Tissue Donors: Individuals supplying living tissue, organs, cells, blood or blood components for transfer or transplantation to histocompatible recipients.Deltaretrovirus Infections: Infections caused by the HTLV or BLV deltaretroviruses. They include human T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (LEUKEMIA-LYMPHOMA, T-CELL, ACUTE, HTLV-I-ASSOCIATED).Deltaretrovirus Antibodies: Antibodies reactive with various types of human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma antigens or bovine leukemia virus antigens.Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques: Laboratory techniques that involve the in-vitro synthesis of many copies of DNA or RNA from one original template.Blood DonorsLiving Donors: Non-cadaveric providers of organs for transplant to related or non-related recipients.Tissue and Organ Procurement: The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.Transplantation, Homologous: Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.Gift Giving: The bestowing of tangible or intangible benefits, voluntarily and usually without expectation of anything in return. However, gift giving may be motivated by feelings of ALTRUISM or gratitude, by a sense of obligation, or by the hope of receiving something in return.ChicagoAltruism: Consideration and concern for others, as opposed to self-love or egoism, which can be a motivating influence.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Student Health Services: Health services for college and university students usually provided by the educational institution.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.San FranciscoClergy: Persons ordained for religious duties, who serve as leaders and perform religious services.Tissue Banks: Centers for acquiring, characterizing, and storing organs or tissue for future use.United States Office of Research Integrity: An office of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE organized in June 1992 to promote research integrity and investigate misconduct in research supported by the Public Health Service. It consolidates the Office of Scientific Integrity of the National Institutes of Health and the Office of Scientific Integrity Review in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health.Third-Party Consent: Informed consent given by someone other than the patient or research subject.IllinoisRivers: Large natural streams of FRESH WATER formed by converging tributaries and which empty into a body of water (lake or ocean).Foundations: Organizations established by endowments with provision for future maintenance.Corneal Transplantation: Partial or total replacement of the CORNEA from one human or animal to another.Graft Survival: The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Graft Rejection: An immune response with both cellular and humoral components, directed against an allogeneic transplant, whose tissue antigens are not compatible with those of the recipient.Keratoplasty, Penetrating: Partial or total replacement of all layers of a central portion of the cornea.Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.HumanitiesPolitics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Human Body: The human being as a non-anatomical and non-zoological entity. The emphasis is on the philosophical or artistic treatment of the human being, and includes lay and social attitudes toward the body in history. (From J. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Philosophy: A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)Philosophy, MedicalGene Library: A large collection of DNA fragments cloned (CLONING, MOLECULAR) from a given organism, tissue, organ, or cell type. It may contain complete genomic sequences (GENOMIC LIBRARY) or complementary DNA sequences, the latter being formed from messenger RNA and lacking intron sequences.Religion: A set of beliefs concerning the nature, cause, and purpose of the universe, especially when considered as the creation of a superhuman agency. It usually involves devotional and ritual observances and often a moral code for the conduct of human affairs. (Random House Collegiate Dictionary, rev. ed.)Manitoba: A province of Canada, lying between the provinces of Saskatchewan and Ontario. Its capital is Winnipeg. Taking its name from Lake Manitoba, itself named for one of its islands, the name derived from Algonquian Manitou, great spirit. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p724 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p332)Histocompatibility Testing: Identification of the major histocompatibility antigens of transplant DONORS and potential recipients, usually by serological tests. Donor and recipient pairs should be of identical ABO blood group, and in addition should be matched as closely as possible for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in order to minimize the likelihood of allograft rejection. (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Brain Death: A state of prolonged irreversible cessation of all brain activity, including lower brain stem function with the complete absence of voluntary movements, responses to stimuli, brain stem reflexes, and spontaneous respirations. Reversible conditions which mimic this clinical state (e.g., sedative overdose, hypothermia, etc.) are excluded prior to making the determination of brain death. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp348-9)United StatesEye: The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.Eye Banks: Centers for storing various parts of the eye for future use.Descemet Stripping Endothelial Keratoplasty: A surgical procedure or KERATOPLASTY involving selective stripping and replacement of diseased host DESCEMET MEMBRANE and CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM with a suitable and healthy donor posterior lamella. The advantage to this procedure is that the normal corneal surface of the recipient is retained, thereby avoiding corneal surface incisions and sutures.Grief: Normal, appropriate sorrowful response to an immediate cause. It is self-limiting and gradually subsides within a reasonable time.Social Work: The use of community resources, individual case work, or group work to promote the adaptive capacities of individuals in relation to their social and economic environments. It includes social service agencies.Antigens, CD274: An inhibitory B7 antigen that has specificity for the T-CELL receptor PROGRAMMED CELL DEATH 1 PROTEIN. CD274 antigen provides negative signals that control and inhibit T-cell responses and is found at higher than normal levels on tumor cells, suggesting its potential role in TUMOR IMMUNE EVASION.Electronic Mail: Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.Heart Transplantation: The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.Transplantation, Heterotopic: Transplantation of tissue typical of one area to a different recipient site. The tissue may be autologous, heterologous, or homologous.

Effect of MTHFR 677C>T on plasma total homocysteine levels in renal graft recipients. (1/3426)

BACKGROUND: Hyperhomocysteinemia is an established, independent risk factor for vascular disease morbidity and mortality. The 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism C677T has been shown to result in increased total homocysteine concentrations on the basis of low folate levels caused by a decreased enzyme activity. The effect of this polymorphism on total homocysteine and folate plasma levels in renal transplant patients is unknown. METHODS: We screened 636 kidney graft recipients for the presence of the MTHFR C677T gene polymorphism. The major determinants of total homocysteine and folate plasma concentrations of 63 patients, who were identified to be homozygous for this gene polymorphism compared with heterozygotes (N = 63), and patients with wild-type alleles (N = 63), who were matched for sex, age, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and body mass index, were identified by analysis of covariance. The variables included sex, age, GFR, body mass index, time since transplantation, folate and vitamin B12 levels, the use of azathioprine, and the MTHFR genotype. To investigate the impact of the kidney donor MTHFR genotype on total homocysteine and folate plasma concentrations, a similar model was applied in 111 kidney graft recipients with stable graft function, in whom the kidney donor C677T MTHFR gene polymorphism was determined. RESULTS: The allele frequency of the C677T polymorphism in the MTHFR gene was 0.313 in the whole study population [wild-type (CC), 301; heterozygous (CT), 272; and homozygous mutant (TT), 63 patients, respectively] and showed no difference in the patient subgroups with various renal diseases. The MTHFR C677T gene polymorphism significantly influenced total homocysteine and folate plasma concentrations in renal transplant recipients (P = 0.0009 and P = 0.0002, respectively). Furthermore, a significant influence of the GFR (P = 0.0001), folate levels (P = 0.0001), age (P = 0.0001), body mass index (P = 0.0001), gender (P = 0.0005), and vitamin B12 levels (P = 0.004) on total homocysteine concentrations was observed. The donor MTHFR gene polymorphism had no influence on total homocysteine and folate levels. Geometric mean total homocysteine levels in patients homozygous for the mutant MTHFR allele were 18.6 micromol/liter compared with 14.6 micromol/liter and 14.9 micromol/liter in patients heterozygous for the MTHFR gene polymorphism and those with wild-type alleles (P < 0.05 for TT vs. CT and CC). Geometric mean folate levels were lower in CT and TT patients (11.2 and 10.2 nmol/liter) compared with CC patients (13.6 nmol/liter, P < 0.05 vs. CT and TT). CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that homozygosity for the C677T polymorphism in the MTHFR gene significantly increases total homocysteine concentrations and lowers folate levels in kidney graft recipients, even in patients with excellent renal function (GFR more than median). These findings have important implications for risk evaluation and vitamin intervention therapy in these patients who carry an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular disease.  (+info)

A prospective, randomized trial of tacrolimus/prednisone versus tacrolimus/prednisone/mycophenolate mofetil in renal transplant recipients. (2/3426)

BACKGROUND: Between September 20, 1995 and September 20, 1997, 208 adult patients undergoing renal transplantation were randomized to receive tacrolimus/prednisone (n=106) or tacrolimus/prednisone/mycophenolate mofetil (n=102), with the goal of reducing the incidence of rejection. METHODS: The mean recipient age was 50.7+/-13.7 years. Sixty-three (30.3%) patients were 60 years of age or older at the time of transplantation. The mean donor age was 34.5+/-21.7 years. The mean cold ischemia time was 30.5+/-9.2 hr. The mean follow-up is 15+/-7 months. RESULTS: The overall 1-year actuarial patient survival was 94%; the overall 1-year actuarial graft survival was 87%. When the patient and graft survival data were stratified to recipients under the age of 60 who did not have delayed graft function, the overall 1-year actuarial patient survival was 97%, and the corresponding 1-year actuarial graft survival was 93%. There were no differences between the two groups. The overall incidence of rejection was 36%; in the double-therapy group, it was 44%, whereas in the triple therapy group, it was 27% (P=0.014). The mean serum creatinine was 1.6+/-0.8 mg/dl. A total of 36% of the successfully transplanted patients were taken off prednisone; 32% of the patients were taken off antihypertensive medications. The incidence of delayed graft function was 21%, the incidence of cytomegalovirus was 12.5%, and the initial and final incidences of posttransplant insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus were 7.0% and 2.9%; again, there was no difference between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: This trial suggests that the combination of tacrolimus, steroids, and mycophenolate mofetil is associated with excellent patient and graft survival and a lower incidence of rejection than the combination of tacrolimus and steroids.  (+info)

Pediatric renal transplantation under tacrolimus-based immunosuppression. (3/3426)

BACKGROUND: Tacrolimus has been used as a primary immunosuppressive agent in adult and pediatric renal transplant recipients, with reasonable outcomes. Methods. Between December 14, 1989 and December 31, 1996, 82 pediatric renal transplantations alone were performed under tacrolimus-based immunosuppression without induction anti-lymphocyte antibody therapy. Patients undergoing concomitant or prior liver and/or intestinal transplantation were not included in the analysis. The mean recipient age was 10.6+/-5.2 years (range: 0.7-17.9). Eighteen (22%) cases were repeat transplantations, and 6 (7%) were in patients with panel-reactive antibody levels over 40%. Thirty-four (41%) cases were with living donors, and 48 (59%) were with cadaveric donors. The mean donor age was 27.3+/-14.6 years (range: 0.7-50), and the mean cold ischemia time in the cadaveric cases was 26.5+/-8.8 hr. The mean number of HLA matches and mismatches was 2.8+/-1.2 and 2.9+/-1.3; there were five (6%) O-Ag mismatches. The mean follow-up was 4.0+/-0.2 years. RESULTS: The 1- and 4-year actuarial patient survival was 99% and 94%. The 1- and 4-year actuarial graft survival was 98% and 84%. The mean serum creatinine was 1.1+/-0.5 mg/dl, and the corresponding calculated creatinine clearance was 88+/-25 ml/min/1.73 m2. A total of 66% of successfully transplanted patients were withdrawn from prednisone. In children who were withdrawn from steroids, the mean standard deviation height scores (Z-score) at the time of transplantation and at 1 and 4 years were -2.3+/-2.0, -1.7+/-1.0, and +0.36+/-1.5. Eighty-six percent of successfully transplanted patients were not taking anti-hypertensive medications. The incidence of acute rejection was 44%; between December 1989 and December 1993, it was 63%, and between January 1994 and December 1996, it was 23% (P=0.0003). The incidence of steroid-resistant rejection was 5%. The incidence of delayed graft function was 5%, and 2% of patients required dialysis within 1 week of transplantation. The incidence of cytomegalovirus was 13%; between December 1989 and December 1992, it was 17%, and between January 1993 and December 1996, it was 12%. The incidence of early Epstein-Barr virus-related posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) was 9%; between December 1989 and December 1992, it was 17%, and between January 1993 and December 1996, it was 4%. All of the early PTLD cases were treated successfully with temporary cessation of immunosuppression and institution of antiviral therapy, without patient or graft loss. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate the short- and medium-term efficacy of tacrolimus-based immunosuppression in pediatric renal transplant recipients, with reasonable patient and graft survival, routine achievement of steroid and anti-hypertensive medication withdrawal, gratifying increases in growth, and, with further experience, a decreasing incidence of both rejection and PTLD.  (+info)

Split liver transplantation. (4/3426)

OBJECTIVE: This study reviews the indications, technical aspects, and experience with ex vivo and in situ split liver transplantation. BACKGROUND: The shortage of cadaveric donor livers is the most significant factor inhibiting further application of liver transplantation for patients with end-stage liver disease. Pediatric recipients, although they represent only 15% to 20% of the liver transplant registrants, suffer the greatest from the scarcity of size-matched cadaveric organs. Split liver transplantation provides an ideal means to expand the donor pool for both children and adults. METHODS: This review describes the evolution of split liver transplantation from reduced liver transplantation and living-related liver transplantation. The two types of split liver transplantation, ex vivo and in situ, are compared and contrasted, including the technique, selection of patients for each procedure, and the most current results. RESULTS: Ex vivo splitting of the liver is performed on the bench after removal from the cadaver. It is usually divided into two grafts: segments 2 and 3 for children, and segments 4 to 8 for adults. Since 1990, 349 ex vivo grafts have been reported. Until recently, graft and patient survival rates have been lower and postoperative complication rates higher in ex vivo split grafts than in whole organ cadaveric transplantation. Further, the use of ex vivo split grafts has been relegated to the elective adult patient because of the high incidence of graft dysfunction (right graft) when placed in an emergent patient. Reasons for the poor function of ex vivo splits except in elective patients have focused on graft damage due to prolonged cold ischemia times and rewarming during the long benching procedure. In situ liver splitting is accomplished in a manner identical to the living donor procurement. This technique for liver splitting results in the same graft types as in the ex vivo technique. However, graft and patient survival rates reported for in situ split livers have exceeded 85% and 90%, respectively, with a lower incidence of postoperative complications, including biliary and reoperation for bleeding. These improved results have also been observed in the urgent patient. CONCLUSION: Splitting of the cadaveric liver expands the donor pool of organs and may eliminate the need for living-related donation for children. Recent experience with the ex vivo technique, if applied to elective patients, results in patient and graft survival rates comparable to whole-organ transplantation, although postoperative complication rates are higher. In situ splitting provides two grafts of optimal quality that can be applied to the entire spectrum of transplant recipients: it is the method of choice for expanding the cadaver liver donor pool.  (+info)

High-risk donors: expanding donor criteria. (5/3426)

Advances in the surgical techniques, preservation solutions, and methods for predicting eventual long-term renal function from expanded donors will be critical in allowing precise selection criteria for kidneys for transplantation, resulting in the optimum use of a scarce and precious resource. Until other options such as xenotransplantation or tissue engineering become realistic, the challenge for the millennium will be to identify which donor organs previously considered suboptimal can be safely used to expand the organ donor pool.  (+info)

Correction of bone marrow failure in dyskeratosis congenita by bone marrow transplantation. (6/3426)

Dyskeratosis congenita is recognized by its dermal lesions and constitutional aplastic anemia in some cases. We report successful allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in two siblings with this disease from their sister, and their long term follow-up. We used reduced doses of cyclophosphamide and busulfan for conditioning instead of total body irradiation. Also, we report late adverse effects of transplantation which are not distinguishable from the natural course of disease.  (+info)

Relaxin secretion by human granulosa cell culture is predictive of in-vitro fertilization-embryo transfer success. (7/3426)

We have developed a cell culture system for human luteinizing granulosa cells which supports the timely and dynamic secretion of oestrogen, progesterone and relaxin in patterns that mimic serum concentrations of these hormones during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. There was a wide variation in the amount of relaxin secreted by the cultured cells for the 69 patients studied. As relaxin production was generally maximal by day 10 of culture, comparisons were made at this time point. It was observed that most of the conceptions occurred in patients with higher relaxin secretion in vitro. All cycles with relaxin > 800 pg/ml on day 10 had a term pregnancy while only 13% of cycles with relaxin < 200 pg/ml had term pregnancies. A limited number of cycles from donor/recipient cycles did not show similar results. Steroid concentrations were not predictive of conception. These results demonstrated that in-vitro production of relaxin is predictive of implantation success in in-vitro fertilization (IVF)-embryo transfer cycles. This supports the hypothesis that relaxin may be involved in implantation and that lowered relaxin concentrations may be a partial cause of poor pregnancy rates after IVF.  (+info)

Short-term toxicity in pediatric marrow transplantation using related and unrelated donors. (8/3426)

The use of volunteer, unrelated donors has substantially increased the number of potential donors for pediatric marrow transplantation during the past few years. We describe our single institution experience of short-term toxicity after pediatric marrow transplantation using sibling or unrelated donors. Fully matched (A, B and DR loci) donors were employed in 94% of the cases in both groups. Conditioning of similar intensity and uniform supportive care were employed in the two groups. Both primary non-engraftment and secondary graft failure were more common among recipients of unmanipulated URD grafts. Clinically significant (grades III-IV) acute GVHD and toxic mortality during the immediate post-transplant period were also higher in this group of patients. Pediatric marrow transplantation using volunteer, unrelated donors appears to be associated with an increased incidence of procedure-related toxic complications.  (+info)

  • It also includes the development of a national forum on donor registries, a new model donor card, and increased cooperation between HHS, other Federal agencies, and State governments to promote donor awareness. (archives.gov)
  • I call upon all medical professionals, educators, volunteers, government agencies, and private organizations to join me in raising awareness of the need for organ donors in communities throughout our Nation. (archives.gov)
  • It is taken from live donors and used to treat patients with conditions including leukaemia - Sheffield Children's Hospital and the Royal Hallamshire Hospital in Broomhill have a base for the Anthony Nolan Trust. (thestar.co.uk)
  • For many of these patients, finding a marrow donor who is a match is their chance for a cure. (childrens.com)
  • While patients in the Mater are currently offered a donor heart from increased risk donors, this usually takes place immediately prior to the operation and if the patient refuses then the next person on the list is offered the increased risk donor heart. (irishheart.ie)
  • Tissue types are inherited, so patients are most likely to match the tissue type of someone who shares their racial or ethnic heritage. (northshore.org)
  • No difficulties were noted using infant donor tissue, including the intraoperative use of the Moria microkeratome to prepare the DSAEK donor, insertion of the donor graft, or with air-bubble management. (ovid.com)
  • The higher preoperative endothelial cell densities in infant donor tissue should improve graft survival and long-term maintenance of corneal transparency provided that surgery-related endothelial cell loss is minimized. (ovid.com)
  • Usually, when a dog needs a bone and tissue graft it is taken from elsewhere in their body, which is not only complicated but painful. (dogsandpuppies.co.uk)
  • However, using donor bone, a vet stripped the small joints of cartilage and put a plate and screws in to align Rusty's bones, which were then encouraged to fuse using the graft. (dogsandpuppies.co.uk)
  • Donors that are pre-stripped by the eye bank for DMEK surgery do not increase the risk of graft failure or re-bubbling compared to surgeon prepared tissue. (arvojournals.org)
  • Ask your doctor what tissue bank is supplying the graft, and why that tissue bank has been selected. (verywellhealth.com)
  • The purpose of this study was to investigate a simple, in vitro, enzyme-based method to cleave off donor MHC/HLA class I proteins, the dominant trigger of graft rejection, from donor cells to inhibit the host rejection response. (atcmeetingabstracts.com)
  • LEITR will now expand from exclusively procuring eye tissue to assuming responsibility for procurement of bone, skin, heart valves, connective tissue and veins used in surgeries and medical research at hospitals throughout Florida. (biospace.com)
  • Even in cases where one is not able to be an organ donor, a person may be able to dramatically change the life of up to 80 people through the gift of donated tissues such as eyes, bone and skin," said Chris Snow , director of Tissue Bank Manitoba. (chrisd.ca)
  • When they die, the dogs' soft tissue and bone will be used in life-saving surgery to aid other injured pets. (dogsandpuppies.co.uk)
  • We have revised our guidance on the regulation of bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) donations where the donor is an adult lacking capacity or child without competence to consent. (hta.gov.uk)
  • Under the Human Tissue Act 2004, any potential donation of bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) from adults who lack capacity to consent and children who lack competence to consent, must be assessed by an Accredited Assessor (AA) and a report submitted to the HTA for decision. (hta.gov.uk)
  • In August, the Food and Drug Administration restricted the operations of a major tissue processor, CryoLife Inc. of Kennesaw, Ga., because the methods it used to cleanse donated tissues were deemed inadequate. (nytimes.com)
  • METHODS: We conducted a review of our initial 42 (19 with 6-month follow up) consecutive DSAEK surgeries using ASF tissue compared with 357 (199 with 6-month follow up) time-matched controls using standard tissue. (biomedsearch.com)
  • This work evaluates the endothelial cell loss resulting from two recently described methods of preparing endothelial tissue for DMEK procedures. (arvojournals.org)
  • Common methods and standards for evaluating potential donors of organs and tissues are needed to facilitate effective data collection for assessing the risk for infectious disease transmission. (cdc.gov)
  • Donor screening methods include evaluating the donor's medical history and physical examination results and assessing (often in the form of a questionnaire) the donor for behavioral risk factors associated with a higher prevalence of communicable diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • Reprocessing the tissue has the potential to have a considerable impact on addressing the problems associated with cadaveric donor shortage. (lboro.ac.uk)
  • He had a simple business model: Pay funeral directors for access to bodies and resell bones, heart valves, spines, and other tissues to biotech firms in need of spare parts. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Effector memory T cells (T EM cells) move between the blood and the spleen, and bear the ability to enter non-lymphoid tissues in case of an (re)infectious challenge. (nature.com)
  • We have evaluated whether pancreatic islets and lymphoid tissues of T1D and nondiabetic organ donors differ in the amount and distribution of HA and HA-binding proteins (hyaladherins), such as inter-α-inhibitor (IαI), versican, and tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • The organization was established in 1987, and is an official Donate Life organization accredited by the Association of Organ Procurement Organizations (AOPO) and the American Association of Tissue Banks (AATB). (prweb.com)
  • RTI Donor Services is accredited by the American Association of Tissue Banks and affiliated with RTI Surgical, Inc. (RTI Surgical), a global surgical implant company providing surgeons with safe biologic, metal and synthetic implants. (biospace.com)
  • The American Association of Tissue Banks (AATB) is an educational and scientific, tax exempt organization founded in 1976. (healthfinder.gov)
  • Additionally, high schools will receive organ and tissue donation education materials for posting in school Wellness Centers, reaching 60% of students. (prweb.com)
  • Dr. Ian Williams, an epidemiologist at the federal disease centers, said the donor was probably a ''window case'' -- that is, he was unknowingly infected shortly before he died and never showed any symptoms of the disease. (nytimes.com)
  • We performed a retrospective observational cohort study among 15,133 Dutch donors of tissues and stem cells from 2010 to 2015 to assess seroprevalence of Coxiella burnetii antibodies, to identify factors associated with presence of C. burnetii antibodies, and to assess the proportion of undiagnosed chronic Q fever cases. (eurosurveillance.org)
  • cDNA Panel _ Human Tumor Tissue, Same Tumor Type, Different Donors Human samples 80 % of the research is conducted on human samples. (antibody-antibodies.com)
  • GENTAUR suppliers human normal cells, cell lines, RNA extracts and lots of antibodies and ELISA kits to Human proteins as well as cDNA Panel _ Human Tumor Tissue, Same Tumor Type, Different Donors. (antibody-antibodies.com)
  • To decrease the potential for disease transmission, donors are screened for risk factors by medical history and for evidence of infection by specific testing. (cdc.gov)
  • RTI has a proud history of tissue innovation and safety, and recently announced a significant global milestone of providing more than 8 million biologic implants processed through RTI's proprietary sterilization processes with zero confirmed incidence of implant-associated infection. (biospace.com)
  • Hyperacute rejection occurs when the patient's body has already produced a large number of antibodies (proteins manufactured by the immune system to battle disease and infection) that immediately recognize the antigens from the donor organ. (jrank.org)
  • The risk of HIV infection as a result of allograft tissue transplant has been estimated to be one in a million. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Infection transmission could be the result of a disease the donor had in his or her body, or contamination of the tissue during processing. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Although regulatory requirements and risk-benefit considerations for evaluating organ and tissue donors differ, the fundamental process for donor screening and testing, and the challenges faced in prospectively assessing the risk for donor-derived infection, are similar for organ and tissue donors. (cdc.gov)
  • If there is a problem with the donor lung or if you have an infection, the surgery cannot be performed. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • While our state-of-the-art technology is sophisticated, there is a brief period shortly after infection when HIV is not detectable in a donor. (blood.ca)
  • Descemet's membrane , a thin, strong sheet of tissue that serves as a protective barrier against infection and injuries, thickens with age. (uspharmacist.com)
  • Anyone can register as a donor at DonorNetworkWest.org or at the DMV. (prweb.com)
  • If you want to go ahead and request the documents needed to register as a donor, complete the short form below . (imperial.ac.uk)
  • HTA welcomed the 'sensitive and realistic accounts' of body donation shown in the Channel 5 series 'Body Donors', broadcast at 9pm on the 29 Sep and 6 October 2015. (hta.gov.uk)
  • The numbers mark the sixth consecutive year of increased donations by Gift of Life Michigan, the state's organ and tissue recovery program. (aopo.org)
  • Transplanted tissues have transmitted transmissible spongiform encephalopathies and in the UK there have been more cases of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) than elsewhere in the world. (springer.com)
  • Efforts are made to ensure that the donor did not have a potentially transmissible disease and that the donated tissues are handled in a manner that minimizes the chance of contamination. (verywellhealth.com)