Tibet: An autonomous region located in central Asia, within China.Medicine, Tibetan Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the Tibetan culture.Altitude: A vertical distance measured from a known level on the surface of a planet or other celestial body.Antelopes: Any of various ruminant mammals of the order Bovidae. They include numerous species in Africa and the American pronghorn.Buddhism: The teaching ascribed to Gautama Buddha (ca. 483 B.C.) holding that suffering is inherent in life and that one can escape it into nirvana by mental and moral self-purification. (Webster, 3d ed)Freshwater Biology: The study of life and ECOLOGIC SYSTEMS in bodies of FRESHWATER.History of MedicineJuniperus: A plant genus of the family CUPRESSACEAE. The species are slow growing coniferous evergreen trees or shrubs.Kashin-Beck Disease: Disabling osteochondrodysplasia with OSTEOSCLEROSIS, cone-shaped METAPHYSIS, and shortening of the DIAPHYSIS. It is endemic in parts of Siberia and northern China. Mineral deficiencies (e.g., selenium, iodine), fungal cereal contamination, and water contamination may be contributing factors in its etiology.Echinococcus multilocularis: A north temperate species of tapeworm (CESTODA) whose adult form infects FOXES and wild RODENTS. The larval form can infect humans producing HEPATIC HYDATID CYSTS.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Altitude Sickness: Multiple symptoms associated with reduced oxygen at high ALTITUDE.Lagomorpha: An order of small mammals comprising two families, Ochotonidae (pikas) and Leporidae (RABBITS and HARES). Head and body length ranges from about 125 mm to 750 mm. Hares and rabbits have a short tail, and the pikas lack a tail. Rabbits are born furless and with both eyes and ears closed. HARES are born fully haired with eyes and ears open. All are vegetarians. (From Nowak, Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p539-41)Medicine, Chinese Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the Chinese culture.Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-Proline Dioxygenases: Dioxygenase enzymes that specifically hydroxylate a PROLINE residue on the HYPOXIA-INDUCIBLE FACTOR 1, ALPHA SUBUNIT. They are OXYGEN-dependent enzymes that play an important role in mediating cellular adaptive responses to HYPOXIA.Naphazoline: An adrenergic vasoconstrictor agent used as a decongestant.Individualized Medicine: Therapeutic approach tailoring therapy for genetically defined subgroups of patients.Snow: Frozen water crystals that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Echinococcus granulosus: A species of hydatid tapeworm (class CESTODA) in the family Taeniidae, whose adult form infects the DIGESTIVE TRACT of DOGS, other canines, and CATS. The larval form infects SHEEP; PIGS; HORSES; and may infect humans, where it migrates to various organs and forms permanent HYDATID CYSTS.Meteorology: The science of studying the characteristics of the atmosphere such as its temperature, density, winds, clouds, precipitation, and other atmospheric phenomena and aiming to account for the weather in terms of external influences and the basic laws of physics. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Internal Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.Torture: The intentional infliction of physical or mental suffering upon an individual or individuals, including the torture of animals.Nuclear Medicine: A specialty field of radiology concerned with diagnostic, therapeutic, and investigative use of radioactive compounds in a pharmaceutical form.Phylogeography: A field of study concerned with the principles and processes governing the geographic distributions of genealogical lineages, especially those within and among closely related species. (Avise, J.C., Phylogeography: The History and Formation of Species. Harvard University Press, 2000)Locusta migratoria: A species of migratory Old World locusts, in the family ACRIDIDAE, that are important pests in Africa and Asia.Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.Medicine, Kampo: System of herbal medicine practiced in Japan by both herbalists and practitioners of modern medicine. Kampo originated in China and is based on Chinese herbal medicine (MEDICINE, CHINESE TRADITIONAL).Medicine, East Asian Traditional: Medical practice or discipline that is based on the knowledge, cultures, and beliefs of the people in EAST ASIA.Erigeron: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE that is similar to CONYZA. Members contain SESQUITERPENES.Thioredoxin Reductase 2: A subtype of thioredoxin reductase found primarily in MITOCHONDRIA.Theft: Unlawful act of taking property.Echinococcosis, Hepatic: Liver disease caused by infections with parasitic tapeworms of the genus ECHINOCOCCUS, such as Echinococcus granulosus or Echinococcus multilocularis. Ingested Echinococcus ova burrow into the intestinal mucosa. The larval migration to the liver via the PORTAL VEIN leads to watery vesicles (HYDATID CYST).Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Echinococcosis: An infection caused by the infestation of the larval form of tapeworms of the genus Echinococcus. The liver, lungs, and kidney are the most common areas of infestation.Asian Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the southeastern and eastern areas of the Asian continent.Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Acclimatization: Adaptation to a new environment or to a change in the old.Hematologic Agents: Drugs that act on blood and blood-forming organs and those that affect the hemostatic system.Ethnobotany: The study of plant lore and agricultural customs of a people. In the fields of ETHNOMEDICINE and ETHNOPHARMACOLOGY, the emphasis is on traditional medicine and the existence and medicinal uses of PLANTS and PLANT EXTRACTS and their constituents, both historically and in modern times.Salinity: Degree of saltiness, which is largely the OSMOLAR CONCENTRATION of SODIUM CHLORIDE plus any other SALTS present. It is an ecological factor of considerable importance, influencing the types of organisms that live in an ENVIRONMENT.Aster Plant: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. This plant should not be confused with microtubule asters (MICROTUBULES) nor with aster yellows phytoplasma (mycoplasma-like organisms).Phytotherapy: Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.Chlamydiaceae Infections: Infections with bacteria of the family CHLAMYDIACEAE.Inula: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. Members contain INULIN, alantol, helenin, alantic acid, and acrid resin.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.NepalEchinococcosis, Pulmonary: Helminth infection of the lung caused by Echinococcus granulosus or Echinococcus multilocularis.Hordeum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The EDIBLE GRAIN, barley, is widely used as food.Gentianaceae: A plant family of the order Gentianales, subclass Asteridae, class Magnoliopsida.History, Ancient: The period of history before 500 of the common era.Clinical Medicine: The study and practice of medicine by direct examination of the patient.Procollagen-Proline Dioxygenase: A mixed-function oxygenase that catalyzes the hydroxylation of a prolyl-glycyl containing peptide, usually in PROTOCOLLAGEN, to a hydroxyprolylglycyl-containing-peptide. The enzyme utilizes molecular OXYGEN with a concomitant oxidative decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate to SUCCINATE. The enzyme occurs as a tetramer of two alpha and two beta subunits. The beta subunit of procollagen-proline dioxygenase is identical to the enzyme PROTEIN DISULFIDE-ISOMERASES.Drugs, Chinese Herbal: Chinese herbal or plant extracts which are used as drugs to treat diseases or promote general well-being. The concept does not include synthesized compounds manufactured in China.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Regenerative Medicine: A field of medicine concerned with developing and using strategies aimed at repair or replacement of damaged, diseased, or metabolically deficient organs, tissues, and cells via TISSUE ENGINEERING; CELL TRANSPLANTATION; and ARTIFICIAL ORGANS and BIOARTIFICIAL ORGANS and tissues.Emergency Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Sesquiterpenes, Eudesmane: SESQUITERPENES cyclized into two adjoining cyclohexane rings but with a different configuration from the ARTEMISININS.Climate Change: Any significant change in measures of climate (such as temperature, precipitation, or wind) lasting for an extended period (decades or longer). It may result from natural factors such as changes in the sun's intensity, natural processes within the climate system such as changes in ocean circulation, or human activities.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Medicine, Ayurvedic: The traditional Hindu system of medicine which is based on customs, beliefs, and practices of the Hindu culture. Ayurveda means "the science of Life": veda - science, ayur - life.Complementary Therapies: Therapeutic practices which are not currently considered an integral part of conventional allopathic medical practice. They may lack biomedical explanations but as they become better researched some (PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES; DIET; ACUPUNCTURE) become widely accepted whereas others (humors, radium therapy) quietly fade away, yet are important historical footnotes. Therapies are termed as Complementary when used in addition to conventional treatments and as Alternative when used instead of conventional treatment.Anoxia: Relatively complete absence of oxygen in one or more tissues.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Plankton: Community of tiny aquatic PLANTS and ANIMALS, and photosynthetic BACTERIA, that are either free-floating or suspended in the water, with little or no power of locomotion. They are divided into PHYTOPLANKTON and ZOOPLANKTON.Integrative Medicine: The discipline concerned with using the combination of conventional ALLOPATHIC MEDICINE and ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE to address the biological, psychological, social, and spiritual aspects of health and illness.Chloroflexi: Phylum of green nonsulfur bacteria including the family Chloroflexaceae, among others.Osteopathic Medicine: A medical discipline that is based on the philosophy that all body systems are interrelated and dependent upon one another for good health. This philosophy, developed in 1874 by Dr. Andrew Taylor Still, recognizes the concept of "wellness" and the importance of treating illness within the context of the whole body. Special attention is placed on the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Sports Medicine: The field of medicine concerned with physical fitness and the diagnosis and treatment of injuries sustained in exercise and sports activities.Genetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide: A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Haplotypes: The genetic constitution of individuals with respect to one member of a pair of allelic genes, or sets of genes that are closely linked and tend to be inherited together such as those of the MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX.Medicine, African Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the African peoples. It includes treatment by medicinal plants and other materia medica as well as by the ministrations of diviners, medicine men, witch doctors, and sorcerers.POU Domain Factors: A family of transcription factors characterized by the presence of a bipartite DNA-binding domain known as the POU domain. The POU domain contains two subdomains, a POU-specific domain and a POU-homeodomain. The POU domain was originally identified as a region of approximately 150 amino acids shared between the Pit-1, Oct-1, Oct-2, and Unc-86 transcription factors.Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the use of physical agents, mechanical apparatus, and manipulation in rehabilitating physically diseased or injured patients.Occupational Medicine: Medical specialty concerned with the promotion and maintenance of the physical and mental health of employees in occupational settings.Postpartum Hemorrhage: Excess blood loss from uterine bleeding associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR or CHILDBIRTH. It is defined as blood loss greater than 500 ml or of the amount that adversely affects the maternal physiology, such as BLOOD PRESSURE and HEMATOCRIT. Postpartum hemorrhage is divided into two categories, immediate (within first 24 hours after birth) or delayed (after 24 hours postpartum).
  • Herbal and mineral medicines are the main treatments while other physical therapies, like acupuncture and phlebotomy (Phlebotomy - the act or practice of opening a vein by incision or puncture to remove blood as a therapeutic treatment. (people.com.cn)
  • Tibetan medicine has a history that is thousands of years old and in large part its origins stretch back before the written record and long before the current political borders were drawn," says Lilly Atlihan, a Tibetan medicine practitioner, who along with her Tibetan physician husband, Palnam Jinpa, runs a practice in New York. (openthemagazine.com)
  • In the practice of modern medicine, we are mostly viewed as our symptoms, not as a whole system that has become out of balance. (allergiesandyourgut.com)
  • Following the revolution of 1911, the traditional practice of counting years from the accession of an emperor was abolished , e.g. (marcelweyland.com)
  • To help people connect with him, a modern and easy-to-understand set of materials have been produced to make his practice accessible to everyone in six different languages: English, Tibetan (བོད་ཡིག), Chinese (中文), Hindi (हिंदी), Tamil (தமிழ்) and Nepali (नेपाली). (dorjeshugden.org)
  • བོད་སྐད། ) are a cluster of mutually unintelligible Sino-Tibetan languages spoken by approximately 8 million people, primarily Tibetan, living across a wide area of eastern Central Asia bordering the Indian subcontinent , including the Tibetan Plateau and Baltistan , Ladakh , Nepal, Sikkim , and Bhutan the northern Indian subcontinent. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although Tibet is politically part of China today, Ladakh, like parts of Nepal, is situated on the Tibetan plateau.Ladakh has many Tibetan refugees who fled Tibet with the invasion from China.The daunting height of the Himalaya adds to its isolation, even today the main road routes to Ladakh remain closed for more than six months of each year. (pavanemann.com)
  • Chinese authorities have arbitrarily detained husband of Sangyal Tso, the mother of two who died of self-immolation late last month in Dokhog (Ch: Daogao) Township in Chone (Ch: Zhuoni) County, Kanlho (Ch: Gannan) Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Gansu Province, in the Tibetan province of Amdo. (tchrd.org)
  • Our interpreter Dorje , a Tibetan from Amdo who'd been with us for a month and with whom we'd become quite close, heard me wondering aloud what lay beyond the path through the bushes. (chinabuddhismencyclopedia.com)
  • The best elements of Indian ayurvedic, Chinese, Greek and other medical traditions are integrated with Tibetan practices in a coherent and powerful system. (people.com.cn)
  • As one of the oldest medical traditions in the world, Tibetan medicine is gradually being brought into the limelight as Tibetan culture draws much public attention both at home and abroad. (people.com.cn)
  • Because all traditions reinterpret their traditions in terms of their present contexts, there are significant differences between how Tibetan Dream Yoga is now being taught and how it was understood in say, the time of Milarepa. (dreamyoga.com)
  • Because the context of today's Tibetan Dream Yoga has the advantages of models from physics, other religious traditions, holism, and over two thousand years of Western philosophy as well as psychology and integral psychology, they will be broader and wider than traditional, classical teachings of Tibetan sutras. (dreamyoga.com)
  • Two classics edited by W.Y. Evans-Wentz, Tibet's Great Yogi, Milarepa, and Tibetan Yoga and Secret Doctrines, demonstrate a long tradition of interest in dreams and dreaming by Tibetan spiritual adepts. (dreamyoga.com)
  • This Thangka has been mounted with wood scrolls, Ready for hanging on the wall, or rolled up for storage. (ebay.com)
  • He reappears throughout the exhibit in thangkas and illustrative scrolls for his followers (who included many doctors) to meditate upon and cultivate in the footsteps of. (theepochtimes.com)
  • The central figures of Thangkas may follow Nepalese or Indian types, but their decorative details, such as cloud scrolls, flowers, and architectural motifs, are often of Chinese origin. (tibetsongtsantravel.com)
  • In architecture, the chorten, or Tibetan stupa , was derived from Indian prototypes and was composed of one or more square bases, a square balcony, a bulbous dome, and a mast upholding umbrellas, surmounted by a flame finial. (tibetsongtsantravel.com)
  • Coiffe de Pandit by Etienne Bock, an informative article on Indian and Tibetan pandita hats used by Buddhists along with reference to the Bon religion. (himalayanart.org)
  • Tibet is one of the most remarkable destination that is surrounded by great snow capped mountains, fabulous monastery sights, 100 years of old caravan trails cross the mysterious terrain through veiled valleys to exotic cities all inhabited by the friendly Tibetan Buddhists. (globalholidaysadventure.com)
  • Consequently, when sutras are cited below, it is important to remember that different students in different historical periods will interpret them in different ways and that what is said about traditional Vajrayana may not apply to how it is understood and practiced today. (dreamyoga.com)
  • In historical, social and political sense, the term "mandala" is also employed to denote traditional Southeast Asian political formations (such as federation of kingdoms or vassalized states). (wikipedia.org)
  • Skulls are featured prominently in Tibetan symbolism and many of our DharmaShop customers are fond of this reminder that nothing lasts forever. (dharmashop.com)
  • For its exquisite workmanship and elegant beauty, Tibetan carpet is called the world's three major carpets together with Persian carpet and the Oriental art carpet. (tibetadvisor.com)
  • It is thought that most of the Tibeto-Burman speakers in Southwest China, including Tibetans, are direct descendants from the ancient Qiang people . (wikipedia.org)
  • In the Baltistan region of northern Pakistan, the Balti people are a Muslim ethnicity of Tibetan descent numbering around 300,000. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recent research into the ability of Tibetans' metabolism to function normally in the oxygen-deficient atmosphere above 4,400 metres (14,400 ft) shows that, although Tibetans living at high altitudes have no more oxygen in their blood than other people, they have ten times more nitric oxide and double the forearm blood flow of low-altitude dwellers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Norbulingka is a community with a sustainable business model and a strong social mission: keeping Tibetan culture alive by training people for the future. (norbulingka.org)
  • Therefore, Tibetan people use the bones to make unique adornments, which they believe will bring wild charm for the lucky wearer. (absolutechinatours.com)
  • Tibetan people use them for flooring, wall hanging and sitting. (absolutechinatours.com)
  • The Tibetan knife is essential for all Tibetan people, usually used for self-defense, hunting and food division. (tibetadvisor.com)
  • But most of all it is notable for its delightful people - friendly as only Tibetans can be and immensely colorful. (pavanemann.com)
  • It is the traditional homeland of the Tibetan people as well as some other ethnic groups such as Monpa , Tamang , Qiang , sherpa , and Lhoba peoples and is now also inhabited by considerable numbers of Han Chinese and Hui people . (hitchhikersgui.de)
  • Tibetan medicine is a vast and eminently 'holistic' or 'complementary' healing system in which the human body is considered to be based on the 'five cosmic energies' (space, air, fire, water, earth). (people.com.cn)
  • Since each individual disease is caused by disharmony or disturbances in one of the five elements, the treatment principle is to balance the elements through diet according to an individual's constitution and behavior, utilize herbs, and other accessory therapies such as blood letting, Mey-Tzar (Tibetan moxa), external therapy (heat or cold), natural or medicinal bath, enema, and Ku Nye (Tibetan Massage). (allergiesandyourgut.com)
  • Visitors will be exposed to approximately 140 objects including medical texts, teaching drawings, and treatment tools and powered herbs used during the golden age of Tibetan medicine. (theepochtimes.com)
  • INGREDIENTS: The main ingredients are Spikenard plus a special blend of Tibetan herbs, holy water and assorted precious gems. (garudashop.com)
  • Diagnostic techniques used in Tibetan medical tradition basically involve interviewing of the patient, urinalysis, and pulse reading. (people.com.cn)