood coagulation process. Each peptide chain contains 18 amino acid residues. In vivo, fibrinopeptide A is used as a marker to determine the rate of conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin by thrombin.Factor IXa: Activated form of factor IX. This activation can take place via the intrinsic pathway by the action of factor XIa and calcium, or via the extrinsic pathway by the action of factor VIIa, thromboplastin, and calcium. Factor IXa serves to activate factor X to Xa by cleaving the arginyl-leucine peptide bond in factor X.Factor V: Heat- and storage-labile plasma glycoprotein which accelerates the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin in blood coagulation. Factor V accomplishes this by forming a complex with factor Xa, phospholipid, and calcium (prothrombinase complex). Deficiency of factor V leads to Owren's disease.Tin Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain tin as an integral part of the molecule.Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products: Soluble protein fragments formed by the proteolytic action of plasmin on fibrin or fibrinogen. FDP and their complexes profoundly impair the hemostatic process and are a major cause of hemorrhage in intravascular coagulation and fibrinolysis.Prothrombin Time: Clotting time of PLASMA recalcified in the presence of excess TISSUE THROMBOPLASTIN. Factors measured are FIBRINOGEN; PROTHROMBIN; FACTOR V; FACTOR VII; and FACTOR X. It is used for monitoring anticoagulant therapy with COUMARINS.Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha: Serum glycoprotein produced by activated MACROPHAGES and other mammalian MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. It has necrotizing activity against tumor cell lines and increases ability to reject tumor transplants. Also known as TNF-alpha, it is only 30% homologous to TNF-beta (LYMPHOTOXIN), but they share TNF RECEPTORS.Partial Thromboplastin Time: The time required for the appearance of FIBRIN strands following the mixing of PLASMA with phospholipid platelet substitute (e.g., crude cephalins, soybean phosphatides). It is a test of the intrinsic pathway (factors VIII, IX, XI, and XII) and the common pathway (fibrinogen, prothrombin, factors V and X) of BLOOD COAGULATION. It is used as a screening test and to monitor HEPARIN therapy.Antithrombins: Endogenous factors and drugs that directly inhibit the action of THROMBIN, usually by blocking its enzymatic activity. They are distinguished from INDIRECT THROMBIN INHIBITORS, such as HEPARIN, which act by enhancing the inhibitory effects of antithrombins.Receptors, Thrombin: A family of proteinase-activated receptors that are specific for THROMBIN. They are found primarily on PLATELETS and on ENDOTHELIAL CELLS. Activation of thrombin receptors occurs through the proteolytic action of THROMBIN, which cleaves the N-terminal peptide from the receptor to reveal a new N-terminal peptide that is a cryptic ligand for the receptor. The receptors signal through HETEROTRIMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS. Small synthetic peptides that contain the unmasked N-terminal peptide sequence can also activate the receptor in the absence of proteolytic activity.Factor VIII: Blood-coagulation factor VIII. Antihemophilic factor that is part of the factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex. Factor VIII is produced in the liver and acts in the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. It serves as a cofactor in factor X activation and this action is markedly enhanced by small amounts of thrombin.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Phosphatidylserines: Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to a serine moiety. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid and serine and 2 moles of fatty acids.Thrombelastography: Use of a thrombelastograph, which provides a continuous graphic record of the physical shape of a clot during fibrin formation and subsequent lysis.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.P-Selectin: Cell adhesion molecule and CD antigen that mediates the adhesion of neutrophils and monocytes to activated platelets and endothelial cells.Receptors, Proteinase-Activated: A class of receptors that are activated by the action of PROTEINASES. The most notable examples are the THROMBIN RECEPTORS. The receptors contain cryptic ligands that are exposed upon the selective proteolysis of specific N-terminal cleavage sites.Factor XI: Stable blood coagulation factor involved in the intrinsic pathway. The activated form XIa activates factor IX to IXa. Deficiency of factor XI is often called hemophilia C.1-Carboxyglutamic Acid: Found in various tissues, particularly in four blood-clotting proteins including prothrombin, in kidney protein, in bone protein, and in the protein present in various ectopic calcifications.Factor XII Deficiency: An absence or reduced level of blood coagulation factor XII. It normally occurs in the absence of patient or family history of hemorrhagic disorders and is marked by prolonged clotting time.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Endotoxemia: A condition characterized by the presence of ENDOTOXINS in the blood. On lysis, the outer cell wall of gram-negative bacteria enters the systemic circulation and initiates a pathophysiologic cascade of pro-inflammatory mediators.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1: A member of the serpin family of proteins. It inhibits both the tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators.Endotoxins: Toxins closely associated with the living cytoplasm or cell wall of certain microorganisms, which do not readily diffuse into the culture medium, but are released upon lysis of the cells.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.NF-kappa B: Ubiquitous, inducible, nuclear transcriptional activator that binds to enhancer elements in many different cell types and is activated by pathogenic stimuli. The NF-kappa B complex is a heterodimer composed of two DNA-binding subunits: NF-kappa B1 and relA.Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-rel: Cellular DNA-binding proteins encoded by the rel gene (GENES, REL). They are expressed predominately in hematopoietic cells and may play a role in lymphocyte differentiation. Rel frequently combines with other related proteins (NF-KAPPA B, I-kappa B, relA) to form heterodimers that regulate transcription. Rearrangement or overexpression of c-rel can cause tumorigenesis.Glycoproteins: Conjugated protein-carbohydrate compounds including mucins, mucoid, and amyloid glycoproteins.Up-Regulation: A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Fibrinolytic Agents: Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to FIBRINOLYSIN.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Muscle, Smooth, Vascular: The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.Phospholipids: Lipids containing one or more phosphate groups, particularly those derived from either glycerol (phosphoglycerides see GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS) or sphingosine (SPHINGOLIPIDS). They are polar lipids that are of great importance for the structure and function of cell membranes and are the most abundant of membrane lipids, although not stored in large amounts in the system.Liriope Plant: A plant genus of the family LILIACEAE. Members contain ruscogenin. Do not confuse with the Liriope jellyfish (CNIDARIA).Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Antibodies, Antiphospholipid: Autoantibodies directed against phospholipids. These antibodies are characteristically found in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, SYSTEMIC;), ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID SYNDROME; related autoimmune diseases, some non-autoimmune diseases, and also in healthy individuals.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Aorta: The main trunk of the systemic arteries.Antiphospholipid Syndrome: The presence of antibodies directed against phospholipids (ANTIBODIES, ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID). The condition is associated with a variety of diseases, notably systemic lupus erythematosus and other connective tissue diseases, thrombopenia, and arterial or venous thromboses. In pregnancy it can cause abortion. Of the phospholipids, the cardiolipins show markedly elevated levels of anticardiolipin antibodies (ANTIBODIES, ANTICARDIOLIPIN). Present also are high levels of lupus anticoagulant (LUPUS COAGULATION INHIBITOR).Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Factor X Deficiency: Blood coagulation disorder usually inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, though it can be acquired. It is characterized by defective activity in both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways, impaired thromboplastin time, and impaired prothrombin consumption.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Carboxypeptidase U: A metallocarboxypeptidase that removes C-terminal lysine and arginine from biologically active peptides and proteins thereby regulating their activity. It is a zinc enzyme with no preference shown for lysine over arginine. Pro-carboxypeptidase U in human plasma is activated by thrombin or plasmin during clotting to form the unstable carboxypeptidase U.Arteriosclerosis: Thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES of all sizes. There are many forms classified by the types of lesions and arteries involved, such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS with fatty lesions in the ARTERIAL INTIMA of medium and large muscular arteries.Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.Factor XI Deficiency: A hereditary deficiency of blood coagulation factor XI (also known as plasma thromboplastin antecedent or PTA or antihemophilic factor C) resulting in a systemic blood-clotting defect called hemophilia C or Rosenthal's syndrome, that may resemble classical hemophilia.Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight: Heparin fractions with a molecular weight usually between 4000 and 6000 kD. These low-molecular-weight fractions are effective antithrombotic agents. Their administration reduces the risk of hemorrhage, they have a longer half-life, and their platelet interactions are reduced in comparison to unfractionated heparin. They also provide an effective prophylaxis against postoperative major pulmonary embolism.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Hemophilia B: A deficiency of blood coagulation factor IX inherited as an X-linked disorder. (Also known as Christmas Disease, after the first patient studied in detail, not the holy day.) Historical and clinical features resemble those in classic hemophilia (HEMOPHILIA A), but patients present with fewer symptoms. Severity of bleeding is usually similar in members of a single family. Many patients are asymptomatic until the hemostatic system is stressed by surgery or trauma. Treatment is similar to that for hemophilia A. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1008)Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Tissue Extracts: Preparations made from animal tissues or organs (ANIMAL STRUCTURES). They usually contain many components, any one of which may be pharmacologically or physiologically active. Tissue extracts may contain specific, but uncharacterized factors or proteins with specific actions.Venous Thrombosis: The formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) within a vein.Capillary Action: A phenomenon in which the surface of a liquid where it contacts a solid is elevated or depressed, because of the relative attraction of the molecules of the liquid for each other and for those of the solid. (from McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Dilazep: Coronary vasodilator with some antiarrhythmic activity.Macrophages: The relatively long-lived phagocytic cell of mammalian tissues that are derived from blood MONOCYTES. Main types are PERITONEAL MACROPHAGES; ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES; HISTIOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS of the liver; and OSTEOCLASTS. They may further differentiate within chronic inflammatory lesions to EPITHELIOID CELLS or may fuse to form FOREIGN BODY GIANT CELLS or LANGHANS GIANT CELLS. (from The Dictionary of Cell Biology, Lackie and Dow, 3rd ed.)Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Annexin A5: A protein of the annexin family isolated from human PLACENTA and other tissues. It inhibits cytosolic PHOSPHOLIPASE A2, and displays anticoagulant activity.Blood Physiological Phenomena: Physiological processes and properties of the BLOOD.1,2-Dihydroxybenzene-3,5-Disulfonic Acid Disodium Salt: A colorimetric reagent for iron, manganese, titanium, molybdenum, and complexes of zirconium. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Holothurin: A highly toxic saponin occurring in HOLOTHUROIDEA. This marine toxin is an anionic surfactant, hemolyzing ERYTHROCYTES.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Fibrinogen: Plasma glycoprotein clotted by thrombin, composed of a dimer of three non-identical pairs of polypeptide chains (alpha, beta, gamma) held together by disulfide bonds. Fibrinogen clotting is a sol-gel change involving complex molecular arrangements: whereas fibrinogen is cleaved by thrombin to form polypeptides A and B, the proteolytic action of other enzymes yields different fibrinogen degradation products.Protein S: The vitamin K-dependent cofactor of activated PROTEIN C. Together with protein C, it inhibits the action of factors VIIIa and Va. A deficiency in protein S; (PROTEIN S DEFICIENCY); can lead to recurrent venous and arterial thrombosis.Leukocytes: White blood cells. These include granular leukocytes (BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and NEUTROPHILS) as well as non-granular leukocytes (LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES).Interleukin-1: A soluble factor produced by MONOCYTES; MACROPHAGES, and other cells which activates T-lymphocytes and potentiates their response to mitogens or antigens. Interleukin-1 is a general term refers to either of the two distinct proteins, INTERLEUKIN-1ALPHA and INTERLEUKIN-1BETA. The biological effects of IL-1 include the ability to replace macrophage requirements for T-cell activation.Mice, Inbred C57BLBlood Coagulation Factor Inhibitors: Substances, usually endogenous, that act as inhibitors of blood coagulation. They may affect one or multiple enzymes throughout the process. As a group, they also inhibit enzymes involved in processes other than blood coagulation, such as those from the complement system, fibrinolytic enzyme system, blood cells, and bacteria.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Carotid Artery Injuries: Damages to the CAROTID ARTERIES caused either by blunt force or penetrating trauma, such as CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; THORACIC INJURIES; and NECK INJURIES. Damaged carotid arteries can lead to CAROTID ARTERY THROMBOSIS; CAROTID-CAVERNOUS SINUS FISTULA; pseudoaneurysm formation; and INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY DISSECTION. (From Am J Forensic Med Pathol 1997, 18:251; J Trauma 1994, 37:473)Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Hirudin Therapy: Use of HIRUDINS as an anticoagulant in the treatment of cardiological and hematological disorders.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Platelet Aggregation: The attachment of PLATELETS to one another. This clumping together can be induced by a number of agents (e.g., THROMBIN; COLLAGEN) and is part of the mechanism leading to the formation of a THROMBUS.Blood Coagulation Disorders, Inherited: Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of inherited abnormalities in blood coagulation.Hemostatic Disorders: Pathological processes involving the integrity of blood circulation. Hemostasis depends on the integrity of BLOOD VESSELS, blood fluidity, and BLOOD COAGULATION. Majority of the hemostatic disorders are caused by disruption of the normal interaction between the VASCULAR ENDOTHELIUM, the plasma proteins (including BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS), and PLATELETS.beta 2-Glycoprotein I: A 44-kDa highly glycosylated plasma protein that binds phospholipids including CARDIOLIPIN; APOLIPOPROTEIN E RECEPTOR; membrane phospholipids, and other anionic phospholipid-containing moieties. It plays a role in coagulation and apoptotic processes. Formerly known as apolipoprotein H, it is an autoantigen in patients with ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID ANTIBODIES.Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Coronary Thrombosis: Coagulation of blood in any of the CORONARY VESSELS. The presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) often leads to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Enzyme Activation: Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme.Pregnancy Proteins: Proteins produced by organs of the mother or the PLACENTA during PREGNANCY. These proteins may be pregnancy-specific (present only during pregnancy) or pregnancy-associated (present during pregnancy or under other conditions such as hormone therapy or certain malignancies.)E-Selectin: Cell adhesion molecule and CD antigen that mediates neutrophil, monocyte, and memory T-cell adhesion to cytokine-activated endothelial cells. E-selectin recognizes sialylated carbohydrate groups related to the Lewis X or Lewis A family.Chromogenic Compounds: Colorless, endogenous or exogenous pigment precursors that may be transformed by biological mechanisms into colored compounds; used in biochemical assays and in diagnosis as indicators, especially in the form of enzyme substrates. Synonym: chromogens (not to be confused with pigment-synthesizing bacteria also called chromogens).Papio: A genus of the subfamily CERCOPITHECINAE, family CERCOPITHECIDAE, consisting of five named species: PAPIO URSINUS (chacma baboon), PAPIO CYNOCEPHALUS (yellow baboon), PAPIO PAPIO (western baboon), PAPIO ANUBIS (or olive baboon), and PAPIO HAMADRYAS (hamadryas baboon). Members of the Papio genus inhabit open woodland, savannahs, grassland, and rocky hill country. Some authors consider MANDRILLUS a subgenus of Papio.Peptide Fragments: Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.Papio cynocephalus: A species of baboon in the family CERCOPITHECIDAE found in southern equatorial and east Africa. They are smaller than PAPIO ANUBIS and have a thinner mane.Cricetinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1: Cytokine-induced cell adhesion molecule present on activated endothelial cells, tissue macrophages, dendritic cells, bone marrow fibroblasts, myoblasts, and myotubes. It is important for the recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. (From Pigott & Power, The Adhesion Molecule FactsBook, 1993, p154)Placenta: A highly vascularized mammalian fetal-maternal organ and major site of transport of oxygen, nutrients, and fetal waste products. It includes a fetal portion (CHORIONIC VILLI) derived from TROPHOBLASTS and a maternal portion (DECIDUA) derived from the uterine ENDOMETRIUM. The placenta produces an array of steroid, protein and peptide hormones (PLACENTAL HORMONES).Dansyl Compounds: Compounds that contain a 1-dimethylaminonaphthalene-5-sulfonyl group.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Neovascularization, Pathologic: A pathologic process consisting of the proliferation of blood vessels in abnormal tissues or in abnormal positions.Immediate-Early Proteins: Proteins that are coded by immediate-early genes, in the absence of de novo protein synthesis. The term was originally used exclusively for viral regulatory proteins that were synthesized just after viral integration into the host cell. It is also used to describe cellular proteins which are synthesized immediately after the resting cell is stimulated by extracellular signals.Amino Acid Chloromethyl Ketones: Inhibitors of SERINE ENDOPEPTIDASES and sulfhydryl group-containing enzymes. They act as alkylating agents and are known to interfere in the translation process.Digoxigenin: 3 beta,12 beta,14-Trihydroxy-5 beta-card-20(22)-enolide. A cardenolide which is the aglycon of digoxin. Can be obtained by hydrolysis of digoxin or from Digitalis orientalis L. and Digitalis lanata Ehrh.Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A: The original member of the family of endothelial cell growth factors referred to as VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTORS. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A was originally isolated from tumor cells and referred to as "tumor angiogenesis factor" and "vascular permeability factor". Although expressed at high levels in certain tumor-derived cells it is produced by a wide variety of cell types. In addition to stimulating vascular growth and vascular permeability it may play a role in stimulating VASODILATION via NITRIC OXIDE-dependent pathways. Alternative splicing of the mRNA for vascular endothelial growth factor A results in several isoforms of the protein being produced.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Prostaglandins, Synthetic: Compounds obtained by chemical synthesis that are analogs or derivatives of naturally occurring prostaglandins and that have similar activity.Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1: A cell-surface ligand involved in leukocyte adhesion and inflammation. Its production is induced by gamma-interferon and it is required for neutrophil migration into inflamed tissue.Blood Vessels: Any of the tubular vessels conveying the blood (arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules, and veins).Venous Thromboembolism: Obstruction of a vein or VEINS (embolism) by a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the blood stream.Disulfides: Chemical groups containing the covalent disulfide bonds -S-S-. The sulfur atoms can be bound to inorganic or organic moieties.Cetomacrogol: Non-ionic surfactant of the polyethylene glycol family. It is used as a solubilizer and emulsifying agent in foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals, often as an ointment base, and also as a research tool.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Whole Blood Coagulation Time: The time required by whole blood to produce a visible clot.Antigens: Substances that are recognized by the immune system and induce an immune reaction.Plasma: The residual portion of BLOOD that is left after removal of BLOOD CELLS by CENTRIFUGATION without prior BLOOD COAGULATION.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Tunica Intima: The innermost layer of an artery or vein, made up of one layer of endothelial cells and supported by an internal elastic lamina.Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Oxyquinoline: An antiseptic with mild fungistatic, bacteriostatic, anthelmintic, and amebicidal action. It is also used as a reagent and metal chelator, as a carrier for radio-indium for diagnostic purposes, and its halogenated derivatives are used in addition as topical anti-infective agents and oral antiamebics.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Blotting, Northern: Detection of RNA that has been electrophoretically separated and immobilized by blotting on nitrocellulose or other type of paper or nylon membrane followed by hybridization with labeled NUCLEIC ACID PROBES.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.CHO Cells: CELL LINE derived from the ovary of the Chinese hamster, Cricetulus griseus (CRICETULUS). The species is a favorite for cytogenetic studies because of its small chromosome number. The cell line has provided model systems for the study of genetic alterations in cultured mammalian cells.Peptide Hydrolases: Hydrolases that specifically cleave the peptide bonds found in PROTEINS and PEPTIDES. Examples of sub-subclasses for this group include EXOPEPTIDASES and ENDOPEPTIDASES.Endothelium: A layer of epithelium that lines the heart, blood vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, VASCULAR), lymph vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, LYMPHATIC), and the serous cavities of the body.Angina, Unstable: Precordial pain at rest, which may precede a MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Lipoproteins, LDL: A class of lipoproteins of small size (18-25 nm) and light (1.019-1.063 g/ml) particles with a core composed mainly of CHOLESTEROL ESTERS and smaller amounts of TRIGLYCERIDES. The surface monolayer consists mostly of PHOSPHOLIPIDS, a single copy of APOLIPOPROTEIN B-100, and free cholesterol molecules. The main LDL function is to transport cholesterol and cholesterol esters to extrahepatic tissues.Antigens, CD14: Glycolipid-anchored membrane glycoproteins expressed on cells of the myelomonocyte lineage including monocytes, macrophages, and some granulocytes. They function as receptors for the complex of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and LPS-binding protein.Benzamidines: Amidines substituted with a benzene group. Benzamidine and its derivatives are known as peptidase inhibitors.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Myocytes, Smooth Muscle: Non-striated, elongated, spindle-shaped cells found lining the digestive tract, uterus, and blood vessels. They are derived from specialized myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, SMOOTH MUSCLE).Simvastatin: A derivative of LOVASTATIN and potent competitive inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HYDROXYMETHYLGLUTARYL COA REDUCTASES), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. It may also interfere with steroid hormone production. Due to the induction of hepatic LDL RECEPTORS, it increases breakdown of LDL CHOLESTEROL.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Shwartzman Phenomenon: Hemorrhagic necrosis that was first demonstrated in rabbits with a two-step reaction, an initial local (intradermal) or general (intravenous) injection of a priming endotoxin (ENDOTOXINS) followed by a second intravenous endotoxin injection (provoking agent) 24 h later. The acute inflammation damages the small blood vessels. The following intravascular coagulation leads to capillary and venous THROMBOSIS and NECROSIS. Shwartzman phenomenon can also occur in other species with a single injection of a provoking agent, and during infections or pregnancy. Its susceptibility depends on the status of IMMUNE SYSTEM, coagulation, FIBRINOLYSIS, and blood flow.Chlorates: Inorganic salts of chloric acid that contain the ClO3- ion.Noxae: Agents capable of exerting a harmful effect on the body.Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.Receptors, Cell Surface: Cell surface proteins that bind signalling molecules external to the cell with high affinity and convert this extracellular event into one or more intracellular signals that alter the behavior of the target cell (From Alberts, Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2nd ed, pp693-5). Cell surface receptors, unlike enzymes, do not chemically alter their ligands.Transcription Factor AP-1: A multiprotein complex composed of the products of c-jun and c-fos proto-oncogenes. These proteins must dimerize in order to bind to the AP-1 recognition site, also known as the TPA-responsive element (TRE). AP-1 controls both basal and inducible transcription of several genes.Fibrinolysin: A product of the lysis of plasminogen (profibrinolysin) by PLASMINOGEN activators. It is composed of two polypeptide chains, light (B) and heavy (A), with a molecular weight of 75,000. It is the major proteolytic enzyme involved in blood clot retraction or the lysis of fibrin and quickly inactivated by antiplasmins.Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors: A family of angiogenic proteins that are closely-related to VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR A. They play an important role in the growth and differentiation of vascular as well as lymphatic endothelial cells.CD40 Ligand: A membrane glycoprotein and differentiation antigen expressed on the surface of T-cells that binds to CD40 ANTIGENS on B-LYMPHOCYTES and induces their proliferation. Mutation of the gene for CD40 ligand is a cause of HYPER-IGM IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME, TYPE 1.Fibroblasts: Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells: Endothelial cells that line venous vessels of the UMBILICAL CORD.von Willebrand Factor: A high-molecular-weight plasma protein, produced by endothelial cells and megakaryocytes, that is part of the factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex. The von Willebrand factor has receptors for collagen, platelets, and ristocetin activity as well as the immunologically distinct antigenic determinants. It functions in adhesion of platelets to collagen and hemostatic plug formation. The prolonged bleeding time in VON WILLEBRAND DISEASES is due to the deficiency of this factor.Endothelial Growth Factors: These growth factors are soluble mitogens secreted by a variety of organs. The factors are a mixture of two single chain polypeptides which have affinity to heparin. Their molecular weight are organ and species dependent. They have mitogenic and chemotactic effects and can stimulate endothelial cells to grow and synthesize DNA. The factors are related to both the basic and acidic FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTORS but have different amino acid sequences.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Aprotinin: A single-chain polypeptide derived from bovine tissues consisting of 58 amino-acid residues. It is an inhibitor of proteolytic enzymes including CHYMOTRYPSIN; KALLIKREIN; PLASMIN; and TRYPSIN. It is used in the treatment of HEMORRHAGE associated with raised plasma concentrations of plasmin. It is also used to reduce blood loss and transfusion requirements in patients at high risk of major blood loss during and following open heart surgery with EXTRACORPOREAL CIRCULATION. (Reynolds JEF(Ed): Martindale: The Extra Pharmacopoeia (electronic version). Micromedex, Inc, Englewood, CO, 1995)Lymphokines: Soluble protein factors generated by activated lymphocytes that affect other cells, primarily those involved in cellular immunity.Leukocytes, Mononuclear: Mature LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES transported by the blood to the body's extravascular space. They are morphologically distinguishable from mature granulocytic leukocytes by their large, non-lobed nuclei and lack of coarse, heavily stained cytoplasmic granules.Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases: A superfamily of PROTEIN-SERINE-THREONINE KINASES that are activated by diverse stimuli via protein kinase cascades. They are the final components of the cascades, activated by phosphorylation by MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE KINASES, which in turn are activated by mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAP KINASE KINASE KINASES).Chemokine CCL2: A chemokine that is a chemoattractant for MONOCYTES and may also cause cellular activation of specific functions related to host defense. It is produced by LEUKOCYTES of both monocyte and lymphocyte lineage and by FIBROBLASTS during tissue injury. It has specificity for CCR2 RECEPTORS.Teratocarcinoma: A malignant neoplasm consisting of elements of teratoma with those of embryonal carcinoma or choriocarcinoma, or both. It occurs most often in the testis. (Dorland, 27th ed)
... tissue factor TF (CD142, thromboplastin); decay accelerating factor (CD55); protectin (CD59, inhibitor of MAC) and complement ... A possible role for Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor in fertility through semen liquefaction"] Check ,url= value (help). ...
... and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI). Standalone Kunitz domains are used as a framework for the development of new ... tissue factor pathway inhibitor precursor; and Kunitz STI protease inhibitor contained in legume seeds. Kunitz domains are ... and partial characterization of a second human tissue-factor-pathway inhibitor". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 91 (8): 3353- ... a factor Xa inhibitor from the tick Ornithodoros moubata". FEBS Lett. 352 (2): 251-7. doi:10.1016/0014-5793(94)00941-4. PMID ...
Belaaouaj AA, Li A, Wun TC (2000). "Matrix metalloproteinases cleave tissue factor pathway inhibitor. Effects on coagulation". ... Agapova OA, Ricard CS, Salvador-Silva M, Hernandez MR (2001). "Expression of matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of ... Genomic organization, chromosomal location, gene linkage, and tissue-specific expression". J. Biol. Chem. 270 (24): 14568-75. ... and tissue remodeling, as well as in disease processes, such as arthritis and metastasis. Most MMP's are secreted as inactive ...
Border WA, Noble NA (1994). "Transforming growth factor beta in tissue fibrosis". N. Engl. J. Med. 331 (19): 1286-92. doi: ... Johnson DW, Qumsiyeh M, Benkhalifa M, Marchuk DA (1996). "Assignment of human transforming growth factor-beta type I and type ... Gao J, Symons AL, Bartold PM (1999). "Expression of transforming growth factor-beta receptors types II and III within various ... Betaglycan also known as Transforming growth factor beta receptor III (TGFBR3), is a cell-surface chondroitin sulfate / heparan ...
Border WA, Noble NA (1994). "Transforming growth factor beta in tissue fibrosis". N. Engl. J. Med. 331 (19): 1286-92. doi: ... Transforming growth factor beta 1 or TGF-β1 is a polypeptide member of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily of ... It also acts as a negative autocrine growth factor. Dysregulation of TGF-β activation and signaling may result in apoptosis. ... Lee CG, Kang HR, Homer RJ, Chupp G, Elias JA (2006). "Transgenic modeling of transforming growth factor-beta(1): role of ...
... but may be related to factors secreted by the tumors, in particular a circulating pool of cell-derived tissue factor-containing ... Del Conde I, Bharwani LD, Dietzen DJ, Pendurthi U, Thiagarajan P, López JA (2007). "Microvesicle-associated tissue factor and ...
Tissue factor also binds to factor VII in the blood, which initiates the extrinsic coagulation cascade to increase thrombin ... conclusively shown to express tissue factor protein and also it was proved that the rat platelets carry both the tissue factor ... fibroblast growth factor, insulin-like growth factor 1, platelet-derived epidermal growth factor, and vascular endothelial ... Six studies suggested platelets express tissue factor: the definitive study shows they do not. The platelets from rats were ...
Tissue factor pathway inhibitor 2 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the TFPI2 gene. GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ... 1999). "Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 is a novel mitogen for vascular smooth muscle cells". J. Biol. Chem. 274 (9): 5379-84 ... "Entrez Gene: TFPI2 tissue factor pathway inhibitor 2". Bützow R, Huhtala ML, Bohn H, et al. (1988). "Purification and ... 2001). "Genomic structure and promoter activity of the human tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 gene". Biochim. Biophys. Acta. ...
Derrick EK, Barker JN, Khan A, Price ML, Macdonald DM (1993). "The tissue distribution of factor XIIIa positive cells". ... Curiously, the testis contains factors such as cytokines, which are usually only produced upon infections and tissue damage. ... Niemi M, Sharpe RM, Brown WR (1986). "Macrophages in the interstitial tissue of the rat testis". Cell Tissue Res. 243 (2): 337- ... survival of tissue transplanted into the testis, or testicular tissue transplanted elsewhere. Evidence includes the tolerance ...
Saliva contains tissue factor which promotes the blood clotting mechanism. The enzyme lysozyme is found in many tissues and is ... Saliva contains cell-derived tissue factor, and many compounds that are antibacterial or promote healing. Salivary tissue ... Berckmans RJ, Sturk A, van Tienen LM, Schaap MC, Nieuwland R (2011). "Cell-derived vesicles exposing coagulant tissue factor in ... Saliva contains growth factors such as epidermal growth factor, VEGF, TGF-β1, leptin, IGF-I, lysophosphatidic acid, hyaluronan ...
"Tissue-specific mitotic bookmarking by hematopoietic transcription factor GATA1". Cell. 150 (4): 725-37. doi:10.1016/j.cell. ... Notable transcription factors implicated in mitotic bookmarking include: BRD4 GATA1 HSP70 TFIID ESRRB Sarge, K. D.; Park-Sarge ... "Molecular bookmarks" are the factors that allow transcription to resume in an orderly fashion in newborn cells following ... During mitosis, gene transcription is silenced and most transcription factors are removed from chromatin. The term bookmarking ...
"Racial differences in endotoxin-induced tissue factor-triggered coagulation". J. Thromb. Haemost. 7 (4): 634-40. doi:10.1111/j. ... The binding of platelet factor 4 (CXCL4) appears to be critical for the platelet induced killing of P. falciparum. The Duffy ... Miller LH, Mason SJ, Clyde DF, McGinniss MH (August 1976). "The resistance factor to Plasmodium vivax in blacks. The Duffy- ... Rot A (2005). "Contribution of Duffy antigen to chemokine function". Cytokine Growth Factor Rev. 16 (6): 687-94. doi:10.1016/j. ...
Growth factor alternatives for bone tissue engineering". Current Pharmaceutical Design. 19 (19): 3420-3428. doi:10.2174/ ... Purmorphamine has been shown to induce osteogenesis in bone tissue as well as influencing growth and differentiation of neurons ...
However, partial thromboplastin is just phospholipids, and not tissue factor. Currently, recombinant tissue factor is not ... Although sometimes used as a synonym for the protein tissue factor (with its official name "Coagulation factor III [ ... Tissue factor Carlsen E, Stinessen MB, Prydz H (November 1987). "Differential effect of alpha-interferon and gamma-interferon ... Thromboplastin is the combination of both phospholipids and tissue factor, both of which are needed in the activation of the ...
Yun TH, Cott JE, Tapping RI, Slauch JM, Morrissey JH (January 2009). "Proteolytic inactivation of tissue factor pathway ... However, OmpT can inactivate the tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), counteracting the host's immune response, and further ... There is a genetic link between OmpT and other UTI-mediating factors (such as kpsMT, cnf1, prf, and sfa), but the functional ...
"Nomenclature for factors of the HLA system, 2004". Tissue Antigens. 65 (4): 301-69. PMID 15787720. doi:10.1111/j.1399-0039.2005 ... resulting in the rejection of the tissue bearing those cells. This is particularly important in the case of transplanted tissue ... The proteins encoded by certain genes are also known as antigens, as a result of their historic discovery as factors in organ ... May 1992). "Nomenclature for factors of the HLA system, 1991". Human Immunology. 34 (1): 4-18. PMID 1399721. doi:10.1016/0198- ...
"A Serum Factor in Lupus Erythematosus with Affinity for Tissue Nuclei". BMJ. 2 (5047): 732-734. doi:10.1136/bmj.2.5047.732. PMC ... It is important to note that not all anti-dsDNA antibodies are associated with lupus nephritis and that other factors can cause ... They are superior to the previously used animal tissues because of their large size and the high rate of mitosis (cell division ... "Blood factor in acute disseminated lupus erythematosus; determination of gamma globulin as specific plasma fraction." The ...
2003). "Tetranectin binds hepatocyte growth factor and tissue-type plasminogen activator". Eur. J. Biochem. 270 (8): 1850-4. ...
EXTEM test mildly activates haemostasis via the physiological activator tissue factor. The result is influenced by extrinsic ... Whole blood coagulation thrombelastographic profiles employing minimal tissue factor activation. J Thromb Haemost. 2003;1:551-8 ... Whole blood thrombelastographic coagulation profiles using minimal tissue factor activation can display hypercoagulation in ... Improvement of ROTEM clot stabilization kinetics in a patient with severe factor XIII deficiency after administration of factor ...
"Nomenclature for factors of the HLA system, 2004". Tissue Antigens. 65 (4): 301-69. doi:10.1111/j.1399-0039.2005.00379.x. PMC ... Tissue Antigens. 61 (1): 20-48. doi:10.1034/j.1399-0039.2003.610103.x. PMID 12622774. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2008- ... Lee EB, Kim JY, Zhao J, Park MH, Song YW (February 2007). "Haplotype association of IL-8 gene with Behcet's disease". Tissue ... Tissue Antigens. 20 (2): 144-6. doi:10.1111/j.1399-0039.1982.tb00337.x. PMID 6958087.. ...
Factor Mfge produced in lymphoid tissues mainly by FDCs is known to enhance engulfment of apoptotic cells. Deficit of this ... "Effects of tumor necrosis factor and lymphotoxin on peripheral lymphoid tissue development". Int Immunol. 10 (6): 727-41. doi: ... In normal lymphoid tissue recirculating resting B cells migrate through the FDC networks, whereas antigen-activated B cells are ... These sarcomas often involve lymphoid tissues, but in a number of cases the tumor has been found in the liver, bile duct, ...
PITX2 - Measurement in prostate tissue as a prognosis factor for prostate cancer. The company continues to focus on discovering ...
... a tissue-specific nuclear transport factor". Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 95 (2): 582-7. doi:10.1073/pnas.95.2.582. PMC 18463 . ...
"Patterns of target tissue reinnervation and trophic factor expression after nerve grafting". Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery ... Some factors include Schwann cell characteristics, neurotrophic factors, and nerve branch size. These factors influence the ... These are trophic factors that are discussed in detail in above sections. These factors can influence where an axon grows ... Neurotrophic factors are support proteins and factors that help assist in the growth and maintenance of axons throughout the ...
If the causative factor persists, tissue will become more fibrous over time. This condition occurs in association with denture ... Treatment is by surgical excision (complete removal) of the fibrous tissue overgrowth and addressing the causative factor to ... The excessive tissue is composed of cellular, inflamed fibrous connective tissue. The appearance of an epulis fissuratum ... Tissue biopsy is not usually indicated before removal of the lesion, since the excises surgical specimen is usually sent for ...
"Indobufen inhibits tissue factor in human monocytes through a thromboxane-mediated mechanism". Cardiovascular Research. 69 (1 ...
This is a type of safeguard to the system, almost like a two-factor authentication method. First, the B cells have to encounter ... Connective tissue cells. Hidden categories: *All articles with unsourced statements. *Articles with unsourced statements from ... Differentiation of mature B cells into plasma cells is dependent upon the transcription factors Blimp-1/PRDM1 and IRF4. ...
This behavior is one factor giving MRI its tremendous soft tissue contrast. MRI contrast agents, such as those containing ... Diseased tissue, such as tumors, can be detected because the protons in different tissues return to their equilibrium state at ... Typically, in soft tissues T1 is around one second while T2 and T* 2 are a few tens of milliseconds. However, these values can ... These agents appear very dark on T* 2-weighted images and may be used for liver imaging, as normal liver tissue retains the ...
A nosebleed is loss of blood from the tissue lining the nose. Bleeding most often occurs in 1 nostril only. ... Plasma factor VII activity. Factor VII activity. The factor VII assay is a blood test to measure the activity of factor VII. ... Factor VII is one such coagulation factor. Factor VII deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents ... A form of factor VII called NovoSeven can also be used. If you have factor VII deficiency due to a lack of vitamin K, you can ...
Plasma vWF level in CAD patients examined at 24 h and 48 h after admission might be an independent prognostic factor for MACE. ... Von Willebrand factor (vWF) is stored in endothelial cells and released into blood plasma upon vascular dysfunction. This meta- ... Cocaine and specific cocaine metabolites induce von Willebrand factor release from endothelial cells in a tissue-specific ... The search strategy was composed by the following search terms (vWF OR Willebrand Protein OR von Willebrand Factor OR Factor ...
... the interface between factor Xa and tissue factor in the quaternary complex tissue factor-factor VIIa-factor Xa-tissue factor ... Tissue factor, also called platelet tissue factor, factor III, or CD142 is a protein encoded by the F3 gene, present in ... Together with factor VIIa, tissue factor forms the tissue factor or extrinsic pathway of coagulation. This is opposed to the ... Tissue factor is not needed to activate the intrinsic pathway. Interactions[edit]. Tissue factor has been shown to interact ...
... the invention specifically contemplates both endogenous tissues and ex vivo tissues, e.g., transplant tissues, tissues grown in ... Duncan, Matthew R., et al., "Connective Tissue Growth Factor Mediates Transforming Growth Factor β-Induced Collagen Synthesis: ... "Connective tissue growth factor" or "CTGF" refers to the amino acid sequences of substantially purified CTGF derived from any ... Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF). CTGF is a 36 kD, cysteine-rich, heparin binding, secreted glycoprotein originally ...
Characterisation of tissue factor-bearing extracellular vesicles with AFM: Comparison of air-tapping-mode AFM and liquid peak ... RESULTS: Vesicles were immobilised on antibody-coated surfaces to select tissue factor (TF)-positive vesicles. The size range ...
Transforming growth factor beta in tissue fibrosis.. Border WA1, Noble NA. ...
This condition creates a mixture of high-density and low-density tissue in the breast. It can be caused by menstruation, ... Women with scattered fibroglandular breast tissue may develop lumpy or painful breasts. ... Risk factors. Different conditions affect whether or not a women is likely to have scattered fibroglandular breast tissue. ... Dense breast tissue: All you need to know What is dense breast tissue and what are the symptoms of dense breasts? Learn about ...
The rapid localization of ovarian cancer cells to milky spots indicated that omental tissue secretes a factor, or factors that ... Ovarian Cancer Metastases Influenced by Factors in Target Tissues. Both milky spots and fat cells in omentum promote cancer ... Omental fat is composed of adipocytes, blood vessels, immune cells, and other connective tissue and contains unusual immune ... In the first experiment, researchers investigated whether abdominal fat tissue that contains milky spots is a more attractive ...
Factors that may increase your risk of sarcoma include:. *Inherited syndromes. A risk of soft tissue sarcoma can be inherited ... Soft tissues connect, support and surround other body structures. The soft tissues include muscle, fat, blood vessels, nerves, ... Soft tissue sarcoma is a type of cancer that begins in the soft tissues of your body. ... In the lab, a doctor trained in analyzing body tissues (pathologist) examines the tissue sample for signs of cancer. The ...
Tissue factor expression in human pterygium.. [Ryo Ando, Satoru Kase, Tsutomu Ohashi, Zhenyu Dong, Junichi Fukuhara, Atsuhiro ... Previous reports suggest that tissue factor (TF) expression is closely related to the EMT of tumor cells, and subsequent tumor ... In this study, we analyzed the expression and immunolocalization of TF in pterygial and normal conjunctival tissues of humans. ... Immunoreactivity for TF was detected in all pterygial tissues examined. TF immunoreactivity was localized in the cytoplasm of ...
Included within the scope of tissue factor protein is tissue factor from recombinant ...sources. Human tissue is mentioned as ... the presence of Factor VIIa was insured by the presence of Factor VII and Factor IXa, Factor IXa being able to convert Factor ... It was known that tissue factor could be found in all tissues and, besides, the Respondents choice of adipose tissue was ... 9. A biologically active tissue factor protein or a biologically active variant or fragment of said tissue factor protein which ...
Buy our Recombinant Human Tissue Factor protein. Ab119148 is a protein fragment produced in Escherichia coli and has been ... Recombinant Human Tissue Factor protein. See all Tissue Factor proteins and peptides. ... Initiates blood coagulation by forming a complex with circulating factor VII or VIIa. The [TF:VIIa] complex activates factors ... Cell and tissue imaging tools. Cellular and biochemical assays. By product type. Proteins and Peptides. Proteomics tools. ...
... Liming Liu,1,2,3 ... Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is an important endocrine metabolic regulator with emerging beneficial roles in lipid ... We investigated the impact of FGF21 in experimental colitis-induced epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT) lipolysis. Methods. ... Nutrient deficiencies are common in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Adipose tissue plays a critical role in ...
Risk factors for soft tissue sarcoma include radiation, genetic conditions and personal history. Learn about soft tissue ... Risk factors for soft tissue sarcoma. A risk factor is something that increases the risk of developing cancer. It could be a ... Possible risk factors. The following factors have been linked with soft tissue sarcoma, but there is not enough evidence to ... But sometimes soft tissue sarcoma develops in people who dont have any of the risk factors described below. ...
The [TF:VIIa] complex activates factors IX or X by specific limited proteolysis. TF plays a role in normal hemostasis by ... Initiates blood coagulation by forming a complex with circulating factor VII or VIIa. ... "Affinity purification of human tissue factor: interaction of factor VII and tissue factor in detergent micelles.". Guha A., ... "Affinity purification of human tissue factor: interaction of factor VII and tissue factor in detergent micelles.". Guha A., ...
Some people with several risk factors never develop cancer, while others with no known risk factors do. Knowing your risk ... Use the menu to see other pages.A risk factor is anything that increases a persons chance of developing cancer. Although risk ... factors and talking about them with your doctor may help you make more informed lifestyle and health care choices. ... factors often influence the development of cancer, most do not directly cause cancer. ...
Activation of factor VII bound to tissue factor: a key early step in the tissue factor pathway of blood coagulation. Proc Natl ... The tissue factor/factor VIIa/factor Xa complex: a model built by docking and site-directed mutagenesis. Proteins. 2003; 53: ... Relations between factor VIIa binding and expression of factor VIIa/tissue factor catalytic activity on cell surfaces. J Biol ... Giansily-Blaizot M. Model of a ternary complex between activated factor VII, tissue factor and factor IX. Thromb Haemo. 2002; ...
Localization of tissue factor in the normal vessel wall and in the atherosclerotic plaque. J N Wilcox, K M Smith, S M Schwartz ... Tissue factor (TF)-producing cells were identified in normal human vessels and atherosclerotic plaques by in situ hybridization ... Localization of tissue factor in the normal vessel wall and in the atherosclerotic plaque ... Localization of tissue factor in the normal vessel wall and in the atherosclerotic plaque ...
Senescence-associated tissue microenvironment promotes colon cancer formation through the secretory factor GDF15.. Guo Y1, ... These findings implicate the importance of a senescence-associated tissue microenvironment and the secretory factor GDF15 in ... Using primary human colon tissue, we found an accumulation of senescent fibroblasts in normal tissues from individuals with ... In addition, we observed increased mRNA expression of GDF15 in primary normal colon tissue from people at increased risk for ...
The MafA transcription factor appears to be responsible for tissue-specific expression of insulin. Taka-aki Matsuoka, Isabella ... The MafA transcription factor appears to be responsible for tissue-specific expression of insulin ... The MafA transcription factor appears to be responsible for tissue-specific expression of insulin ... The MafA transcription factor appears to be responsible for tissue-specific expression of insulin ...
Human Pancreatic Duct Cells Exert Tissue Factor-Dependent Procoagulant Activity. Claire Beuneu, Olivier Vosters, Babak Movahedi ... Human Pancreatic Duct Cells Exert Tissue Factor-Dependent Procoagulant Activity. Claire Beuneu, Olivier Vosters, Babak Movahedi ... TF, tissue factor. Early loss of functional β-cells after islet transplantation represents a major limitation of this ... Human Pancreatic Duct Cells Exert Tissue Factor-Dependent Procoagulant Activity Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a ...
Human Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor ELISA Kit (TFPI) (ab108904) has been cited in 1 publications. References for Human in ... Cell and tissue imaging tools. Cellular and biochemical assays. By product type. Proteins and Peptides. Proteomics tools. ...
... tissue factor explanation free. What is tissue factor? Meaning of tissue factor medical term. What does tissue factor mean? ... Looking for online definition of tissue factor in the Medical Dictionary? ... tissue factor factor III, one of the coagulation factors.. transfer factor (TF) a factor occurring in sensitized lymphocytes ... stable factor factor VII, one of the coagulation factors.. Stuart factor (Stuart-Prower factor) factor X, one of the ...
... in the Euratom basic standards for Radiation Protection dated May 1996 by the tissue weighting factor in calculations of the ... Different probabilities exist for the occurrence of stochastic radiation effects in various organs and tissues. This different ... dated May 1996 by the tissue weighting factorSee tissue weighting factor. in calculations of the effective doseMeasure of a ... values are multiplied by the respective tissue weighting factorSee tissue weighting factor. and the products added. ...
... which is an independent risk factor for breast cancer -- as reliably as expert radiologists. This marks the first time a deep- ... Researchers from MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital have developed an automated model that assesses dense breast tissue in ... Automated system identifies dense tissue, a risk factor for breast cancer, in mammograms Deep-learning model has been used ... Automated system identifies dense tissue, a risk factor for breast cancer, in mammograms. Massachusetts Institute of Technology ...
  • The most common group of disorders in the family of genetically determined heritable disorders of connective tissues, characterised by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and tissue fragility. (bmj.com)
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is the most common group of disorders in the family of genetically determined heritable disorders of connective tissues. (bmj.com)
  • Hajdu-Cheney syndrome (HCS) is a rare inherited connective tissue disease characterized by acroosteolysis of hands and feet, developmental defects of bones, teeth and joints causing distinctive craniofacial and skull changes, and also manifested by severe osteoporosis and short stature. (biomedcentral.com)
  • a disorder of fatty tissue distribution over the thighs, lower legs and hips. (medi.de)
  • If the disorder spreads further down the legs, we talk of the "drawstring trouser phenomenon" because the deformities always end at the ankles, which are, however, overlapped by the fatty tissue. (medi.de)
  • If the fatty pads are immune to every diet and sporting activity, jodhpurs can be a sign of lipoedema, a congenital disorder of fatty tissue distribution. (medi.de)
  • With the obesity epidemic, scientists now understand that fatty tissue is an active endocrine organ that contributes to chronic inflammation throughout the body. (diabetescare.net)
  • Differential Replication, Lung Tissue Tropism, and Inflammatory and Innate Immune Responses in Macaques Infected with H5N1 and 1918 Reassortant Influenza Viruses. (pnas.org)
  • After 24 hr, bronchoalveolar lavage cells (BALC) and lavaged lung tissue were assayed for iNOS mRNA and BALC iNOS-dependent (L-NAME-inhibitable) chemiluminescence and cell counts were also determined. (cdc.gov)
  • Gene expressions of key transcription factors that characterize radial glial cells in the vz were demonstrated in Xenopus. (xenbase.org)
  • Transcripts of the gp340 gene were detected in all human sinus tissues analyzed by RT-PCR. (storysteel.cf)
  • A newly identified NF-κB (nuclear factor κB)-binding site was located on the upstream promoter region (-725/-716) of the human UGT1A1 gene. (elsevier.com)
  • To investigate echinococcosis in co-endemic regions three polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays based on the amplification Favipiravir of a fragment within the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1) mitochondrial gene were optimized for the detection of G1 and DNA derived from parasite tissue or canid fecal samples. (biosemiotics2013.org)
  • In addition, this signaling integration is involved in tissue-specific gene expression during development. (wikipedia.org)
  • Independent risk factors for failing NOM in octogenarians included ≥ 1 unit of packed red blood cells (PRBC) (p = 0.039) within 24 h of admission. (bvsalud.org)
  • Chemicals from the platelets further the clotting process by attracting other platelets, and then proteins in your blood (called clotting factors) end up as long strands of fibrin that get "tangled up with the platelets in the plug to create a net that traps even more platelets and cells," it adds. (activebeat.com)
  • A material based on a natural product of bones and citrus fruits, called citrate, provides the extra energy stem cells need to form new bone tissue, according to a team of Penn State bioengineers. (psu.edu)
  • We are uncovering the mechanism whereby citrate influences stem cell activity, not only in bone, but by implication extending to other types of cells and tissues. (psu.edu)
  • A screen of ncRNA sequences identified in EST sequencing projects discovered a 'ncRNA repressor of the nuclear factor of activated T cells' called NRON. (wikipedia.org)
  • Severe thermal injury in addition to distal ear-hole wounds induced marked local and systemic inflammatory responses in the lungs and significantly augmented the expression of inflammatory mediators in the ear tissue. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Interestingly, attenuated early ear wound healing in the thermally injured mouse resulted in incomplete tissue regeneration in addition to a marked inflammatory response, as evidenced by the histological appearance of the wound and increased transcription of potent inflammatory mediators. (biomedcentral.com)
  • These findings suggest that the observed systemic inflammatory response of a severe thermal injury undoubtedly has an adverse effect on wound healing and tissue regeneration. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This is not a sustainable method, especially in the case of large wounds or bone tissue removed during cancer treatment. (psu.edu)
  • Characterization of the histopathology and cellular localization of SARS-CoV-2 in the tissues of patients with fatal COVID-19 is critical to further understand its pathogenesis and transmission and for public health prevention measures. (cdc.gov)
  • The major lipolysis-inducing pathway in our bodies is the sympathetic nervous system and here the studies showed that brain insulin reduces sympathetic nervous system activity in fat tissue. (scienceblog.com)
  • Detection of proteins associated with the pyroptosis signaling pathway in breast cancer tissues and their significance. (ijcep.com)
  • In the case of highly pathogenic influenza A viruses, such as avian H5N1, infection is often associated with severe tissue destruction and dysregulated immune responses ( 2 ). (asm.org)
  • Some people need surgery to remove tissue damaged by the infection. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Additionally, the results of Cox regression showed that oligometastatic state was not an independent risk factor for BCR (P = 0.682). (bvsalud.org)
  • Low serum HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and it is influenced by genetic and environmental factors. (usda.gov)
  • About 4 % population worldwide is dying by this deadly disease and this toll is likely to swell by 5.4 % in the year 2025 [ 3 ] additionally diabetes is known to be risk factor for other diseases as well. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Ear-hole wounds in MRL/MpJ mice have previously displayed accelerated healing and tissue regeneration in the absence of a secondary insult. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Immunolabeling of endogenous splicing factor SC35 (red) and transfected FP-tagged lamin B receptor. (cellimagelibrary.org)
  • Brain Derived Neurotrophic factor and its receptor TrkB suppose to coordinate both of the above mentioning signaling pathways in depression disturbances. (scirp.org)
  • Tissue damage due to extravasation does not occur frequently, but the consequences can be severe. (storysteel.cf)
  • Below digastric and occasionally soft tissue can be prepared to introduce yourself, explain associations of less severe haemorrhage, and tympanosclerosis. (gnlg.org)
  • Keep these items on hand when returning to work: a mask , tissues, and hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol, if possible. (cdc.gov)
  • Research has documented an association between breast cancer and other environmental factors such as smoking cigarettes, drinking alcohol, and taking hormone replacement therapy -- factors that can be controlled. (breastcancer.org)
  • While both 1918 reassortant viruses also were highly pathogenic, the H5N1 virus was exceptional for the extent of tissue damage, cytokinemia, and interference with immune regulatory mechanisms, which may help explain the extreme virulence of HPAI viruses in humans. (pnas.org)
  • In addition to pressure applied to the skin, friction and moisture may contribute to skin and tissue damage. (cdc.gov)
  • Many give off chemicals called toxins, which can damage tissue and make you sick. (medlineplus.gov)
  • However, CLs are the major predisposing factors of bacterial keratitis which is commonly caused by adhesion of microbes such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus epidermidis. (usda.gov)
  • To get better informed on the topic, we've compiled a list of what to know about blood clots including the signs and symptoms, what the major risk factors are, as well as how to prevent and treat them. (activebeat.com)
  • 2011) The mTOR-regulated phosphoproteome reveals a mechanism of mTORC1-mediated inhibition of growth factor signaling. (phosphosite.org)
  • Ph found that it may be seen with secondary brain about other factors and close apposition of failed pituitary adenoma, rarely clear, vitrectomy may present circumstances is unclear. (gnlg.org)
  • Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) have attracted attention as an alternative to antibiotics for treatment of wound infections, but their use is challenged by limited tissue penetration and high cytotoxicity. (usda.gov)
  • Looking at ecological factors, such as diet, climate, how social a species is, and where it lives, they were able to reject several previously proposed hypotheses that have attempted to link the appendix to dietary or environmental factors. (lactobacto.com)
  • Title: Phosphatase activity of small C-terminal domain phosphatase 1 (SCP1) controls the stability of the key neuronal regulator RE1-silencing transcription factor (REST). (nih.gov)
  • Surgical treatment to remove small sections of scar tissue can be done using laparoscopy. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Vaccination and or infections can change these soluble factors for good or bad. (nih.gov)
  • Von Hagen's plastination technique preserves real bodies and tissues by the removal of the fluid and replacement with resin. (asu.edu)
  • In humans, a relationship between psychosocial factors in early childhood and later amygdala volumes based on prospective data has been demonstrated, providing a key link between early experience and brain development. (dericbownds.net)
  • Alzheimer's disease is named after German physician Dr. Alois Alzheimer, who in 1906 described abnormalities in the brain tissue of a patient who had died of an unspecified mental illness. (thegreateducator.com)
  • As neuron death increases, brain tissue in affected regions shrinks. (thegreateducator.com)
  • The exact investigation of the bone-implant border necessitates a combined study of foreign material and host tissue. (storysteel.gq)
  • In a study, it has been shown to modulate the metabolic activities in the white adipose tissues that prevent angiogenesis. (turmericforhealth.com)
  • Identification of their primary causal and risk factors can, therefore, It should be noted that the Lee-Carter method contribute to prevention and control. (who.int)
  • Identification of their primary causal and risk factors can, therefore, contribute to prevention and control. (who.int)