Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Anesthesia Recovery Period: The period of emergence from general anesthesia, where different elements of consciousness return at different rates.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching: A method used to study the lateral movement of MEMBRANE PROTEINS and LIPIDS. A small area of a cell membrane is bleached by laser light and the amount of time necessary for unbleached fluorescent marker-tagged proteins to diffuse back into the bleached site is a measurement of the cell membrane's fluidity. The diffusion coefficient of a protein or lipid in the membrane can be calculated from the data. (From Segen, Current Med Talk, 1995).Recovery Room: Hospital unit providing continuous monitoring of the patient following anesthesia.Spinal Cord Injuries: Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).Convalescence: The period of recovery following an illness.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Nerve Regeneration: Renewal or physiological repair of damaged nerve tissue.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Phosphocreatine: An endogenous substance found mainly in skeletal muscle of vertebrates. It has been tried in the treatment of cardiac disorders and has been added to cardioplegic solutions. (Reynolds JEF(Ed): Martindale: The Extra Pharmacopoeia (electronic version). Micromedex, Inc, Englewood, CO, 1996)Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Brain Injuries: Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.Neuromuscular Nondepolarizing Agents: Drugs that interrupt transmission at the skeletal neuromuscular junction without causing depolarization of the motor end plate. They prevent acetylcholine from triggering muscle contraction and are used as muscle relaxants during electroshock treatments, in convulsive states, and as anesthesia adjuvants.Neuromuscular Blockade: The intentional interruption of transmission at the NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION by external agents, usually neuromuscular blocking agents. It is distinguished from NERVE BLOCK in which nerve conduction (NEURAL CONDUCTION) is interrupted rather than neuromuscular transmission. Neuromuscular blockade is commonly used to produce MUSCLE RELAXATION as an adjunct to anesthesia during surgery and other medical procedures. It is also often used as an experimental manipulation in basic research. It is not strictly speaking anesthesia but is grouped here with anesthetic techniques. The failure of neuromuscular transmission as a result of pathological processes is not included here.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Mice, Inbred C57BLBacteriological Techniques: Techniques used in studying bacteria.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Filtration: A process of separating particulate matter from a fluid, such as air or a liquid, by passing the fluid carrier through a medium that will not pass the particulates. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Ischemia: A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Paresis: A general term referring to a mild to moderate degree of muscular weakness, occasionally used as a synonym for PARALYSIS (severe or complete loss of motor function). In the older literature, paresis often referred specifically to paretic neurosyphilis (see NEUROSYPHILIS). "General paresis" and "general paralysis" may still carry that connotation. Bilateral lower extremity paresis is referred to as PARAPARESIS.Myocardial Reperfusion Injury: Damage to the MYOCARDIUM resulting from MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION (restoration of blood flow to ischemic areas of the HEART.) Reperfusion takes place when there is spontaneous thrombolysis, THROMBOLYTIC THERAPY, collateral flow from other coronary vascular beds, or reversal of vasospasm.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Neuronal Plasticity: The capacity of the NERVOUS SYSTEM to change its reactivity as the result of successive activations.Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Hot Temperature: Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Myocardial Stunning: Prolonged dysfunction of the myocardium after a brief episode of severe ischemia, with gradual return of contractile activity.Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Propofol: An intravenous anesthetic agent which has the advantage of a very rapid onset after infusion or bolus injection plus a very short recovery period of a couple of minutes. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1992, 1st ed, p206). Propofol has been used as ANTICONVULSANTS and ANTIEMETICS.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Hindlimb: Either of two extremities of four-footed non-primate land animals. It usually consists of a FEMUR; TIBIA; and FIBULA; tarsals; METATARSALS; and TOES. (From Storer et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p73)Micropore Filters: A membrane or barrier with micrometer sized pores used for separation purification processes.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Myocardial Contraction: Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Axons: Nerve fibers that are capable of rapidly conducting impulses away from the neuron cell body.Sleep Deprivation: The state of being deprived of sleep under experimental conditions, due to life events, or from a wide variety of pathophysiologic causes such as medication effect, chronic illness, psychiatric illness, or sleep disorder.Electrophysiology: The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.Paralysis: A general term most often used to describe severe or complete loss of muscle strength due to motor system disease from the level of the cerebral cortex to the muscle fiber. This term may also occasionally refer to a loss of sensory function. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p45)Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Locomotion: Movement or the ability to move from one place or another. It can refer to humans, vertebrate or invertebrate animals, and microorganisms.Myocardial Ischemia: A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Anesthetics, Intravenous: Ultrashort-acting anesthetics that are used for induction. Loss of consciousness is rapid and induction is pleasant, but there is no muscle relaxation and reflexes frequently are not reduced adequately. Repeated administration results in accumulation and prolongs the recovery time. Since these agents have little if any analgesic activity, they are seldom used alone except in brief minor procedures. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p174)Membrane Potentials: The voltage differences across a membrane. For cellular membranes they are computed by subtracting the voltage measured outside the membrane from the voltage measured inside the membrane. They result from differences of inside versus outside concentration of potassium, sodium, chloride, and other ions across cells' or ORGANELLES membranes. For excitable cells, the resting membrane potentials range between -30 and -100 millivolts. Physical, chemical, or electrical stimuli can make a membrane potential more negative (hyperpolarization), or less negative (depolarization).Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Muscle Fatigue: A state arrived at through prolonged and strong contraction of a muscle. Studies in athletes during prolonged submaximal exercise have shown that muscle fatigue increases in almost direct proportion to the rate of muscle glycogen depletion. Muscle fatigue in short-term maximal exercise is associated with oxygen lack and an increased level of blood and muscle lactic acid, and an accompanying increase in hydrogen-ion concentration in the exercised muscle.Exercise Test: Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.Myocardial Reperfusion: Generally, restoration of blood supply to heart tissue which is ischemic due to decrease in normal blood supply. The decrease may result from any source including atherosclerotic obstruction, narrowing of the artery, or surgical clamping. Reperfusion can be induced to treat ischemia. Methods include chemical dissolution of an occluding thrombus, administration of vasodilator drugs, angioplasty, catheterization, and artery bypass graft surgery. However, it is thought that reperfusion can itself further damage the ischemic tissue, causing MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.Sodium: A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.Diffusion: The tendency of a gas or solute to pass from a point of higher pressure or concentration to a point of lower pressure or concentration and to distribute itself throughout the available space. Diffusion, especially FACILITATED DIFFUSION, is a major mechanism of BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT.Specimen Handling: Procedures for collecting, preserving, and transporting of specimens sufficiently stable to provide accurate and precise results suitable for clinical interpretation.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Anesthesia, General: Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.Aphasia: A cognitive disorder marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or express language in its written or spoken form. This condition is caused by diseases which affect the language areas of the dominant hemisphere. Clinical features are used to classify the various subtypes of this condition. General categories include receptive, expressive, and mixed forms of aphasia.Pyramidal Tracts: Fibers that arise from cells within the cerebral cortex, pass through the medullary pyramid, and descend in the spinal cord. Many authorities say the pyramidal tracts include both the corticospinal and corticobulbar tracts.Remission, Spontaneous: A spontaneous diminution or abatement of a disease over time, without formal treatment.Bone Marrow Transplantation: The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Calibration: Determination, by measurement or comparison with a standard, of the correct value of each scale reading on a meter or other measuring instrument; or determination of the settings of a control device that correspond to particular values of voltage, current, frequency or other output.Lactic Acid: A normal intermediate in the fermentation (oxidation, metabolism) of sugar. The concentrated form is used internally to prevent gastrointestinal fermentation. (From Stedman, 26th ed)Evaluation Studies as Topic: Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.Androstanols: Androstanes and androstane derivatives which are substituted in any position with one or more hydroxyl groups.Muscles: Contractile tissue that produces movement in animals.Regeneration: The physiological renewal, repair, or replacement of tissue.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Adenosine Triphosphate: An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.Hemiplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function on one side of the body. This condition is usually caused by BRAIN DISEASES that are localized to the cerebral hemisphere opposite to the side of weakness. Less frequently, BRAIN STEM lesions; cervical SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; and other conditions may manifest as hemiplegia. The term hemiparesis (see PARESIS) refers to mild to moderate weakness involving one side of the body.Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Ambulatory Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on an outpatient basis. It may be hospital-based or performed in an office or surgicenter.Perfusion: Treatment process involving the injection of fluid into an organ or tissue.Energy Metabolism: The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.Nerve Crush: Treatment of muscles and nerves under pressure as a result of crush injuries.Anoxia: Relatively complete absence of oxygen in one or more tissues.Agar: A complex sulfated polymer of galactose units, extracted from Gelidium cartilagineum, Gracilaria confervoides, and related red algae. It is used as a gel in the preparation of solid culture media for microorganisms, as a bulk laxative, in making emulsions, and as a supporting medium for immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.Reperfusion: Restoration of blood supply to tissue which is ischemic due to decrease in normal blood supply. The decrease may result from any source including atherosclerotic obstruction, narrowing of the artery, or surgical clamping. It is primarily a procedure for treating infarction or other ischemia, by enabling viable ischemic tissue to recover, thus limiting further necrosis. However, it is thought that reperfusion can itself further damage the ischemic tissue, causing REPERFUSION INJURY.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Anesthesia, Intravenous: Process of administering an anesthetic through injection directly into the bloodstream.Reperfusion Injury: Adverse functional, metabolic, or structural changes in ischemic tissues resulting from the restoration of blood flow to the tissue (REPERFUSION), including swelling; HEMORRHAGE; NECROSIS; and damage from FREE RADICALS. The most common instance is MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.Vecuronium Bromide: Monoquaternary homolog of PANCURONIUM. A non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent with shorter duration of action than pancuronium. Its lack of significant cardiovascular effects and lack of dependence on good kidney function for elimination as well as its short duration of action and easy reversibility provide advantages over, or alternatives to, other established neuromuscular blocking agents.Cell Count: The number of CELLS of a specific kind, usually measured per unit volume or area of sample.Physical Exertion: Expenditure of energy during PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. Intensity of exertion may be measured by rate of OXYGEN CONSUMPTION; HEAT produced, or HEART RATE. Perceived exertion, a psychological measure of exertion, is included.Water Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Peripheral Nerve Injuries: Injuries to the PERIPHERAL NERVES.Cold Temperature: An absence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably below an accustomed norm.Ventricular Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.Forelimb: A front limb of a quadruped. (The Random House College Dictionary, 1980)Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Motor Skills: Performance of complex motor acts.Sodium-Hydrogen Antiporter: A plasma membrane exchange glycoprotein transporter that functions in intracellular pH regulation, cell volume regulation, and cellular response to many different hormones and mitogens.Rest: Freedom from activity.Atracurium: A non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent with short duration of action. Its lack of significant cardiovascular effects and its lack of dependence on good kidney function for elimination provide clinical advantage over alternate non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents.Buffers: A chemical system that functions to control the levels of specific ions in solution. When the level of hydrogen ion in solution is controlled the system is called a pH buffer.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor: A glycoprotein of MW 25 kDa containing internal disulfide bonds. It induces the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of neutrophilic granulocyte precursor cells and functionally activates mature blood neutrophils. Among the family of colony-stimulating factors, G-CSF is the most potent inducer of terminal differentiation to granulocytes and macrophages of leukemic myeloid cell lines.Transplantation, Autologous: Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Hematopoiesis: The development and formation of various types of BLOOD CELLS. Hematopoiesis can take place in the BONE MARROW (medullary) or outside the bone marrow (HEMATOPOIESIS, EXTRAMEDULLARY).Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Coma: A profound state of unconsciousness associated with depressed cerebral activity from which the individual cannot be aroused. Coma generally occurs when there is dysfunction or injury involving both cerebral hemispheres or the brain stem RETICULAR FORMATION.Potassium: An element in the alkali group of metals with an atomic symbol K, atomic number 19, and atomic weight 39.10. It is the chief cation in the intracellular fluid of muscle and other cells. Potassium ion is a strong electrolyte that plays a significant role in the regulation of fluid volume and maintenance of the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.Methohexital: An intravenous anesthetic with a short duration of action that may be used for induction of anesthesia.Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Reference Standards: A basis of value established for the measure of quantity, weight, extent or quality, e.g. weight standards, standard solutions, methods, techniques, and procedures used in diagnosis and therapy.Bicarbonates: Inorganic salts that contain the -HCO3 radical. They are an important factor in determining the pH of the blood and the concentration of bicarbonate ions is regulated by the kidney. Levels in the blood are an index of the alkali reserve or buffering capacity.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Transfer of HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS from BONE MARROW or BLOOD between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as an alternative to BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION in the treatment of a variety of neoplasms.Methods: A series of steps taken in order to conduct research.Regional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Tupaiidae: The only family of the order SCANDENTIA, variously included in the order Insectivora or in the order Primates, and often in the order Microscelidea, consisting of five genera. They are TUPAIA, Ananthana (Indian tree shrew), Dendrogale (small smooth-tailed tree shrew), Urogale (Mindanao tree shrew), and Ptilocercus (pen-tailed tree shrew). The tree shrews inhabit the forest areas of eastern Asia from India and southwestern China to Borneo and the Philippines.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Solid Phase Extraction: An extraction method that separates analytes using a solid phase and a liquid phase. It is used for preparative sample cleanup before analysis by CHROMATOGRAPHY and other analytical methods.Neurologic Examination: Assessment of sensory and motor responses and reflexes that is used to determine impairment of the nervous system.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Centrifugation: Process of using a rotating machine to generate centrifugal force to separate substances of different densities, remove moisture, or simulate gravitational effects. It employs a large motor-driven apparatus with a long arm, at the end of which human and animal subjects, biological specimens, or equipment can be revolved and rotated at various speeds to study gravitational effects. (From Websters, 10th ed; McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Light: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.Cerebral Cortex: The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Anesthesia: A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Blood: The body fluid that circulates in the vascular system (BLOOD VESSELS). Whole blood includes PLASMA and BLOOD CELLS.Leukocyte Count: The number of WHITE BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in venous BLOOD. A differential leukocyte count measures the relative numbers of the different types of white cells.Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Limit of Detection: Concentration or quantity that is derived from the smallest measure that can be detected with reasonable certainty for a given analytical procedure.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Dark Adaptation: Adjustment of the eyes under conditions of low light. The sensitivity of the eye to light is increased during dark adaptation.Anesthetics, Inhalation: Gases or volatile liquids that vary in the rate at which they induce anesthesia; potency; the degree of circulation, respiratory, or neuromuscular depression they produce; and analgesic effects. Inhalation anesthetics have advantages over intravenous agents in that the depth of anesthesia can be changed rapidly by altering the inhaled concentration. Because of their rapid elimination, any postoperative respiratory depression is of relatively short duration. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p173)Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Platelet Count: The number of PLATELETS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.Whole-Body Irradiation: Irradiation of the whole body with ionizing or non-ionizing radiation. It is applicable to humans or animals but not to microorganisms.Sensory Deprivation: The absence or restriction of the usual external sensory stimuli to which the individual responds.Neuromuscular Junction: The synapse between a neuron and a muscle.Nitrous Oxide: Nitrogen oxide (N2O). A colorless, odorless gas that is used as an anesthetic and analgesic. High concentrations cause a narcotic effect and may replace oxygen, causing death by asphyxia. It is also used as a food aerosol in the preparation of whipping cream.Cryopreservation: Preservation of cells, tissues, organs, or embryos by freezing. In histological preparations, cryopreservation or cryofixation is used to maintain the existing form, structure, and chemical composition of all the constituent elements of the specimens.Acute Kidney Injury: Abrupt reduction in kidney function. Acute kidney injury encompasses the entire spectrum of the syndrome including acute kidney failure; ACUTE KIDNEY TUBULAR NECROSIS; and other less severe conditions.Blood Cell Count: The number of LEUKOCYTES and ERYTHROCYTES per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD. A complete blood count (CBC) also includes measurement of the HEMOGLOBIN; HEMATOCRIT; and ERYTHROCYTE INDICES.Lactates: Salts or esters of LACTIC ACID containing the general formula CH3CHOHCOOR.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Neostigmine: A cholinesterase inhibitor used in the treatment of myasthenia gravis and to reverse the effects of muscle relaxants such as gallamine and tubocurarine. Neostigmine, unlike PHYSOSTIGMINE, does not cross the blood-brain barrier.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Consciousness: Sense of awareness of self and of the environment.Flocculation: The aggregation of suspended solids into larger clumps.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry: A microanalytical technique combining mass spectrometry and gas chromatography for the qualitative as well as quantitative determinations of compounds.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Models, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.Stress, Physiological: The unfavorable effect of environmental factors (stressors) on the physiological functions of an organism. Prolonged unresolved physiological stress can affect HOMEOSTASIS of the organism, and may lead to damaging or pathological conditions.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Guinea Pigs: A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.Sodium Channels: Ion channels that specifically allow the passage of SODIUM ions. A variety of specific sodium channel subtypes are involved in serving specialized functions such as neuronal signaling, CARDIAC MUSCLE contraction, and KIDNEY function.Patch-Clamp Techniques: An electrophysiologic technique for studying cells, cell membranes, and occasionally isolated organelles. All patch-clamp methods rely on a very high-resistance seal between a micropipette and a membrane; the seal is usually attained by gentle suction. The four most common variants include on-cell patch, inside-out patch, outside-out patch, and whole-cell clamp. Patch-clamp methods are commonly used to voltage clamp, that is control the voltage across the membrane and measure current flow, but current-clamp methods, in which the current is controlled and the voltage is measured, are also used.Fluorescent Dyes: Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.Neural Conduction: The propagation of the NERVE IMPULSE along the nerve away from the site of an excitation stimulus.Glucose: A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.Methyl Ethers: A group of compounds that contain the general formula R-OCH3.Neuromuscular Blocking Agents: Drugs that interrupt transmission of nerve impulses at the skeletal neuromuscular junction. They can be of two types, competitive, stabilizing blockers (NEUROMUSCULAR NONDEPOLARIZING AGENTS) or noncompetitive, depolarizing agents (NEUROMUSCULAR DEPOLARIZING AGENTS). Both prevent acetylcholine from triggering the muscle contraction and they are used as anesthesia adjuvants, as relaxants during electroshock, in convulsive states, etc.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Motor Cortex: Area of the FRONTAL LOBE concerned with primary motor control located in the dorsal PRECENTRAL GYRUS immediately anterior to the central sulcus. It is comprised of three areas: the primary motor cortex located on the anterior paracentral lobule on the medial surface of the brain; the premotor cortex located anterior to the primary motor cortex; and the supplementary motor area located on the midline surface of the hemisphere anterior to the primary motor cortex.
Time Inc. Retrieved May 11, 2013. "Holly Montag , Ascend Recovery". Ascend Recovery. Retrieved 2016-01-06. Holly Montag on IMDb ... Montag works at Ascend Recovery, a drug and alcohol rehabilitation center in American Fork. Montag and Wilson have one child, ...
Retrieved April 2013 "How Windows Time Service Works: Windows Time Service". Microsoft Corporation. Retrieved 2008-10-28. ... Data Recovery". Microsoft Corporation. Retrieved 2008-10-28. [1] "Windows Firewall/Internet Connection Sharing (ICS)"], ...
The Santiago Times reported in 2013 that Asenjo's group was to begin testing a vaccine for alcoholism on mice and hoped to ... John Lavitt (2013-11-04). "Alcohol Vaccine: A True Advance in the Treatment of Alcoholism?". Recovery View. Retrieved 2014-02- ... "World's first alcoholism vaccine to run preclinical trial in Chile". Santiago Times. 2013-01-22. Retrieved 2014-02-08. ... "Chilean senator calls for prudence in lithium development". Santiago Times. 2012-09-26. Retrieved 2014-02-08. "Congreso del ...
Joseph J. Ryan (1954-10-16). "Norfolk Hard Hit by Edge of Storm". The New York Times. Norfolk, Virginia. p. 11. Retrieved 2015- ... With existing infrastructure already poor, the recovery was very slow since many of the few existing roads were blocked, and ... Rotberg and Clague, p. 182 "Hurricane Dents Economy of Haiti". New York Times. 1956-01-05. Retrieved 2009-06-14. Gifford, p. 22 ... "Carolina Beaches Ravaged by Hazel". The New York Times. Wilmington, North Carolina. Associated Press. 1954-10-16. p. 10. ...
Te Kohanga Ote Whenua Hou, pers comm "Whenua Hou - Codfish Island - Kākāpō Recovery". Kākāpō Recovery. Retrieved 2017-11-16. ... Milne, Amy (15 January 2010). "Sirocco chills out on Codfish Island". The Southland Times. Retrieved 15 June 2015. "Prime ... Codfish is a predator-free bird sanctuary and the focus of kakapo recovery efforts. It holds the majority of the breeding ...
Times, Los Angeles. "Mollie Lowery dies at 70; served as a friend of and advocate for people living on L.A.'s sidewalks". ... "recovery awards". Retrieved July 28, 2016. "Despite homeless man's attack, 'NCIS' star an advocate". March 18, 2016. Retrieved ... Times, Los Angeles. "Plan offers new hope for housing the homeless". latimes.com. Retrieved July 28, 2016. ... The facility initially offered night-time support to homeless and mentally ill people. Rice and Lowery later renamed the center ...
"Remarkable Recovery". Times Daily. 1988-05-20. p. 2A. "Stroke survivor cited". Pittsburgh Press. 1992-02-22. p. W2. "Ohio 2 ... United Press International (1970-12-01). "Full recovery seen for '63 Miss America". The Bryant Times. p. 3. "It's A Long Way ... Associated Press (1962-09-07). "Miss America Crown Won by Ohio's Jacquelyn Mayer". Gadsden Times. p. 1. "Stroke victim to ... noted for her recovery from a near-fatal stroke suffered at age 28. Mayer graduated Sandusky High School in 1960, spending much ...
"Energy Recovery and Disposal". "Biofuels: Wasted Energy". Oliver, Christian, Financial Times. April 15, 2014. Retrieved 2014-07 ... This process is carried out at a resource recovery facility. Resource recovery is not only important to the environment, but it ... Resource recovery is the retrieval of recyclable waste, which was intended for disposal, for a specific next use. It is the ... Waste recovery (that is, recycling, reuse) can curb economic costs because it avoids extracting raw materials and often cuts ...
Graduating on time, Calvin concurrently earned a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics from Morehouse College and a Bachelor of ... "Louisiana Recovery Authority". State of Louisiana. Retrieved January 30, 2007. Sadeqi, Sharooq (April 18, 2006). "New Orleans ... Mackie to the Louisiana Recovery Authority (LRA), the guiding agency to lead the state's rebuilding efforts following the ... The New York Times. Retrieved 27 August 2017. "Tulane University Department of Mechanical Engineering". Tulane University. ...
He worked in jobs ranging from postal clerk to shoe salesman during his time at Columbia as a student before earning his B.A. ... "Why Is Arthur Burns of the Fed Smiling? He Sees Recovery". People. Retrieved December 5, 2012. Sobel, Robert (1980). "The ... Burns advised Nixon on economic policy during his brief time in the White House. As expected, Burns was appointed to replace ... He has a reputation of having been overly influenced by political pressure in his monetary policy decisions during his time as ...
"A Corinthian recovery". The Times. 5 November 1934. p. 6. "Sheffielder for Corinthians". Sheffield Independent. 22 November ... He made his debut against Wales on 19 January 1935 and played for the last time on 12 March 1938 against Scotland. Hill made 4 ... Hill played for Corinthian a number of times in 1934 and 1935. He played for Yorkshire Amateur in 1935 and 1936. Hill played ... Subscription required (help)). "F.A. Amateur Cup". The Times. 5 April 1937. p. 5. Haydn Hill at CricketArchive. ...
"Recovery School District faces anger over firings at Cohen, L.B. Landry high schools." The Times Picayune. October 9, 2012. ... Danielle Dreilinger of The Times Picayune wrote that "John Mac has become a flashpoint for tensions over the continuing role of ... In 2010 Paul Vallas, the superintendent of the Recovery School District, said that McDonogh should be converted into a charter ... In March 2014 the Recovery School District announced that McDonogh would be renovated, so the school would close temporarily. ...
"Long recovery road". The Canberra Times. 28 December 1971. p. 1. Retrieved 6 March 2017 - via Trove. Risk Frontiers (February ... At the time, Althea was one of the strongest tropical cyclones to strike the coast of Queensland; it still stands as the most ... Initial recovery work was delayed by persistent flooding of roadways, but within a few days of the cyclone, residents received ... "Cyclone". The Canberra Times. 24 December 1971. p. 3. Retrieved 6 March 2017 - via Trove. Centre for Research on the ...
Held inside Saddleback's Worship Center, the event is notable as the first time the two Presidential candidates met during the ... Saddleback is known for their signature ministries such as Celebrate Recovery, AIDS/HIV Ministry, Daniel Plan Ministry and ... please check on Saddleback Website for times) In November and December 2006, Saddleback Church played host to the second annual ... The Purpose Driven Church (PDC) curriculum and Celebrate Recovery program were founded at Saddleback Church. Waterfall and ...
At that time there were two theatre halls for the English in Calcutta. Lebedev was so successful that it aroused envy in ... "Staging a recovery". The Real Page 3. Indian Express Newspapers (Mumbai) Ltd. Retrieved 2006-12-09. Sengupta, Subodh Chandra ... Daily Times. Archived from the original on June 22, 2006. Retrieved 2006-12-08. Sengupta, Subodh Chandra and Bose, Anjali ( ... The theatre Lebedev established at Domtala (Ezra Street) used for the first time Bengali actors and actresses. The show held on ...
Rick Karlan (September 27, 2009). "Headed toward recovery". Albany Times Union. Retrieved 2009-09-27. Eric Anderson (May 8, ... The Albany Times Union is the area's primary daily newspaper; its headquarters moved to suburban Colonie from Albany in the ... Both Macy's, which up until this time only had locations in the New York City area, and Sears originally wanted to build stores ... There are no radio stations in the Albany area that provide programming in languages other than English on a full-time basis. A ...
Secure run time environment (sandbox) for guest processes. Live queuing - queued jobs preserve their full generic Linux ... Checkpoint and recovery. Tools: automatic installation and configuration scripts, on-line monitors. MOSIX is most suitable for ... Running applications with unpredictable resource requirements or run times.[citation needed] Running long processes, which are ... still preserving their autonomy over their own clusters and their ability to disconnect their nodes from the grid at any time, ...
... work has been quoted numerous times in variety of media, including The New York Times, The New Yorker, The Wall Street Journal ... "Conferences". Foundations Recovery Network. Retrieved 2013-10-31. Alan Downs's website. ... Stead, Deborah (1997-05-04). "When a Company Bows To a Neurotic Boss". The New York Times. Retrieved 2009-03-19. "Corporate ...
Sources also said the many-time All-Star has no plan to move to another team and the only thing he wants at this time is to ... Joaquin Henson (April 22, 2009). "Road to recovery". The Philippine Star. Retrieved March 17, 2012. [permanent dead link] ... The two-time MVP made his PBA return on October 28, 2014, in a 83-75 win against Blackwater, the team that released him a few ... The two time MVP averaged 1.29 points, 6.93 minutes and 1.57 rebounds in only 14 games, the worst season in his 15 years in the ...
"L.B. Landry High School in Algiers overcomes early chaos to finish school year smoothly." The Times-Picayune. May 18, 2011. ... It was previously operated by New Orleans Public Schools, then Recovery School District. It is currently home to George ... "Green said he arrived from Carver High School in the 9th Ward,[...]" "George Washington Carver Senior High School." Recovery ... In August 2007 the Recovery School District (RSD) placed students from Carver and Marshall Middle School in twenty-four ...
Recovery School District. Retrieved 26 July 2014. RSD looks at making charters pay rent, The Times-Picayune, December 18, 2009 ... The Recovery School District had been created in 2003 to allow the state to take over failing schools, those that fell into a ... At the time, 10% of high school students selected German. In 1918, because of World War I propaganda, German was discontinued. ... "RSD Frequently Asked Questions". Vallas wants no return to old ways, The Times-Picayune, July 25, 2009. Orleans Parish school ...
The Recovery School District stated that there were plans to reopen Reed in 2016; it was looking for organizations to act as ... During that month it moved to its original building, which at that time housed middle and high school classes. Reed closed in ... It was directly operated by the Recovery School District. It was named after Sarah Towles Reed (March 8, 1882 - May 8, 1978), a ... "Sarah T. Reed High School." Recovery School District. Retrieved on March 17, 2013. "Home." Sarah T. Reed High School. Retrieved ...
Times of India. 10 November 2014. Retrieved 14 April 2016. Swamy, Rohan (28 November 2011). "Road To Recovery". The Indian ...
Time for You (radio edit) 2) Where Were You? CD1 (BOIL4CD1) 1) Time for You (radio edit) 2) Where Were You? 3) Sour 16 CD2 ( ... "A Speedy Recovery". Bripop Revival. Retrieved 11 December 2012. "Lost Sheffield Bands: Speedy (Formerly Blammo!)". Sheffield ... ISBN 1-904994-00-8. "Publicity poster for Time for You single (with reference to forthcoming album)". Britpop Revival. ... Time for You 6) Going Home 7) I Like You So Much 8) Another Day (In the Life of Riley) 9) Heard, Seen, Done, Been 10) Karaoke ...
Recovery School District. Retrieved on March 17, 2013. "2009-2010 High Schools." Recovery School District. June 10, 2011. ... This was in light of an investigation by the New Orleans Times-Picayune and allegations of a bribery attempt. Some parents ... As of 2013 it is directly operated by the Recovery School District (RSD) and is a K-8 school. It previously served grades K-11 ... Andrew Vanacore of The Times Picayune said that compared to the former Abramson High School, "The new Abramson, part of a ...
At this time the surrounding lands were inhabited by Pomeranians, but Gdańsk soon became a starting point for German settlement ... Radzilowski, John (2009). "Remembrance and Recovery: The Museum of the Warsaw Rising and the Memory of World War II in Post- ... In the last million years, an ice sheet entered the area of Poland eight times, bringing along with it changes of reaches of ...
Facts Causes Symptoms/Signs Diagnosis Specialists Treatment Recovery Time Complications Prognosis *Facts you should know about ... Facts Causes Symptoms/Signs Diagnosis Specialists Treatment Recovery Time Complications Prognosis Center ... After surgery, physical therapy, rehab treatment, and recovery time take months, lasting up to a year or more. ... The care provider will learn about mechanism of injury and the appearance of the leg at time of injury. Knee examination will ...
What is appropriate follow-up following a shoulder dislocation? How long is the recovery time for a dislocated shoulder?. ... What is appropriate follow-up following a shoulder dislocation? How long is the recovery time for a dislocated shoulder? ... What is appropriate follow-up following a shoulder dislocation? How long is the recovery time for a dislocated shoulder? ... The total rehabilitation and recovery time from a shoulder dislocation is about 12-16 weeks. ...
I remain hyper sensitive for quite some time following this exposure. I have had this... ... I have had Ttp twice this year Im 48 my doc said the next time Ttp happens they will take my immune system. Has anyone had ... Ive noticed that when I encounter something that triggers an attack, I remain hyper sensitive for quite some time following ... I have had this happen following my methacholine challenge test, and several times following exposure to irritants such as ...
Recovery time varies from person to person but usually involves 1 week in the hospital. ... Recovery time. After waking up, a person will have a tube down their throat that helps them to breathe. It will feel strange ... Heart bypass surgery is a complicated procedure that involves a significant amount of preparation and recovery time. ... Although times can vary, heart bypass surgery usually lasts between 3 and 6 hours. ...
... mainly because of a lack of time and investment ... Time and money shortage hits disaster recovery. Survey: ... Disaster recovery and business continuity plans are being undermined by a lack of time and resources, according to new research ... "IT departments have been spending much time and effort on ways of bringing down the time it takes to restore data. Yet, this ... You may unsubscribe from these newsletters at any time.. You agree to receive updates, alerts, and promotions from the CBS ...
What expectation should I have for a recovery time after which I should be able to walk relatively pain free? + The recovery is ... What expectation should I have for a recovery time after which I should be able to walk relatively pain free? + The recovery is ... Recovery time after chondroplasty Art S. Six plus weeks ago, I had arthoscopic knee surgery and a chondroplasty procedure. ... Recovery time for this surgery is highly individual. Depending on the complications of the surgery, the state the knee was in ...
George Osborne said that the stronger-than-expected third quarter growth figures gave him confidence that a steady recovery was ... Osborne said Tuesday that the stronger-than-expected third-quarter growth figures gave him confidence that a steady recovery ...
... the progress of recovery can vary greatly from patient to patient. One thing that affects recovery time is the patients state ... Subject: Colectomy Recovery Time and Risks Category: Health , Conditions and Diseases Asked by: insertwittynamehere-ga List ... Subject: Re: Colectomy Recovery Time and Risks Answered By: pinkfreud-ga on 20 Mar 2003 16:26 PST Rated:. ... Subject: Re: Colectomy Recovery Time and Risks From: pinkfreud-ga on 20 Mar 2003 16:39 PST. ...
Well walk you through the less obvious symptoms of a broken leg, treatments, and what to expect during recovery. Plus, learn ... Broken Leg: Symptoms, Treatment, and Recovery Time. Medically reviewed by William Morrison, MD on August 10, 2018. - Written by ... Your recovery time will depend on the severity of the injury and how you follow your doctors directions. ... Breaking a leg and your recovery time will have a major impact on your mobility and lifestyle. When treated promptly and ...
Recovery time was shorter by about a day and a half for patients awaiting surgery who shared a room with someone who had ... Hospital roommates can affect the course of recovery from surgery, new research indicates. ... Hospital roommates can affect the course of recovery from surgery, new research indicates. Recovery time was shorter by about a ... HEALTH; Hospital Roommate Can Affect Recovery Time, Study Finds. By DANIEL GOLEMAN Published: May 5, 1988. ...
I know everyones recovery is different, but I need to plan on the amount of time I will need help. My husband will be here the ... Everyones recovery is different but with young kids around the house you might want to count on very limited activity for at ... You wont be able to lift your 2 year old for at least that amount of time. The risk is in developing a hernia. ... whole time too, but my mom will come for extra help with cooking and cleaning and watching the kids. Sorry this got a little ...
An apparatus and a corresponding method provide for real-time recovery of compromised information in a computer network. The ... for recovery of compromised data;. FIG. 5B. is a block diagram of a recovery program to institute real-time recovery of a ... including the time of last update of time-dependent data objects (e.g., target bearing); time of last hot recovery from an IW ... the ROM 208 includes a recovery architecture 300 that the processor 204 implements for real-time recovery of compromised ...
ovarian cyst surgery recovery time. I had a 7 cm fluid filled cyst removed from my left ovary and also some smaller ones from ... The inside needs time to heal as well and at times even with women who feel better a week later will carry on right away and ... The inside needs time to heal as well and at times even with women who feel better a week later will carry on right away and ... I understand I just had surgery and it could take time but I was kind of given the impression I would feel better and I dont so ...
For most college students, it is time to leave your hometown to return to school. This can be an exciting time where you will ... However, for someone in eating disorder recovery, the transition may be overwhelming. Though you may be ready to take on the ... new semester, its important to remember these tips and tricks for maintaining recovery. ... For most college students, it is time to leave your hometown to return to school. This can be an exciting time where you will ...
The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) has hiked policy rates 10 times in this period, which hasnt helped borrowers either. ... The recovery agent cannot discuss your debt issue with another person. Time: The recovery agent should contact you between 7am ... Calls: You can choose the place and time for receiving recovery calls. You can also request them not to call you at a ... Knowing those rights will help you handle a recovery agent. Identity: You can ask the recovery agent to show his identity card ...
The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 didnt set aside those regulations. So its not surprising when the ... 1) The simple math of jobless recoveries is rooted in population dynamics. The U.S. labor force of 154 million keeps growing by ... There are two common reasons for the current "jobless recovery" - and one bad policy decision that is making the current spell ... Employers dont rush to hire new workers the first time new orders begin to pick up. There are significant fixed costs ...
The recession that ended three years ago this summer has been followed by the feeblest recovery since the Great Depression, ... The engines that usually drive recoveries arent firing up this time.. Investment in housing, which grew an average of nearly ... The Washington Times Comment Policy. The Washington Times welcomes your comments on Spot.im, our third-party provider. Please ... The AP compared nine economic recoveries since the end of World War II that lasted at least three years. A 10th recovery that ...
People with diabetes are more likely to spend longer in intensive care and pick up an infection after an accident than those without, a U.S. study suggests.
An L-Shaped Recovery Isnt an Anomaly, Its the Norm Commentary Many analysts and economists are trying to predict the shape ... Economic Recovery Key to Trump Reelection in November, Strategists Say WASHINGTON-The state of the economy is a paramount issue ... Australian Recovery to Create Jobs and Become More Self Sufficient A key member of the Morrison governments co-ordination team ... Report Suggest US Children Left Behind in Economic Recovery A new report on child welfare that found more U.S. children living ...
Thats a big change from the first half of the year, when the economy, and earnings, seemed to be on solid recovery tracks.. ... A digest of essential news, insight and analysis from L.A. Times editors. ...
This parameter specifies the time stamp up to which recovery will proceed. At most one of recovery_target_time. and recovery_ ... or just before the recovery target (. false. ). Applies to both recovery_target_time and recovery_target_xid, whichever one is ... Continuous Archiving and Point-In-Time Recovery (PITR). At all times, PostgreSQL maintains a write ahead log (WAL) in the pg_ ... will continue recovery. Upon completion of the recovery process, the server will rename recovery.conf. to recovery.done. (to ...
... will continue recovery. Upon completion of the recovery process, the server will rename recovery.conf. to recovery.done. (to ... recovery.conf. . You can specify the stop point, known as the "recovery target", either by date/time, named restore point or by ... Continuous Archiving and Point-in-Time Recovery (PITR). At all times, PostgreSQL maintains a write ahead log (WAL) in the pg_ ... Thus, this technique supports point-in-time recovery: it is possible to restore the database to its state at any time since ...
Instead, Kaniya underwent an innovative procedure that repairs the ACL, allowing for quicker recovery and less pain. ... Minimally invasive approach to ACL surgery reduces recovery time. *Download PDF Copy ... its more effective than an external knee brace and the innovative suture technique helps speed up recovery time. ... Instead, Kaniya underwent an innovative procedure that repairs the ACL, allowing for quicker recovery and less pain. ...
Many worry that the state of the schools will hamper Detroits recovery from bankruptcy, a recovery evident in the new loft- ... Lockers near the swimming pool typify the decay at the Spain school. Credit Salwan Georges for The New York Times Most of the ... The school is said to be ridden with rats and crumbling ceilings. Credit Salwan Georges for The New York Times Not everyone has ... The empty swimming pool at the Spain school in Detroit. Credit Salwan Georges for The New York Times ...
Improvement is progressive with time and physical therapy exercises. In a study of outcomes in the Journal of Bone and Joint ... it was found that most patients recover in six months with slightly more recovery over the next 18 months. Patients reported ... the best way to have optimal outcomes is by early range-of-motion exercises and limiting the time of casting. ...
  • To recover successfully using continuous archiving (also called "online backup" by many database vendors), you need a continuous sequence of archived WAL files that extends back at least as far as the start time of your backup. (postgresql.org)
  • Database point-in-time recovery (DBPITR) and Flashback features enable you to recover your database to a prior point in time. (oracle.com)
  • It is sometimes called incomplete recovery because it does not use all of the available redo or completely recover all changes to your database. (oracle.com)
  • It's nothing to be afraid of, because you come back stronger than before as long as you take time to recover. (livestrong.com)
  • They need time to recover and rebuild. (livestrong.com)
  • Typhoid and jaundice, both these conditions take some time to recover. (diethealthclub.com)
  • The total recovery time for full use of an ankle after surgery to repair an ankle fracture is 12 months, according to Kaiser Permanente. (reference.com)
  • This includes the time spent wearing a cast, receiving physical therapy and returning the ankle to pre-fracture functionality. (reference.com)
  • There were 63 male (58.3 %) and 45 Female (41.7 %) with an average age of 8.6 years (range: 4 to 14 years), being the right extremity the most affected in 50.9 %, the most frequent fracture was the type III in 77.8 % (84 cases), the average operating time for an open reduction was 60.3 minutes and for a close reduction 30.8 minutes. (medigraphic.com)
  • No matter what treatment is done, the best way to have optimal outcomes is by early range-of-motion exercises and limiting the time of casting. (livestrong.com)
  • Our hope is our study will lead to further research, because identifying those at risk for prolonged recovery is critical to developing early interventions that improve outcomes for people who suffer concussions. (eurekalert.org)
  • Commentary Many analysts and economists are trying to predict the shape of the economic recovery post-COVID-19. (theepochtimes.com)
  • The approach uses distances between restored plots and reference plots along the successional gradient, represented by a vector in ordination space, to predict time to recovery. (uio.no)
  • The recession that ended three years ago this summer has been followed by the feeblest recovery since the Great Depression, according an extensive review of the country's economic ups and down over the past eight decades. (washingtontimes.com)
  • Since June 2009, governments at all levels have slashed 642,000 jobs, the only time government employment has fallen in the three years after a recession. (washingtontimes.com)
  • Many leaders see the massive joint recovery financing as a crucial tool of EU solidarity as some in the 27-nation bloc will have a harder time than others regaining their economic footing after the deepest-ever EU recession this year. (indiatimes.com)
  • Founded on the idea that abstinence is the bedrock of any recovery from drug or alcohol addiction , Hazelden will now incorporate anti-addiction medications in its rehabilitation programs. (time.com)
  • Treating drug addiction is as much about addressing why people become hooked on substances like alcohol, painkillers or illegal drugs as it is about weaning them off of their habit- at least that's the core of the Hazelden recovery approach. (time.com)
  • Using the appropriate medication to treat addiction is an idea whose time has certainly come, at least according to the latest research, which has documented the effectiveness of such strategies for decades. (time.com)
  • But last year, an unlikely group of renegades - suspender-wearing luthiers from the Appalachian Artisan Center here - embarked on a novel approach to the hopelessness of addiction called Culture of Recovery, an apprentice program for young adults rebounding from the insidious treadmill of opioids and other substances. (seattletimes.com)
  • Recovery from life's problems, dysfunctional behaviors and addiction from a Biblical perspective. (christians-in-recovery.org)
  • Smoking and Addiction Recovery: When is the Right Time to Quit? (drugrehab.org)
  • Many people in recovery rely on smoking because they believe it's less deadly than their addiction. (drugrehab.org)
  • It's not uncommon for people, even professionals, to believe that trying to quit smoking alongside alcohol addiction could be a roadblock to recovery . (drugrehab.org)
  • The RBI has issued guidelines on training recovery agents and the methods they should adopt for collection. (hindustantimes.com)
  • New and improved anesthesia techniques, as well as pain management medications and methods, have reduced pain and improved recovery after knee replacement surgery. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Here we report on role of sample storage conditions in reducing cultural recovery, optimization of methods for enhanced recovery, and culture-independent DNA-based quantification of mycobacteria (culturable and non-culturable) from MWF matrices. (astm.org)
  • The state-of-the art methods developed in this study for selective recovery and real-time PCR based quantification would allow rapid and efficient analysis of field MWF samples for mycobacteria including both culturable and non-culturable sub-populations. (astm.org)
  • Methods to reduce recovery time are to use a larger quantity of water, cooking a lesser amount of food at a time, and using a stronger heat source. (wikipedia.org)
  • Opening an oven door can reduce the temperature within an oven by up to 50° F (30° C). Methods to reduce oven recovery time include the placement of a baking stone or pizza stone, tiles made of ceramic, or a brick insert device in an oven, all of which serve to reduce recovery time through their heat retention properties. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, we still lack adequate methods for predicting the expected time to compositional recovery in restoration studies. (uio.no)
  • command, specifying, at a minimum, the tablespaces of the recovery set and the target time for the point-in-time recovery, and, if desired, an auxiliary destination as well. (oracle.com)
  • Restores the datafiles from the recovery set and the auxiliary set to the auxiliary instance. (oracle.com)
  • RMAN restores the database from backups created before the target time, and then applies incremental backups and logs to re-create all changes between the time of the data file backups and the end point of recovery. (oracle.com)
  • The average time spent in the hospital after an open colectomy (as distinguished from a laparascopic colectomy) is approximately eight to ten days: 'Proctocolectomy means that the entire colon and rectum are removed. (google.com)
  • Hospital roommates can affect the course of recovery from surgery, new research indicates. (nytimes.com)
  • Because less time is spent in the hospital, laser surgery is also less expensive. (deseretnews.com)
  • Recovery time can be considered a surrogate marker of severity and extended hospital stay imposes an economic burden on both family and limited health budgets in developing countries. (plos.org)
  • Justin Block of The Huffington Pos t reports that Odom was assisted into a chair, marking the first time the Laker has gotten out of bed since entering the hospital on Tuesday. (inquisitr.com)
  • Initial reports of Odom's condition had many fearing that the NBA great had little to no chance of recovery, with multiple outlets reporting that Odom's organs, including his liver, kidneys, and heart, were failing, and that family and friends, including estranged wife and reality television star Khloe Kardashian, were rushing to the hospital to say their goodbyes. (inquisitr.com)
  • Several studies have described the time course of stress relaxation in human joints, but most have looked only at the effects of short durations of stretch. (nih.gov)
  • The time course of recovery from stretch in human ankles has not been documented. (nih.gov)
  • Torque had recovered by 43% within 2 min of the release of stretch, but the degree of recovery did not appear to depend on whether subjects remained relaxed or performed isometric contractions. (nih.gov)
  • Recovery is initially rapid when the stretch is released. (nih.gov)
  • These data provide a description of the time course of the effects of stretch, and of the subsequent relief of stretch, on mechanical properties of human ankles. (nih.gov)
  • The doctor is surprised by the long recovery - he says that his intestines are still 'asleep' and need to wake up. (google.com)
  • There are several factors that may explain the more rapid recovery, said Dr. Kulik, who conducted the research with Heike Mahler, a psychologist at California State University at Long Beach. (nytimes.com)
  • There are two common reasons for the current "jobless recovery" - and one bad policy decision that is making the current spell of joblessness unnecessarily long. (washingtontimes.com)
  • Tommy John was a long-time Major League Baseball pitcher, and he was the first to have this now-common surgery. (healthline.com)
  • How Long Is Wisdom Teeth Recovery Time? (colgate.com)
  • According to the offices of practicing oral surgeon Dr. Joseph Arzadon of Arlington, Virginia, typical wisdom teeth recovery time is three to four days, although it can be as long as one week. (colgate.com)
  • This could help boost the construction sector and economic recovery in the short term, while improving urban congestion in the long term. (ft.com)
  • But life is starting to get better, and after a long and hard-fought recovery from a car accident that nearly took his life, the comic has gotten married. (inquisitr.com)
  • Tracy and his long-time fiancée, (and mother of his 2-year-old daughter, Maven) Megan Wollover , were married Sunday night in a small ceremony. (inquisitr.com)
  • His long-time fiancée remained by his side following the accident and during his recovery, and the new Mrs. Morgan said the experience has strengthened their relationship. (inquisitr.com)
  • Taylor was a two-time Howard County Football Defensive Player of the Year at Long Reach in mid-2000s. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Taylor, the former two-time Howard County Times Football Defensive Player of the Year while he was at Long Reach High School in the mid 2000s, still remembers what it was like to put his body through the wringer on a weekly basis. (baltimoresun.com)
  • These kids get to avoid the serious long-term side effects of surgery while hastening their spondylolysis recovery time. (regenexx.com)
  • A possible compromise could involve using both the EU's next long-term budget for 2021 to 2027, which would disburse grants, and the Recovery Fund, which would operate on the basis of loans. (indiatimes.com)
  • But I stayed as long as I could, 20 mins the first time, about 17 mins the second time. (whattoexpect.com)
  • This may sound like it's a long time to wait for results, and healing milestones can vary between individuals, but all surgery causes trauma to the body. (demotix.com)
  • In times of stress, it is easy to fall back into disordered eating patterns. (nationaleatingdisorders.org)
  • One only has to look back at the Economic Recovery Act of 2008 to see the potential. (washingtontimes.com)
  • Oracle Database also provides a set of features collectively known as Flashback Technology that supports viewing past states of data, and winding and rewinding data back and forth in time, without requiring the restore of the database from backup. (oracle.com)
  • No, I'm not saying that, but obviously it's not going to be as soon as we thought because now we're taking a few days off … But I think any time someone is injured and you're not sure when they're exactly going to be back, you can't really count on them in a sense. (taipeitimes.com)
  • After your body is put through hell and back, waking up for those endless nights, you require time to unwind, recuperate, and spend time with your little bundle of joy. (indiatimes.com)
  • From his youth playing days, until finishing his football career at Division II Shepherd University in 2009, he sought out ways to speed up a recovery process that routinely required two to three days for his body to get back to 100 percent. (baltimoresun.com)
  • A lot of the athletic population are benefiting because they can do their hard workouts, and then they can hop in cryo that night or the next day and then they get back to their hard work out again and not have to cut back for recovery," Edwards said. (baltimoresun.com)
  • If the testing by the business line is not successful due to infrastructure recovery issues, then the infrastructure is handed back to the technology support group for further analysis and recovery and the time is reset to the start at the initial delivery time. (wikipedia.org)
  • To pass time before the first pitch, Kate drove back home and consumed herself in phone calls to plan an upcoming charity event. (seattletimes.com)
  • First we will deal with a cycle where the part needs more time to cool than it takes you to get the screw back to build the next shot. (ptonline.com)
  • Their business models are based on customers paying back several times the amount they borrowed through annual interest rates in the hundreds of percent. (socialistworker.co.uk)
  • And golfers can get back on the links within four to six weeks, a fraction of the time from a traditional hip replacement. (jacksonville.com)
  • But it's taken longer for the leading treatment providers in the community, including Hazelden and Betty Ford , to accept the idea that giving drug addicts medications similar to those to which they were addicted can be part of recovery. (time.com)
  • Your surgeon will be aware of any concerns unique to you and your recovery and will also provide precise directions about any medications that you are prescribed. (demotix.com)
  • LONDON - U.K. Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne said Tuesday that the stronger-than-expected third-quarter growth figures gave him confidence that a steady recovery was under way even though global conditions remain choppy. (wsj.com)
  • Catch all the Business News , Breaking News Events and Latest News Updates on The Economic Times . (indiatimes.com)
  • If unwanted database changes are limited to specific tables or table partitions, then you can use a previously created RMAN backup to return only these objects to a point in time before the unwanted changes occurred. (oracle.com)
  • DBPITR can be time-consuming because RMAN must restore all data files. (oracle.com)
  • RMAN provides support for point-in-time recovery for one or more PDBs. (oracle.com)
  • Gastrectomy reduces food intake and body weight (BW) hampering recovery of physical conditions. (hindawi.com)
  • Prolonged exposure to heat stress increases the risk of overexertion and heat illness in firefighters and reduces the performance time (PT) and rate of recovery even at low work intensity. (cdc.gov)
  • This also provides prognostic information to clinicians and family as longer recovery time has economic and social implications on the family in our setting. (plos.org)
  • Nonethless, if any additional, prospective studies confirm our finding that dizziness may indicate protracted recovery,' said Lau, 'clinicians should consider using separate, specific dizziness tests for dizziness' such as the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), 'rather than relying on postural/balance tests [such as the BESS ] as indicators of dizziness. (momsteam.com)
  • Claus Egge, senior storage analyst at IDC, said in the research: "IT departments have been spending much time and effort on ways of bringing down the time it takes to restore data. (zdnet.com)
  • If recovery is needed, we restore the backup and then replay from the backed-up WAL files to bring the backup up to current time. (postgresql.org)
  • it is possible to restore the database to its state at any time since your base backup was taken. (postgresql.org)
  • In this case, you restore a whole database backup and then apply redo logs or incremental backups to re-create all changes up to a point in time before the unwanted change. (oracle.com)
  • Many IT practitioners mistakenly refer to it as the time it takes to restore a system, an application and its data. (techtarget.com)
  • They've since treated a wide range of people - from high school athletes to adults looking to increase their athletic shelf life - for a variety of reasons, including sports recovery, health and wellness and beauty and spa treatments. (baltimoresun.com)
  • These belts are so designed to keep your lower abdomen in a comfortable position, especially if you have had a C-section, these belts are no less than a boon, keeping your stitches also intact, which would otherwise be a painful situation every time you sit or lie down. (indiatimes.com)