Sleep: A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.Sleep, REM: A stage of sleep characterized by rapid movements of the eye and low voltage fast pattern EEG. It is usually associated with dreaming.Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Sleep Apnea, Obstructive: A disorder characterized by recurrent apneas during sleep despite persistent respiratory efforts. It is due to upper airway obstruction. The respiratory pauses may induce HYPERCAPNIA or HYPOXIA. Cardiac arrhythmias and elevation of systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures may occur. Frequent partial arousals occur throughout sleep, resulting in relative SLEEP DEPRIVATION and daytime tiredness. Associated conditions include OBESITY; ACROMEGALY; MYXEDEMA; micrognathia; MYOTONIC DYSTROPHY; adenotonsilar dystrophy; and NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p395)Sleep Apnea Syndromes: Disorders characterized by multiple cessations of respirations during sleep that induce partial arousals and interfere with the maintenance of sleep. Sleep apnea syndromes are divided into central (see SLEEP APNEA, CENTRAL), obstructive (see SLEEP APNEA, OBSTRUCTIVE), and mixed central-obstructive types.Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: Disorders characterized by impairment of the ability to initiate or maintain sleep. This may occur as a primary disorder or in association with another medical or psychiatric condition.Polysomnography: Simultaneous and continuous monitoring of several parameters during sleep to study normal and abnormal sleep. The study includes monitoring of brain waves, to assess sleep stages, and other physiological variables such as breathing, eye movements, and blood oxygen levels which exhibit a disrupted pattern with sleep disturbances.Wakefulness: A state in which there is an enhanced potential for sensitivity and an efficient responsiveness to external stimuli.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Actigraphy: The measurement and recording of MOTOR ACTIVITY to assess rest/activity cycles.Arousal: Cortical vigilance or readiness of tone, presumed to be in response to sensory stimulation via the reticular activating system.Sleep Apnea, Central: A condition associated with multiple episodes of sleep apnea which are distinguished from obstructive sleep apnea (SLEEP APNEA, OBSTRUCTIVE) by the complete cessation of efforts to breathe. This disorder is associated with dysfunction of central nervous system centers that regulate respiration.Circadian Rhythm: The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.Disorders of Excessive Somnolence: Disorders characterized by hypersomnolence during normal waking hours that may impair cognitive functioning. Subtypes include primary hypersomnia disorders (e.g., IDIOPATHIC HYPERSOMNOLENCE; NARCOLEPSY; and KLEINE-LEVIN SYNDROME) and secondary hypersomnia disorders where excessive somnolence can be attributed to a known cause (e.g., drug affect, MENTAL DISORDERS, and SLEEP APNEA SYNDROME). (From J Neurol Sci 1998 Jan 8;153(2):192-202; Thorpy, Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine, 2nd ed, p320)Sleep Bruxism: A sleep disorder characterized by grinding and clenching of the teeth and forceful lateral or protrusive jaw movements. Sleep bruxism may be associated with TOOTH INJURIES; TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DISORDERS; sleep disturbances; and other conditions.Sleep Disorders, Intrinsic: Dyssomnias (i.e., insomnias or hypersomnias) associated with dysfunction of internal sleep mechanisms or secondary to a sleep-related medical disorder (e.g., sleep apnea, post-traumatic sleep disorders, etc.). (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Electrooculography: Recording of the average amplitude of the resting potential arising between the cornea and the retina in light and dark adaptation as the eyes turn a standard distance to the right and the left. The increase in potential with light adaptation is used to evaluate the condition of the retinal pigment epithelium.Sleep Medicine Specialty: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of SLEEP WAKE DISORDERS and their causes.Sleep Arousal Disorders: Sleep disorders characterized by impaired arousal from the deeper stages of sleep (generally stage III or IV sleep).Snoring: Rough, noisy breathing during sleep, due to vibration of the uvula and soft palate.Narcolepsy: A condition characterized by recurrent episodes of daytime somnolence and lapses in consciousness (microsomnias) that may be associated with automatic behaviors and AMNESIA. CATAPLEXY; SLEEP PARALYSIS, and hypnagogic HALLUCINATIONS frequently accompany narcolepsy. The pathophysiology of this disorder includes sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, which normally follows stage III or IV sleep. (From Neurology 1998 Feb;50(2 Suppl 1):S2-S7)Delta Rhythm: Brain waves seen on EEG characterized by a high amplitude and a frequency of 4 Hz and below. They are considered the "deep sleep waves" observed during sleep in dreamless states, infancy, and in some brain disorders.Sleep Paralysis: A common condition characterized by transient partial or total paralysis of skeletal muscles and areflexia that occurs upon awakening from sleep or less often while falling asleep. Stimuli such as touch or sound may terminate the episode, which usually has a duration of seconds to minutes. This condition may occur in normal subjects or be associated with NARCOLEPSY; CATAPLEXY; and hypnagogic HALLUCINATIONS. The pathophysiology of this condition is closely related to the normal hypotonia that occur during REM sleep. (From Adv Neurol 1995;67:245-271)Dreams: A series of thoughts, images, or emotions occurring during sleep which are dissociated from the usual stream of consciousness of the waking state.REM Sleep Behavior Disorder: A disorder characterized by episodes of vigorous and often violent motor activity during REM sleep (SLEEP, REM). The affected individual may inflict self injury or harm others, and is difficult to awaken from this condition. Episodes are usually followed by a vivid recollection of a dream that is consistent with the aggressive behavior. This condition primarily affects adult males. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p393)Nocturnal Myoclonus Syndrome: Excessive periodic leg movements during sleep that cause micro-arousals and interfere with the maintenance of sleep. This condition induces a state of relative sleep deprivation which manifests as excessive daytime hypersomnolence. The movements are characterized by repetitive contractions of the tibialis anterior muscle, extension of the toe, and intermittent flexion of the hip, knee and ankle. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p387)Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: A technique of respiratory therapy, in either spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated patients, in which airway pressure is maintained above atmospheric pressure throughout the respiratory cycle by pressurization of the ventilatory circuit. (On-Line Medical Dictionary [Internet]. Newcastle upon Tyne(UK): The University Dept. of Medical Oncology: The CancerWEB Project; c1997-2003 [cited 2003 Apr 17]. Available from: http://cancerweb.ncl.ac.uk/omd/)Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Fatigue: The state of weariness following a period of exertion, mental or physical, characterized by a decreased capacity for work and reduced efficiency to respond to stimuli.Hypnotics and Sedatives: Drugs used to induce drowsiness or sleep or to reduce psychological excitement or anxiety.Habits: Acquired or learned responses which are regularly manifested.Melatonin: A biogenic amine that is found in animals and plants. In mammals, melatonin is produced by the PINEAL GLAND. Its secretion increases in darkness and decreases during exposure to light. Melatonin is implicated in the regulation of SLEEP, mood, and REPRODUCTION. Melatonin is also an effective antioxidant.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Cataplexy: A condition characterized by transient weakness or paralysis of somatic musculature triggered by an emotional stimulus or physical exertion. Cataplexy is frequently associated with NARCOLEPSY. During a cataplectic attack, there is a marked reduction in muscle tone similar to the normal physiologic hypotonia that accompanies rapid eye movement sleep (SLEEP, REM). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p396)Restless Legs Syndrome: A disorder characterized by aching or burning sensations in the lower and rarely the upper extremities that occur prior to sleep or may awaken the patient from sleep.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Sleep Phase Chronotherapy: A progressive advance or delay of bedtime until the desired bedtime is achieved.Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Body Temperature: The measure of the level of heat of a human or animal.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Mandibular Advancement: Moving a retruded mandible forward to a normal position. It is commonly performed for malocclusion and retrognathia. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Somnambulism: A parasomnia characterized by a partial arousal that occurs during stage IV of non-REM sleep. Affected individuals exhibit semipurposeful behaviors such as ambulation and are difficult to fully awaken. Children are primarily affected, with a peak age range of 4-6 years.Adenoidectomy: Excision of the adenoids. (Dorland, 28th ed)Tonsillectomy: Surgical removal of a tonsil or tonsils. (Dorland, 28th ed)Pharynx: A funnel-shaped fibromuscular tube that conducts food to the ESOPHAGUS, and air to the LARYNX and LUNGS. It is located posterior to the NASAL CAVITY; ORAL CAVITY; and LARYNX, and extends from the SKULL BASE to the inferior border of the CRICOID CARTILAGE anteriorly and to the inferior border of the C6 vertebra posteriorly. It is divided into the NASOPHARYNX; OROPHARYNX; and HYPOPHARYNX (laryngopharynx).Uvula: A fleshy extension at the back of the soft palate that hangs above the opening of the throat.Homeostasis: The processes whereby the internal environment of an organism tends to remain balanced and stable.Pons: The front part of the hindbrain (RHOMBENCEPHALON) that lies between the MEDULLA and the midbrain (MESENCEPHALON) ventral to the cerebellum. It is composed of two parts, the dorsal and the ventral. The pons serves as a relay station for neural pathways between the CEREBELLUM to the CEREBRUM.Palate, Soft: A movable fold suspended from the posterior border of the hard palate. The uvula hangs from the middle of the lower border.Brain Waves: Wave-like oscillations of electric potential between parts of the brain recorded by EEG.Activity Cycles: Bouts of physical irritability or movement alternating with periods of quiescence. It includes biochemical activity and hormonal activity which may be cellular. These cycles are shorter than 24 hours and include sleep-wakefulness cycles and the periodic activation of the digestive system.Azabicyclo Compounds: Bicyclic bridged compounds that contain a nitrogen which has three bonds. The nomenclature indicates the number of atoms in each path around the rings, such as [2.2.2] for three equal length paths. Some members are TROPANES and BETA LACTAMS.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Chronobiology Disorders: Disruptions of the rhythmic cycle of bodily functions or activities.Positive-Pressure Respiration: A method of mechanical ventilation in which pressure is maintained to increase the volume of gas remaining in the lungs at the end of expiration, thus reducing the shunting of blood through the lungs and improving gas exchange.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Monitoring, Ambulatory: The use of electronic equipment to observe or record physiologic processes while the patient undergoes normal daily activities.Cross-Over Studies: Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Pharyngeal Muscles: The muscles of the PHARYNX are voluntary muscles arranged in two layers. The external circular layer consists of three constrictors (superior, middle, and inferior). The internal longitudinal layer consists of the palatopharyngeus, the salpingopharyngeus, and the stylopharyngeus. During swallowing, the outer layer constricts the pharyngeal wall and the inner layer elevates pharynx and LARYNX.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Respiratory Mechanics: The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.
  • Results: Fourteen patients were commenced on melatonin over the specified time period (13 male, median RBD onset age 56 years, range 20-77 years). (elsevier.com)
  • Methods: In this prospective, case-control, PET study, patients with IRBD and no clinical evidence of parkinsonism and cognitive impairment were recruited from tertiary sleep centres in Spain (Barcelona) and Denmark (Aarhus). (medicalbrief.co.za)
  • However, an alternative treatment is desirable for those with RBD refractory to clonazepam, for those who experience intolerable side-effects with clonazepam, and for those in whom clonazepam precipitates or aggravates obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). (elsevier.com)
  • Awareness can help you improve your sleep habits and in turn your well-being and productivity in order to "rise and shine" to accomplish what you really want (and need) to do on any given day. (washingtontimes.com)
  • There has been a longstanding belief that our sleep habits are being critically affected by our inability to put down our phones or pull ourselves away from screens. (newsblaze.com)
  • The researchers combined studies focusing on media habits and screen time of teenagers and school-aged children. (newsblaze.com)
  • The researchers and authors of the study align with numerous other experts on the key ways to reduce the impact screens have on your children's sleep habits. (newsblaze.com)
  • To foster awareness and healthier amounts of pillow time, the NWF guide "Green Time for Sleep Time" offers parents helpful advice about improving sleeping habits by exposing children to more outdoor play time every day. (news4jax.com)
  • There will be circumstances in which you need to adjust your sleeping habits. (wikihow.com)
  • From high stress events to illness and even to just identifying problems in your sleeping habits with a sleep diary, adjusting your sleep to these situations will help you get enough sleep and maintain your health. (wikihow.com)
  • Be flexible in your schedule and sleep habits to accommodate events that will disrupt your sleep. (wikihow.com)
  • The research team, led by neurologist Nathaniel Watson, looked at the weight and sleeping habits of 1,088 pairs of twins in the University of Washington Twin Registry and found that those who got less sleep - less than 7 hours a night - were not only heavier, but also had less control over their weight than those who got more than 9 hours of shuteye. (time.com)
  • Each student was asked two questions about his or her sleep habits: how often they slept for at least seven hours a night, and how often they slept less than they should. (time.com)
  • The students were participating in a larger longitudinal study and were asked to fill out a questionnaire about their sleep habits. (edweek.org)
  • Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? (medicalxpress.com)
  • The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Sufferers of mild sleep apnoea can significantly improve their condition by changing their eating and sleeping habits. (straitstimes.com)
  • Like many sleep researchers, Van Cauter argues that besides simply sleeping less, humans are no longer subjected to seasonal changes in the lengths of day and night. (nytimes.com)
  • The researchers found that those who drank the Montmorency tart cherry juice in the morning and at night were able to sleep more than an hour longer each night (averaging 84 minutes) compared to the placebo, and their sleep tended to be more efficient. (prnewswire.com)
  • Nevertheless, the evidence is sufficient for some researchers to call for further examination of sleep modification as an obesity prevention strategy. (childtrends.org)
  • In a second experiment, the researchers had 14 people either spend a weekend at home or camping -- this time in the summer. (healthonnet.org)
  • The switch in the brain that sends us off to sleep has been identified by researchers at Oxford University's Centre for Neural Circuits and Behaviour in a study in fruit flies. (eurekalert.org)
  • Researchers at University of California Los Angeles suggest that cramming up for exams by skipping sleep may not be the approach for better academic achievement. (medindia.net)
  • Studying, of course, is a key contributor to academic achievement, but what students may fail to appreciate is that adequate sleep is also important for academics, researchers say. (medindia.net)
  • Across the board, the researchers found that study time became increasingly associated with more academic problems, because longer study hours generally meant fewer hours of sleep. (medindia.net)
  • In the past, researchers also thought that getting too much sleep could lead to overweight, but this study shows that may not be the case. (time.com)
  • While the side effects of not getting enough sleep have long been established, researchers are now investigating the health consequences associated with too much sleep. (healthline.com)
  • As standardized test scores become more important to teacher evaluations and school funding in districts nationwide, a few researchers -- including Edwards -- say later start times for adolescents is a relatively simple solution. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • What researchers now know, however, is that sleep cycles change during late adolescence, requiring teens to sleep longer and later. (educationworld.com)
  • In a 2006 study, researchers examined 35,000 time-use diaries of Americans collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics over two years. (washingtoncitypaper.com)
  • At 11 p.m. local time, the researchers write, "people in the center of the country are 10 percentage points more likely to be asleep than people on the coasts. (washingtoncitypaper.com)
  • Hard to say-while Easterners started work later than those in the Central time zone, researchers also found they were more likely to work over lunch, possibly erasing any productivity gap. (washingtoncitypaper.com)
  • In addition to looking at the impact of social media on sleep disruption, the researchers also examined students' regular bedtime routines. (edweek.org)
  • Researchers have found that humans didn't always sleep in 8-hour chunks. (renegadehealth.com)
  • As many as one in five survivors of childhood cancer may have sleep problems that can impair cognitive performance in such areas as memory, performance of tasks, and emotional control, according to a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, led by a team of researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. (lww.com)
  • Teenagers also ate approximately 200 more calories - roughly equivalent to an extra can of soda or small snack - during the day if the variability in their sleep throughout the week increased by just one hour, for example by sleeping in an extra hour on a lazy Saturday morning, the researchers reported in the journal "Sleep Medicine. (scienceline.org)
  • Sleep researchers are now giving considerable attention to how and why this condition occurs. (nih.gov)
  • Assessing individuals who suffer from poor sleep may get easier in the coming year as a new device based on technology developed by researchers at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston finds its way to sleep labs and doctors' offices. (nih.gov)
  • By capturing the dynamic relationship between breathing and heart rate, called cardiopulmonary coupling (CPC), the researchers create a map of sleep throughout the night rather than simply counting how many times a patient stops breathing. (nih.gov)
  • Researchers report, "However, the odds of insufficient sleep duration were 147% higher for adolescents who use mobile phones in a dark room in contrast to those who were not night-time users of mobile phones. (ecochildsplay.com)
  • In the Yale University study, researchers conducted a systematic review of six studies that examined the impact of delayed school start times. (healthcentral.com)
  • The results underscore the importance of the "Sleep Well, Be Well" campaign of the National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project, a collaboration between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Academy of Sleep Medicine, Sleep Research Society and other partners. (eurekalert.org)
  • Keeping a regular schedule for sleeping and eating, getting exercise daily - preferably in sunlight and not just before bedtime - and using relaxation or mindfulness practice and cognitive interventions to help manage anxiety" were the key takeaways from this review, Ms. Trainor said in an interview. (medscape.com)
  • For example, children's use of electronic media, particularly around bedtime, is consistently associated with negative effects on their sleep. (childtrends.org)
  • That combined effect is not completely surprising, Guerrero told Medscape Medical News , because if children are not sleeping, they are often using their devices, so limits on bedtime and screen use work well together. (medscape.com)
  • Guerrero suggested that, given these findings, parents should be encouraged to restrict screen time, especially 1 to 2 hours before bedtime, so children's minds and bodies can prepare for sleep. (medscape.com)
  • Start by scheduling consistent bath and pajama time, story time and other pre-bedtime activities as part of the nighttime adjustment process. (childrens.com)
  • But a new study argues that social media and the lack of proper bedtime routines are making it increasingly difficult for students to get the sleep they need to thrive and even function at all in the classroom. (edweek.org)
  • Having a consistent bedtime and wake time will ensure that children are getting enough sleep, which then ensures their best success at school and in daytime functioning," said Meltzer. (edweek.org)
  • It might be a good idea to establish a "worry time" at least an hour before bedtime to write down all your worries or what you need to do the next day, he said. (medicalxpress.com)
  • So if your little arachnophobe only fears spiders after seven p.m., the fear may be bedtime-related, while a fear that's present at other times is likely authentic. (dreams.co.uk)
  • When these cells are exposed to ongoing light, a protein called melanopsin continually regenerates within them, signaling levels of ambient light directly to the brain to regulate consciousness, sleep and alertness. (hindustantimes.com)
  • Everyone experiences natural dips in alertness and increased wakefulness during certain times in a 24-hour period. (healthline.com)
  • It was long ago shown that a midafternoon nap of about 20 minutes can improve alertness and productivity and reduce mistakes among sleep-deprived workers, yet few employers offer a midday lie-down or provide a place for one. (nytimes.com)
  • Adequate sleep paired with limits on screen time helps reduce impulsivity in children, a study suggests. (medscape.com)
  • The authors studied the effect of adequate sleep, limited screen time, and physical activity on impulsivity in children. (medscape.com)
  • Most people say that about eight hours of sleep is an adequate amount, however it differs from person to person depending on their sex, age, and health conditions. (educationindex.com)
  • Everyone needs adequate sleep to function properly and to stay healthy, but sleep requirements vary by age and activity level. (wikihow.com)
  • Regardless of age and general sleep recommendations, your body requires adequate rest to function at its best. (wikihow.com)
  • But an adequate amount of sleep is also critical for academic success. (medindia.net)
  • More research is needed to determine which biological mechanisms are at work and exactly how much sleep is enough to override the influence of obesity genes, but the results add to the evidence that adequate sleep is crucial to maintaining a healthy weight. (time.com)
  • The more days students get adequate sleep - the better GPAs they attain. (medindia.net)
  • Fifty eight percent of the respondents felt that their work was impacted due to lack of adequate sleep with 11 percent falling asleep at work. (indiatimes.com)
  • A study published on Wednesday found children who adhered to Canadian guidelines for limiting recreational screen time to less than two hours a day, and achieving adequate physical activity and sleep, had greater cognitive abilities than those who did not. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • Although sleep research is a fairly new area of study, the difference in adolescent sleep cycles was noted as early as 1913, according to Carskadon. (educationworld.com)
  • Meltzer was not involved with this study, which took place in Wales, but she has studied and written extensively about adolescent sleep disruption. (edweek.org)
  • Each of these can disrupt the body's natural metabolic slow-down or temperature-control mechanisms, and so disrupt or curtail sleep, his study suggests. (time.com)
  • Intense exercise too close to bed can also "throw off" the body's thermoregulation processes, says Michael Grandner, an associate professor and director of the Sleep & Health Research Program at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. (time.com)
  • Your body's built-in sleep clocks cause your core temperature to drop during the hour or two before bed, and once you're asleep, it should continue to drop very gradually until reaching its lowest point sometime around 3 A.M., Grandner explains. (time.com)
  • Your body's circadian pacemaker works best when you get up at about the same time every day. (cdc.gov)
  • Using a formula based on the body's natural rhythms, the Sleep Calculator will work out the best time for you to rise or go to sleep. (thesun.co.uk)
  • The problem of sleep curtailment in late-20th-century Western society ''is so big,'' one prominent sleep researcher told me, ''that people just can't digest it. (nytimes.com)
  • But with online classes and extra engagements, he hardly has any spare time now," said Biswal, a researcher. (indiatimes.com)
  • Even a little extra time can make a big difference, however, according to long-time sleep researcher Mary A. Carskadon, professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown University and director of the Sleep Research Laboratory at E.P. Bradley University Hospital in East Providence, Rhode Island. (educationworld.com)
  • To reach a larger population, Goldberger's team - including Joseph Mietus, a bioengineer, Chung-Kang Peng, a statistical physicist, and Robert Thomas, a sleep researcher - wanted to develop a point-of-care device that could easily travel from a doctor's office to a patient's home. (nih.gov)
  • Although daylight has the biggest impact on regulating circadian rhythms, artificial light, meal times, diet, and amount of physical activity can also have an influence. (medscape.com)
  • The National Sleep Foundation has more on circadian rhythms and sleep . (healthonnet.org)
  • While proponents of Daylight Saving Time argue that later hours of daylight promote healthy active lifestyles, the impact to the circadian rhythms of people, or internal body clocks, never fully adjust to that extra hour, according to National Geographic. (plushbeds.com)
  • As children progress through puberty, their circadian rhythms begin to favor a delayed sleep phase that prefers late morning and late day activities. (healthcentral.com)
  • Peter Thomson-Whike, 11, whose screen time is strictly limited by his mother during the week, uses his iPad to message a friend at his home in Vancouver, B.C., on Sept. 26, 2018. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • At the University of Chicago Medical Center, Eve Van Cauter, a research professor of medicine, is beginning a major sleep-debt study that will, in her words, ''delineate the consequences of sleep curtailment for not only mood, not only cognition, not only performance, but also metabolism, cardiovascular function and immune function. (nytimes.com)
  • In the study, tart cherry juice helped to increase the availability of tryptophan, an essential amino acid and a precursor to serotonin that helps with sleep. (prnewswire.com)
  • With an industry demand for more courses, the SGS Education Center will offer dental professionals more access to Dental Association meetings, study clubs, and will also host a series of Dental Sleep Medicine seminars throughout 2013. (prweb.com)
  • Sleep Group Solutions offers sleep study interpretation , oral appliances (Norad Boil & Bite, Respire ), online directory 1800SleepLab.com and online marketing for CPAP Intolerant patients (1800Sleeptest). (prweb.com)
  • A new research study done at the University of Colorado, Boulder, sought out to answer this exact question of why screens negatively impact our sleep. (newsblaze.com)
  • The results may add scientific reinforcement to physicians' advice to parents of children, Guerrero said, and help them zero in on two factors that can make a difference, because few children (17.7%) in the study met both screen and sleep recommendations. (medscape.com)
  • For the ABCD study, parents were asked to record the hours the child slept most nights. (medscape.com)
  • The findings, the study authors said, add to evidence that time in the sun and the dark helps people get to sleep at a decent hour. (healthonnet.org)
  • The study also highlights how modern living -- so heavy on artificial light -- may thwart our sleep. (healthonnet.org)
  • The study doesn't establish a direct cause-and-effect relationship between time outdoors and better sleep. (healthonnet.org)
  • The big question now is to figure out what internal signal the sleep switch responds to,' says Dr Diogo Pimentel of Oxford University, the other lead author of the study. (eurekalert.org)
  • It has been very difficult to measure brain activation during sleep," said Brown University neuroscientist Masako Tamaki, lead author of the study published online Tuesday in the Journal of Neuroscience. (latimes.com)
  • Two particular sleep waves in the supplementary motor area appeared to have the strongest correlation with the improved keyboarding, the study found. (latimes.com)
  • The problem is the trade-off between study and sleep. (medindia.net)
  • In the study, UCLA professor of psychiatry Andrew J. Fuligni, UCLA graduate student Cari Gillen-O'Neel and colleagues report that sacrificing sleep for extra study time, whether it's cramming for a test or plowing through a pile of homework, is actually counterproductive. (medindia.net)
  • As a result, many high school students end up with irregular study schedules, often facing nights in which they need to spend substantially more time than usual studying or completing school work. (medindia.net)
  • Of course, those students who averaged more study time overall tended to receive higher grades in school. (medindia.net)
  • The study results are published in the September issue of the journal Sleep . (eurekalert.org)
  • The study involved a nationally representative survey of 3,760 men and women in Finland who had been working at any time in the prior year. (eurekalert.org)
  • To request a copy of the study, "Sleep and Sickness Absence: A Nationally Representative Register-Based Follow-Up Study," and the commentary, "Working with Poor Sleep," or to arrange an interview with the study author or an AASM spokesperson, please contact Communications Coordinator Lynn Celmer at 630-737-9700, ext. 9364, or [email protected] . (eurekalert.org)
  • The study was based on self-reported data on height, weight and sleep from 604 pairs of identical twins and 484 sets of fraternal twins. (time.com)
  • The 29 children underwent a baseline sleep study at enrollment, and 20 of them returned for a follow-up sleep study after six months. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • College students who do not take proper sleep, excessively sit before television or computer screens, suffer from stress, gamble, use alcohol or tobacco, or suffer from other health-related issues do not fare well in academics, according to a new study. (medindia.net)
  • The objectives of this study were to assess the capability of PTT to classify respiratory sleep events as either central or obstructive in nature and its sensitivity to detect both apnoeas and hypopnoeas. (actapress.com)
  • Slightly more than 750,000 were diagnosed with at least one sleep disorder, the study authors said. (health.com)
  • Veterans with PTSD had a very high sleep disorder prevalence of 16 percent, the highest among the various health conditions or other population characteristics that we examined," study senior author James Burch said in a news release from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. (health.com)
  • But a new University of Michigan study suggests that a large proportion of MS patients may have an undiagnosed sleep disorder that is also known to cause fatigue. (newswise.com)
  • Braley's work on this study was funded in part by an American Sleep Medicine Foundation Bridge-to-K grant. (newswise.com)
  • A separate study found heartlanders got 15 minutes more sleep on average, proposing TV schedules as a likely cause. (washingtoncitypaper.com)
  • This is the first major study to demonstrate that childhood cancer survivors are especially vulnerable to memory, emotional control, organizational, and associated neurocognitive skills due to fatigue and sleep problems," said senior author Kevin R. Krull, PhD, Associate Member of the Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control. (lww.com)
  • But a new study shows that contrary to previous beliefs, maintaining a regular sleep cycle may be more important than how much sleep teenagers actually get to some aspects of their health. (scienceline.org)
  • Peppard PE, Young T, Palta M, Skatrud J. Prospective study of the association between sleep-disordered breathing and hypertension. (springer.com)
  • Long-term cardiovascular outcomes in men with obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea with or without treatment with continuous positive airway pressure: an observational study. (springer.com)
  • On the flip side, a recent study from the University of Minnesota that Education Week wrote about found that pushing back high school start times improved academic performance, attendance and health, and reduced car crashes near schools. (edweek.org)
  • Lawmakers there approved a bill in April requiring the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to study the sleep needs of teens and survey districts that have already implemented later start times. (edweek.org)
  • A new study led by an international team of biologists has identified some of the brain chemicals that allow seals to sleep with half of their brain at a time. (innovations-report.com)
  • Findings from this study may explain the biological mechanisms that enable the brain to remain alert during waking hours and go off-line during sleep. (innovations-report.com)
  • The next step may be to initiate a sleep study, which requires that patients go to a special sleep lab where they will stay overnight. (nih.gov)
  • A Stanford University study looked at 21 years of traffic data and concluded that the spring shift is associated with a small but significant increase in the number of fatal accidents on the Monday following the time shift. (uwhealth.org)
  • Interestingly, the Stanford study showed that the fall shift is also associated with more accidents on the Sunday morning following the "fall back" time shift in October. (uwhealth.org)
  • HealthDay)-Sleeplessness could cost you when it's time to stand on your bathroom scale, a new British study suggests. (medicalxpress.com)
  • A study out of Yale University set out to determine the results of these later start times. (healthcentral.com)
  • One study found visits to the health clinic to rest fell from 69 to 30 visits after school start times were delayed, and two studies found significant decreases in depression scores. (healthcentral.com)
  • One study found significant improvements in attention levels after start times were delayed, and another reported improvements in reaction times. (healthcentral.com)
  • SINGAPORE - According to a study conducted by Jurong Health Services, one in three Singaporeans suffers from moderate to severe sleep apnoea , and one in 10 is afflicted with severe sleep apnoea. (straitstimes.com)
  • Thus, adolescents who must conform their waking times with school or work schedules may experience a sleep deficit. (childtrends.org)
  • This led to a marked drop in the average number of adolescents reporting at least seven hours of sleep nightly between 1991-1995 and 1996-2000. (time.com)
  • Adolescents should get 9 to 10 hours, though most teenagers sleep only about seven hours. (nytimes.com)
  • Adolescents with erratic sleep cycles may be more vulnerable to obesity. (scienceline.org)
  • They collected sleep data from 300 teenagers from across Pennsylvania and correlated it with the number of calories the adolescents consumed daily. (scienceline.org)
  • There's evidence that by imposing our schedules upon adolescents we may actually be endangering them to some extent," Alberto Ramos, the co-director of the Sleep Medicine Program at the University of Miami Medical School recently told the Miami Herald . (edweek.org)
  • Also note that time_nanosleep appears to do similar math, but it is somewhat more intuitive that the seconds parameter has an upper limit on what it can be. (php.net)
  • The role of sleep in children's development is incompletely understood. (childtrends.org)
  • Findings linking inadequate and/or disturbed sleep with children's cognitive function (including academic difficulties), or with their emotional or behavioral problems, are also beset by issues that call into question the direction of causality. (childtrends.org)
  • NWF's parents guide advocates trimming down children's consumption of electronic entertainment and balancing it with some outdoor play time every day. (news4jax.com)
  • Hilary Thomson sets strict limits on her children's screen time: 15 to 20 minutes a day for her son, who is 11, and during the week, none at all for her 5-year-old twin girls and 8-year-old daughter. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • The Healthy Sleep Project addresses the sleep health focus area of Healthy People 2020, which provides science-based, 10-year national objectives for improving the health of all Americans. (innovations-report.com)
  • On Thursday, the Harvard journal Education Next will release Edwards' findings that show that later start times, which usually allow teens more sleep, boost test scores significantly. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Often times the games children play or the shows and moves children watch are more stimulous. (newsblaze.com)
  • Children with negatively impacted sleep could experience long-term effects on their health. (newsblaze.com)
  • A lot of emphasis goes to helping children sleep when they're babies, but it shouldn't stop there. (newsblaze.com)
  • Remarkably, although the physiological requirement for sleep is undisputed, there is little consensus on how much sleep children actually need. (childtrends.org)
  • According to NWF Guide, young children and teens are losing anywhere from 10 to 14 hours of sleep a week. (news4jax.com)
  • Making matters worse, children are generally bad judges of the amount of sleep they really need. (news4jax.com)
  • School age children 6-13 years old need 9-11 hours of sleep every day. (wikihow.com)
  • Now, with the situation unlikely to change any time soon, children have become more distressed. (indiatimes.com)
  • Hence, PTT shows promises to differentiate respiratory events accordingly in absence of motion artefacts and can be a useful tool in a simplified ambulatory screening system for children for sleep-disordered breathing investigation. (actapress.com)
  • Designed for babies and young children, Little Aurelia blends gentle yet effective botanical ingredients with soothing essential oils to calm and settle at bath time and before bed. (beautyhabit.com)
  • Meanwhile, some parents are pushing back against a later start time, amid concern that ending the school day later means students' after-school activities go on too late and their children have to stay up even later to finish their homework. (edweek.org)
  • You might be surprised at how much sleep children need . (ecochildsplay.com)
  • It's been known for some time that watching television before bed is not the best for children transitioning into sleep. (ecochildsplay.com)
  • Rather than simply set rules, we need to explain to our children the consequence of screen time before bed. (ecochildsplay.com)
  • Studies show this is a very common issue, affecting up to three-quarters of kids from preschool through adolescence at one time or another,' clinical psychologist Jayne Schachter Walco, Ph.D. of Parsippany, New Jersey, says, 'parents think of fears as something only small children deal with, but that's untrue. (dreams.co.uk)
  • Overtired children have more difficulty reaching and maintaining deep sleep and spend more time in lighter, dreaming sleep, so vivid nightmares may come calling more often. (dreams.co.uk)
  • A wide range of stressors could affect sleep during COVID-19 social distancing interventions, including "major changes in routines, living with uncertainty," and anxiety about health, the economic situation, and how long this situation will last, the authors write. (medscape.com)
  • The memory necessary in the process of learning - both short- and long-term -is heavily reduced by a lack of sleep, thereby hindering growth and improvement. (washingtontimes.com)
  • How long should my baby sleep? (argos.co.uk)
  • The body clock says it's the right time, and the sleep switch has built up pressure during a long waking day. (eurekalert.org)
  • They were asked to keep a diary for a 14-day period, recording how long they studied, how long they slept and whether or not they experienced two academic problems: not understanding something taught the following day in class and performing poorly on a test, quiz or homework. (medindia.net)
  • A long trail of biological research attests to the effects sleep can potentially have on school work. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Having had to write about the 'sleeping giant' more times than I care to remember during a long career in journalism, it's nice to finally put that cliché to rest. (csmonitor.com)
  • About 70 million Americans sleep poorly or not nearly long enough to achieve the full physical, emotional and cognitive benefits sleep can bestow . (nytimes.com)
  • But I am very familiar with nights of sleep four to six hours long. (theincidentaleconomist.com)
  • Peker Y, Carlson J, Hedner J. Increased incidence of coronary artery disease in sleep apnoea: a long-term follow-up. (springer.com)
  • MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network. (innovations-report.com)
  • Many say that as long as these cycles are not interrupted, you can sleep for as many or as little as you like without it affecting your tiredness the next day. (thesun.co.uk)
  • Sleep experts and medical professionals have long argued that early school start times are making it difficult for kids to reach their academic potential and may even be harming their health. (healthcentral.com)
  • The results suggest that shorter sleep provides a more permissive environment for the expression of obesity related genes. (time.com)
  • Or it may be that extended sleep is protective by suppressing expression of obesity genes," said Watson in a statement . (time.com)
  • Lack of sleep has also been correlated with increased risk of heart disease, obesity, hypertension, and markers of inflammation. (theincidentaleconomist.com)
  • If untreated, sleep apnoea can lead to a higher risk of high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke and obesity. (straitstimes.com)
  • Better sleep quality and fewer early morning awakenings, however, appeared to be protective against PTSD symptoms. (medscape.com)
  • With such a high demand for quality sleep courses, Sleep Group Solutions continues to grow as leaders in complete sleep protocol solutions. (prweb.com)
  • However, perceived inadequate or poor-quality sleep is associated with a number of emotional, behavioral, and health problems. (childtrends.org)
  • Understand the role of caffeine in sleep quality. (humankinetics.com)
  • The AASM is a professional membership society that improves sleep health and promotes high quality patient centered care through advocacy, education, strategic research, and practice standards . (eurekalert.org)
  • It's far more important to make sure you get enough sleep and that it's good quality sleep . (healthline.com)
  • The pittsburgh sleep quality index: A new instrument for psychiatric practice and research. (springer.com)
  • This sleep spectrogram was produced using novel sleep quality analysis software. (nih.gov)
  • Because of the device's small size and portability, it may also permit at-home monitoring of sleep quality. (nih.gov)
  • The sleep spectrogram shows unstable or poor-quality sleep and stable or high-quality sleep, and allows us to dissect different causes of apneas [which occur during unstable sleep]," explains Goldberger. (nih.gov)
  • The impact of sleep difficulties and fatigue on neurocognitive functioning was comparable to cognitive side effects commonly associated with high-dose cranial irradiation therapy. (lww.com)
  • To test the effectiveness of repeated 200 mg doses of caffeine on cognitive function and live-fire marksmanship with soldiers during three successive nights of sustained wakefulness followed by 4-h afternoon sleep periods. (nih.gov)
  • A total daily dose of 800 mg caffeine during successive overnight periods of wakefulness is an effective strategy to maintain cognitive function when optimal sleep periods during the day are not available. (nih.gov)
  • Furthermore, sleep is vital for physical and mental development, as well as cognitive processes like attention and memory. (ecochildsplay.com)
  • Here's some of the impact that a lack of sleep has on our success with projects at work, school, or home. (washingtontimes.com)
  • According to Annarbor.com, her proposal was met with doubts about the lack of the tangible benefits of starting school later, concerns about tweaking bus times, and cost. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Eleven percent Indians took leave from work because of lack of sleep, according to the survey commissioned by Philips Electronics India Limited. (indiatimes.com)
  • however, many diseases lack specific corroborative wait time data. (nih.gov)
  • Since changing the laws in states and nations takes time and the legislative pull most of us lack, aside from writing letters to local lawmakers as well as those in Washington, you'll have to take matters into your own hands in order to minimize the jetlag impact of DST. (plushbeds.com)
  • Based on previous research, He and his colleagues suspected that lack of sleep may affect weight gain. (scienceline.org)
  • Negative effects on sleep can result from both excessively high activity levels, such as stress and work overload, or excessively low levels, such as from depression or confinement, the authors note. (medscape.com)
  • Even though the amount of tryptophan in tart cherry juice is smaller than a normal dose given to aid sleep, the compounds in tart cherries could prevent the tryptophan from breaking down so it's able to work in the body more effectively,' Greenway explained. (prnewswire.com)
  • Some employees sleep, nap, or take a power-nap only during their allotted break time at work. (educationindex.com)
  • The work in fruit flies allowed the critical part of the sleep switch to be discovered. (eurekalert.org)
  • for something else than mixing sleeping with signals, give some thought to whether Perl is the tool you should be using for work requiring nanosecond accuracies. (perl.org)
  • Your circadian rhythm may be off-balance if you work irregular shifts or go to bed at different times throughout the week. (healthline.com)
  • The direct flip cannot work unless all start times are reasonable. (sleepfoundation.org)
  • On the other hand, studies have shown that employers indicate a change in start times has not affected their business or the number of hours their student employees can work. (sleepfoundation.org)
  • Basically, we wanted to sleep in so we started to shift our work time from 6 to 7, then to 8 and now we start work at 9. (ycombinator.com)
  • If for any reason at all you aren't completely satisfied with your results from this keto friendly fat loss & sleep support supplement we will work to resolve your concern. (amazon.com)
  • Hillarys has created a sleep calculator which allows you to work out your ideal bed time with just one click. (thesun.co.uk)
  • The Pro Player Health Alliance is a partnership of Sleep Group Solutions and former NFL Players. (prweb.com)
  • And, too, sleep experts and the medical health community agree that when someone is sleep-deprived, their brain simply cannot process feedback from their actions and changing circumstances. (washingtontimes.com)
  • Sleep is integral to good physical health and mental well-being. (wikihow.com)
  • Sleep characteristics were determined by questionnaire, and health measures were derived from physical examination conducted by field physicians. (eurekalert.org)
  • The excess sleep you require might instead be a sign of a related underlying health condition. (healthline.com)
  • Sleep specialists, including EENT doctors, dentists, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, mental health professionals, neurologists, and pediatricians are all included in the listings to create a more comprehensive team approach. (prweb.com)
  • This is the first time that anything like this has been published where Grade Point Average is linked to all these behaviours," said Dr. Ed Ehlinger, the director and chief health officer of the University of Minnesota Boynton Health Service. (medindia.net)
  • For more, visit TIME Health . (time.com)
  • I thought we would see decreases in sleep in more recent years, because so much has been written about teens being at risk with technologies that adversely affect the sleep health of this population," she says. (time.com)
  • So our results show that health literacy around sleep are not only critical but that those messages are not adapted universally, especially not among higher-risk groups. (time.com)
  • Importantly, sleep is a malleable behavior that can be improved through behavioral and educational interventions to influence physical health," Curtis and colleagues wrote. (healio.com)
  • In the natural health world, sleep is praised for its restorative values. (renegadehealth.com)
  • Also, you can explain that daytime sleep is part of your obligation to your employer and yourself to maintain health. (cdc.gov)
  • Maintaining a regular sleep cycle is important for health. (scienceline.org)
  • The lawsuits say that the company provided free services and equipment to medical equipment suppliers, sleep labs and other health care providers in violation of the federal False Claims Act. (seattletimes.com)
  • Sleep is important to our health. (ecochildsplay.com)
  • Both the spring and the fall time changes can cause sort of a temporary jet lag, as if we suddenly stepped off a plane one time zone away," says Plante, an assistant professor of psychiatry at UW School of Medicine and Public Health. (uwhealth.org)
  • If you want to get involved, you can petition Congress and/or sign local, regional, or state petitions at Start School Later , a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that is campaigning to make "school start times compatible with health, safety, education, and equity. (healthcentral.com)
  • He holds a master's degree in health and wellness education and studied clinical sleep health at the University of Delaware. (healthcentral.com)
  • You see, the continuous 8-hour sleep routine that we've been told is "natural" is as natural for human beings as driving in automobiles or crossing several time zones in a matter of hours in an airplane. (renegadehealth.com)