Dental Pulp Necrosis: Death of pulp tissue with or without bacterial invasion. When the necrosis is due to ischemia with superimposed bacterial infection, it is referred to as pulp gangrene. When the necrosis is non-bacterial in origin, it is called pulp mummification.Dental Pulp: A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Apexification: Endodontic procedure performed to induce TOOTH APEX barrier development. ROOT CANAL FILLING MATERIALS are used to repair open apex or DENTAL PULP NECROSIS in an immature tooth. CALCIUM HYDROXIDE and mineral trioxide aggregate are commonly used as the filling materials.Periapical Periodontitis: Inflammation of the PERIAPICAL TISSUE. It includes general, unspecified, or acute nonsuppurative inflammation. Chronic nonsuppurative inflammation is PERIAPICAL GRANULOMA. Suppurative inflammation is PERIAPICAL ABSCESS.Calcium Hydroxide: A white powder prepared from lime that has many medical and industrial uses. It is in many dental formulations, especially for root canal filling.Root Canal Irrigants: Chemicals used mainly to disinfect root canals after pulpectomy and before obturation. The major ones are camphorated monochlorophenol, EDTA, formocresol, hydrogen peroxide, metacresylacetate, and sodium hypochlorite. Root canal irrigants include also rinsing solutions of distilled water, sodium chloride, etc.Dental Pulp CalcificationDental Pulp Capping: Application of a protective agent to an exposed pulp (direct capping) or the remaining thin layer of dentin over a nearly exposed pulp (indirect capping) in order to allow the pulp to recover and maintain its normal vitality and function.Pulpitis: Inflammation of the DENTAL PULP, usually due to bacterial infection in dental caries, tooth fracture, or other conditions causing exposure of the pulp to bacterial invasion. Chemical irritants, thermal factors, hyperemic changes, and other factors may also cause pulpitis.OdontoblastsDental Care: The total of dental diagnostic, preventive, and restorative services provided to meet the needs of a patient (from Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982).Dental Pulp Exposure: The result of pathological changes in the hard tissue of a tooth caused by carious lesions, mechanical factors, or trauma, which render the pulp susceptible to bacterial invasion from the external environment.Dental Pulp Diseases: Endodontic diseases of the DENTAL PULP inside the tooth, which is distinguished from PERIAPICAL DISEASES of the tissue surrounding the root.Necrosis: The pathological process occurring in cells that are dying from irreparable injuries. It is caused by the progressive, uncontrolled action of degradative ENZYMES, leading to MITOCHONDRIAL SWELLING, nuclear flocculation, and cell lysis. It is distinct it from APOPTOSIS, which is a normal, regulated cellular process.Dentin, Secondary: Dentin formed by normal pulp after completion of root end formation.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Dentinogenesis: The formation of dentin. Dentin first appears in the layer between the ameloblasts and odontoblasts and becomes calcified immediately. Formation progresses from the tip of the papilla over its slope to form a calcified cap becoming thicker by the apposition of new layers pulpward. A layer of uncalcified dentin intervenes between the calcified tissue and the odontoblast and its processes. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha: Serum glycoprotein produced by activated MACROPHAGES and other mammalian MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. It has necrotizing activity against tumor cell lines and increases ability to reject tumor transplants. Also known as TNF-alpha, it is only 30% homologous to TNF-beta (LYMPHOTOXIN), but they share TNF RECEPTORS.Pulp Capping and Pulpectomy Agents: Materials used in DENTAL PULP CAPPING or PULPECTOMY.Dental Papilla: Mesodermal tissue enclosed in the invaginated portion of the epithelial enamel organ and giving rise to the dentin and pulp.Dental Pulp Cavity: The space in a tooth bounded by the dentin and containing the dental pulp. The portion of the cavity within the crown of the tooth is the pulp chamber; the portion within the root is the pulp canal or root canal.Dental Care for Chronically Ill: Dental care for patients with chronic diseases. These diseases include chronic cardiovascular, endocrinologic, hematologic, immunologic, neoplastic, and renal diseases. The concept does not include dental care for the mentally or physically disabled which is DENTAL CARE FOR DISABLED.Endodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the maintenance of the dental pulp in a state of health and the treatment of the pulp cavity (pulp chamber and pulp canal).Operating Room Technicians: Specially trained personnel to assist in routine technical procedures in the operating room.Root Canal Therapy: A treatment modality in endodontics concerned with the therapy of diseases of the dental pulp. For preparatory procedures, ROOT CANAL PREPARATION is available.Tooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Arthus Reaction: A dermal inflammatory reaction produced under conditions of antibody excess, when a second injection of antigen produces intravascular antigen-antibody complexes which bind complement, causing cell clumping, endothelial damage, and vascular necrosis.Dentinal Fluid: The lymph or fluid of dentin. It is a transudate of extracellular fluid, mainly cytoplasm of odontoblastic processes, from the dental pulp via the dentinal tubules. It is also called dental lymph. (From Stedman, 26th ed, p665)Periapical Abscess: Acute or chronic inflammation of tissues surrounding the apical portion of a tooth, associated with the collection of pus, resulting from infection following pulp infection through a carious lesion or as a result of an injury causing pulp necrosis. (Dorland, 27th ed)Periodontal Diseases: Pathological processes involving the PERIODONTIUM including the gum (GINGIVA), the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS), the DENTAL CEMENTUM, and the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT.Osteology: The branch of anatomy that concerns the structure and function of bones.Periodontitis: Inflammation and loss of connective tissues supporting or surrounding the teeth. This may involve any part of the PERIODONTIUM. Periodontitis is currently classified by disease progression (CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS; AGGRESSIVE PERIODONTITIS) instead of age of onset. (From 1999 International Workshop for a Classification of Periodontal Diseases and Conditions, American Academy of Periodontology)Allergy and Immunology: A medical specialty concerned with the hypersensitivity of the individual to foreign substances and protection from the resultant infection or disorder.Osteolysis: Dissolution of bone that particularly involves the removal or loss of calcium.Gingivitis: Inflammation of gum tissue (GINGIVA) without loss of connective tissue.Pathology, Oral: A dental specialty concerned with pathology of the oral cavity.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Surgery, Oral: A dental specialty concerned with the diagnosis and surgical treatment of disease, injuries, and defects of the human oral and maxillofacial region.Access to Information: Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Radicular Cyst: Slow-growing fluid-filled epithelial sac at the apex of a tooth with a nonvital pulp or defective root canal filling.Periapical Granuloma: Chronic nonsuppurative inflammation of periapical tissue resulting from irritation following pulp disease or endodontic treatment.Periapical Diseases: Diseases of the PERIAPICAL TISSUE surrounding the root of the tooth, which is distinguished from DENTAL PULP DISEASES inside the TOOTH ROOT.Cysts: Any fluid-filled closed cavity or sac that is lined by an EPITHELIUM. Cysts can be of normal, abnormal, non-neoplastic, or neoplastic tissues.Periapical Tissue: Tissue surrounding the apex of a tooth, including the apical portion of the periodontal membrane and alveolar bone.Odontogenic Cysts: Cysts found in the jaws and arising from epithelium involved in tooth formation. They include follicular cysts (e.g., primordial cyst, dentigerous cyst, multilocular cyst), lateral periodontal cysts, and radicular cysts. They may become keratinized (odontogenic keratocysts). Follicular cysts may give rise to ameloblastomas and, in rare cases, undergo malignant transformation.Dentin SensitivityDentin: The hard portion of the tooth surrounding the pulp, covered by enamel on the crown and cementum on the root, which is harder and denser than bone but softer than enamel, and is thus readily abraded when left unprotected. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dentin Desensitizing Agents: Substances which reduce or eliminate dentinal sensitivity or the pain associated with a source of stimulus (such as touch, heat, or cold) at the orifice of exposed dentinal tubules causing the movement of tubular fluid that in turn stimulates tooth nerve receptors.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Dentin Permeability: The property of dentin that permits passage of light, heat, cold, and chemical substances. It does not include penetration by microorganisms.Hypersensitivity, Delayed: An increased reactivity to specific antigens mediated not by antibodies but by cells.Toothpastes: Dentifrices that are formulated into a paste form. They typically contain abrasives, HUMECTANTS; DETERGENTS; FLAVORING AGENTS; and CARIOSTATIC AGENTS.
Untreated dental caries then allow bacteria to reach the level of the pulp, causing infection. The bacteria gains access to the ... The innermost cells die and form an aggregate of dead tissue. The inner cells undergo ischemic liquefactive necrosis which ... This infection is what causes necrosis of the pulp. Expansion of the cyst causes erosion of the floor of the maxillary sinus. ... Removal of the necrotic pulp and the inflamed tissue as well as proper sealing of the canals and an appropriately fitting crown ...
Inflammation of the dental pulp, termed pulpitis, produces true hypersensitivity of the nerves in the dental pulp. Pulpitis is ... pulpal inflammation will irreversibly progress to pulpal necrosis due to compression of the venous microcirculation and tissue ... coolant water jet from a dental instrument. Electrical - electric pulp testers. Mechanical-tactile - dental probe during dental ... Evaporation - air blast from a dental instrument. Chemical - acids, e.g. dietary, gastric, acid etch during dental treatments. ...
Excessive pressure can lead to frictional heat that may cause pulpal discomfort or necrosis of the dental pulp. Surfaces of ... It is important to refer to manufacturer's directions before using any product on dental restorations. Trauma to soft tissues ... "American Dental Hygienists' Association Position Paper on the Oral Prophylaxis" (PDF). www.adha.org. American Dental Hygienists ... Dental tape is used for polishing the proximal surfaces of teeth that are inaccessible to other polishing instruments. It is ...
Pulpal necrosis[edit]. Pulp necrosis usually occurs either as ischaemic necrosis (infarction) caused by disruption to the blood ... and nearby soft tissues such as the lips, tongue, etc. The study of dental trauma is called dental traumatology.[1] ... Potential sequelae can involve pulpal necrosis, pulp obliteration and root resorption.[10] Necrosis is the most common ... The layers of tissue that make up the tooth are clearly visible, with the pink pulp standing out against the paler dentine and ...
... or when a dental restoration is missing. Due to lack of intrapulpal pressure in an open lesion, pulp necrosis does not take ... inflammation of dental pulp in which the development of granulation tissue is seen, and is characterised by the overgrowth of ... the tissue outside the boundary of a tooth's pulp chamber. A pulp polyp may be found in an open carious lesion (tooth cavity), ... A pulp polyp, also known as chronic hyperplastic pulpitis, is a "productive" (i.e., growing) ...
This inflammatory cyst originated from a reaction to dental pulp necrosis. Dentigerous cyst, the second most prevalent cyst, is ... an inclusion cyst from remanents of the dental lamina on a newborn gingiva Gingival cyst of the adult; a soft tissue variant of ... Cysts that arise from tissue(s) that would normally develop into teeth are referred to as odontogenic cysts. Other cysts of the ... The high prevalence of tooth impactions and dental infections that occur in the bones of the jaws is also significant to ...
There is a small risk of pulp necrosis. If root canal treatment is attempted it can be difficult or impossible on a tooth with ... The exact causes of pulp obliteration are unclear but it typically occurs in response to dental trauma, especially following ... also termed pulp chamber obliteration or root canal obliteration) is a condition which can occur in teeth where hard tissue is ... electric pulp test) Lack of visible radiolucency where pulp system should be on radiographs (x-rays) Most of the time this ...
This may lead to ischemia (lack of oxygen) and necrosis (tissue death). Pulpitis is termed reversible when the inflamed pulp is ... Those cracks that are irritating the pulp but do not extend through the pulp chamber can be amenable to stabilizing dental ... The part of the pulp inside the crown is the pulp chamber, and the central soft tissue nutrient canals within each root are ... Left untreated, pulpitis may become irreversible, then progress to pulp necrosis (death of the pulp) and apical periodontitis. ...
At the core of the tooth is soft connective tissue termed the dental pulp. The pulp is pink/red due to its vascularity, but is ... Teeth may turn grey following trauma-induced pulp necrosis (death of the pulp). This discoloration typically develops weeks or ... vascular pulp tissue. As this process starts to approach the external surface of the tooth, a pink hue of this replacement pulp ... Failure to completely clean out the necrotic soft tissue of the pulp system may cause staining, and certain root canal ...
Dental trauma which may cause staining either as a result of pulp necrosis or internal resorption. Alternatively the tooth may ... Changes in the thickness of the dental hard tissues would result in intrinsic discolouration. There are a few causal factors ... Bleaching agents are only allowed to be given via dental practitioners, dental therapists and dental hygienists. Bleaching is ... either supplied by a dental professional or available over the counter). In some countries non dental professionals also carry ...
Necrosis of pulp (K04.2) Pulp degeneration (K04.3) Abnormal hard tissue formation in pulp (K04.4) Acute apical periodontitis of ... Other dental caries (K02.9) Dental caries, unspecified (K03) Other diseases of hard tissues of teeth (K03.0) Excessive ... Disease of hard tissues of teeth, unspecified (K04) Diseases of pulp and periapical tissues (K04.0) Pulpitis (K04.1) ... Posteruptive colour changes of dental hard tissues (K03.8) Other specified diseases of hard tissues of teeth (K03.9) ...
Dental pulp, which is a richly vascularized and innervated tissue, is enclosed by tissues, such as dentin, which are incapable ... When the disease process is of pulpal origin, the pulpal infection and necrosis may drain not only through the apical foramen, ... As a result, necrotic tissue located within the pulp chamber and canals provide nutrients for pathogenic bacteria to grow and ... Kakehashi, S. The effects of surgical exposures of dental pulps in germ-free and conventional laboratory rats. Oral Surg Oral ...
radiographically there is no obvious clear band of dentine visible between the carious lesion and the dental pulp on the ... This procedure is invasive and there is loss of biological dental tissues, which is not required for Hall technique stainless ... clinically - symptoms of irreversible pulpitis or pulpal necrosis[20]. *More than half of the root has resorbed and the primary ... "British dental journal. 171 (2). ISSN 0007-0610.. *^ "The Australian and New Zealand journal of dental and oral health therapy ...
... is a technique used in dental restorations to prevent the dental pulp from necrosis, after being exposed, or ... CaOH cement is not adhesive to tooth tissues and thus does not provide a coronal seal. In pulp perfusion studies, CaOH has ... To prevent the pulp from deteriorating when a dental restoration gets near the pulp, the dentist will place a small amount of a ... The ultimate goal of pulp capping or stepwise caries removal is to protect a healthy dental pulp and avoid the need for root ...
... pulp necrosis, periapical lesions and tooth developmental anomalies. In those with poor immune function, disseminated shingles ... Although VZV has been detected in autopsies of nervous tissue, there are no methods to find dormant virus in the ganglia of ... Gupta, S; Sreenivasan, V; Patil, PB (2015). "Dental complications of herpes zoster: Two case reports and review of literature ... Sometimes this leads to unnecessary dental treatment. Post herpetic neuralgia uncommonly is associated with shingles in the ...
Tooth decay may cause pulpitis (toothache) to occur in the same region, and this may cause pulp necrosis and the formation of a ... and the dental follicle. The soft tissue covering a partially erupted tooth is known as an operculum, an area which can be ... electronic irrigators and dental floss. This is a minor surgical procedure where the affected soft tissue covering and ... The presence of dental plaque or infection beneath an inflamed operculum without other obvious causes of pain will often lead ...
This procedure is invasive and there is loss of biological dental tissues, which is not required for Hall technique stainless ... radiographically there is no obvious clear band of dentine visible between the carious lesion and the dental pulp on the ... symptoms of irreversible pulpitis or pulpal necrosis More than half of the root has resorbed and the primary tooth is close to ... However, if the patient experiences pain/discomfort after the initial few days, consult your dental professional. A dental ...
Tiny particles of dental materials (e.g. abrasive polishing pastes) may become impregnated in the gingival tissues and trigger ... difference between a periapical abscess and abscesses of the periodontium are that the latter do not arise from pulp necrosis. ... The journal of contemporary dental practice. 9 (6): 82-91. PMID 18784863. Ammons WF, Schectman LR, Page RC (1972). "Host tissue ... may exist just after exiting small blood vessels deep within the underlying connective tissue of the soft tissue between teeth ...
... is inflammation of dental pulp tissue. The pulp contains the blood vessels the nerves and connective tissue inside a ... with pulp necrosis may be able to conduct electric current next to infected and hypersensitive pulp tissue Inflamed pulp tissue ... Seltzer and Bender's Dental Pulp. Quintessence, 2002 Eugene Chen and Paul V. Abbott, "Dental Pulp Testing: A Review," ... In addition, dental caries is more likely to develop pulpitis due to less time for the dental pulp to react and protect itself ...
... is inflammation of dental pulp tissue. The pulp contains the blood vessels the nerves and connective tissue inside a ... products associated with pulp necrosis may be able to conduct electric current next to infected and hypersensitive pulp tissue ... Seltzer and Bender's Dental Pulp. Quintessence, 2002. *^ a b c d e Eugene Chen and Paul V. Abbott, "Dental Pulp Testing: A ... In addition, dental caries is more likely to develop pulpitis due to less time for the dental pulp to react and protect itself ...
... irreversible pulpitis and pulpal necrosis, since it is the likely outcome of untreated dental caries, although not always. In ... 2010). Cohen's pathways of the pulp. Berman LH (web editor) (10th ed.). St. Louis, Mo.: Mosby Elsevier. pp. 529-555. ISBN 978-0 ... is mass of chronically inflamed granulation tissue that forms at the apex of the root of a nonvital (dead) tooth. However, a ... Periapical periodontitis can be considered a sequela in the natural history of dental caries (tooth decay), ...
... creates a superficial zone of coagulation or necrosis that remains compatible with the underlying tissue and isolates the pulp ... it can be removed by a dentist or dental therapist under local anaesthetic. If the soft tissue in the canals is still healthy ... Caries does not have to develop significantly before it reaches the pulp chamber. When the soft tissue in the pulp chamber is ... Its mechanism of action is the cauterization of the pulp tissue. It carburizes heat-denaturated pulp and bacterial ...
... during dental procedures). Odontoblasts were originally the outer cells of the dental papilla. Thus, dentin and pulp tissue ... reducing the probability of partial pulp necrosis. The distinction of the two kinds of tertiary dentin is important, because ... In vertebrates, an odontoblast is a cell of neural crest origin that is part of the outer surface of the dental pulp, and whose ... the dentinal tubules from tissue fluid that originally traveled from the blood vessels located in the adjacent pulp tissue. ...
Other specified diseases of hard tissues of teeth (521.81) Cracked tooth (522) Diseases of pulp and periapical tissues (523) ... Diseases of hard tissues of teeth (521.0) Dental caries (521.1) Excessive attrition (521.2) Abrasion of teeth (521.3) Erosion ... Acute and subacute necrosis of liver (570.0) Hepatic failure, acute (571) Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis (571.0) Fatty ... Cellulitis and abscess of oral soft tissues (528.4) Cysts of oral soft tissues (528.5) Diseases of lips (528.6) Leukoplakia of ...
Dental trauma[12] which may cause staining either as a result of pulp necrosis or internal resorption. Alternatively the tooth ... The organic matrix of dental plaque and calcified tissues undergo a series of chemical and morphological changes that lead to ... doi:10.1016/j.dental.2004.04.002. ISSN 0109-5641. PMID 15451241.. *^ American Dental Association (November 2010) [September ... Bleaching agents are only allowed to be given by dental practitioners, dental therapists, and dental hygienists. ...
History of dental restorations,[46] use of dental appliances, or oral exposure to substances that may cause oral lichenoid ... Pulp calcification *Pulp stone. *Pulp canal obliteration. *Pulp necrosis. *Pulp polyp. *Pulpitis ... Tissue biopsies of oral LP help to confirm the diagnosis and are particularly of value for erythematous and erosive LP, which ... "IOSR Journal of Dental and Medical Sciences. 12: 61-69. doi:10.9790/0853-1216169.. ...
Necrosis. Dental Pulp Necrosis. Pathologic Processes. Dental Pulp Diseases. Tooth Diseases. Stomatognathic Diseases. Anti- ... Regeneration (revascularization) of dental pulp. Immature Permanent Tooth With a Diagnosis of Pulpal Necrosis. ... Clinically confirmed necrotic pulp that will be confirmed with common endodontic pulp vitality tests (No response to cold or ... Tissue Characterization in Teeth Treated With a Regeneration Protocol. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ...
Dental Pulp Necrosis. Death of pulp tissue with or without bacterial invasion. When the necrosis is due to ischemia with ... When the necrosis is non-bacterial in origin, it is called pulp mummification. ... Physicochemical property of fimbriated (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) and non-fimbriated bacteria of attaching to cells, tissue, and ... superimposed bacterial infection, it is referred to as pulp gangrene. ...
A limited necrosis is induced against the vital pulp tissue (Figure 2). Necrosis provokes a slight irritation and stimulates ... S. Zhai, Y. Wang, W. Jiang et al., "Nemotic human dental pulp fibroblasts promote human dental pulp stem cells migration," ... On the left part of the pulp, the necrotic tissue is acellular, whereas in the right part of pulp, the vital pulp displays ... dental pulp stem/progenitor cells migrate to the injured site from perivascular region in the pulp tissue deeper from the ...
The present study examined the expression alterations of lncRNAs in tumor necrosis factor‑α induced osteogenic differentiation ... make them a promising target for bone tissue engineering. Long non‑coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have an important role in the ... Profiling lncRNA alterations during TNF‑α induced osteogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells.. Tao R1, Li YX2, Liu YK ... The multipotent and easily accessible characteristics of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) ...
Mast cells in inflamed human dental pulp. Scand J Dent Res 1971;79:488. 99. Zachrisson BU. Mast cells in the human dental pulp ... However, when a new and different irritant was injected into the pouch, a violent reaction, leading to tissue necrosis, ... 1. A report of studies into changes in the fine structure of the dental pulp in human caries pulpitis. J Endodon 1981;7:8. 71. ... Block RM, Lewis RD, Sheats JB, Burke SH, Fawley J. Antibody formation and cell-mediated immunity to dog pulp tissue altered by ...
K04.1 Necrosis of pulp K04.2 Pulp degeneration K04.3 Abnormal hard tissue formation in pulp ... 158 Dental and oral diseases with cc. *159 Dental and oral diseases without cc/mcc ... Unspecified diseases of pulp and periapical tissues. 2016 2017 2018 Billable/Specific Code *K04.90 is a billable/specific ICD- ... Pulp tooth disorder. ICD-10-CM K04.90 is grouped within Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v35.0): *011 Tracheostomy for face ...
Consequently, HDACis and DNMTis have the potential to enhance tertiary dentinogenesis by influencing the cellular and tissue ... aimed to protect the pulp and harness its natural regenerative capacity. If the dental pulp is exposed, as long as the ... aimed to protect the pulp and harness its natural regenerative capacity. If the dental pulp is exposed, as long as the ... The aim of this review is to highlight the potential role of epigenetic approaches in the treatment of the damaged dental pulp ...
... pulp necrosis in adults.. The concept of cell homing in dental pulp and dentin regeneration was first proposed in 2010.26 In ... The isolation of dental pulp stem cells in 2000 set the scene enabling tissue engineering to generate dental pulp, leading to ... Pulp tissue graft. Minced pulp tissue has been used as a source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) for tissue regeneration. The ... Regeneration of dental-pulp-like tissue by chemotaxis-induced cell homing. Tissue Engineering Part A. 2010;16(10):3023-31. [ ...
... the bacteria then may penetrate the underlying dentin and progress into the soft pulp tissue. Dental caries can result in loss ... Untreated caries can lead to incapacitating pain, a bacterial infection that leads to pulpal necrosis, tooth extraction and ... Studies on dental caries. I. Dental status and dental needs of elementary school children. Pub Health Rep 1938;53:751-65. ... Dental Caries. Dental caries is an infectious, communicable, multifactorial disease in which bacteria dissolve the enamel ...
... mechanical pulp exposure in animals with normal oral bacteria causes an infection of the dental pulp, with pulpal tissue ... Lesions of endodontic origin are associated with bacterial contamination and necrosis of the dental pulp, which typically ... inflammation and necrosis of the dental pulp, (3) the development of inflammation in the periapical area, and (4) periapical ... The infection persists as the necrotic tissue of the dental pulp is inaccessible to leukocytes and, hence, represents a ...
Preliminary clinical attempts have shown the feasibility of developing mineralized repair tissue, which may provide a ... AbstractDental pulp regeneration after pulp necrosis in immature teeth represents a major departure from traditional endodontic ... Dental pulp regeneration after pulp necrosis in immature teeth represents a major departure from traditional endodontic therapy ... it would achieve the restoration of normal host responses in the pulp space and the regeneration of destroyed dental tissues. ...
... dental implants, oral pathology, as well as oral and maxillofacial surgery. ... and cause pulp necrosis. Stem-cell-based tissue engineering and autogenous tooth implantation provide potential strategies for ... Vital pulp capping provides the advantage of maintaining the vitality of the dental pulp. However, dental pulp tissue is easily ... R. S. Prescott, R. Alsanea, M. I. Fayad et al., "In vivo generation of dental pulp-like tissue by using dental pulp stem cells ...
An avulsed tooth results in necrosis (dying) of the pulp tissue in the tooth. ... Pulp. The soft tissue in the center of all teeth, where the nerve tissue and blood vessels are. If tooth decay reaches the pulp ... Inflamed gum tissue caused by bacteria in dental plaque. Mild gingivitis causes little or no pain. You might not notice it. If ... Dental lasers are used for a variety of gum disease treatments. Patients can have their gum tissue restored to health without ...
... and characterization of human dental pulp-derived mesenchymal stem cells for banking and clinical use. Tissue Eng Part C ... 2012) Stem cell- and growth factor-based regenerative therapies for avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Stem Cell Res Ther ... 2001) Multilineage cells from human adipose tissue: implications for cell-based therapies. Tissue Eng 7: 211-228. ... Cell Tissue Res 333: 449-459.. *Tian H, Bharadwaj S, Liu Y, Ma H, Ma PX, et al. (2010) Myogenic differentiation of human bone ...
Untreated dental caries then allow bacteria to reach the level of the pulp, causing infection. The bacteria gains access to the ... The innermost cells die and form an aggregate of dead tissue. The inner cells undergo ischemic liquefactive necrosis which ... This infection is what causes necrosis of the pulp. Expansion of the cyst causes erosion of the floor of the maxillary sinus. ... Removal of the necrotic pulp and the inflamed tissue as well as proper sealing of the canals and an appropriately fitting crown ...
Pulp regeneration after non-infected and infected necrosis, what type of tissue do we want? A review. Dent Traumatol 2012;28:13 ... Pulp and periodontal tissue repair - regeneration or tissue metaplasia after dental trauma. A review. Dent Traumatol 2012;28:19 ... Pulp and periodontal tissue repair - regeneration or tissue metaplasia after dental trauma. A review. Dent Traumatol 2012;28:19 ... Pulp regeneration after non-infected and infected necrosis, what type of tissue do we want? A review. Dent Traumatol 2012;28:13 ...
Inflammation of the dental pulp, termed pulpitis, produces true hypersensitivity of the nerves in the dental pulp. Pulpitis is ... pulpal inflammation will irreversibly progress to pulpal necrosis due to compression of the venous microcirculation and tissue ... coolant water jet from a dental instrument. Electrical - electric pulp testers. Mechanical-tactile - dental probe during dental ... Evaporation - air blast from a dental instrument. Chemical - acids, e.g. dietary, gastric, acid etch during dental treatments. ...
The pulp tissue was characterized for the different groups, with special emphasis on cell density, inflammatory cells, ... In conclusion, orthodontic tooth movement per se has no long-lasting or irreversible effect on pulpal tissues, neither in the ... force application led to long-lasting or irreversible changes in pulpal tissues. Dimensional variables showed significant age- ... It is generally accepted that the effect of orthodontic tooth movement on the dental pulp in adolescents is reversible and that ...
Necrosis and hypoxia of the tooth pulp are the primary outcomes of dental avulsion. For the preservation of the periodontal ... Assessing dental avulsion. • Injury mechanisms and other associated tissues injured. • The history of the previous crown ... Posts Tagged Dental emergency. All You Need To Know About Dental Avulsion. Posted by etrans22 on Jul 23, 2019 in Dentistry , ... Any gum injury has a potential impact on your dental health. Your gum has soft tissues that are extremely sensitive and moist; ...
... of the dental pulp (nerve). Removal of the necrotic tissue remnan *Hand assisted laparoscopic surgery versus conventional ... is a frequently performed dental procedure and is carried out on teeth in which irreversible pulpitis has led to necrosis ( ...
... and integrity in our mission of education supporting oral health professionals and those allied with the dental industry. ... peer-reviewed journal that reconnects practicing dental hygienists with the nations leading educators and researchers. ... Understanding the risk for traumatic dental injuries (TDIs) and performing trauma first aid when they occur can encourage ... After a TDI, full recovery of the dental pulp and periradicular tissues is the goal.1,2 If proper healing does not take place, ...
It is usually the result of necrosis and infection of dental pulp following dental caries. ... inflammation and destruction of dental pulp and surrounding tissues, including the periodontal membrane and alveolar bone. The ... Infection of nerve tissue by the invading organism results in necrosis and liquefaction of the tissue, with edema of ... abscess arising in the periodontal tissue other than the orifice through which the vascular supply enters the dental pulp. ...
Pulpal necrosis[edit]. Pulp necrosis usually occurs either as ischaemic necrosis (infarction) caused by disruption to the blood ... and nearby soft tissues such as the lips, tongue, etc. The study of dental trauma is called dental traumatology.[1] ... Potential sequelae can involve pulpal necrosis, pulp obliteration and root resorption.[10] Necrosis is the most common ... The layers of tissue that make up the tooth are clearly visible, with the pink pulp standing out against the paler dentine and ...
Necrosis, or lack of blood supply, then sets in, literally reducing the once vital tissues into dried tissue. The tooth is dead ... When the dental pulp is inflamed, macrophages dominate, followed by T8, T4, B and mast cells. Its this inflammatory process ... Wed also want to be certain to not irreversibly injure any dental pulps, running the risk of pain and possibly root canals. So ... Its important to remember that every time a tooth is drilled upon, the dental pulp heals via the process of inflammation. ...
dental pulp calcification 10.3. DSPP ENAM 7. dental pulp necrosis 10.3. AMBN AMELX DSPP ... MalaCards integrated aliases for Teeth Hard Tissue Disease:. Name: Teeth Hard Tissue Disease 12 15 ... dental fluorosis 10.2. AMBN AMELX DSPP MMP20 15. amelogenesis imperfecta, hypoplastic/hypomaturation, x-linked 2 10.2. AMBN ... MalaCards based summary : Teeth Hard Tissue Disease is related to dentin dysplasia and amelogenesis imperfecta, type ib. An ...
  • The dental pulp may be exposed to the carious lesion or influenced by the adverse effects of filling materials (Figure 1 ). (hindawi.com)
  • However, when endodontic therapy is performed, new irritants in the form of medicaments, irrigating solutions, or chemically altered tissue proteins may be introduced into the granulomatous lesion. (scribd.com)
  • In case of an infected root canal with developed necrosis of the pulp, on the other hand, lesion may sometimes develop within the tissue surrounding the root apex (periapical tissue). (justia.com)
  • The surfaces of the root canal after extirpation of the pulp and the infected root canal are not only smooth but have the remaining protein, and particularly in case of the infected root canal, there are various impurities such as microorganisms and pus, and the surface of the root canal itself, being infected by microorganisms, is softened (soft dentin) to form a lesion deeply infected by microorganisms. (justia.com)
  • they need to fully understand the effects of lesion depth and the response of the pulp after the stimuli. (cdeworld.com)
  • Histology: The majority of this lesion consists of fibrous tissue and the epithelial lining is largely denuded. (jhu.edu)
  • We resort to the endodontic therapy if a lesion (carious, traumatic) determines an irreversible alteration of the pulp tissue, even necrosis. (dentistagalassini.it)
  • Concerns over the cost and destructive nature of dental treatment have led to the call for novel minimally invasive, biologically based restorative solutions. (frontiersin.org)
  • Consequently, HDACis and DNMTis have the potential to enhance tertiary dentinogenesis by influencing the cellular and tissue processes at low concentrations with minimal side effects, providing an opportunity to develop a topically placed, inexpensive bio-inductive restorative material. (frontiersin.org)
  • Resin-based dental restorative materials are extensively used today in dentistry. (mdpi.com)
  • The development and widespread use of new generations of resin-based dental restorative materials has allowed for the application of more conservative, esthetic and long lasting restorative techniques. (mdpi.com)
  • These adhesive techniques are extensively used in a wide variety of applications in dentistry, including restorative procedures, prosthodontics, orthodontics and preventive dentistry, making resin-based composites one of the most important groups of materials in dental practice. (mdpi.com)
  • 11,12 After placement of the powder to protect the pulp-dentin complex, the restorative procedure is similar to the process for deep cavities indirect capping: calcium hydroxide cement, GIC base, and amalgam/resin composite. (cdeworld.com)
  • Restorative procedures can also affect pulpal tissue. (crimsonpublishers.com)
  • One key requirement of a successful restorative procedure is to cause minimal additional irritation of the pulp so as not to interfere with normal pulpal healing. (crimsonpublishers.com)
  • The present study examined the expression alterations of lncRNAs in tumor necrosis factor‑α induced osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs. (nih.gov)
  • The amount of internal root resorption and number of TRAP positive cells around the root apex were determined and expression of Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α), Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor Kappa-B Ligand (RANKL) and Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (M-CSF) in pulp tissue of root apex was examined by immunohistochemistry. (alliedacademies.org)
  • Tumor necrosis factor-α in liver ischemia/reperfusion injury. (nih.gov)
  • A tooth with direct exposure of the pulp at a fracture site requires endodontic treatment or extraction. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • Recently, Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) has been mentioned as a source for growth factors and potentially ideal scaffold for regenerative endodontic treatment regimens due to their recognition to maintain vitality of pulp tissues by promoting cell growth and transport of growth factors in a disinfected environment [ 13 - 16 ]. (biomedres.info)
  • The decrease in the size of the pulp is thought to be related to a reduction in the number of nerves and blood vessels. (biologicaldentalhealth.com)
  • During treatment, it is important to work carefully and controlled in order to only remove tooth material where this is needed and to prevent opening of the pulps, which contain blood vessels and nerves of the elements. (edvc.nl)
  • In that case, a dentist may recommend root canal treatment, which starts with removing the dentinal pulpal complex - the tooth's "guts," so to speak, rich in nerves, blood vessels and delicate connective tissue. (biologicaldentalhealth.com)
  • Endodontic disease occurs when the dental pulp (odontoblasts, fibroblasts, undifferentiated mesenchymal cells, blood vessels, and nerves in the center of the tooth) becomes infected and/or inflamed. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • The term "endodontics" includes the branch of dentistry that deals with the endodontium therapy, that is the space inside the tooth which contains the dental pulp (cells, such as the odontoblasts, and stellate cells, by vessels and nerves). (dentistagalassini.it)
  • This reestablishes blood flow and regenerates nerves and pulp through the release of natural growth factors. (beverlyhillsdentalhealth.com)
  • The pulp is removed from the inside of the tooth part in bad condition with special tools called limes, the root content (cups and nerves) is extracted, the inside of the tooth is perfectly cleaned, disinfected and dried. (blimpt.com)
  • Ordinarily, the connective tissues become inflamed when they are exposed to an irritant. (scribd.com)
  • Cyst development stage: Epithelial cells form strands and are attracted to the area which contains exposed connective tissue and foreign substances. (wikipedia.org)
  • Substances released by the body's immune system as a result of the connective tissue breakdown, such as cytokines and growth factors, contribute to the mobilization and proliferation of epithelial cells in the area. (wikipedia.org)
  • This theory is unlikely in the absence of malignant transformation of epithelial cells as it does not follow the existing relationship between connective tissue and epithelium. (wikipedia.org)
  • Epithelial cells have an inherent quality to reproduce and cover any connective tissue that is not already lined with epithelia. (wikipedia.org)
  • After the experimental periods, the subcutaneous connective tissue surrounding the implanted material was removed and subjected to histotechnical processing and staining with hematoxylin and eosin. (bvsalud.org)
  • Beneath a calciotraumatic line, a thin layer identified as reactionary dentin underlines the periphery of the pulp chamber. (hindawi.com)
  • Another natural issue of concern is that, as we age, the size or volume of the pulp changes because the continued formation of secondary dentin throughout the life of the tooth gradually reduces the size of the pulp chamber and the canals in the roots. (biologicaldentalhealth.com)
  • If fractures are complicated you can make pulpotomies, nerve removal of the pulp chamber, in less serious cases and if this is not possible tooth extraction would take place. (ish-world.org)
  • The most obvious indication of endodontic disease is a fractured tooth with exposure of the pulp chamber. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • Except in very young animals, one of these options is indicated for every tooth in which a fracture has exposed the pulp chamber. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • In the process of root canal treatment, doctors often require of tooth root canal treatment of preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative were taken X-ray film, in order to help diagnosis and know the location of pulp chamber and root canal number and morphology, root canal working length measurement and subsequent follow-up providing the basis of the comparison and evaluation of curative effect. (viva-dental.com)
  • For this reason, and after improvements in local anaesthesia, the use of arsenical "devitalizing pastes" gradually declined.Arsenic and its compounds are known to be extremely toxic on contact with hard and soft tissues, and prolonged application or leakage of arsenic trioxide can cause severe damage to the periodontal tissues and alveolar bone. (minervamedica.it)
  • Ca(OH) 2 is the most widely accepted material, due to its biological and antimicrobial properties, such as reparative dentin to bridge a pulp exposure, induction of hard tissue formation and ability to stimulate the formation of new bone, healing of large periradicular lesions and inhibition of root resorption [ 17 - 19 ]. (omicsonline.org)
  • might result in tissue-space emphysema if directed into empty canals. (ohio-public-library.com)
  • It is indicated for direct pulp capping, pulpotomy and pulpal curettage procedures, and it is used routinely as an intracanal dressing between office visits to cleanse root canals and prevent flare-ups. (momknows.in)
  • Recently, a research line carried out on dental tissues has concretely reported the biological waste regenerative potential. (bvsalud.org)
  • The recent research lines and the consolidated bioethical principles on biological wastes have certified the safety of the reusing of biological tissues in clinical therapies and in cell banking for future regenerative applications. (bvsalud.org)
  • OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of electroacupuncture(EA)pretreatment on transient receptor potential vanilloid 1(TRPV1)/calcitonin gene-related peptide(CGRP)signal and nuclear factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65) protein expression in myocardial tissue of acute myocardial ischemic injury (AMI) rats, and to investigate the possible mechanism of electroacupuncture pretreatment against AMI. (bvsalud.org)
  • however, currently available dental-materials are limited by non-specific action, cytotoxicity and poor clinical handling. (frontiersin.org)
  • Preliminary clinical attempts have shown the feasibility of developing mineralized repair tissue, which may provide a clinically acceptable outcome. (ovid.com)
  • This article describes the current clinical strategies and protocols for the optimal disinfection and preparation of the pulp space environment to promote periapical healing as well as soft and hard tissue development after an infectious process. (ovid.com)
  • This is a Seal Program developed by the American Dental Association (ADA) to approve that a dental product is safe and has clinical effectiveness. (colgate.com)
  • Clinical signs of a dental problem are usually only shown when horses can no longer deal with the situation. (edvc.nl)
  • Clinical signs of disease due to opened pulps are often not clinically visible until years later. (edvc.nl)
  • Next to being able to have a closer look in the mouth, the dental scope allows other people to look in the mouth via a screen and also images of clinical findings can be made and saved. (edvc.nl)
  • Detection of a dental focus is based on an anamnesis (the relationship between a basic disease and a pathological state of mouth) and on the clinical and X-ray examinations. (dentisty.org)
  • The potential therapeutic application of epigenetic modifying agents, DNA-methyltransferase-inhibitors (DNMTi) and histone-deacetylase-inhibitors (HDACi), have been shown to promote mineralisation and repair processes in dental-pulp-cell (DPC) populations as well as induce the release of bioactive dentine-matrix-components. (frontiersin.org)
  • 2/3 dentine), sensible pulps, without spontaneous pain, were included. (bmj.com)
  • Interventions Peripheral carious tissue removal to hard dentine was performed. (bmj.com)