Office Visits: Visits made by patients to health service providers' offices for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.House Calls: Visits to the patient's home by professional personnel for the purpose of diagnosis and/or treatment.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.United StatesPrimary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Outpatient Clinics, Hospital: Organized services in a hospital which provide medical care on an outpatient basis.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Appointments and Schedules: The different methods of scheduling patient visits, appointment systems, individual or group appointments, waiting times, waiting lists for hospitals, walk-in clinics, etc.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Ambulatory Care Facilities: Those facilities which administer health services to individuals who do not require hospitalization or institutionalization.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Prenatal Care: Care provided the pregnant woman in order to prevent complications, and decrease the incidence of maternal and prenatal mortality.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Physicians' Offices: The room or rooms in which the physician and staff provide patient care. The offices include all rooms in the physician's office suite.Outpatients: Persons who receive ambulatory care at an outpatient department or clinic without room and board being provided.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Tape Recording: Recording of information on magnetic or punched paper tape.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Utilization Review: An organized procedure carried out through committees to review admissions, duration of stay, professional services furnished, and to evaluate the medical necessity of those services and promote their most efficient use.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Home Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Dental Care: The total of dental diagnostic, preventive, and restorative services provided to meet the needs of a patient (from Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982).Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Community Health Nursing: General and comprehensive nursing practice directed to individuals, families, or groups as it relates to and contributes to the health of a population or community. This is not an official program of a Public Health Department.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Time and Motion Studies: The observation and analysis of movements in a task with an emphasis on the amount of time required to perform the task.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Dental Care for Children: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of children, including the prevention of tooth diseases and instruction in dental hygiene and dental health. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Drug Utilization: The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Episode of Care: An interval of care by a health care facility or provider for a specific medical problem or condition. It may be continuous or it may consist of a series of intervals marked by one or more brief separations from care, and can also identify the sequence of care (e.g., emergency, inpatient, outpatient), thus serving as one measure of health care provided.Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Practice Management, Medical: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a physician's practice.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Physician Assistants: Health professionals who practice medicine as members of a team with their supervising physicians. They deliver a broad range of medical and surgical services to diverse populations in rural and urban settings. Duties may include physical exams, diagnosis and treatment of disease, interpretation of tests, assist in surgery, and prescribe medications. (from http://www.aapa.orglabout-pas accessed 2114/2011)Stomatognathic Diseases: General or unspecified diseases of the stomatognathic system, comprising the mouth, teeth, jaws, and pharynx.Insurance Claim Review: Review of claims by insurance companies to determine liability and amount of payment for various services. The review may also include determination of eligibility of the claimant or beneficiary or of the provider of the benefit; determination that the benefit is covered or not payable under another policy; or determination that the service was necessary and of reasonable cost and quality.Telephone: An instrument for reproducing sounds especially articulate speech at a distance. (Webster, 3rd ed)Drug Prescriptions: Directions written for the obtaining and use of DRUGS.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Medication Adherence: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in taking drugs or medicine as prescribed. This includes timing, dosage, and frequency.MassachusettsCost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.WashingtonPostnatal Care: The care provided to women and their NEWBORNS for the first few months following CHILDBIRTH.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.North CarolinaMedical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Patient Dropouts: Discontinuance of care received by patient(s) due to reasons other than full recovery from the disease.Insurance Claim Reporting: The design, completion, and filing of forms with the insurer.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Naturopathy: A drugless system of therapy, making use of physical forces such as air, light, water, heat, massage. Treatments are often diet- and nutrition-oriented with attention given to the patient's personal history and lifestyle. (From Cassileth, Alternative Medicine Handbook, 1998, p329)Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Medically Uninsured: Individuals or groups with no or inadequate health insurance coverage. Those falling into this category usually comprise three primary groups: the medically indigent (MEDICAL INDIGENCY); those whose clinical condition makes them medically uninsurable; and the working uninsured.ColoradoFeasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Anti-Asthmatic Agents: Drugs that are used to treat asthma.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Videotape Recording: Recording of visual and sometimes sound signals on magnetic tape.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Emergency Services, Psychiatric: Organized services to provide immediate psychiatric care to patients with acute psychological disturbances.Patient Readmission: Subsequent admissions of a patient to a hospital or other health care institution for treatment.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Drug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Diagnosis-Related Groups: A system for classifying patient care by relating common characteristics such as diagnosis, treatment, and age to an expected consumption of hospital resources and length of stay. Its purpose is to provide a framework for specifying case mix and to reduce hospital costs and reimbursements and it forms the cornerstone of the prospective payment system.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Time Management: Planning and control of time to improve efficiency and effectiveness.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Telemedicine: Delivery of health services via remote telecommunications. This includes interactive consultative and diagnostic services.Rheumatology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of inflammatory or degenerative processes and metabolic derangement of connective tissue structures which pertain to a variety of musculoskeletal disorders, such as arthritis.TennesseeCosts and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.After-Hours Care: Medical care provided after the regular practice schedule of the physicians. Usually it is designed to deliver 24-hour-a-day and 365-day-a-year patient care coverage for emergencies, triage, pediatric care, or hospice care.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Patient Discharge: The administrative process of discharging the patient, alive or dead, from hospitals or other health facilities.United States Department of Veterans Affairs: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to VETERANS. It was established March 15, 1989 as a Cabinet-level position.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.OhioMichiganConfidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Emergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Triage: The sorting out and classification of patients or casualties to determine priority of need and proper place of treatment.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Respiratory Tract Infections: Invasion of the host RESPIRATORY SYSTEM by microorganisms, usually leading to pathological processes or diseases.Intervention Studies: Epidemiologic investigations designed to test a hypothesized cause-effect relation by modifying the supposed causal factor(s) in the study population.Respiratory Tract DiseasesHospitals, Urban: Hospitals located in metropolitan areas.Patient Participation: Patient involvement in the decision-making process in matters pertaining to health.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Alberta: A province of western Canada, lying between the provinces of British Columbia and Saskatchewan. Its capital is Edmonton. It was named in honor of Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the fourth daughter of Queen Victoria. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p26 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p12)Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Morbidity: The proportion of patients with a particular disease during a given year per given unit of population.Cost Savings: Reductions in all or any portion of the costs of providing goods or services. Savings may be incurred by the provider or the consumer.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.International Classification of Diseases: A system of categories to which morbid entries are assigned according to established criteria. Included is the entire range of conditions in a manageable number of categories, grouped to facilitate mortality reporting. It is produced by the World Health Organization (From ICD-10, p1). The Clinical Modifications, produced by the UNITED STATES DEPT. OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, are larger extensions used for morbidity and general epidemiological purposes, primarily in the U.S.Self Care: Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.Group Processes: The procedures through which a group approaches, attacks, and solves a common problem.GeorgiaStatistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Air Pollutants: Any substance in the air which could, if present in high enough concentration, harm humans, animals, vegetation or material. Substances include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; and volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Manitoba: A province of Canada, lying between the provinces of Saskatchewan and Ontario. Its capital is Winnipeg. Taking its name from Lake Manitoba, itself named for one of its islands, the name derived from Algonquian Manitou, great spirit. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p724 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p332)OregonPatient Credit and Collection: Accounting procedures for determining credit status and methods of obtaining payment.Fee-for-Service Plans: Method of charging whereby a physician or other practitioner bills for each encounter or service rendered. In addition to physicians, other health care professionals are reimbursed via this mechanism. Fee-for-service plans contrast with salary, per capita, and prepayment systems, where the payment does not change with the number of services actually used or if none are used. (From Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Hospitals, Veterans: Hospitals providing medical care to veterans of wars.District of Columbia: A federal area located between Maryland and Virginia on the Potomac river; it is coextensive with Washington, D.C., which is the capital of the United States.Veterans: Former members of the armed services.Patient-Centered Care: Design of patient care wherein institutional resources and personnel are organized around patients rather than around specialized departments. (From Hospitals 1993 Feb 5;67(3):14)Kenya: A republic in eastern Africa, south of ETHIOPIA, west of SOMALIA with TANZANIA to its south, and coastline on the Indian Ocean. Its capital is Nairobi.MarylandContinental Population Groups: Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Quebec: A province of eastern Canada. Its capital is Quebec. The region belonged to France from 1627 to 1763 when it was lost to the British. The name is from the Algonquian quilibek meaning the place where waters narrow, referring to the gradually narrowing channel of the St. Lawrence or to the narrows of the river at Cape Diamond. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p993 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p440)Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Personal Health Services: Health care provided to individuals.Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Nurse Practitioners: Nurses who are specially trained to assume an expanded role in providing medical care under the supervision of a physician.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Spain: Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.Professional-Family Relations: The interactions between the professional person and the family.Observation: The act of regarding attentively and studying facts and occurrences, gathering data through analyzing, measuring, and drawing conclusions, with the purpose of applying the observed information to theoretical assumptions. Observation as a scientific method in the acquisition of knowledge began in classical antiquity; in modern science and medicine its greatest application is facilitated by modern technology. Observation is one of the components of the research process.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Gatekeeping: The controlling of access to health services, usually by primary care providers; often used in managed care settings to reduce utilization of expensive services and reduce referrals. (From BIOETHICS Thesaurus, 1999)Pollination: The transfer of POLLEN grains (male gametes) to the plant ovule (female gamete).BostonFees, Medical: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for medical services.Infant Care: Care of infants in the home or institution.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Case Management: A traditional term for all the activities which a physician or other health care professional normally performs to insure the coordination of the medical services required by a patient. It also, when used in connection with managed care, covers all the activities of evaluating the patient, planning treatment, referral, and follow-up so that care is continuous and comprehensive and payment for the care is obtained. (From Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2nd ed)Preventive Dentistry: The branch of dentistry concerned with the prevention of disease and the maintenance and promotion of oral health.Brazil
  • Standing in front of members of the Louisiana State football team, President Trump started his comments by saying his days are 10 times more exciting than those of most other presidents and finished by making an impeachment joke. (latimes.com)
  • But in between, Trump heaped plenty of praise on college football's newly crowned national champions during their White House visit Friday morning. (latimes.com)
  • Though President Trump has made it significantly more difficult to visit the Caribbean island - including revoking the once popular People to People travel option - Americans can still go under the 'support for the Cuban people' visa category. (essence.com)
  • As details of his movements continue to be confirmed, it's likely announcements of protest actions will follow, as happened the last time Trump paid a similar visit . (lamag.com)
  • Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump tore into New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie during a Monday stop in New Hampshire, hitting his 2016 GOP rival on President Obama's visit to the Garden State in the wake of Superstorm Sandy in 2012 and saying it's unlikely Mr. Christie didn't know anything about the 2013 lane closures on the George Washington Bridge. (washingtontimes.com)
  • But while the visit may give Trump a chance to bask in Israel's delight, Netanyahu also comes with serious concerns to raise about the president's broader approach on the Middle East. (timesofisrael.com)
  • Mr Netanyahu is also due to visit Washington and meet with his close ally US President Donald Trump twice next week. (straitstimes.com)
  • Mr Netanyahu has been pushing for the White House to recognise Israel's claim of sovereignty over the Golan Heights, seized from Syria in the 1967 Six-Day War, and Mr Trump tweeted Thursday that "it is time" to do so . (straitstimes.com)
  • Mr Trump became the first sitting American president to visit the wall , the holiest site where Jews are allowed to pray, in May 2017. (straitstimes.com)
  • Mr Pompeo said he did not know why neither Mr Trump nor Mr Pence visited the site with Netanyahu, and declined to say whether it indicated a change in how the United States sees its status. (straitstimes.com)
  • JERUSALEM (AFP) - US top diplomat Mike Pompeo became the first high-ranking American official to visit the Western Wall in annexed east Jerusalem with an Israeli prime minister on Thursday (March 21), giving another boost to Mr Benjamin Netanyahu's re-election campaign. (straitstimes.com)
  • The visit came less than three weeks before Israel's April 9 elections in which Mr Netanyahu is facing a tough challenge from a centrist alliance led by a former military chief of staff, Mr Benny Gantz. (straitstimes.com)
  • Since we have no idea how much longer the doors of Cuba will be open to us, now is the time to go on this bucket list adventure . (essence.com)
  • Located just south of Florida, nestled between the Caribbean Sea, the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean, the island of Cuba is a country where time seems to almost stand still. (essence.com)
  • HAVANA TIMES, Dec. 12 - Mexican President Felipe Calderon will visit Cuba in the first semester of 2010, announced Foreign Minister Patricia Espinosa. (havanatimes.org)
  • Public relations officer of the Gurgaon police Subash Boken said there would be heavy security and traffic diversions due to the PM's visit. (hindustantimes.com)
  • In a statement released Tuesday, the White House said Obama called Rousseff on Monday, and the leaders decided to postpone the visit until more progress is made. (latimes.com)
  • HONOLULU - A Hawaiian newspaper on Wednesday praised Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's visit to the symbolic site of Japan's 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor with U.S. President Barack Obama. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • Obama visited Hiroshima in May, the first sitting U.S. president to do so, to pay tribute to those killed in the U.S. atomic bombings on that city and Nagasaki in 1945. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • Religious and harvest festivals are taken extremely seriously throughout the region with Easter events celebrated just as earnestly in Orthodox Christian churches as harvest time in the fertile valley vineyards of the south. (responsibletravel.com)
  • Tamil Nadu chief minister Edappadi Palaniswami will reach Delhi on Monday on a two-day visit where he will discuss the political situation in Tamil Nadu with the senior leaders of his alliance partner Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP). (hindustantimes.com)
  • Prime Minister Lee's visit is very important because it enables the high-level focus of the bilateral relationship," Indian High Commissioner to Singapore T C A Raghavan said. (indiatimes.com)
  • During her visit, Minister Marsudi will hold bilateral talks with Solomon Islands Minister of Foreign Affairs and External Trade Hon. Milner Tozaka. (solomontimes.com)
  • Bashagha, who visited Cairo last month, said on twitter that the meeting was "fruitful and constructive" and described the relations with Cairo as "very important. (alarabiya.net)
  • The delegation also met GNA Foreign Minister Mohamed Taher Siala and promised to reopen the Egyptian embassy in Tripoli "at the earliest time," said Mohamed Elgeblawi, the GNA foreign ministry spokesman on Twitter. (alarabiya.net)
  • Get real-time notifications, view your trip details, and access mobile-only deals. (expedia.com)
  • Check out more photos from her trip and take notes from our exclusive guide so that you too can visit too before it's too late. (essence.com)
  • OTTAWA , Dec. 20, 2015 /CNW/ - After a successful trip to Lebanon , the Honourable John McCallum, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, continued on to Jordan for a two day follow-up visit. (newswire.ca)
  • If your purpose for visiting Madagascar is to see some of its spectacular wildlife, then it is best to time your trip accordingly. (onthegotours.com)
  • Dr. Deborah Birx, the coordinator of the White House Coronavirus Task Force, is defending her trip to Delaware after she came under fire for visiting with family during Thanksgiving weekend while urging the rest of America to stay home. (washingtontimes.com)
  • The paper said Abe's Pearl Harbor visit "was the second part of a peace offering" between the two World War II adversaries following Obama's preceding trip to Hiroshima, where the United States dropped the first of two atomic bombs in 1945 to bring about Japan's surrender. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • Another option is the Vancouver to Victoria ferry trip that takes around one and a half hours one way (excluding waiting time). (mapsofworld.com)
  • We are trying to time our trip to have less crowds but most cable cars still running and many higher elevation hiking trails open. (myswissalps.com)
  • Turns out he's mad for coming to see me because I've put on weight, making the trip a waste of his time. (fmylife.com)
  • Mr. Bush made a surprise visit to have Thanksgiving dinner at the Bob Hope Dining Hall at Baghdad International Airport with some 600 soldiers from the 1st Armored Division and the 82nd Airborne Division. (washingtontimes.com)
  • Considering French President Macron's Baghdad meeting with Iraqi officials, including Barzani, and Macron's emphasis on Iraq's sovereignty during the visit, it is not far-fetched to say that Turkey, by hosting Barzani in Ankara, wanted to remind France of its close relations with the KRG," he said. (arabnews.com)
  • When is the best time to swim with humpback whales? (responsibletravel.com)
  • When choosing the best time to visit the South Pacific you ll also need to bear in mind what you want to do there, whether that s swimming with humpback whales in Tonga and Tahiti, snorkelling in the waters off Fiji, or avoiding the chock-a-block Antipodean school holiday season. (responsibletravel.com)
  • Chuck Schilken is a multiplatform editor and sports writer for the Los Angeles Times. (latimes.com)
  • The best time to visit the Caucasus is either side of summer if you re travelling in the south with milder temperatures in the north, particularly on higher ground, making hanging glaciers in North Ossetia a permanent fixture. (responsibletravel.com)
  • By entering your email address you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and consent to receive emails from Time Out about news, events, offers and partner promotions. (timeout.com)
  • At a time when local news is more important than ever, support from our readers is essential. (delmartimes.net)
  • The increased tempo was noted by Iranian news agency Tasnim in its article on the Azerbaijani visit. (eurasianet.org)
  • Catch all the Business News , Breaking News Events and Latest News Updates on The Economic Times . (indiatimes.com)
  • Download The Economic Times News App to get Daily Market Updates & Live Business News. (indiatimes.com)
  • T he first time I visited Egypt was 51 years ago, when it was still enjoying what was left of its beautiful past, which the coup d'etat organizers of 1952 tried to distort. (arabtimesonline.com)
  • During this visit, I saw how the recovery of Egypt has begun and how the clean blood flows in the veins and to the old face, and how large groups of people have discovered the devastating danger represented by the Muslim Brotherhood. (arabtimesonline.com)
  • We thank brother and friend Antoine Hamshawi, who brought us back to Egypt and love Egypt by inviting me to spend the best time with him and with his family in the first and second Blue Nile, and thanks to him we will soon have visits to Egypt and to those we love in Egypt. (arabtimesonline.com)
  • March-early May and late September-November are great times to see the best that Egypt has to offer without worrying about the weather. (intrepidtravel.com)
  • While there may be a different pace to the day during this time in Egypt, it's definitely a positive eye-opening cultural experience. (intrepidtravel.com)
  • Visit Egypt and adventure along the River Nile through the land of the pharaohs, from. (intrepidtravel.com)
  • Iceland can stay relatively warm through the first week of October, so planning a September visit can be ideal (most of the crowds have thinned as children return to school). (travelandleisure.com)
  • V&A Waterfront is one of the most-visited places in South Africa and it has the crowds to go with it. (responsibletravel.com)
  • When to visit to beat the heat (and the crowds! (intrepidtravel.com)
  • Crowds come in flocks usually at the start and end of summer (late May-June and August-early September), but visiting just outside of these times is ideal to escape some of the crowds and the brunt of the sun's heat. (intrepidtravel.com)
  • Senior Egyptian security officials visited the Libyan capital Tripoli for the first time in years on Sunday and held talks with officials from the Government of National Accord (GNA), the Libyan interior ministry said. (alarabiya.net)
  • From Thura Shwe Mann, chairman of the Union Solidarity and Development Party and speaker of the House of Representatives, to Suu Kyi, China is about to initiate a multi-faceted diplomacy with Myanmar by sustaining government-to-government communication and at the same time deepening talks with opposition parties and non-governmental figures of Myanmar. (globaltimes.cn)
  • As long as you are fine with the rain, this is a good time to see the lush greenery and enjoy bigger waves for surfing. (excursiopedia.com)
  • In recent times, decades of sanctions and isolation placed on the nation while it was under Fidel Castro's communist regime have been slowly softening in the U.S., allowing Americans to finally have a chance to experience Cuba's magic. (essence.com)
  • EU foreign policy chief Josep Borrell will visit Moscow early next month to press the Kremlin on the arrest of Alexei Navalny, with the bloc weighing fresh sanctions, European diplomats say. (timesofisrael.com)
  • From May to October, it's hot and rainy at times but there's still plenty of sunshine so don't be put off (read our guide to hurricane seasons to find out more). (weather2travel.com)
  • WASHINGTON -- A state visit to the U.S. by the president of Brazil was put on hold Tuesday in the latest diplomatic fallout from leaks by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden about U.S. spying tactics. (latimes.com)
  • The visit put to rest the diplomatic differences related to Swine Flu. (havanatimes.org)
  • But which month is the best to visit? (visitscotland.com)
  • December can sometimes be the start of the rainy season but at the beginning of the month, rainfall should be at a minimum and lizards, snakes and chameleons are usually quite active during this time. (onthegotours.com)
  • During the ninth and holiest month in the Islamic calendar, Ramadan is observed by Muslims across the world as a time of spiritual rejuvenation and for this month, Muslims fast from sunrise to sunset. (intrepidtravel.com)
  • After a full month of work the 15-member jury has given its verdicts in the 11th Havana Times Photo Contest. (havanatimes.org)
  • We're really pleased that you've read X Times of Israel articles in the past month. (timesofisrael.com)
  • Each day, The Times-Gazette will draw three times a day for free three-month subscriptions to the newspaper. (timesgazette.com)
  • Research should be part and parcel of a travelling experience and we ve done some of the hard work for you, so read on to find out the best time to visit the South Pacific. (responsibletravel.com)
  • During his stay, he will visit Srinagar, Jammu and Leh where he will meet civil society members, political leaders and business delegations to find a lasting solution to the Kashmir problem. (hindustantimes.com)
  • I hope the PM will find time to visit other Provincial HQs to do the same thing. (solomontimes.com)
  • Tracie Guisinger, media sales consultant with The Times-Gazette, puts finishing touches on the newspaper's booth in the Wharton Building at the Highland County Fairgrounds on Friday. (timesgazette.com)
  • Lake Louise, Icefields Parkway and Jasper National Park are other scenic spots you can visit on a Canadian Rockies Tour. (mapsofworld.com)
  • A new poll shows President Bush has received a "substantial immediate" boost in popularity and approval ratings after his surprise visit with the troops in Iraq on Thanksgiving. (washingtontimes.com)
  • The summer months - July and August - are Iceland's warmest, and have long been the most popular time to visit. (travelandleisure.com)
  • This is actually the most popular time to visit the country as the water is clearer, if you want to do water activities like snorkeling or fishing, the weather is great for outdoor activities. (excursiopedia.com)
  • The visit was the first for senior Egyptian officials to Tripoli since 2014 when the country entered a civil war between the GNA, based in the capital, and the eastern-based Libyan National Army (LNA), led by Khalifa Haftar. (alarabiya.net)
  • The visiting officials would inspect the Egyptian embassy in Tripoli which has been closed since 2014, Egyptian state newspaper Ahram reported. (alarabiya.net)
  • Beyond keeping up with national and local events, The Rio Times will also cover issues of specific interest to foreign nationals here. (riotimesonline.com)