Tumors or cancer of the THYMUS GLAND.
A single, unpaired primary lymphoid organ situated in the MEDIASTINUM, extending superiorly into the neck to the lower edge of the THYROID GLAND and inferiorly to the fourth costal cartilage. It is necessary for normal development of immunologic function early in life. By puberty, it begins to involute and much of the tissue is replaced by fat.
Enlargement of the thymus. A condition described in the late 1940's and 1950's as pathological thymic hypertrophy was status thymolymphaticus and was treated with radiotherapy. Unnecessary removal of the thymus was also practiced. It later became apparent that the thymus undergoes normal physiological hypertrophy, reaching a maximum at puberty and involuting thereafter. The concept of status thymolymphaticus has been abandoned. Thymus hyperplasia is present in two thirds of all patients with myasthenia gravis. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992; Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1486)
Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).
New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.
A plant genus of the family LAMIACEAE best known for the thyme spice added to foods.
Neoplasms containing cyst-like formations or producing mucin or serum.
Extracts of the thymus that contain specific, but uncharacterized factors or proteins with specific activities; three distinct substances are already known: thymotoxin, thymin and thymosin.
Humoral factors secreted by the thymus gland. They participate in the development of the lymphoid system and the maturation of the cellular immune response.
Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.
Surgical removal of the thymus gland. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Two or more abnormal growths of tissue occurring simultaneously and presumed to be of separate origin. The neoplasms may be histologically the same or different, and may be found in the same or different sites.
Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.
Tumors or cancers of the KIDNEY.
Abnormal growths of tissue that follow a previous neoplasm but are not metastases of the latter. The second neoplasm may have the same or different histological type and can occur in the same or different organs as the previous neoplasm but in all cases arises from an independent oncogenic event. The development of the second neoplasm may or may not be related to the treatment for the previous neoplasm since genetic risk or predisposing factors may actually be the cause.
An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.
Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.
An adenocarcinoma producing mucin in significant amounts. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Conditions which cause proliferation of hemopoietically active tissue or of tissue which has embryonic hemopoietic potential. They all involve dysregulation of multipotent MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS, most often caused by a mutation in the JAK2 PROTEIN TYROSINE KINASE.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
DNA present in neoplastic tissue.
Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.
Tumors or cancer of the PAROTID GLAND.
A benign neoplasm derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic accumulations of retained secretions are formed. In some instances, considerable portions of the neoplasm, or even the entire mass, may be cystic. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Experimentally induced new abnormal growth of TISSUES in animals to provide models for studying human neoplasms.
Neoplasms developing from some structure of the connective and subcutaneous tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in connective or soft tissue.
Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.
Neoplasms associated with a proliferation of a single clone of PLASMA CELLS and characterized by the secretion of PARAPROTEINS.
Tumors or cancer of the APPENDIX.
A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.
A multilocular tumor with mucin secreting epithelium. They are most often found in the ovary, but are also found in the pancreas, appendix, and rarely, retroperitoneal and in the urinary bladder. They are considered to have low-grade malignant potential.
Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.
Tumors or cancer of the ENDOCRINE GLANDS.
A neoplasm originating from thymic tissue, usually benign, and frequently encapsulated. Although it is occasionally invasive, metastases are extremely rare. It consists of any type of thymic epithelial cell as well as lymphocytes that are usually abundant. Malignant lymphomas that involve the thymus, e.g., lymphosarcoma, Hodgkin's disease (previously termed granulomatous thymoma), should not be regarded as thymoma. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Tumors or cancer of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, from the MOUTH to the ANAL CANAL.
Tumors, cancer or other neoplasms produced by exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation.
Carcinoma that arises from the PANCREATIC DUCTS. It accounts for the majority of cancers derived from the PANCREAS.
Neoplasms composed of vascular tissue. This concept does not refer to neoplasms located in blood vessels.
Tumors or cancer of the EYE.
Tumors or cancer of the NOSE.
Tumors or cancer of the SALIVARY GLANDS.
Inbred C57BL mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been produced by many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a high degree of genetic uniformity and homozygosity, making them widely used for biomedical research, including studies on genetics, immunology, cancer, and neuroscience.
An adenocarcinoma containing finger-like processes of vascular connective tissue covered by neoplastic epithelium, projecting into cysts or the cavity of glands or follicles. It occurs most frequently in the ovary and thyroid gland. (Stedman, 25th ed)
A malignant neoplasm characterized by the formation of numerous, irregular, finger-like projections of fibrous stroma that is covered with a surface layer of neoplastic epithelial cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.
Specialized tissues that are components of the lymphatic system. They provide fixed locations within the body where a variety of LYMPHOCYTES can form, mature and multiply. The lymphoid tissues are connected by a network of LYMPHATIC VESSELS.
Tumors or cancer of the TESTIS. Germ cell tumors (GERMINOMA) of the testis constitute 95% of all testicular neoplasms.
Neoplasms composed of muscle tissue: skeletal, cardiac, or smooth. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in muscles.
Neoplasms composed of glandular tissue, an aggregation of epithelial cells that elaborate secretions, and of any type of epithelium itself. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the various glands or in epithelial tissue.
HEMATOPOIETIC PROGENITOR CELLS that have migrated to the THYMUS where they differentiate into T-LYMPHOCYTES. Thymocytes are classified into maturational stages based on the expression of CELL SURFACE ANTIGENS.
Proteins, glycoprotein, or lipoprotein moieties on surfaces of tumor cells that are usually identified by monoclonal antibodies. Many of these are of either embryonic or viral origin.
A benign epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.
A malignant cystic or semisolid tumor most often occurring in the ovary. Rarely, one is solid. This tumor may develop from a mucinous cystadenoma, or it may be malignant at the onset. The cysts are lined with tall columnar epithelial cells; in others, the epithelium consists of many layers of cells that have lost normal structure entirely. In the more undifferentiated tumors, one may see sheets and nests of tumor cells that have very little resemblance to the parent structure. (Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972, p184)
Neoplasms of whatever cell type or origin, occurring in the extraskeletal connective tissue framework of the body including the organs of locomotion and their various component structures, such as nerves, blood vessels, lymphatics, etc.
Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.
Tumors or cancer of the UTERUS.
Tumors or cancer of the INTESTINES.
Neoplasms composed of sebaceous or sweat gland tissue or tissue of other skin appendages. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the sebaceous or sweat glands or in the other skin appendages.
Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.
Neoplasms located in the vasculature system, such as ARTERIES and VEINS. They are differentiated from neoplasms of vascular tissue (NEOPLASMS, VASCULAR TISSUE), such as ANGIOFIBROMA or HEMANGIOMA.
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
Sweat gland neoplasms are abnormal growths that can be benign or malignant, originating from the sweat glands (eccrine or apocrine) and found anywhere on the skin surface.
Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.
Tumors or cancer of the PALATE, including those of the hard palate, soft palate and UVULA.
Neoplasms composed of more than one type of neoplastic tissue.
Tumors or cancer of the MANDIBLE.
A malignant neoplasm derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic accumulations of retained secretions are formed. The neoplastic cells manifest varying degrees of anaplasia and invasiveness, and local extension and metastases occur. Cystadenocarcinomas develop frequently in the ovaries, where pseudomucinous and serous types are recognized. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations, or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. All animals within an inbred strain trace back to a common ancestor in the twentieth generation.
Tumors or cancer of the BILE DUCTS.
Ability of neoplasms to infiltrate and actively destroy surrounding tissue.
Tumors or cancer of the SPLEEN.
Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.
Tumors in any part of the heart. They include primary cardiac tumors and metastatic tumors to the heart. Their interference with normal cardiac functions can cause a wide variety of symptoms including HEART FAILURE; CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS; or EMBOLISM.
A cystic tumor of the ovary, containing thin, clear, yellow serous fluid and varying amounts of solid tissue, with a malignant potential several times greater than that of mucinous cystadenoma (CYSTADENOMA, MUCINOUS). It can be unilocular, parvilocular, or multilocular. It is often bilateral and papillary. The cysts may vary greatly in size. (Dorland, 27th ed; from Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972)
Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.
Tumors or cancer of the COLON.
Cancer or tumors of the MAXILLA or upper jaw.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
A classification of T-lymphocytes, especially into helper/inducer, suppressor/effector, and cytotoxic subsets, based on structurally or functionally different populations of cells.
Tumors or cancer of the anal gland.
Tumors or cancer of the MEDIASTINUM.
Neoplasms composed of primordial GERM CELLS of embryonic GONADS or of elements of the germ layers of the EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the gonads or present in an embryo or FETUS.
Neoplasms located in the bone marrow. They are differentiated from neoplasms composed of bone marrow cells, such as MULTIPLE MYELOMA. Most bone marrow neoplasms are metastatic.
White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.
Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.
Neoplasms composed of fatty tissue or connective tissue made up of fat cells in a meshwork of areolar tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in adipose tissue.
Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.
Benign and malignant neoplastic processes that arise from or secondarily involve the meningeal coverings of the brain and spinal cord.
They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.
Tumors or cancer of the DUODENUM.
A disorder of neuromuscular transmission characterized by weakness of cranial and skeletal muscles. Autoantibodies directed against acetylcholine receptors damage the motor endplate portion of the NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION, impairing the transmission of impulses to skeletal muscles. Clinical manifestations may include diplopia, ptosis, and weakness of facial, bulbar, respiratory, and proximal limb muscles. The disease may remain limited to the ocular muscles. THYMOMA is commonly associated with this condition. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1459)
Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.
Tumors or cancers of the ADRENAL CORTEX.
Tumors or cancer of the MOUTH.
Molecules on the surface of T-lymphocytes that recognize and combine with antigens. The receptors are non-covalently associated with a complex of several polypeptides collectively called CD3 antigens (ANTIGENS, CD3). Recognition of foreign antigen and the major histocompatibility complex is accomplished by a single heterodimeric antigen-receptor structure, composed of either alpha-beta (RECEPTORS, ANTIGEN, T-CELL, ALPHA-BETA) or gamma-delta (RECEPTORS, ANTIGEN, T-CELL, GAMMA-DELTA) chains.
Tumors or cancer of the TONGUE.
Inbred AKR mice are a strain of laboratory mice that are homozygous at all gene loci and have a high incidence of developing certain diseases, such as leukemia and autoimmune disorders, making them useful for research purposes in biomedicine.
Differentiation antigens found on thymocytes and on cytotoxic and suppressor T-lymphocytes. CD8 antigens are members of the immunoglobulin supergene family and are associative recognition elements in MHC (Major Histocompatibility Complex) Class I-restricted interactions.
Tumors or cancer in the ILEUM region of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL).
Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.
Experimentally induced tumors of the LIVER.
The unborn young of a viviparous mammal, in the postembryonic period, after the major structures have been outlined. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after CONCEPTION until BIRTH, as distinguished from the earlier EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.
Process of classifying cells of the immune system based on structural and functional differences. The process is commonly used to analyze and sort T-lymphocytes into subsets based on CD antigens by the technique of flow cytometry.
Tumors or cancer of the URINARY BLADDER.
A malignant tumor arising from secreting cells of a racemose gland, particularly the salivary glands. Racemose (Latin racemosus, full of clusters) refers, as does acinar (Latin acinus, grape), to small saclike dilatations in various glands. Acinar cell carcinomas are usually well differentiated and account for about 13% of the cancers arising in the parotid gland. Lymph node metastasis occurs in about 16% of cases. Local recurrences and distant metastases many years after treatment are common. This tumor appears in all age groups and is most common in women. (Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1240; from DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p575)
A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Benign and malignant neoplasms which occur within the substance of the spinal cord (intramedullary neoplasms) or in the space between the dura and spinal cord (intradural extramedullary neoplasms). The majority of intramedullary spinal tumors are primary CNS neoplasms including ASTROCYTOMA; EPENDYMOMA; and LIPOMA. Intramedullary neoplasms are often associated with SYRINGOMYELIA. The most frequent histologic types of intradural-extramedullary tumors are MENINGIOMA and NEUROFIBROMA.
Tumors or cancer of the VAGINA.
The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.
The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.
A usually benign glandular tumor composed of oxyphil cells, large cells with small irregular nuclei and dense acidophilic granules due to the presence of abundant MITOCHONDRIA. Oxyphil cells, also known as oncocytes, are found in oncocytomas of the kidney, salivary glands, and endocrine glands. In the thyroid gland, oxyphil cells are known as Hurthle cells and Askanazy cells.
The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.
Benign and malignant neoplastic processes arising from or involving components of the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous systems, cranial nerves, and meninges. Included in this category are primary and metastatic nervous system neoplasms.
A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
Inbred BALB/c mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been selectively bred to be genetically identical to each other, making them useful for scientific research and experiments due to their consistent genetic background and predictable responses to various stimuli or treatments.
A Janus kinase subtype that is involved in signaling from GROWTH HORMONE RECEPTORS; PROLACTIN RECEPTORS; and a variety of CYTOKINE RECEPTORS such as ERYTHROPOIETIN RECEPTORS and INTERLEUKIN RECEPTORS. Dysregulation of Janus kinase 2 due to GENETIC TRANSLOCATIONS have been associated with a variety of MYELOPROLIFERATIVE DISORDERS.
Tumors or cancer located in muscle tissue or specific muscles. They are differentiated from NEOPLASMS, MUSCLE TISSUE which are neoplasms composed of skeletal, cardiac, or smooth muscle tissue, such as MYOSARCOMA or LEIOMYOMA.
A rare malignant neoplasm characterized by rapidly proliferating, extensively infiltrating, anaplastic cells derived from blood vessels and lining irregular blood-filled or lumpy spaces. (Stedman, 25th ed)
A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).
Lymphoid cells concerned with humoral immunity. They are short-lived cells resembling bursa-derived lymphocytes of birds in their production of immunoglobulin upon appropriate stimulation.
Clonal myeloid disorders that possess both dysplastic and proliferative features but are not properly classified as either MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES or MYELOPROLIFERATIVE DISORDERS.
Surgical removal of the pancreas. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Formation of LYMPHOCYTES and PLASMA CELLS from the lymphoid stem cells which develop from the pluripotent HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS in the BONE MARROW. These lymphoid stem cells differentiate into T-LYMPHOCYTES; B-LYMPHOCYTES; PLASMA CELLS; or NK-cells (KILLER CELLS, NATURAL) depending on the organ or tissues (LYMPHOID TISSUE) to which they migrate.
Neoplasms which arise from peripheral nerve tissue. This includes NEUROFIBROMAS; SCHWANNOMAS; GRANULAR CELL TUMORS; and malignant peripheral NERVE SHEATH NEOPLASMS. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp1750-1)
A benign tumor composed of fat cells (ADIPOCYTES). It can be surrounded by a thin layer of connective tissue (encapsulated), or diffuse without the capsule.

Tumorigenicity of mouse thymoma is suppressed by soluble type II transforming growth factor beta receptor therapy. (1/1008)

Many types of tumor cells overexpress transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), which is believed to promote tumor progression. We hypothesized that overexpression of the extracellular region of the type II TGF-beta receptor (soluble TbetaRII) would compete for or block TGF-beta binding to TbetaRs on immune cells, preventing TGF-beta-mediated immunosuppression and consequently resulting in the eradication of tumor cells. We tested this in the mouse thymoma cell line EL4, which has been reported to suppress cellular immunity by secreting a large amount of TGF-beta. Transduction of EL4 with recombinant retrovirus encoding soluble TbetaRII resulted in the secretion of heterogeneously glycosylated, 25 to 35 kDa truncated TbetaRII. Inoculation of 1 x 10(4) to 5 x 10(4) soluble TbetaRII-modified EL4 cells (EL4/Ts, EL4 cells transduced with recombinant retrovirus encoding soluble TbetaRII and neomycin resistance gene) s.c. to mice showed reduced tumorigenicity, as indicated by lower overall tumor incidence (7%, 1 of 14; P < 0.001) compared with unmodified EL4 (100%, 9 of 9) or vector-modified EL4 cells (EL4/neo, EL4 cells transduced with recombinant retrovirus encoding neomycin resistance gene; 100%, 4 of 4). Administration of mitomycin C-treated EL4/Ts cells (1 x 10(6)) after EL4 inoculation (1 x 10(4)) reduced tumor incidence from 100% (5 of 5 in mice inoculated with mitomycin C-treated EL4/neo) to 40% (4 of 10, P < 0.05), indicating that supply of soluble TbetaRII could actually block TGF-beta-mediated tumorigenesis. In vitro tumor cytotoxicity assays revealed 3-5-fold higher cytotoxic activity with lymphocytes from EL4/Ts-bearing mice compared with those from EL4- or EL4/neo-bearing mice, indicating that the observed tumor rejection was mediated by restoration of the tumor-specific cellular immunity. These data suggest that expression of soluble TbetaRII is an effective strategy for treating highly progressive tumors secreting TGF-beta.  (+info)

Invasive thymoma with long-term survival by extensive reoperation. (2/1008)

The recurrence of invasive thymoma is often observed; however, no accepted treatment of recurrent invasive thymoma has yet been established. We herein report a 41-year-old woman with invasive thymoma and pleural dissemination who demonstrated long-term survival after undergoing 4 operations. Based on our findings, reoperation is thus suggested in patients with intrathoracic recurrence and long-term survival can be expected.  (+info)

Primary mediastinal malignancies: findings in 219 patients. (3/1008)

The purpose of this study was to determine the demographics, histology, methods of treatment, and survival in primary mediastinal malignancies. We did a retrospective review of the statewide New Mexico Tumor Registry for all malignant tumors treated between January 1, 1973 and December 31, 1995. Benign tumors and cysts of the mediastinum were excluded. Two hundred nineteen patients were identified from a total of 110,284 patients with primary malignancies: 55% of tumors were lymphomas, 16% malignant germ cell tumors, 14% malignant thymomas, 5% sarcomas, 3% malignant neurogenic tumors, and 7% other tumors. There were significant differences in gender between histologies (P < 0.001). Ninety-four percent of germ cell tumors occurred in males, 66% of neurogenic tumors were in females; other tumors occurred in males in 58% of cases. There were also significant differences in ages by histology (P < 0.001). Neurogenic tumors were most common in the first decade, lymphomas and germ cell tumors in the second to fourth decades, and lymphomas and thymomas in patients in their fifth decades and beyond. Stage at presentation (P = 0.001) and treatment (P < 0.001) also differed significantly between histologic groups. Five-year survival was 54% for lymphomas, 51% for malignant germ cell tumors, 49% for malignant thymomas, 33% for sarcomas, 56% for neurogenic tumors, and 51% overall. These survival rates were not statistically different (P > 0.50). Lymphomas, malignant germ cell tumors, and thymomas were the most frequently encountered malignant primary mediastinal neoplasms in this contemporary series of patients. Demographics, stage at presentation, and treatment modality varied significantly by histology. Despite these differences, overall five-year survival was not statistically different.  (+info)

Promoter element for transcription of unrearranged T-cell receptor beta-chain gene in pro-T cells. (4/1008)

The hallmark of T- and B-lymphocyte development is the rearrangement of variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) segments of T-cell receptor (TCR) and immunoglobulin (Ig) genes to generate a diverse repertoire of antigen receptor specificities in the immune system. The process of V(D)J recombination is shared in the rearrangement of all seven antigen receptor genes and is controlled by changes in chromatin structure, which regulate accessibility to the recombinase apparatus in a lineage- and stage-specific manner. These chromatin changes are linked to transcription of the locus in its unrearranged (germline) configuration. To understand how germline transcription of the TCRbeta-chain gene is regulated, we determined the structure of germline transcripts initiating near the Dbeta1 segment and identified a promoter within this region. The Dbeta1 promoter is active in the presence of the TCRbeta enhancer (Ebeta), and in this context, exhibits preferential activity in pro-T versus mature T-cell lines, as well as T- versus B-lineage specificity. These studies provide insight into the developmental regulation of TCRbeta germline transcription, one of the earliest steps in T-cell differentiation.  (+info)

Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumor metastases to the thyroid gland: differential diagnosis with medullary thyroid carcinoma. (5/1008)

Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of the thyroid gland are rare. Apart from medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), metastases of gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) NET may also occur. Features of six patients (five men, one female: age range, 39-67 years) with thyroid metastases from a GEP-NET are described. Thyroid metastases were bilateral in all patients and were associated with enlarged neck lymph nodes in five. In four cases, the thyroid tumor was either the first sign of the disease (n = 2) or was an isolated site of recurrence (n = 2). The tumors were well (n = 3) or poorly differentiated (n = 3). Five tumors for which the primary site could be determined corresponded to foregut-derived tumors (3 lungs, 1 thymus and 1 pancreatic NET). One tumor demonstrated calcitonin (CT) production as shown by immunohistochemistry and elevated plasma CT levels. However, the disease history and the clinical features strongly favored a metastasizing GEP-NET. No tumoral RET proto-oncogene mutation was found in this patient. The differential diagnosis between metastatic GEP-NET and MTC is crucial because prognosis, work-up, and treatment differ greatly.  (+info)

Dermatomyositis associated with invasive thymoma. (6/1008)

We report a case of dermatomyositis (DM) associated with invasive thymoma in a 22-year-old woman who was admitted to our hospital complaining of dyspnea which required ventilation support. The reddened elevated scaly eruptions were prominent over the extensor surfaces. Chest X-ray and computed tomography showed mediastinal masses, which were diagnosed as mixed type thymoma. Muscle and skin biopsy specimens were compatible with DM. She was treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy followed by extended removal of the anterior mediastinal tumor and subsequent radiotherapy. She has had a good clinical course without recurrence of thymoma or DM for more than 3 years. The role of thymoma in the development of DM is discussed.  (+info)

Novel endogenous type D retroviral particles expressed at high levels in a SCID mouse thymic lymphoma. (7/1008)

A xenograft model of the human disease Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) was investigated with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Transplantation of human LCH biopsy material into SCID mice resulted in the generation of mouse tumors resembling lymphomas. A thymoma cell line (ThyE1M6) was generated from one of these mice and found to display significant levels of Mg2+-dependent reverse transcriptase activity. Electron microscopy revealed particles with type D retroviral morphology budding from ThyE1M6 cells at a high frequency, whereas control cultures were negative. Reverse transcription-PCR of virion RNA with degenerate primers for conserved regions of various mouse, human, and primate retroviruses amplified novel sequences related to primate type D retroviruses, murine intracisternal A particles, Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus, and murine long interspersed nuclear elements but not other retroviral classes. We demonstrate that these sequences represent a novel group of endogenous retroviruses expressed at low levels in mice but expressed at high levels in the ThyE1M6 cell line. Furthermore, we propose that the activation of endogenous retroviral elements may be associated with a high incidence of thymomas in SCID mice.  (+info)

Sequences between the enhancer and promoter in the long terminal repeat affect murine leukemia virus pathogenicity and replication in the thymus. (8/1008)

We previously showed that the 93-bp region between the enhancer and promoter (named DEN for downstream of enhancer) of the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the MCF13 murine leukemia virus is an important determinant of the ability of this virus to induce thymic lymphoma. In this study we observed that DEN plays a role in the regulation of virus replication in the thymus during the preleukemic period. A NF-kappaB site in the DEN region partially contributes to the effect of DEN on both lymphomagenicity and virus replication. To further study the effects of DEN and the NF-kappaB site on viral pathogenicity during the preleukemic period, we examined replication of wild-type and mutant viruses with a deletion of the NF-kappaB site or the entire DEN region in the thymus. Thymic lymphocytes which were infected with wild-type and mutant viruses were predominantly the CD3(-) CD4(+) CD8(+) and CD3(+) CD4(+) CD8(+) cells. The increase in infection by wild-type virus and both mutant viruses of these two subpopulations during the preleukemic period ranged from 9- to 84-fold, depending upon the time point and virus. The major difference between the wild-type and both mutant viruses was the lower rate and lower level of mutant virus replication in these thymic subpopulations. Significant differences in replication between wild-type and both mutant viruses were seen in the CD3(-) CD4(+) CD8(+) and CD3(-) CD4(-) CD8(-) subpopulations, suggesting that these thymic cell types are important targets for viral transformation.  (+info)

Thymus neoplasms are abnormal growths in the thymus gland that result from uncontrolled cell division. The term "neoplasm" refers to any new and abnormal growth of tissue, also known as a tumor. Thymus neoplasms can be benign or malignant (cancerous).

Malignant thymus neoplasms are called thymomas or thymic carcinomas. Thymomas are the most common type and tend to grow slowly, invading nearby tissues and organs. They can also spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body. Thymic carcinomas are rarer and more aggressive, growing and spreading more quickly than thymomas.

Symptoms of thymus neoplasms may include coughing, chest pain, difficulty breathing, or swelling in the neck or upper chest. Treatment options for thymus neoplasms depend on the type, size, location, and stage of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health. Treatment may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

The thymus gland is an essential organ of the immune system, located in the upper chest, behind the sternum and surrounding the heart. It's primarily active until puberty and begins to shrink in size and activity thereafter. The main function of the thymus gland is the production and maturation of T-lymphocytes (T-cells), which are crucial for cell-mediated immunity, helping to protect the body from infection and cancer.

The thymus gland provides a protected environment where immune cells called pre-T cells develop into mature T cells. During this process, they learn to recognize and respond appropriately to foreign substances while remaining tolerant to self-tissues, which is crucial for preventing autoimmune diseases.

Additionally, the thymus gland produces hormones like thymosin that regulate immune cell activities and contribute to the overall immune response.

Thymus hyperplasia is a condition where the thymus gland, which is a part of the immune system located in the upper chest beneath the breastbone, becomes enlarged due to an increase in the number of cells. This is different from a tumor, where there is an abnormal growth of cells that can be benign or cancerous.

Thymus hyperplasia can be classified into two types: true hyperplasia and lymphoid hyperplasia. True hyperplasia refers to an increase in the number of thymic epithelial cells, while lymphoid hyperplasia is an increase in the number of lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell) within the thymus gland.

Thymus hyperplasia can occur as a result of various factors, including autoimmune diseases, infections, and certain medications. In some cases, it may not cause any symptoms and may be discovered incidentally during imaging studies or other medical tests. However, in other cases, it may cause symptoms such as cough, chest pain, difficulty breathing, and swallowing.

Treatment for thymus hyperplasia depends on the underlying cause and severity of symptoms. In some cases, no treatment may be necessary, while in others, medications or surgery may be required.

Pancreatic neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the pancreas that can be benign or malignant. The pancreas is a gland located behind the stomach that produces hormones and digestive enzymes. Pancreatic neoplasms can interfere with the normal functioning of the pancreas, leading to various health complications.

Benign pancreatic neoplasms are non-cancerous growths that do not spread to other parts of the body. They are usually removed through surgery to prevent any potential complications, such as blocking the bile duct or causing pain.

Malignant pancreatic neoplasms, also known as pancreatic cancer, are cancerous growths that can invade and destroy surrounding tissues and organs. They can also spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body, such as the liver, lungs, or bones. Pancreatic cancer is often aggressive and difficult to treat, with a poor prognosis.

There are several types of pancreatic neoplasms, including adenocarcinomas, neuroendocrine tumors, solid pseudopapillary neoplasms, and cystic neoplasms. The specific type of neoplasm is determined through various diagnostic tests, such as imaging studies, biopsies, and blood tests. Treatment options depend on the type, stage, and location of the neoplasm, as well as the patient's overall health and preferences.

Neoplasms are abnormal growths of cells or tissues in the body that serve no physiological function. They can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slow growing and do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant neoplasms are aggressive, invasive, and can metastasize to distant sites.

Neoplasms occur when there is a dysregulation in the normal process of cell division and differentiation, leading to uncontrolled growth and accumulation of cells. This can result from genetic mutations or other factors such as viral infections, environmental exposures, or hormonal imbalances.

Neoplasms can develop in any organ or tissue of the body and can cause various symptoms depending on their size, location, and type. Treatment options for neoplasms include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy, among others.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Thymus Plant" refers to a type of plant and does not have a medical definition. The Thymus plant belongs to the mint family and is commonly used as an herb in cooking. It is known for its small, fragrant leaves and is often used to add flavor to dishes. In some cases, the essential oil from the thymus plant may be used in medicinal products, such as throat lozenges or mouthwashes, due to its antiseptic properties. However, a "Thymus plant" itself does not have a medical definition. If you have any questions about medicinal plants or herbs, I'd be happy to try and help answer those for you!

Neoplasms: Neoplasms refer to abnormal growths of tissue that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They occur when the normal control mechanisms that regulate cell growth and division are disrupted, leading to uncontrolled cell proliferation.

Cystic Neoplasms: Cystic neoplasms are tumors that contain fluid-filled sacs or cysts. These tumors can be benign or malignant and can occur in various organs of the body, including the pancreas, ovary, and liver.

Mucinous Neoplasms: Mucinous neoplasms are a type of cystic neoplasm that is characterized by the production of mucin, a gel-like substance produced by certain types of cells. These tumors can occur in various organs, including the ovary, pancreas, and colon. Mucinous neoplasms can be benign or malignant, and malignant forms are often aggressive and have a poor prognosis.

Serous Neoplasms: Serous neoplasms are another type of cystic neoplasm that is characterized by the production of serous fluid, which is a thin, watery fluid. These tumors commonly occur in the ovary and can be benign or malignant. Malignant serous neoplasms are often aggressive and have a poor prognosis.

In summary, neoplasms refer to abnormal tissue growths that can be benign or malignant. Cystic neoplasms contain fluid-filled sacs and can occur in various organs of the body. Mucinous neoplasms produce a gel-like substance called mucin and can also occur in various organs, while serous neoplasms produce thin, watery fluid and commonly occur in the ovary. Both mucinous and serous neoplasms can be benign or malignant, with malignant forms often being aggressive and having a poor prognosis.

Thymus extracts are pharmaceutical preparations made from the thymus gland, which is a part of the immune system located in the chest behind the breastbone. The thymus gland plays an essential role in the development and maturation of immune cells called T-lymphocytes or T-cells.

Thymus extracts contain various immunomodulatory substances, including thymosins, thymopoietin, and other peptides, that are believed to help regulate and boost the immune system's function. These extracts have been used in medical research and some clinical applications, particularly in patients with weakened immune systems due to conditions such as primary immunodeficiency disorders, cancer, or HIV/AIDS.

It is important to note that the use of thymus extracts remains controversial, and their efficacy and safety have not been fully established. Therefore, they should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare professional.

Thymus hormones, also known as thymic factors or thymic humoral factors, refer to the biologically active molecules secreted by the thymus gland. The two main thymus hormones are thymosin and thymopoietin. These hormones play crucial roles in the differentiation, maturation, and function of T-cells, which are a type of white blood cell responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Thymosin is involved in the maturation of T-cells, helping them to distinguish between self and non-self antigens, while thymopoietin contributes to the differentiation of T-cells into their various subsets and supports their proliferation and activation.

The thymus gland is a primary lymphoid organ located in the upper chest region, anterior to the heart. It plays a critical role in the adaptive immune system, particularly during fetal development and early childhood. The thymus gland begins to atrophy after puberty, leading to a decrease in the production of thymus hormones. This natural decline in thymic function is believed to contribute to the decreased immune response observed in older individuals.

Supplementation with thymus hormones has been explored as a potential therapeutic approach for enhancing immune function in various clinical settings, including immunodeficiency disorders, cancer, and aging. However, more research is needed to fully understand their mechanisms of action and potential benefits and risks.

Skin neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the skin that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They result from uncontrolled multiplication of skin cells, which can form various types of lesions. These growths may appear as lumps, bumps, sores, patches, or discolored areas on the skin.

Benign skin neoplasms include conditions such as moles, warts, and seborrheic keratoses, while malignant skin neoplasms are primarily classified into melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma. These three types of cancerous skin growths are collectively known as non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs). Melanoma is the most aggressive and dangerous form of skin cancer, while NMSCs tend to be less invasive but more common.

It's essential to monitor any changes in existing skin lesions or the appearance of new growths and consult a healthcare professional for proper evaluation and treatment if needed.

Thymectomy is a surgical procedure that involves the removal of the thymus gland. The thymus gland is a part of the immune system located in the upper chest, behind the sternum (breastbone), and above the heart. It is responsible for producing white blood cells called T-lymphocytes, which help fight infections.

Thymectomy is often performed as a treatment option for patients with certain medical conditions, such as:

* Myasthenia gravis: an autoimmune disorder that causes muscle weakness and fatigue. In some cases, the thymus gland may contain abnormal cells that contribute to the development of myasthenia gravis. Removing the thymus gland can help improve symptoms in some patients with this condition.
* Thymomas: tumors that develop in the thymus gland. While most thymomas are benign (non-cancerous), some can be malignant (cancerous) and may require surgical removal.
* Myasthenic syndrome: a group of disorders characterized by muscle weakness and fatigue, similar to myasthenia gravis. In some cases, the thymus gland may be abnormal and contribute to the development of these conditions. Removing the thymus gland can help improve symptoms in some patients.

Thymectomy can be performed using various surgical approaches, including open surgery (through a large incision in the chest), video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS, using small incisions and a camera to guide the procedure), or robotic-assisted surgery (using a robot to perform the procedure through small incisions). The choice of surgical approach depends on several factors, including the size and location of the thymus gland, the patient's overall health, and the surgeon's expertise.

Multiple primary neoplasms refer to the occurrence of more than one primary malignant tumor in an individual, where each tumor is unrelated to the other and originates from separate cells or organs. This differs from metastatic cancer, where a single malignancy spreads to multiple sites in the body. Multiple primary neoplasms can be synchronous (occurring at the same time) or metachronous (occurring at different times). The risk of developing multiple primary neoplasms increases with age and is associated with certain genetic predispositions, environmental factors, and lifestyle choices such as smoking and alcohol consumption.

T-lymphocytes, also known as T-cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a key role in the adaptive immune system's response to infection. They are produced in the bone marrow and mature in the thymus gland. There are several different types of T-cells, including CD4+ helper T-cells, CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells, and regulatory T-cells (Tregs).

CD4+ helper T-cells assist in activating other immune cells, such as B-lymphocytes and macrophages. They also produce cytokines, which are signaling molecules that help coordinate the immune response. CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells directly kill infected cells by releasing toxic substances. Regulatory T-cells help maintain immune tolerance and prevent autoimmune diseases by suppressing the activity of other immune cells.

T-lymphocytes are important in the immune response to viral infections, cancer, and other diseases. Dysfunction or depletion of T-cells can lead to immunodeficiency and increased susceptibility to infections. On the other hand, an overactive T-cell response can contribute to autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammation.

Kidney neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the kidney tissues that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can originate from various types of kidney cells, including the renal tubules, glomeruli, and the renal pelvis.

Malignant kidney neoplasms are also known as kidney cancers, with renal cell carcinoma being the most common type. Benign kidney neoplasms include renal adenomas, oncocytomas, and angiomyolipomas. While benign neoplasms are generally not life-threatening, they can still cause problems if they grow large enough to compromise kidney function or if they undergo malignant transformation.

Early detection and appropriate management of kidney neoplasms are crucial for improving patient outcomes and overall prognosis. Regular medical check-ups, imaging studies, and urinalysis can help in the early identification of these growths, allowing for timely intervention and treatment.

A "second primary neoplasm" is a distinct, new cancer or malignancy that develops in a person who has already had a previous cancer. It is not a recurrence or metastasis of the original tumor, but rather an independent cancer that arises in a different location or organ system. The development of second primary neoplasms can be influenced by various factors such as genetic predisposition, environmental exposures, and previous treatments like chemotherapy or radiation therapy.

It is important to note that the definition of "second primary neoplasm" may vary slightly depending on the specific source or context. In general medical usage, it refers to a new, separate cancer; however, in some research or clinical settings, there might be more precise criteria for defining and diagnosing second primary neoplasms.

The spleen is an organ in the upper left side of the abdomen, next to the stomach and behind the ribs. It plays multiple supporting roles in the body:

1. It fights infection by acting as a filter for the blood. Old red blood cells are recycled in the spleen, and platelets and white blood cells are stored there.
2. The spleen also helps to control the amount of blood in the body by removing excess red blood cells and storing platelets.
3. It has an important role in immune function, producing antibodies and removing microorganisms and damaged red blood cells from the bloodstream.

The spleen can be removed without causing any significant problems, as other organs take over its functions. This is known as a splenectomy and may be necessary if the spleen is damaged or diseased.

Thyroid neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the thyroid gland, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can vary in size and may cause a noticeable lump or nodule in the neck. Thyroid neoplasms can also affect the function of the thyroid gland, leading to hormonal imbalances and related symptoms. The exact causes of thyroid neoplasms are not fully understood, but risk factors include radiation exposure, family history, and certain genetic conditions. It is important to note that most thyroid nodules are benign, but a proper medical evaluation is necessary to determine the nature of the growth and develop an appropriate treatment plan.

Adenocarcinoma, mucinous is a type of cancer that begins in the glandular cells that line certain organs and produce mucin, a substance that lubricates and protects tissues. This type of cancer is characterized by the presence of abundant pools of mucin within the tumor. It typically develops in organs such as the colon, rectum, lungs, pancreas, and ovaries.

Mucinous adenocarcinomas tend to have a distinct appearance under the microscope, with large pools of mucin pushing aside the cancer cells. They may also have a different clinical behavior compared to other types of adenocarcinomas, such as being more aggressive or having a worse prognosis in some cases.

It is important to note that while a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma, mucinous can be serious, the prognosis and treatment options may vary depending on several factors, including the location of the cancer, the stage at which it was diagnosed, and the individual's overall health.

Myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs) are a group of rare, chronic blood cancers that originate from the abnormal proliferation or growth of one or more types of blood-forming cells in the bone marrow. These disorders result in an overproduction of mature but dysfunctional blood cells, which can lead to serious complications such as blood clots, bleeding, and organ damage.

There are several subtypes of MPDs, including:

1. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML): A disorder characterized by the overproduction of mature granulocytes (a type of white blood cell) in the bone marrow, leading to an increased number of these cells in the blood. CML is caused by a genetic mutation that results in the formation of the BCR-ABL fusion protein, which drives uncontrolled cell growth and division.
2. Polycythemia Vera (PV): A disorder characterized by the overproduction of all three types of blood cells - red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets - in the bone marrow. This can lead to an increased risk of blood clots, bleeding, and enlargement of the spleen.
3. Essential Thrombocythemia (ET): A disorder characterized by the overproduction of platelets in the bone marrow, leading to an increased risk of blood clots and bleeding.
4. Primary Myelofibrosis (PMF): A disorder characterized by the replacement of normal bone marrow tissue with scar tissue, leading to impaired blood cell production and anemia, enlargement of the spleen, and increased risk of infections and bleeding.
5. Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia (CNL): A rare disorder characterized by the overproduction of neutrophils (a type of white blood cell) in the bone marrow, leading to an increased number of these cells in the blood. CNL can lead to an increased risk of infections and organ damage.

MPDs are typically treated with a combination of therapies, including chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, and stem cell transplantation. The choice of treatment depends on several factors, including the subtype of MPD, the patient's age and overall health, and the presence of any comorbidities.

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a technique used in pathology and laboratory medicine to identify specific proteins or antigens in tissue sections. It combines the principles of immunology and histology to detect the presence and location of these target molecules within cells and tissues. This technique utilizes antibodies that are specific to the protein or antigen of interest, which are then tagged with a detection system such as a chromogen or fluorophore. The stained tissue sections can be examined under a microscope, allowing for the visualization and analysis of the distribution and expression patterns of the target molecule in the context of the tissue architecture. Immunohistochemistry is widely used in diagnostic pathology to help identify various diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and immune-mediated disorders.

The term "DNA, neoplasm" is not a standard medical term or concept. DNA refers to deoxyribonucleic acid, which is the genetic material present in the cells of living organisms. A neoplasm, on the other hand, is a tumor or growth of abnormal tissue that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

In some contexts, "DNA, neoplasm" may refer to genetic alterations found in cancer cells. These genetic changes can include mutations, amplifications, deletions, or rearrangements of DNA sequences that contribute to the development and progression of cancer. Identifying these genetic abnormalities can help doctors diagnose and treat certain types of cancer more effectively.

However, it's important to note that "DNA, neoplasm" is not a term that would typically be used in medical reports or research papers without further clarification. If you have any specific questions about DNA changes in cancer cells or neoplasms, I would recommend consulting with a healthcare professional or conducting further research on the topic.

Lung neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the lung tissue. These tumors can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Malignant lung neoplasms are further classified into two main types: small cell lung carcinoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma. Lung neoplasms can cause symptoms such as cough, chest pain, shortness of breath, and weight loss. They are often caused by smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke, but can also occur due to genetic factors, radiation exposure, and other environmental carcinogens. Early detection and treatment of lung neoplasms is crucial for improving outcomes and survival rates.

Parotid neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the parotid gland, which is the largest of the salivary glands and is located in front of the ear and extends down the neck. These neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Benign parotid neoplasms are typically slow-growing, painless masses that may cause facial asymmetry or difficulty in chewing or swallowing if they become large enough to compress surrounding structures. The most common type of benign parotid tumor is a pleomorphic adenoma.

Malignant parotid neoplasms, on the other hand, are more aggressive and can invade nearby tissues and spread to other parts of the body. They may present as rapidly growing masses that are firm or fixed to surrounding structures. Common types of malignant parotid tumors include mucoepidermoid carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma.

The diagnosis of parotid neoplasms typically involves a thorough clinical evaluation, imaging studies such as CT or MRI scans, and fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) to determine the nature of the tumor. Treatment options depend on the type, size, and location of the neoplasm but may include surgical excision, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.

Cystadenoma is a type of benign tumor (not cancerous), which arises from glandular epithelial cells and is covered by a thin layer of connective tissue. These tumors can develop in various locations within the body, including the ovaries, pancreas, and other organs that contain glands.

There are two main types of cystadenomas: serous and mucinous. Serous cystadenomas are filled with a clear or watery fluid, while mucinous cystadenomas contain a thick, gelatinous material. Although they are generally not harmful, these tumors can grow quite large and cause discomfort or other symptoms due to their size or location. In some cases, cystadenomas may undergo malignant transformation and develop into cancerous tumors, known as cystadenocarcinomas. Regular medical follow-up and monitoring are essential for individuals diagnosed with cystadenomas to ensure early detection and treatment of any potential complications.

Experimental neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that are induced and studied in a controlled laboratory setting, typically in animals or cell cultures. These studies are conducted to understand the fundamental mechanisms of cancer development, progression, and potential treatment strategies. By manipulating various factors such as genetic mutations, environmental exposures, and pharmacological interventions, researchers can gain valuable insights into the complex processes underlying neoplasm formation and identify novel targets for cancer therapy. It is important to note that experimental neoplasms may not always accurately represent human cancers, and further research is needed to translate these findings into clinically relevant applications.

Neoplasms of connective and soft tissue are abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the body's supportive tissues, such as cartilage, tendons, ligaments, fascia, and fat. These neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Benign connective and soft tissue neoplasms include:
- Lipomas: slow-growing, fatty tumors that develop under the skin.
- Fibromas: firm, benign tumors that develop in connective tissue such as tendons or ligaments.
- Nevi (plural of nevus): benign growths made up of cells called melanocytes, which produce pigment.

Malignant connective and soft tissue neoplasms include:
- Sarcomas: a type of cancer that develops in the body's supportive tissues such as muscle, bone, fat, cartilage, or blood vessels. There are many different types of sarcomas, including liposarcoma (fatty tissue), rhabdomyosarcoma (muscle), and osteosarcoma (bone).
- Desmoid tumors: a rare type of benign tumor that can become aggressive and invade surrounding tissues. While not considered cancerous, desmoid tumors can cause significant morbidity due to their tendency to grow and infiltrate nearby structures.

Connective and soft tissue neoplasms can present with various symptoms depending on their location and size. Treatment options include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these modalities. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for recurrence or metastasis (spread) of the tumor.

Liver neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the liver that can be benign or malignant. Benign liver neoplasms are non-cancerous tumors that do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant liver neoplasms are cancerous tumors that can invade and destroy surrounding tissue and spread to other organs.

Liver neoplasms can be primary, meaning they originate in the liver, or secondary, meaning they have metastasized (spread) to the liver from another part of the body. Primary liver neoplasms can be further classified into different types based on their cell of origin and behavior, including hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, and hepatic hemangioma.

The diagnosis of liver neoplasms typically involves a combination of imaging studies, such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI, and biopsy to confirm the type and stage of the tumor. Treatment options depend on the type and extent of the neoplasm and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or liver transplantation.

Plasma cell neoplasms are a type of cancer that originates from plasma cells, which are a type of white blood cell found in the bone marrow. These cells are responsible for producing antibodies to help fight off infections. When plasma cells become cancerous and multiply out of control, they can form a tumor called a plasmacytoma.

There are two main types of plasma cell neoplasms: solitary plasmacytoma and multiple myeloma. Solitary plasmacytoma is a localized tumor that typically forms in the bone, while multiple myeloma is a systemic disease that affects multiple bones and can cause a variety of symptoms such as bone pain, fatigue, and anemia.

Plasma cell neoplasms are diagnosed through a combination of tests, including blood tests, imaging studies, and bone marrow biopsy. Treatment options depend on the stage and extent of the disease, but may include radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and stem cell transplantation.

Appendiceal neoplasms refer to various types of tumors that can develop in the appendix, a small tube-like structure attached to the large intestine. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant and can include:

1. Adenomas: These are benign tumors that arise from the glandular cells lining the appendix. They are usually slow-growing and may not cause any symptoms.
2. Carcinoids: These are neuroendocrine tumors that arise from the hormone-producing cells in the appendix. They are typically small and slow-growing, but some can be aggressive and spread to other parts of the body.
3. Mucinous neoplasms: These are tumors that produce mucin, a slippery substance that can cause the appendix to become distended and filled with mucus. They can be low-grade (less aggressive) or high-grade (more aggressive) and may spread to other parts of the abdomen.
4. Adenocarcinomas: These are malignant tumors that arise from the glandular cells lining the appendix. They are relatively rare but can be aggressive and spread to other parts of the body.
5. Pseudomyxoma peritonei: This is a condition in which mucin produced by an appendiceal neoplasm leaks into the abdominal cavity, causing a jelly-like accumulation of fluid and tissue. It can be caused by both benign and malignant tumors.

Treatment for appendiceal neoplasms depends on the type and stage of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health. Treatment options may include surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy.

Lymphoma is a type of cancer that originates from the white blood cells called lymphocytes, which are part of the immune system. These cells are found in various parts of the body such as the lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow, and other organs. Lymphoma can be classified into two main types: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).

HL is characterized by the presence of a specific type of abnormal lymphocyte called Reed-Sternberg cells, while NHL includes a diverse group of lymphomas that lack these cells. The symptoms of lymphoma may include swollen lymph nodes, fever, night sweats, weight loss, and fatigue.

The exact cause of lymphoma is not known, but it is believed to result from genetic mutations in the lymphocytes that lead to uncontrolled cell growth and division. Exposure to certain viruses, chemicals, and radiation may increase the risk of developing lymphoma. Treatment options for lymphoma depend on various factors such as the type and stage of the disease, age, and overall health of the patient. Common treatments include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, immunotherapy, and stem cell transplantation.

Mucinous cystadenoma is a type of benign tumor that arises from the epithelial cells lining the mucous membranes of the body. It is most commonly found in the ovary, but can also occur in other locations such as the pancreas or appendix.

Mucinous cystadenomas are characterized by the production of large amounts of mucin, a slippery, gel-like substance that accumulates inside the tumor and causes it to grow into a cystic mass. These tumors can vary in size, ranging from a few centimeters to over 20 centimeters in diameter.

While mucinous cystadenomas are generally benign, they have the potential to become cancerous (mucinous cystadenocarcinoma) if left untreated. Symptoms of mucinous cystadenoma may include abdominal pain or swelling, bloating, and changes in bowel movements or urinary habits. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the tumor.

Ovarian neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the ovary, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can originate from various cell types within the ovary, including epithelial cells, germ cells, and stromal cells. Ovarian neoplasms are often classified based on their cell type of origin, histological features, and potential for invasive or metastatic behavior.

Epithelial ovarian neoplasms are the most common type and can be further categorized into several subtypes, such as serous, mucinous, endometrioid, clear cell, and Brenner tumors. Some of these epithelial tumors have a higher risk of becoming malignant and spreading to other parts of the body.

Germ cell ovarian neoplasms arise from the cells that give rise to eggs (oocytes) and can include teratomas, dysgerminomas, yolk sac tumors, and embryonal carcinomas. Stromal ovarian neoplasms develop from the connective tissue cells supporting the ovary and can include granulosa cell tumors, thecomas, and fibromas.

It is essential to diagnose and treat ovarian neoplasms promptly, as some malignant forms can be aggressive and potentially life-threatening if not managed appropriately. Regular gynecological exams, imaging studies, and tumor marker tests are often used for early detection and monitoring of ovarian neoplasms. Treatment options may include surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy, depending on the type, stage, and patient's overall health condition.

Endocrine gland neoplasms refer to abnormal growths (tumors) that develop in the endocrine glands. These glands are responsible for producing hormones, which are chemical messengers that regulate various functions and processes in the body. Neoplasms can be benign or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms tend to grow slowly and do not spread to other parts of the body. Malignant neoplasms, on the other hand, can invade nearby tissues and organs and may also metastasize (spread) to distant sites.

Endocrine gland neoplasms can occur in any of the endocrine glands, including:

1. Pituitary gland: located at the base of the brain, it produces several hormones that regulate growth and development, as well as other bodily functions.
2. Thyroid gland: located in the neck, it produces thyroid hormones that regulate metabolism and calcium balance.
3. Parathyroid glands: located near the thyroid gland, they produce parathyroid hormone that regulates calcium levels in the blood.
4. Adrenal glands: located on top of each kidney, they produce hormones such as adrenaline, cortisol, and aldosterone that regulate stress response, metabolism, and blood pressure.
5. Pancreas: located behind the stomach, it produces insulin and glucagon, which regulate blood sugar levels, and digestive enzymes that help break down food.
6. Pineal gland: located in the brain, it produces melatonin, a hormone that regulates sleep-wake cycles.
7. Gonads (ovaries and testicles): located in the pelvis (ovaries) and scrotum (testicles), they produce sex hormones such as estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone that regulate reproductive function and secondary sexual characteristics.

Endocrine gland neoplasms can cause various symptoms depending on the type and location of the tumor. For example, a pituitary gland neoplasm may cause headaches, vision problems, or hormonal imbalances, while an adrenal gland neoplasm may cause high blood pressure, weight gain, or mood changes.

Diagnosis of endocrine gland neoplasms typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, imaging studies such as CT or MRI scans, and laboratory tests to measure hormone levels. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or hormonal therapy, depending on the type and stage of the tumor.

Thymoma is a type of tumor that originates from the thymus gland, which is a part of the immune system located in the chest behind the breastbone. Thymomas are typically slow-growing and often do not cause any symptoms until they have grown quite large or spread to other parts of the body.

Thymomas can be classified into different types based on their appearance under a microscope, such as type A, AB, B1, B2, and B3. These classifications are important because they can help predict how aggressive the tumor is likely to be and how it should be treated.

Symptoms of thymoma may include cough, chest pain, difficulty breathing, or swelling in the face or neck. Thymomas can also be associated with autoimmune disorders such as myasthenia gravis, which affects muscle strength and mobility. Treatment for thymoma typically involves surgical removal of the tumor, often followed by radiation therapy or chemotherapy to help prevent recurrence.

Gastrointestinal (GI) neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the gastrointestinal tract, which can be benign or malignant. The gastrointestinal tract includes the mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, rectum, and anus.

Benign neoplasms are non-cancerous growths that do not invade nearby tissues or spread to other parts of the body. They can sometimes be removed completely and may not cause any further health problems.

Malignant neoplasms, on the other hand, are cancerous growths that can invade nearby tissues and organs and spread to other parts of the body through the bloodstream or lymphatic system. These types of neoplasms can be life-threatening if not diagnosed and treated promptly.

GI neoplasms can cause various symptoms, including abdominal pain, bloating, changes in bowel habits, nausea, vomiting, weight loss, and anemia. The specific symptoms may depend on the location and size of the neoplasm.

There are many types of GI neoplasms, including adenocarcinomas, gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), lymphomas, and neuroendocrine tumors. The diagnosis of GI neoplasms typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, imaging studies, and biopsy. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, or immunotherapy.

Radiation-induced neoplasms are a type of cancer or tumor that develops as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation. Ionizing radiation is radiation with enough energy to remove tightly bound electrons from atoms or molecules, leading to the formation of ions. This type of radiation can damage DNA and other cellular structures, which can lead to mutations and uncontrolled cell growth, resulting in the development of a neoplasm.

Radiation-induced neoplasms can occur after exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation, such as that received during radiation therapy for cancer treatment or from nuclear accidents. The risk of developing a radiation-induced neoplasm depends on several factors, including the dose and duration of radiation exposure, the type of radiation, and the individual's genetic susceptibility to radiation-induced damage.

Radiation-induced neoplasms can take many years to develop after initial exposure to ionizing radiation, and they often occur at the site of previous radiation therapy. Common types of radiation-induced neoplasms include sarcomas, carcinomas, and thyroid cancer. It is important to note that while ionizing radiation can increase the risk of developing cancer, the overall risk is still relatively low, especially when compared to other well-established cancer risk factors such as smoking and exposure to certain chemicals.

Pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDC) is a specific type of cancer that forms in the ducts that carry digestive enzymes out of the pancreas. It's the most common form of exocrine pancreatic cancer, making up about 90% of all cases.

The symptoms of PDC are often vague and can include abdominal pain, jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes), unexplained weight loss, and changes in bowel movements. These symptoms can be similar to those caused by other less serious conditions, which can make diagnosis difficult.

Pancreatic ductal carcinoma is often aggressive and difficult to treat. The prognosis for PDC is generally poor, with a five-year survival rate of only about 9%. Treatment options may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or a combination of these approaches. However, because PDC is often not detected until it has advanced, treatment is frequently focused on palliative care to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life.

A neoplasm of vascular tissue is an abnormal growth or mass of cells in the blood vessels or lymphatic vessels. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms, such as hemangiomas and lymphangiomas, are typically not harmful and may not require treatment. However, they can cause symptoms if they grow large enough to press on nearby organs or tissues. Malignant neoplasms, such as angiosarcomas, are cancerous and can invade and destroy surrounding tissue, as well as spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body. Treatment for vascular tissue neoplasms depends on the type, size, location, and stage of the growth, and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these.

Eye neoplasms, also known as ocular tumors or eye cancer, refer to abnormal growths of tissue in the eye. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Eye neoplasms can develop in various parts of the eye, including the eyelid, conjunctiva, cornea, iris, ciliary body, choroid, retina, and optic nerve.

Benign eye neoplasms are typically slow-growing and do not spread to other parts of the body. They may cause symptoms such as vision changes, eye pain, or a noticeable mass in the eye. Treatment options for benign eye neoplasms include monitoring, surgical removal, or radiation therapy.

Malignant eye neoplasms, on the other hand, can grow and spread rapidly to other parts of the body. They may cause symptoms such as vision changes, eye pain, floaters, or flashes of light. Treatment options for malignant eye neoplasms depend on the type and stage of cancer but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these treatments.

It is important to note that early detection and treatment of eye neoplasms can improve outcomes and prevent complications. Regular eye exams with an ophthalmologist are recommended for early detection and prevention of eye diseases, including eye neoplasms.

Nose neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the nasal cavity or paranasal sinuses. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slow-growing and do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant neoplasms can invade surrounding tissues and have the potential to metastasize.

Nose neoplasms can cause various symptoms such as nasal congestion, nosebleeds, difficulty breathing through the nose, loss of smell, facial pain or numbness, and visual changes if they affect the eye. The diagnosis of nose neoplasms usually involves a combination of physical examination, imaging studies (such as CT or MRI scans), and biopsy to determine the type and extent of the growth. Treatment options depend on the type, size, location, and stage of the neoplasm and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Salivary gland neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the salivary glands. These glands are responsible for producing saliva, which helps in digestion, lubrication of food and maintaining oral health. Salivary gland neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Benign neoplasms are slow-growing and typically do not spread to other parts of the body. They may cause symptoms such as swelling, painless lumps, or difficulty swallowing if they grow large enough to put pressure on surrounding tissues.

Malignant neoplasms, on the other hand, can be aggressive and have the potential to invade nearby structures and metastasize (spread) to distant organs. Symptoms of malignant salivary gland neoplasms may include rapid growth, pain, numbness, or paralysis of facial nerves.

Salivary gland neoplasms can occur in any of the major salivary glands (parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands) or in the minor salivary glands located throughout the mouth and throat. The exact cause of these neoplasms is not fully understood, but risk factors may include exposure to radiation, certain viral infections, and genetic predisposition.

C57BL/6 (C57 Black 6) is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The term "inbred" refers to a strain of animals where matings have been carried out between siblings or other closely related individuals for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at most genetic loci.

The C57BL/6 strain was established in 1920 by crossing a female mouse from the dilute brown (DBA) strain with a male mouse from the black strain. The resulting offspring were then interbred for many generations to create the inbred C57BL/6 strain.

C57BL/6 mice are known for their robust health, longevity, and ease of handling, making them a popular choice for researchers. They have been used in a wide range of biomedical research areas, including studies of cancer, immunology, neuroscience, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism.

One of the most notable features of the C57BL/6 strain is its sensitivity to certain genetic modifications, such as the introduction of mutations that lead to obesity or impaired glucose tolerance. This has made it a valuable tool for studying the genetic basis of complex diseases and traits.

Overall, the C57BL/6 inbred mouse strain is an important model organism in biomedical research, providing a valuable resource for understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human health and disease.

Adenocarcinoma, papillary is a type of cancer that begins in the glandular cells and grows in a finger-like projection (called a papilla). This type of cancer can occur in various organs, including the lungs, pancreas, thyroid, and female reproductive system. The prognosis and treatment options for papillary adenocarcinoma depend on several factors, such as the location and stage of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health. It is important to consult with a healthcare professional for an accurate diagnosis and personalized treatment plan.

Carcinoma, papillary is a type of cancer that begins in the cells that line the glandular structures or the lining of organs. In a papillary carcinoma, the cancerous cells grow and form small finger-like projections, called papillae, within the tumor. This type of cancer most commonly occurs in the thyroid gland, but can also be found in other organs such as the lung, breast, and kidney. Papillary carcinoma of the thyroid gland is usually slow-growing and has a good prognosis, especially when it is diagnosed at an early stage.

A neoplasm is a tumor or growth that is formed by an abnormal and excessive proliferation of cells, which can be benign or malignant. Neoplasm proteins are therefore any proteins that are expressed or produced in these neoplastic cells. These proteins can play various roles in the development, progression, and maintenance of neoplasms.

Some neoplasm proteins may contribute to the uncontrolled cell growth and division seen in cancer, such as oncogenic proteins that promote cell cycle progression or inhibit apoptosis (programmed cell death). Others may help the neoplastic cells evade the immune system, allowing them to proliferate undetected. Still others may be involved in angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels that supply the tumor with nutrients and oxygen.

Neoplasm proteins can also serve as biomarkers for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, or treatment response. For example, the presence or level of certain neoplasm proteins in biological samples such as blood or tissue may indicate the presence of a specific type of cancer, help predict the likelihood of cancer recurrence, or suggest whether a particular therapy will be effective.

Overall, understanding the roles and behaviors of neoplasm proteins can provide valuable insights into the biology of cancer and inform the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

Lymphoid tissue is a specialized type of connective tissue that is involved in the immune function of the body. It is composed of lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell), which are responsible for producing antibodies and destroying infected or cancerous cells. Lymphoid tissue can be found throughout the body, but it is particularly concentrated in certain areas such as the lymph nodes, spleen, tonsils, and Peyer's patches in the small intestine.

Lymphoid tissue provides a site for the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of lymphocytes, which are critical components of the adaptive immune response. It also serves as a filter for foreign particles, such as bacteria and viruses, that may enter the body through various routes. The lymphatic system, which includes lymphoid tissue, helps to maintain the health and integrity of the body by protecting it from infection and disease.

Testicular neoplasms are abnormal growths or tumors in the testicle that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They are a type of genitourinary cancer, which affects the reproductive and urinary systems. Testicular neoplasms can occur in men of any age but are most commonly found in young adults between the ages of 15 and 40.

Testicular neoplasms can be classified into two main categories: germ cell tumors and non-germ cell tumors. Germ cell tumors, which arise from the cells that give rise to sperm, are further divided into seminomas and non-seminomas. Seminomas are typically slow-growing and have a good prognosis, while non-seminomas tend to grow more quickly and can spread to other parts of the body.

Non-germ cell tumors are less common than germ cell tumors and include Leydig cell tumors, Sertoli cell tumors, and lymphomas. These tumors can have a variety of clinical behaviors, ranging from benign to malignant.

Testicular neoplasms often present as a painless mass or swelling in the testicle. Other symptoms may include a feeling of heaviness or discomfort in the scrotum, a dull ache in the lower abdomen or groin, and breast enlargement (gynecomastia).

Diagnosis typically involves a physical examination, imaging studies such as ultrasound or CT scan, and blood tests to detect tumor markers. Treatment options depend on the type and stage of the neoplasm but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these modalities. Regular self-examinations of the testicles are recommended for early detection and improved outcomes.

Neoplasms in muscle tissue refer to abnormal and excessive growths of muscle cells that can be benign or malignant. These growths can arise from any of the three types of muscle tissue: skeletal, cardiac, or smooth muscle. Neoplasms in muscle tissue are classified based on their origin, behavior, and histological features.

Benign neoplasms in muscle tissue include leiomyomas (smooth muscle), rhabdomyomas (skeletal muscle), and myxomas (cardiac muscle). These tumors are usually slow-growing and do not invade surrounding tissues or spread to other parts of the body.

Malignant neoplasms in muscle tissue, also known as sarcomas, include leiomyosarcoma (smooth muscle), rhabdomyosarcoma (skeletal muscle), and angiosarcoma (cardiac muscle). These tumors are aggressive, invasive, and have the potential to metastasize to other parts of the body.

Symptoms of neoplasms in muscle tissue depend on their location, size, and type. They may include a painless or painful mass, weakness, fatigue, weight loss, and difficulty swallowing or breathing. Treatment options for neoplasms in muscle tissue include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. The choice of treatment depends on the type, stage, location, and patient's overall health condition.

Neoplasms are abnormal growths of cells or tissues that serve no purpose and can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Glandular and epithelial neoplasms refer to specific types of tumors that originate from the glandular and epithelial tissues, respectively.

Glandular neoplasms arise from the glandular tissue, which is responsible for producing and secreting substances such as hormones, enzymes, or other fluids. These neoplasms can be further classified into adenomas (benign) and adenocarcinomas (malignant).

Epithelial neoplasms, on the other hand, develop from the epithelial tissue that lines the outer surfaces of organs and the inner surfaces of cavities. These neoplasms can also be benign or malignant and are classified as papillomas (benign) and carcinomas (malignant).

It is important to note that while both glandular and epithelial neoplasms can become cancerous, not all of them do. However, if they do, the malignant versions can invade surrounding tissues and spread to other parts of the body, making them potentially life-threatening.

Thymocytes are a type of white blood cell that develops in the thymus gland. They are immature T-cells, which are a type of lymphocyte that plays a central role in cell-mediated immunity. Thymocytes undergo a process of maturation and selection in the thymus, where they learn to recognize and respond to foreign substances while remaining tolerant to self-tissues. This helps to ensure that the immune system can effectively fight off infections and diseases without attacking the body's own cells and tissues.

Thymocytes are characterized by the expression of both CD4 and CD8 co-receptors on their surface, which help them to interact with other cells of the immune system. During the maturation process, thymocytes that fail to properly rearrange their T-cell receptor genes or that react strongly to self-antigens are eliminated, while those that can recognize and respond to foreign antigens while remaining tolerant to self are allowed to mature and enter the circulation as functional T-cells.

Abnormalities in thymocyte development and function have been implicated in a variety of immune disorders, including autoimmune diseases and certain types of cancer.

Neoplasm antigens, also known as tumor antigens, are substances that are produced by cancer cells (neoplasms) and can stimulate an immune response. These antigens can be proteins, carbohydrates, or other molecules that are either unique to the cancer cells or are overexpressed or mutated versions of normal cellular proteins.

Neoplasm antigens can be classified into two main categories: tumor-specific antigens (TSAs) and tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). TSAs are unique to cancer cells and are not expressed by normal cells, while TAAs are present at low levels in normal cells but are overexpressed or altered in cancer cells.

TSAs can be further divided into viral antigens and mutated antigens. Viral antigens are produced when cancer is caused by a virus, such as human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical cancer. Mutated antigens are the result of genetic mutations that occur during cancer development and are unique to each patient's tumor.

Neoplasm antigens play an important role in the immune response against cancer. They can be recognized by the immune system, leading to the activation of immune cells such as T cells and natural killer (NK) cells, which can then attack and destroy cancer cells. However, cancer cells often develop mechanisms to evade the immune response, allowing them to continue growing and spreading.

Understanding neoplasm antigens is important for the development of cancer immunotherapies, which aim to enhance the body's natural immune response against cancer. These therapies include checkpoint inhibitors, which block proteins that inhibit T cell activation, and therapeutic vaccines, which stimulate an immune response against specific tumor antigens.

An adenoma is a benign (noncancerous) tumor that develops from glandular epithelial cells. These types of cells are responsible for producing and releasing fluids, such as hormones or digestive enzymes, into the surrounding tissues. Adenomas can occur in various organs and glands throughout the body, including the thyroid, pituitary, adrenal, and digestive systems.

Depending on their location, adenomas may cause different symptoms or remain asymptomatic. Some common examples of adenomas include:

1. Colorectal adenoma (also known as a polyp): These growths occur in the lining of the colon or rectum and can develop into colorectal cancer if left untreated. Regular screenings, such as colonoscopies, are essential for early detection and removal of these polyps.
2. Thyroid adenoma: This type of adenoma affects the thyroid gland and may result in an overproduction or underproduction of hormones, leading to conditions like hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) or hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid).
3. Pituitary adenoma: These growths occur in the pituitary gland, which is located at the base of the brain and controls various hormonal functions. Depending on their size and location, pituitary adenomas can cause vision problems, headaches, or hormonal imbalances that affect growth, reproduction, and metabolism.
4. Liver adenoma: These rare benign tumors develop in the liver and may not cause any symptoms unless they become large enough to press on surrounding organs or structures. In some cases, liver adenomas can rupture and cause internal bleeding.
5. Adrenal adenoma: These growths occur in the adrenal glands, which are located above the kidneys and produce hormones that regulate stress responses, metabolism, and blood pressure. Most adrenal adenomas are nonfunctioning, meaning they do not secrete excess hormones. However, functioning adrenal adenomas can lead to conditions like Cushing's syndrome or Conn's syndrome, depending on the type of hormone being overproduced.

It is essential to monitor and manage benign tumors like adenomas to prevent potential complications, such as rupture, bleeding, or hormonal imbalances. Treatment options may include surveillance with imaging studies, medication to manage hormonal issues, or surgical removal of the tumor in certain cases.

Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma is a type of cancer that arises from the mucin-producing cells in the lining of a cyst. It is a subtype of cystadenocarcinoma, which is a malignant tumor that develops within a cyst. Mucinous cystadenocarcinomas are typically found in the ovary or pancreas but can also occur in other organs such as the appendix and the respiratory tract.

These tumors are characterized by the production of large amounts of mucin, a gel-like substance that can accumulate within the cyst and cause it to grow. Mucinous cystadenocarcinomas tend to grow slowly but can become quite large and may eventually spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body if left untreated.

Symptoms of mucinous cystadenocarcinoma depend on the location and size of the tumor, but they may include abdominal pain or discomfort, bloating, changes in bowel movements, or vaginal bleeding. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the tumor, followed by chemotherapy or radiation therapy to kill any remaining cancer cells. The prognosis for mucinous cystadenocarcinoma depends on several factors, including the stage of the disease at diagnosis and the patient's overall health.

Soft tissue neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the soft tissues of the body. Soft tissues include muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia, nerves, blood vessels, fat, and synovial membranes (the thin layer of cells that line joints and tendons). Neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous), and their behavior and potential for spread depend on the specific type of neoplasm.

Benign soft tissue neoplasms are typically slow-growing, well-circumscribed, and rarely spread to other parts of the body. They can often be removed surgically with a low risk of recurrence. Examples of benign soft tissue neoplasms include lipomas (fat tumors), schwannomas (nerve sheath tumors), and hemangiomas (blood vessel tumors).

Malignant soft tissue neoplasms, on the other hand, can grow rapidly, invade surrounding tissues, and may metastasize (spread) to distant parts of the body. They are often more difficult to treat than benign neoplasms and require a multidisciplinary approach, including surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. Examples of malignant soft tissue neoplasms include sarcomas, such as rhabdomyosarcoma (arising from skeletal muscle), leiomyosarcoma (arising from smooth muscle), and angiosarcoma (arising from blood vessels).

It is important to note that soft tissue neoplasms can occur in any part of the body, and their diagnosis and treatment require a thorough evaluation by a healthcare professional with expertise in this area.

Hematologic neoplasms, also known as hematological malignancies, are a group of diseases characterized by the uncontrolled growth and accumulation of abnormal blood cells or bone marrow cells. These disorders can originate from the myeloid or lymphoid cell lines, which give rise to various types of blood cells, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.

Hematologic neoplasms can be broadly classified into three categories:

1. Leukemias: These are cancers that primarily affect the bone marrow and blood-forming tissues. They result in an overproduction of abnormal white blood cells, which interfere with the normal functioning of the blood and immune system. There are several types of leukemia, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML).
2. Lymphomas: These are cancers that develop from the lymphatic system, which is a part of the immune system responsible for fighting infections. Lymphomas can affect lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow, and other organs. The two main types of lymphoma are Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).
3. Myelomas: These are cancers that arise from the plasma cells, a type of white blood cell responsible for producing antibodies. Multiple myeloma is the most common type of myeloma, characterized by an excessive proliferation of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow, leading to the production of abnormal amounts of monoclonal immunoglobulins (M proteins) and bone destruction.

Hematologic neoplasms can have various symptoms, such as fatigue, weakness, frequent infections, easy bruising or bleeding, weight loss, swollen lymph nodes, and bone pain. The diagnosis typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, laboratory tests, imaging studies, and sometimes bone marrow biopsy. Treatment options depend on the type and stage of the disease and may include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, stem cell transplantation, or a combination of these approaches.

Uterine neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the uterus, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can originate from different types of cells within the uterus, leading to various types of uterine neoplasms. The two main categories of uterine neoplasms are endometrial neoplasms and uterine sarcomas.

Endometrial neoplasms develop from the endometrium, which is the inner lining of the uterus. Most endometrial neoplasms are classified as endometrioid adenocarcinomas, arising from glandular cells in the endometrium. Other types include serous carcinoma, clear cell carcinoma, and mucinous carcinoma.

Uterine sarcomas, on the other hand, are less common and originate from the connective tissue (stroma) or muscle (myometrium) of the uterus. Uterine sarcomas can be further divided into several subtypes, such as leiomyosarcoma, endometrial stromal sarcoma, and undifferentiated uterine sarcoma.

Uterine neoplasms can cause various symptoms, including abnormal vaginal bleeding or discharge, pelvic pain, and difficulty urinating or having bowel movements. The diagnosis typically involves a combination of imaging tests (such as ultrasound, CT, or MRI scans) and tissue biopsies to determine the type and extent of the neoplasm. Treatment options depend on the type, stage, and patient's overall health but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or hormone therapy.

Intestinal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the tissues of the intestines, which can be benign or malignant. These growths are called neoplasms and they result from uncontrolled cell division. In the case of intestinal neoplasms, these growths occur in the small intestine, large intestine (colon), rectum, or appendix.

Benign intestinal neoplasms are not cancerous and often do not invade surrounding tissues or spread to other parts of the body. However, they can still cause problems if they grow large enough to obstruct the intestines or cause bleeding. Common types of benign intestinal neoplasms include polyps, leiomyomas, and lipomas.

Malignant intestinal neoplasms, on the other hand, are cancerous and can invade surrounding tissues and spread to other parts of the body. The most common type of malignant intestinal neoplasm is adenocarcinoma, which arises from the glandular cells lining the inside of the intestines. Other types of malignant intestinal neoplasms include lymphomas, sarcomas, and carcinoid tumors.

Symptoms of intestinal neoplasms can vary depending on their size, location, and type. Common symptoms include abdominal pain, bloating, changes in bowel habits, rectal bleeding, weight loss, and fatigue. If you experience any of these symptoms, it is important to seek medical attention promptly.

Neoplasms, adnexal and skin appendage refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the sweat glands, hair follicles, or other structures associated with the skin. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous), and they can occur anywhere on the body.

Adnexal neoplasms are tumors that arise from the sweat glands or hair follicles, including the sebaceous glands, eccrine glands, and apocrine glands. These tumors can range in size and severity, and they may cause symptoms such as pain, itching, or changes in the appearance of the skin.

Skin appendage neoplasms are similar to adnexal neoplasms, but they specifically refer to tumors that arise from structures such as hair follicles, nails, and sweat glands. Examples of skin appendage neoplasms include pilomatricomas (tumors of the hair follicle), trichilemmomas (tumors of the outer root sheath of the hair follicle), and sebaceous adenomas (tumors of the sebaceous glands).

It is important to note that while many adnexal and skin appendage neoplasms are benign, some can be malignant and may require aggressive treatment. If you notice any unusual growths or changes in your skin, it is important to consult with a healthcare professional for further evaluation and care.

Neoplasm staging is a systematic process used in medicine to describe the extent of spread of a cancer, including the size and location of the original (primary) tumor and whether it has metastasized (spread) to other parts of the body. The most widely accepted system for this purpose is the TNM classification system developed by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC).

In this system, T stands for tumor, and it describes the size and extent of the primary tumor. N stands for nodes, and it indicates whether the cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes. M stands for metastasis, and it shows whether the cancer has spread to distant parts of the body.

Each letter is followed by a number that provides more details about the extent of the disease. For example, a T1N0M0 cancer means that the primary tumor is small and has not spread to nearby lymph nodes or distant sites. The higher the numbers, the more advanced the cancer.

Staging helps doctors determine the most appropriate treatment for each patient and estimate the patient's prognosis. It is an essential tool for communication among members of the healthcare team and for comparing outcomes of treatments in clinical trials.

Vascular neoplasms are a type of tumor that develops from cells that line the blood vessels or lymphatic vessels. These tumors can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign vascular neoplasms, such as hemangiomas and lymphangiomas, are usually harmless and may not require treatment unless they cause symptoms or complications. Malignant vascular neoplasms, on the other hand, are known as angiosarcomas and can be aggressive, spreading to other parts of the body and potentially causing serious health problems.

Angiosarcomas can develop in any part of the body but are most commonly found in the skin, particularly in areas exposed to radiation or chronic lymph edema. They can also occur in the breast, liver, spleen, and heart. Treatment for vascular neoplasms depends on the type, location, size, and stage of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Cell differentiation is the process by which a less specialized cell, or stem cell, becomes a more specialized cell type with specific functions and structures. This process involves changes in gene expression, which are regulated by various intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factors. Differentiation results in the development of distinct cell types that make up tissues and organs in multicellular organisms. It is a crucial aspect of embryonic development, tissue repair, and maintenance of homeostasis in the body.

Sweat gland neoplasms are abnormal growths that develop in the sweat glands. These growths can be benign (noncancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign sweat gland neoplasms include hidradenomas and syringomas, which are usually slow-growing and cause little to no symptoms. Malignant sweat gland neoplasms, also known as sweat gland carcinomas, are rare but aggressive cancers that can spread to other parts of the body. They may cause symptoms such as a lump or mass under the skin, pain, swelling, and redness. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the growth.

Bone neoplasms are abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the bone. They can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign bone neoplasms do not spread to other parts of the body and are rarely a threat to life, although they may cause problems if they grow large enough to press on surrounding tissues or cause fractures. Malignant bone neoplasms, on the other hand, can invade and destroy nearby tissue and may spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body.

There are many different types of bone neoplasms, including:

1. Osteochondroma - a benign tumor that develops from cartilage and bone
2. Enchondroma - a benign tumor that forms in the cartilage that lines the inside of the bones
3. Chondrosarcoma - a malignant tumor that develops from cartilage
4. Osteosarcoma - a malignant tumor that develops from bone cells
5. Ewing sarcoma - a malignant tumor that develops in the bones or soft tissues around the bones
6. Giant cell tumor of bone - a benign or occasionally malignant tumor that develops from bone tissue
7. Fibrosarcoma - a malignant tumor that develops from fibrous tissue in the bone

The symptoms of bone neoplasms vary depending on the type, size, and location of the tumor. They may include pain, swelling, stiffness, fractures, or limited mobility. Treatment options depend on the type and stage of the tumor but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these treatments.

Palatal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that occur on the palate, which is the roof of the mouth. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slower growing and less likely to spread, while malignant neoplasms are more aggressive and can invade nearby tissues and organs.

Palatal neoplasms can have various causes, including genetic factors, environmental exposures, and viral infections. They may present with symptoms such as mouth pain, difficulty swallowing, swelling or lumps in the mouth, bleeding, or numbness in the mouth or face.

The diagnosis of palatal neoplasms typically involves a thorough clinical examination, imaging studies, and sometimes biopsy to determine the type and extent of the growth. Treatment options depend on the type, size, location, and stage of the neoplasm but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for recurrence or spread of the neoplasm.

Neoplasms are abnormal growths of cells or tissues in the body that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). When referring to "Complex and Mixed Neoplasms," it is typically used in the context of histopathology, where it describes tumors with a mixture of different types of cells or growth patterns.

A complex neoplasm usually contains areas with various architectural patterns, cell types, or both, making its classification challenging. It may require extensive sampling and careful examination to determine its nature and behavior. These neoplasms can be either benign or malignant, depending on the specific characteristics of the tumor cells and their growth pattern.

A mixed neoplasm, on the other hand, is a tumor that contains more than one type of cell or tissue component, often arising from different germ layers (the three primary layers of embryonic development: ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm). A common example of a mixed neoplasm is a teratoma, which can contain tissues derived from all three germ layers, such as skin, hair, teeth, bone, and muscle. Mixed neoplasms can also be benign or malignant, depending on the specific components of the tumor.

It's important to note that the classification and behavior of complex and mixed neoplasms can vary significantly based on their location in the body, cellular composition, and other factors. Accurate diagnosis typically requires a thorough examination by an experienced pathologist and may involve additional tests, such as immunohistochemistry or molecular analysis, to determine the appropriate treatment and management strategies.

Mandibular neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the mandible, which is the lower jawbone. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slow-growing and rarely spread to other parts of the body, while malignant neoplasms can invade surrounding tissues and may metastasize (spread) to distant sites.

Mandibular neoplasms can have various causes, including genetic mutations, exposure to certain chemicals or radiation, and infection with certain viruses. The symptoms of mandibular neoplasms may include swelling or pain in the jaw, difficulty chewing or speaking, numbness in the lower lip or chin, loose teeth, and/or a lump or mass in the mouth or neck.

The diagnosis of mandibular neoplasms typically involves a thorough clinical examination, imaging studies such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI scans, and sometimes a biopsy to confirm the type and extent of the tumor. Treatment options depend on the type, stage, and location of the neoplasm, and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for recurrence or metastasis.

Cystadenocarcinoma is a type of tumor that arises from the epithelial lining of a cyst, and it has the potential to invade surrounding tissues and spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body. It typically affects glandular organs such as the ovaries, pancreas, and salivary glands.

Cystadenocarcinomas can be classified into two types: serous and mucinous. Serous cystadenocarcinomas produce a watery fluid, while mucinous cystadenocarcinomas produce a thick, mucus-like fluid. Both types of tumors can be benign or malignant, but malignant cystadenocarcinomas are more aggressive and have a higher risk of metastasis.

Symptoms of cystadenocarcinoma depend on the location and size of the tumor. In some cases, there may be no symptoms until the tumor has grown large enough to cause pain or other problems. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the tumor, along with any affected surrounding tissue. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy may also be used in some cases to help prevent recurrence or spread of the cancer.

Inbred strains of mice are defined as lines of mice that have been brother-sister mated for at least 20 consecutive generations. This results in a high degree of homozygosity, where the mice of an inbred strain are genetically identical to one another, with the exception of spontaneous mutations.

Inbred strains of mice are widely used in biomedical research due to their genetic uniformity and stability, which makes them useful for studying the genetic basis of various traits, diseases, and biological processes. They also provide a consistent and reproducible experimental system, as compared to outbred or genetically heterogeneous populations.

Some commonly used inbred strains of mice include C57BL/6J, BALB/cByJ, DBA/2J, and 129SvEv. Each strain has its own unique genetic background and phenotypic characteristics, which can influence the results of experiments. Therefore, it is important to choose the appropriate inbred strain for a given research question.

Bile duct neoplasms, also known as cholangiocarcinomas, refer to a group of malignancies that arise from the bile ducts. These are the tubes that carry bile from the liver to the gallbladder and small intestine. Bile duct neoplasms can be further classified based on their location as intrahepatic (within the liver), perihilar (at the junction of the left and right hepatic ducts), or distal (in the common bile duct).

These tumors are relatively rare, but their incidence has been increasing in recent years. They can cause a variety of symptoms, including jaundice, abdominal pain, weight loss, and fever. The diagnosis of bile duct neoplasms typically involves imaging studies such as CT or MRI scans, as well as blood tests to assess liver function. In some cases, a biopsy may be necessary to confirm the diagnosis.

Treatment options for bile duct neoplasms depend on several factors, including the location and stage of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health. Surgical resection is the preferred treatment for early-stage tumors, while chemotherapy and radiation therapy may be used in more advanced cases. For patients who are not candidates for surgery, palliative treatments such as stenting or bypass procedures may be recommended to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life.

Neoplasm invasiveness is a term used in pathology and oncology to describe the aggressive behavior of cancer cells as they invade surrounding tissues and organs. This process involves the loss of cell-to-cell adhesion, increased motility and migration, and the ability of cancer cells to degrade the extracellular matrix (ECM) through the production of enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs).

Invasive neoplasms are cancers that have spread beyond the original site where they first developed and have infiltrated adjacent tissues or structures. This is in contrast to non-invasive or in situ neoplasms, which are confined to the epithelial layer where they originated and have not yet invaded the underlying basement membrane.

The invasiveness of a neoplasm is an important prognostic factor in cancer diagnosis and treatment, as it can indicate the likelihood of metastasis and the potential effectiveness of various therapies. In general, more invasive cancers are associated with worse outcomes and require more aggressive treatment approaches.

Splenic neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the spleen, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can arise from various cell types present within the spleen, including hematopoietic cells (red and white blood cells, platelets), stromal cells (supporting tissue), or lymphoid cells (part of the immune system).

There are several types of splenic neoplasms:

1. Hematologic malignancies: These are cancers that affect the blood and bone marrow, such as leukemias, lymphomas, and multiple myeloma. They often involve the spleen, causing enlargement (splenomegaly) and neoplastic infiltration of splenic tissue.
2. Primary splenic tumors: These are rare and include benign lesions like hemangiomas, lymphangiomas, and hamartomas, as well as malignant tumors such as angiosarcoma, littoral cell angiosarcoma, and primary splenic lymphoma.
3. Metastatic splenic tumors: These occur when cancer cells from other primary sites spread (metastasize) to the spleen. Common sources of metastasis include lung, breast, colon, and ovarian cancers, as well as melanomas and sarcomas.

Symptoms of splenic neoplasms may vary depending on the type and extent of the disease but often include abdominal pain or discomfort, fatigue, weight loss, and anemia. Diagnosis typically involves imaging studies (such as ultrasound, CT, or MRI scans) and sometimes requires a biopsy for confirmation. Treatment options depend on the type of neoplasm and may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, or immunotherapy.

There is no medical definition for "dog diseases" as it is too broad a term. However, dogs can suffer from various health conditions and illnesses that are specific to their species or similar to those found in humans. Some common categories of dog diseases include:

1. Infectious Diseases: These are caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites. Examples include distemper, parvovirus, kennel cough, Lyme disease, and heartworms.
2. Hereditary/Genetic Disorders: Some dogs may inherit certain genetic disorders from their parents. Examples include hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), and degenerative myelopathy.
3. Age-Related Diseases: As dogs age, they become more susceptible to various health issues. Common age-related diseases in dogs include arthritis, dental disease, cancer, and cognitive dysfunction syndrome (CDS).
4. Nutritional Disorders: Malnutrition or improper feeding can lead to various health problems in dogs. Examples include obesity, malnutrition, and vitamin deficiencies.
5. Environmental Diseases: These are caused by exposure to environmental factors such as toxins, allergens, or extreme temperatures. Examples include heatstroke, frostbite, and toxicities from ingesting harmful substances.
6. Neurological Disorders: Dogs can suffer from various neurological conditions that affect their nervous system. Examples include epilepsy, intervertebral disc disease (IVDD), and vestibular disease.
7. Behavioral Disorders: Some dogs may develop behavioral issues due to various factors such as anxiety, fear, or aggression. Examples include separation anxiety, noise phobias, and resource guarding.

It's important to note that regular veterinary care, proper nutrition, exercise, and preventative measures can help reduce the risk of many dog diseases.

Heart neoplasms are abnormal growths or tumors that develop within the heart tissue. They can be benign (noncancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign tumors, such as myxomas and rhabdomyomas, are typically slower growing and less likely to spread, but they can still cause serious complications if they obstruct blood flow or damage heart valves. Malignant tumors, such as angiosarcomas and rhabdomyosarcomas, are fast-growing and have a higher risk of spreading to other parts of the body. Symptoms of heart neoplasms can include shortness of breath, chest pain, fatigue, and irregular heart rhythms. Treatment options depend on the type, size, and location of the tumor, and may include surgery, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy.

A serous cystadenoma is a type of benign tumor that arises from the epithelial cells lining the serous glands, which are glands that produce a watery, lubricating fluid. This type of tumor typically develops in the ovary or the pancreas.

Serous cystadenomas of the ovary are usually filled with a clear, watery fluid and have multiple loculations (compartments). They can vary in size from a few millimeters to several centimeters in diameter. Although these tumors are benign, they can cause symptoms if they become large enough to press on surrounding organs or if they rupture and release their contents into the abdominal cavity.

Serous cystadenomas of the pancreas are less common than ovarian serous cystadenomas. They typically occur in the tail of the pancreas and can range in size from a few millimeters to several centimeters in diameter. These tumors are usually asymptomatic, but they can cause symptoms such as abdominal pain or discomfort if they become large enough to press on surrounding organs.

It is important to note that while serous cystadenomas are generally benign, there is a small risk that they may undergo malignant transformation and develop into a type of cancer known as a serous cystadenocarcinoma. For this reason, it is important for patients with these tumors to be followed closely by a healthcare provider and to have regular imaging studies and/or surgical excision to monitor for any changes in the tumor.

Tumor markers are substances that can be found in the body and their presence can indicate the presence of certain types of cancer or other conditions. Biological tumor markers refer to those substances that are produced by cancer cells or by other cells in response to cancer or certain benign (non-cancerous) conditions. These markers can be found in various bodily fluids such as blood, urine, or tissue samples.

Examples of biological tumor markers include:

1. Proteins: Some tumor markers are proteins that are produced by cancer cells or by other cells in response to the presence of cancer. For example, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a protein produced by normal prostate cells and in higher amounts by prostate cancer cells.
2. Genetic material: Tumor markers can also include genetic material such as DNA, RNA, or microRNA that are shed by cancer cells into bodily fluids. For example, circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) is genetic material from cancer cells that can be found in the bloodstream.
3. Metabolites: Tumor markers can also include metabolic products produced by cancer cells or by other cells in response to cancer. For example, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is an enzyme that is released into the bloodstream when cancer cells break down glucose for energy.

It's important to note that tumor markers are not specific to cancer and can be elevated in non-cancerous conditions as well. Therefore, they should not be used alone to diagnose cancer but rather as a tool in conjunction with other diagnostic tests and clinical evaluations.

Colonic neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the large intestine, also known as the colon. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). The two most common types of colonic neoplasms are adenomas and carcinomas.

Adenomas are benign tumors that can develop into cancer over time if left untreated. They are often found during routine colonoscopies and can be removed during the procedure.

Carcinomas, on the other hand, are malignant tumors that invade surrounding tissues and can spread to other parts of the body. Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, and colonic neoplasms are a significant risk factor for developing this type of cancer.

Regular screenings for colonic neoplasms are recommended for individuals over the age of 50 or those with a family history of colorectal cancer or other risk factors. Early detection and removal of colonic neoplasms can significantly reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

Maxillary neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the maxilla, which is the upper jaw bone. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are slow-growing and do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant neoplasms can invade surrounding tissues and spread to distant sites.

Maxillary neoplasms can cause various symptoms such as swelling, pain, numbness, loose teeth, or difficulty in chewing or swallowing. They may also cause nasal congestion, nosebleeds, or visual changes if they affect the eye or orbit. The diagnosis of maxillary neoplasms usually involves a combination of clinical examination, imaging studies such as CT or MRI scans, and biopsy to determine the type and extent of the tumor.

Treatment options for maxillary neoplasms depend on several factors, including the type, size, location, and stage of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health and preferences. Treatment may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these modalities. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for recurrence or metastasis and ensure optimal outcomes.

"Cattle" is a term used in the agricultural and veterinary fields to refer to domesticated animals of the genus *Bos*, primarily *Bos taurus* (European cattle) and *Bos indicus* (Zebu). These animals are often raised for meat, milk, leather, and labor. They are also known as bovines or cows (for females), bulls (intact males), and steers/bullocks (castrated males). However, in a strict medical definition, "cattle" does not apply to humans or other animals.

T-lymphocyte subsets refer to distinct populations of T-cells, which are a type of white blood cell that plays a central role in cell-mediated immunity. The two main types of T-lymphocytes are CD4+ and CD8+ cells, which are defined by the presence or absence of specific proteins called cluster differentiation (CD) molecules on their surface.

CD4+ T-cells, also known as helper T-cells, play a crucial role in activating other immune cells, such as B-lymphocytes and macrophages, to mount an immune response against pathogens. They also produce cytokines that help regulate the immune response.

CD8+ T-cells, also known as cytotoxic T-cells, directly kill infected cells or tumor cells by releasing toxic substances such as perforins and granzymes.

The balance between these two subsets of T-cells is critical for maintaining immune homeostasis and mounting effective immune responses against pathogens while avoiding excessive inflammation and autoimmunity. Therefore, the measurement of T-lymphocyte subsets is essential in diagnosing and monitoring various immunological disorders, including HIV infection, cancer, and autoimmune diseases.

Anal gland neoplasms, also known as anal sac tumors, are abnormal growths that develop from the cells lining the anal glands. These glands are located on either side of the anus in dogs and some other animals, and they produce a scent used for marking territory.

Anal gland neoplasms can be benign or malignant (cancerous). Malignant tumors are more common and tend to grow quickly, invading surrounding tissues and spreading to other parts of the body (metastasis). Common symptoms of anal gland neoplasms include straining to defecate, bleeding from the rectum, and a firm mass that can be felt near the anus.

Treatment for anal gland neoplasms typically involves surgical removal of the tumor. In some cases, radiation therapy or chemotherapy may also be recommended. The prognosis for animals with anal gland neoplasms depends on several factors, including the size and location of the tumor, whether it has spread to other parts of the body, and the overall health of the animal.

Mediastinal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors located in the mediastinum, which is the central compartment of the thoracic cavity that lies between the lungs and contains various vital structures such as the heart, esophagus, trachea, blood vessels, lymph nodes, and nerves. Mediastinal neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous), and they can arise from any of the tissues or organs within the mediastinum.

Benign mediastinal neoplasms may include thymomas, lipomas, neurofibromas, or teratomas, among others. These tumors are typically slow-growing and rarely spread to other parts of the body. However, they can still cause symptoms or complications by compressing adjacent structures within the mediastinum, such as the airways, blood vessels, or nerves.

Malignant mediastinal neoplasms are cancerous tumors that can invade and destroy surrounding tissues and may spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body. Common types of malignant mediastinal neoplasms include thymic carcinomas, lymphomas, germ cell tumors, and neuroendocrine tumors. These tumors often require aggressive treatment, such as surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, to control their growth and spread.

It is important to note that mediastinal neoplasms can present with various symptoms depending on their location, size, and type. Some patients may be asymptomatic, while others may experience cough, chest pain, difficulty breathing, hoarseness, or swallowing difficulties. A thorough diagnostic workup, including imaging studies and biopsies, is necessary to confirm the diagnosis and determine the best course of treatment for mediastinal neoplasms.

Neoplasms, germ cell and embryonal are types of tumors that originate from the abnormal growth of cells. Here's a brief medical definition for each:

1. Neoplasms: Neoplasms refer to abnormal tissue growths or masses, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They result from uncontrolled cell division and may invade surrounding tissues or spread to other parts of the body through a process called metastasis.
2. Germ Cell Tumors: These are rare tumors that develop from the germ cells, which give rise to sperm and eggs in the reproductive organs (ovaries and testes). They can be benign or malignant and may occur in both children and adults. Germ cell tumors can also arise outside of the reproductive organs, a condition known as extragonadal germ cell tumors.
3. Embryonal Tumors: These are a type of malignant neoplasm that primarily affects infants and young children. They develop from embryonic cells, which are immature cells present during fetal development. Embryonal tumors can occur in various organs, including the brain (medulloblastomas), nervous system (primitive neuroectodermal tumors or PNETs), and other areas like the kidneys and liver.

It is essential to note that these conditions require professional medical evaluation and treatment by healthcare professionals with expertise in oncology and related fields.

Bone marrow neoplasms are a type of cancer that originates in the bone marrow, which is the spongy tissue inside bones where blood cells are produced. These neoplasms can be divided into two main categories: hematologic (or liquid) malignancies and solid tumors.

Hematologic malignancies include leukemias, lymphomas, and multiple myeloma. Leukemias are cancers of the white blood cells, which normally fight infections. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells that do not function properly, leading to an increased risk of infection, anemia, and bleeding.

Lymphomas are cancers of the lymphatic system, which helps to fight infections and remove waste from the body. Lymphoma can affect the lymph nodes, spleen, thymus gland, and bone marrow. There are two main types of lymphoma: Hodgkin's lymphoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

Multiple myeloma is a cancer of the plasma cells, which are a type of white blood cell that produces antibodies to help fight infections. In multiple myeloma, abnormal plasma cells accumulate in the bone marrow and produce large amounts of abnormal antibodies, leading to bone damage, anemia, and an increased risk of infection.

Solid tumors of the bone marrow are rare and include conditions such as chordomas, Ewing sarcomas, and osteosarcomas. These cancers originate in the bones themselves or in other tissues that support the bones, but they can also spread to the bone marrow.

Treatment for bone marrow neoplasms depends on the type and stage of cancer, as well as the patient's overall health. Treatment options may include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, stem cell transplantation, targeted therapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Lymphocytes are a type of white blood cell that is an essential part of the immune system. They are responsible for recognizing and responding to potentially harmful substances such as viruses, bacteria, and other foreign invaders. There are two main types of lymphocytes: B-lymphocytes (B-cells) and T-lymphocytes (T-cells).

B-lymphocytes produce antibodies, which are proteins that help to neutralize or destroy foreign substances. When a B-cell encounters a foreign substance, it becomes activated and begins to divide and differentiate into plasma cells, which produce and secrete large amounts of antibodies. These antibodies bind to the foreign substance, marking it for destruction by other immune cells.

T-lymphocytes, on the other hand, are involved in cell-mediated immunity. They directly attack and destroy infected cells or cancerous cells. T-cells can also help to regulate the immune response by producing chemical signals that activate or inhibit other immune cells.

Lymphocytes are produced in the bone marrow and mature in either the bone marrow (B-cells) or the thymus gland (T-cells). They circulate throughout the body in the blood and lymphatic system, where they can be found in high concentrations in lymph nodes, the spleen, and other lymphoid organs.

Abnormalities in the number or function of lymphocytes can lead to a variety of immune-related disorders, including immunodeficiency diseases, autoimmune disorders, and cancer.

Transgenic mice are genetically modified rodents that have incorporated foreign DNA (exogenous DNA) into their own genome. This is typically done through the use of recombinant DNA technology, where a specific gene or genetic sequence of interest is isolated and then introduced into the mouse embryo. The resulting transgenic mice can then express the protein encoded by the foreign gene, allowing researchers to study its function in a living organism.

The process of creating transgenic mice usually involves microinjecting the exogenous DNA into the pronucleus of a fertilized egg, which is then implanted into a surrogate mother. The offspring that result from this procedure are screened for the presence of the foreign DNA, and those that carry the desired genetic modification are used to establish a transgenic mouse line.

Transgenic mice have been widely used in biomedical research to model human diseases, study gene function, and test new therapies. They provide a valuable tool for understanding complex biological processes and developing new treatments for a variety of medical conditions.

Neoplasms in adipose tissue refer to abnormal and excessive growths of cells that form tumors within the fatty connective tissue. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms, such as lipomas, are slow-growing and typically do not spread to other parts of the body. Malignant neoplasms, on the other hand, are cancerous and can invade surrounding tissues and spread to distant sites in the body (metastasis). An example of a malignant neoplasm in adipose tissue is liposarcoma. It's important to note that while some neoplasms may not cause any symptoms, others can cause pain, swelling or other uncomfortable sensations, and therefore should be evaluated by a medical professional for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Colorectal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the colon or rectum, which can be benign or malignant. These growths can arise from the inner lining (mucosa) of the colon or rectum and can take various forms such as polyps, adenomas, or carcinomas.

Benign neoplasms, such as hyperplastic polyps and inflammatory polyps, are not cancerous but may need to be removed to prevent the development of malignant tumors. Adenomas, on the other hand, are precancerous lesions that can develop into colorectal cancer if left untreated.

Colorectal cancer is a malignant neoplasm that arises from the uncontrolled growth and division of cells in the colon or rectum. It is one of the most common types of cancer worldwide and can spread to other parts of the body through the bloodstream or lymphatic system.

Regular screening for colorectal neoplasms is recommended for individuals over the age of 50, as early detection and removal of precancerous lesions can significantly reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

Meningeal neoplasms, also known as malignant meningitis or leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, refer to cancerous tumors that originate in the meninges, which are the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord. These tumors can arise primarily from the meningeal cells themselves, although they more commonly result from the spread (metastasis) of cancer cells from other parts of the body, such as breast, lung, or melanoma.

Meningeal neoplasms can cause a variety of symptoms, including headaches, nausea and vomiting, mental status changes, seizures, and focal neurological deficits. Diagnosis typically involves imaging studies (such as MRI) and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid obtained through a spinal tap. Treatment options may include radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or surgery, depending on the type and extent of the tumor. The prognosis for patients with meningeal neoplasms is generally poor, with a median survival time of several months to a year.

Lymph nodes are small, bean-shaped organs that are part of the immune system. They are found throughout the body, especially in the neck, armpits, groin, and abdomen. Lymph nodes filter lymph fluid, which carries waste and unwanted substances such as bacteria, viruses, and cancer cells. They contain white blood cells called lymphocytes that help fight infections and diseases by attacking and destroying the harmful substances found in the lymph fluid. When an infection or disease is present, lymph nodes may swell due to the increased number of immune cells and fluid accumulation as they work to fight off the invaders.

Duodenal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the duodenum, which is the first part of the small intestine that receives digestive secretions from the pancreas and bile duct. These growths can be benign or malignant (cancerous).

Benign neoplasms include adenomas, leiomyomas, lipomas, and hamartomas. They are usually slow-growing and do not spread to other parts of the body. However, they may cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, bleeding, or obstruction of the intestine.

Malignant neoplasms include adenocarcinomas, neuroendocrine tumors (carcinoids), lymphomas, and sarcomas. They are more aggressive and can invade surrounding tissues and spread to other parts of the body. Symptoms may include abdominal pain, weight loss, jaundice, anemia, or bowel obstruction.

The diagnosis of duodenal neoplasms is usually made through imaging tests such as CT scans, MRI, or endoscopy with biopsy. Treatment depends on the type and stage of the tumor and may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or a combination of these modalities.

Myasthenia Gravis is a long-term autoimmune neuromuscular disorder that leads to muscle weakness. It occurs when communication between nerves and muscles is disrupted at the nerve endings, resulting in fewer impulses being transmitted to activate the muscles. This results in muscle weakness and rapid fatigue. The condition can affect any voluntary muscle, but it most commonly affects muscles of the eyes, face, throat, and limbs. Symptoms may include drooping eyelids (ptosis), double vision (diplopia), difficulty swallowing, slurred speech, and weakness in the arms and legs. The severity of symptoms can vary greatly from person to person, ranging from mild to life-threatening.

The disorder is caused by an abnormal immune system response that produces antibodies against the acetylcholine receptors in the postsynaptic membrane of the neuromuscular junction. These antibodies block or destroy the receptors, which leads to a decrease in the number of available receptors for nerve impulses to activate the muscle fibers.

Myasthenia Gravis can be treated with medications that improve communication between nerves and muscles, such as cholinesterase inhibitors, immunosuppressants, and plasmapheresis or intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) to remove the harmful antibodies from the blood. With proper treatment, many people with Myasthenia Gravis can lead normal or nearly normal lives.

Flow cytometry is a medical and research technique used to measure physical and chemical characteristics of cells or particles, one cell at a time, as they flow in a fluid stream through a beam of light. The properties measured include:

* Cell size (light scatter)
* Cell internal complexity (granularity, also light scatter)
* Presence or absence of specific proteins or other molecules on the cell surface or inside the cell (using fluorescent antibodies or other fluorescent probes)

The technique is widely used in cell counting, cell sorting, protein engineering, biomarker discovery and monitoring disease progression, particularly in hematology, immunology, and cancer research.

Adrenal cortex neoplasms refer to abnormal growths (tumors) in the adrenal gland's outer layer, known as the adrenal cortex. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant (cancerous). Benign tumors are called adrenal adenomas, while cancerous tumors are called adrenocortical carcinomas.

Adrenal cortex neoplasms can produce various hormones, leading to different clinical presentations. For instance, they may cause Cushing's syndrome (characterized by excessive cortisol production), Conn's syndrome (caused by aldosterone excess), or virilization (due to androgen excess). Some tumors may not produce any hormones and are discovered incidentally during imaging studies for unrelated conditions.

The diagnosis of adrenal cortex neoplasms typically involves a combination of imaging techniques, such as CT or MRI scans, and hormonal assessments to determine if the tumor is functional or non-functional. In some cases, a biopsy may be necessary to confirm the diagnosis and differentiate between benign and malignant tumors. Treatment options depend on the type, size, location, and hormonal activity of the neoplasm and may include surgical excision, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

A mouth neoplasm refers to an abnormal growth or tumor in the oral cavity, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Malignant mouth neoplasms are also known as oral cancer. They can develop on the lips, gums, tongue, roof and floor of the mouth, inside the cheeks, and in the oropharynx (the middle part of the throat at the back of the mouth).

Mouth neoplasms can have various causes, including genetic factors, tobacco use, alcohol consumption, and infection with human papillomavirus (HPV). Symptoms may include a lump or thickening in the oral soft tissues, white or red patches, persistent mouth sores, difficulty swallowing or speaking, and numbness in the mouth. Early detection and treatment of mouth neoplasms are crucial for improving outcomes and preventing complications.

1. Receptors: In the context of physiology and medicine, receptors are specialized proteins found on the surface of cells or inside cells that detect and respond to specific molecules, known as ligands. These interactions can trigger a range of responses within the cell, such as starting a signaling pathway or changing the cell's behavior. There are various types of receptors, including ion channels, G protein-coupled receptors, and enzyme-linked receptors.

2. Antigen: An antigen is any substance (usually a protein) that can be recognized by the immune system, specifically by antibodies or T-cells, as foreign and potentially harmful. Antigens can be derived from various sources, such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, or even non-living substances like pollen, chemicals, or toxins. An antigen typically contains epitopes, which are the specific regions that antibodies or T-cell receptors recognize and bind to.

3. T-Cell: Also known as T lymphocytes, T-cells are a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in cell-mediated immunity, a part of the adaptive immune system. They are produced in the bone marrow and mature in the thymus gland. There are several types of T-cells, including CD4+ helper T-cells, CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells, and regulatory T-cells (Tregs). T-cells recognize antigens presented to them by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) via their surface receptors called the T-cell receptor (TCR). Once activated, T-cells can proliferate and differentiate into various effector cells that help eliminate infected or damaged cells.

Tongue neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the tongue tissue. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Benign tongue neoplasms may include entities such as papillomas, fibromas, or granular cell tumors. They are typically slow growing and less likely to spread to other parts of the body.

Malignant tongue neoplasms, on the other hand, are cancers that can invade surrounding tissues and spread to other parts of the body. The most common type of malignant tongue neoplasm is squamous cell carcinoma, which arises from the thin, flat cells (squamous cells) that line the surface of the tongue.

Tongue neoplasms can cause various symptoms such as a lump or thickening on the tongue, pain or burning sensation in the mouth, difficulty swallowing or speaking, and unexplained bleeding from the mouth. Early detection and treatment are crucial for improving outcomes and preventing complications.

'Inbred AKR mice' is a strain of laboratory mice used in biomedical research. The 'AKR' designation stands for "Akita Radioactive," referring to the location where this strain was first developed in Akita, Japan. These mice are inbred, meaning that they have been produced by many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a genetically homogeneous population with minimal genetic variation.

Inbred AKR mice are known for their susceptibility to certain types of leukemia and lymphoma, making them valuable models for studying these diseases and testing potential therapies. They also develop age-related cataracts and have a higher incidence of diabetes than some other strains.

It is important to note that while inbred AKR mice are widely used in research, their genetic uniformity may limit the applicability of findings to more genetically diverse human populations.

CD8 antigens are a type of protein found on the surface of certain immune cells called cytotoxic T lymphocytes or cytotoxic T cells. These cells play a critical role in the adaptive immune response, which is the specific and targeted response of the immune system to foreign substances (antigens) that invade the body.

CD8 antigens help cytotoxic T cells recognize and respond to infected or abnormal cells, such as those that have been infected by a virus or have become cancerous. When a cytotoxic T cell encounters a cell displaying a specific antigen bound to a CD8 molecule, it becomes activated and releases toxic substances that can kill the target cell.

CD8 antigens are also known as cluster of differentiation 8 antigens or CD8 receptors. They belong to a larger family of proteins called major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC class I) molecules, which present antigens to T cells and play a crucial role in the immune system's ability to distinguish between self and non-self.

Ileal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the ileum, which is the final portion of the small intestine. These growths can be benign or malignant (cancerous). Common types of ileal neoplasms include:

1. Adenomas: These are benign tumors that can develop in the ileum and have the potential to become cancerous over time if not removed.
2. Carcinoids: These are slow-growing neuroendocrine tumors that typically start in the ileum. They can produce hormones that cause symptoms such as diarrhea, flushing, and heart problems.
3. Adenocarcinomas: These are malignant tumors that develop from the glandular cells lining the ileum. They are relatively rare but can be aggressive and require prompt treatment.
4. Lymphomas: These are cancers that start in the immune system cells found in the ileum's lining. They can cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and weight loss.
5. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs): These are rare tumors that develop from the connective tissue of the ileum's wall. While most GISTs are benign, some can be malignant and require treatment.

It is important to note that early detection and treatment of ileal neoplasms can significantly improve outcomes and prognosis. Regular screenings and check-ups with a healthcare provider are recommended for individuals at higher risk for developing these growths.

Stomach neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the stomach that can be benign or malignant. They include a wide range of conditions such as:

1. Gastric adenomas: These are benign tumors that develop from glandular cells in the stomach lining.
2. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs): These are rare tumors that can be found in the stomach and other parts of the digestive tract. They originate from the stem cells in the wall of the digestive tract.
3. Leiomyomas: These are benign tumors that develop from smooth muscle cells in the stomach wall.
4. Lipomas: These are benign tumors that develop from fat cells in the stomach wall.
5. Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs): These are tumors that develop from the neuroendocrine cells in the stomach lining. They can be benign or malignant.
6. Gastric carcinomas: These are malignant tumors that develop from the glandular cells in the stomach lining. They are the most common type of stomach neoplasm and include adenocarcinomas, signet ring cell carcinomas, and others.
7. Lymphomas: These are malignant tumors that develop from the immune cells in the stomach wall.

Stomach neoplasms can cause various symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, weight loss, and difficulty swallowing. The diagnosis of stomach neoplasms usually involves a combination of imaging tests, endoscopy, and biopsy. Treatment options depend on the type and stage of the neoplasm and may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or targeted therapy.

Experimental liver neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the liver that are intentionally created or manipulated in a laboratory setting for the purpose of studying their development, progression, and potential treatment options. These experimental models can be established using various methods such as chemical induction, genetic modification, or transplantation of cancerous cells or tissues. The goal of this research is to advance our understanding of liver cancer biology and develop novel therapies for liver neoplasms in humans. It's important to note that these experiments are conducted under strict ethical guidelines and regulations to minimize harm and ensure the humane treatment of animals involved in such studies.

A fetus is the developing offspring in a mammal, from the end of the embryonic period (approximately 8 weeks after fertilization in humans) until birth. In humans, the fetal stage of development starts from the eleventh week of pregnancy and continues until childbirth, which is termed as full-term pregnancy at around 37 to 40 weeks of gestation. During this time, the organ systems become fully developed and the body grows in size. The fetus is surrounded by the amniotic fluid within the amniotic sac and is connected to the placenta via the umbilical cord, through which it receives nutrients and oxygen from the mother. Regular prenatal care is essential during this period to monitor the growth and development of the fetus and ensure a healthy pregnancy and delivery.

Immunophenotyping is a medical laboratory technique used to identify and classify cells, usually in the context of hematologic (blood) disorders and malignancies (cancers), based on their surface or intracellular expression of various proteins and antigens. This technique utilizes specific antibodies tagged with fluorochromes, which bind to the target antigens on the cell surface or within the cells. The labeled cells are then analyzed using flow cytometry, allowing for the detection and quantification of multiple antigenic markers simultaneously.

Immunophenotyping helps in understanding the distribution of different cell types, their subsets, and activation status, which can be crucial in diagnosing various hematological disorders, immunodeficiencies, and distinguishing between different types of leukemias, lymphomas, and other malignancies. Additionally, it can also be used to monitor the progression of diseases, evaluate the effectiveness of treatments, and detect minimal residual disease (MRD) during follow-up care.

Urinary Bladder Neoplasms are abnormal growths or tumors in the urinary bladder, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Malignant neoplasms can be further classified into various types of bladder cancer, such as urothelial carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma. These malignant tumors often invade surrounding tissues and organs, potentially spreading to other parts of the body (metastasis), which can lead to serious health consequences if not detected and treated promptly and effectively.

Carcinoma, acinar cell is a type of pancreatic cancer that originates in the acinar cells of the pancreas. The acinar cells are responsible for producing digestive enzymes. This type of cancer is relatively rare and accounts for less than 5% of all pancreatic cancers. It typically presents with symptoms such as abdominal pain, weight loss, and jaundice. Treatment options may include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy.

Carcinoma is a type of cancer that develops from epithelial cells, which are the cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body. These cells cover organs, glands, and other structures within the body. Carcinomas can occur in various parts of the body, including the skin, lungs, breasts, prostate, colon, and pancreas. They are often characterized by the uncontrolled growth and division of abnormal cells that can invade surrounding tissues and spread to other parts of the body through a process called metastasis. Carcinomas can be further classified based on their appearance under a microscope, such as adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma.

Spinal cord neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors within the spinal cord. These can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They originate from the cells within the spinal cord itself (primary tumors), or they may spread to the spinal cord from other parts of the body (metastatic tumors). Spinal cord neoplasms can cause various symptoms depending on their location and size, including back pain, neurological deficits, and even paralysis. Treatment options include surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.

Vaginal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the vagina. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). The two main types of vaginal neoplasms are:

1. Vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN): This is a condition where the cells on the inner lining of the vagina become abnormal but have not invaded deeper tissues. VAIN can be low-grade or high-grade, depending on the severity of the cell changes.
2. Vaginal cancer: This is a malignant tumor that arises from the cells in the vagina. The two main types of vaginal cancer are squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common type, accounting for about 85% of all cases.

Risk factors for vaginal neoplasms include human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, smoking, older age, history of cervical cancer or precancerous changes, and exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) in utero. Treatment options depend on the type, stage, and location of the neoplasm but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Bone marrow is the spongy tissue found inside certain bones in the body, such as the hips, thighs, and vertebrae. It is responsible for producing blood-forming cells, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. There are two types of bone marrow: red marrow, which is involved in blood cell production, and yellow marrow, which contains fatty tissue.

Red bone marrow contains hematopoietic stem cells, which can differentiate into various types of blood cells. These stem cells continuously divide and mature to produce new blood cells that are released into the circulation. Red blood cells carry oxygen throughout the body, white blood cells help fight infections, and platelets play a crucial role in blood clotting.

Bone marrow also serves as a site for immune cell development and maturation. It contains various types of immune cells, such as lymphocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, which help protect the body against infections and diseases.

Abnormalities in bone marrow function can lead to several medical conditions, including anemia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and various types of cancer, such as leukemia and multiple myeloma. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy are common diagnostic procedures used to evaluate bone marrow health and function.

Neoplasm metastasis is the spread of cancer cells from the primary site (where the original or primary tumor formed) to other places in the body. This happens when cancer cells break away from the original (primary) tumor and enter the bloodstream or lymphatic system. The cancer cells can then travel to other parts of the body and form new tumors, called secondary tumors or metastases.

Metastasis is a key feature of malignant neoplasms (cancers), and it is one of the main ways that cancer can cause harm in the body. The metastatic tumors may continue to grow and may cause damage to the organs and tissues where they are located. They can also release additional cancer cells into the bloodstream or lymphatic system, leading to further spread of the cancer.

The metastatic tumors are named based on the location where they are found, as well as the type of primary cancer. For example, if a patient has a primary lung cancer that has metastasized to the liver, the metastatic tumor would be called a liver metastasis from lung cancer.

It is important to note that the presence of metastases can significantly affect a person's prognosis and treatment options. In general, metastatic cancer is more difficult to treat than cancer that has not spread beyond its original site. However, there are many factors that can influence a person's prognosis and response to treatment, so it is important for each individual to discuss their specific situation with their healthcare team.

An oxyphilic adenoma is a type of benign tumor that develops in the endocrine glands, specifically in the parathyroid gland. This type of adenoma is characterized by the presence of cells called oxyphils, which have an abundance of mitochondria and appear pink on histological examination due to their high oxidative enzyme activity. Oxyphilic adenomas are a common cause of primary hyperparathyroidism, a condition in which the parathyroid glands produce too much parathyroid hormone (PTH), leading to an imbalance of calcium and phosphorus metabolism. Symptoms of primary hyperparathyroidism may include fatigue, weakness, bone pain, kidney stones, and psychological disturbances. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the affected parathyroid gland.

Local neoplasm recurrence is the return or regrowth of a tumor in the same location where it was originally removed or treated. This means that cancer cells have survived the initial treatment and started to grow again in the same area. It's essential to monitor and detect any local recurrence as early as possible, as it can affect the prognosis and may require additional treatment.

Nervous system neoplasms are abnormal growths or tumors that occur within the nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves. These tumors can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous), and their growth can compress or infiltrate surrounding tissues, leading to various neurological symptoms. The causes of nervous system neoplasms are not fully understood but may involve genetic factors, exposure to certain chemicals or radiation, and certain viral infections. Treatment options depend on the type, location, and size of the tumor and can include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Adenocarcinoma is a type of cancer that arises from glandular epithelial cells. These cells line the inside of many internal organs, including the breasts, prostate, colon, and lungs. Adenocarcinomas can occur in any of these organs, as well as in other locations where glands are present.

The term "adenocarcinoma" is used to describe a cancer that has features of glandular tissue, such as mucus-secreting cells or cells that produce hormones. These cancers often form glandular structures within the tumor mass and may produce mucus or other substances.

Adenocarcinomas are typically slow-growing and tend to spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body through the lymphatic system or bloodstream. They can be treated with surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, or a combination of these treatments. The prognosis for adenocarcinoma depends on several factors, including the location and stage of the cancer, as well as the patient's overall health and age.

X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging method that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional (tomographic) images (virtual "slices") of the body. These cross-sectional images can then be used to display detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body.

The term "computed tomography" is used instead of "CT scan" or "CAT scan" because the machines take a series of X-ray measurements from different angles around the body and then use a computer to process these data to create detailed images of internal structures within the body.

CT scanning is a noninvasive, painless medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. CT imaging provides detailed information about many types of tissue including lung, bone, soft tissue and blood vessels. CT examinations can be performed on every part of the body for a variety of reasons including diagnosis, surgical planning, and monitoring of therapeutic responses.

In computed tomography (CT), an X-ray source and detector rotate around the patient, measuring the X-ray attenuation at many different angles. A computer uses this data to construct a cross-sectional image by the process of reconstruction. This technique is called "tomography". The term "computed" refers to the use of a computer to reconstruct the images.

CT has become an important tool in medical imaging and diagnosis, allowing radiologists and other physicians to view detailed internal images of the body. It can help identify many different medical conditions including cancer, heart disease, lung nodules, liver tumors, and internal injuries from trauma. CT is also commonly used for guiding biopsies and other minimally invasive procedures.

In summary, X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging technique that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional images of the body. It provides detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body, allowing physicians to diagnose and treat medical conditions.

BALB/c is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The strain was developed at the Institute of Cancer Research in London by Henry Baldwin and his colleagues in the 1920s, and it has since become one of the most commonly used inbred strains in the world.

BALB/c mice are characterized by their black coat color, which is determined by a recessive allele at the tyrosinase locus. They are also known for their docile and friendly temperament, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory.

One of the key features of BALB/c mice that makes them useful for research is their susceptibility to certain types of tumors and immune responses. For example, they are highly susceptible to developing mammary tumors, which can be induced by chemical carcinogens or viral infection. They also have a strong Th2-biased immune response, which makes them useful models for studying allergic diseases and asthma.

BALB/c mice are also commonly used in studies of genetics, neuroscience, behavior, and infectious diseases. Because they are an inbred strain, they have a uniform genetic background, which makes it easier to control for genetic factors in experiments. Additionally, because they have been bred in the laboratory for many generations, they are highly standardized and reproducible, making them ideal subjects for scientific research.

Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2) is a tyrosine kinase enzyme that plays a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction. It is named after the Roman god Janus, who is depicted with two faces, as JAK2 has two similar phosphate-transferring domains. JAK2 is involved in various cytokine receptor-mediated signaling pathways and contributes to hematopoiesis, immune function, and cell growth.

Mutations in the JAK2 gene have been associated with several myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), including polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and primary myelofibrosis. The most common mutation is JAK2 V617F, which results in a constitutively active enzyme that promotes uncontrolled cell proliferation and survival, contributing to the development of these MPNs.

Muscle neoplasms are abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the muscle tissue. They can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign muscle neoplasms are typically slow-growing and do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant muscle neoplasms, also known as soft tissue sarcomas, can grow quickly, invade nearby tissues, and metastasize (spread) to distant parts of the body.

Soft tissue sarcomas can arise from any of the muscles in the body, including the skeletal muscles (voluntary muscles that attach to bones and help with movement), smooth muscles (involuntary muscles found in the walls of blood vessels, digestive tract, and other organs), or cardiac muscle (the specialized muscle found in the heart).

There are many different types of soft tissue sarcomas, each with its own set of characteristics and prognosis. Treatment for muscle neoplasms typically involves a combination of surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, depending on the type, size, location, and stage of the tumor.

Hemangiosarcoma is a type of cancer that arises from the cells that line the blood vessels (endothelial cells). It most commonly affects middle-aged to older dogs, but it can also occur in cats and other animals, as well as rarely in humans.

This cancer can develop in various parts of the body, including the skin, heart, spleen, liver, and lungs. Hemangiosarcomas of the skin tend to be more benign and have a better prognosis than those that arise internally.

Hemangiosarcomas are highly invasive and often metastasize (spread) to other organs, making them difficult to treat. The exact cause of hemangiosarcoma is not known, but exposure to certain chemicals, radiation, and viruses may increase the risk of developing this cancer. Treatment options typically include surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation therapy, depending on the location and stage of the tumor.

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the genetic material present in the cells of organisms where it is responsible for the storage and transmission of hereditary information. DNA is a long molecule that consists of two strands coiled together to form a double helix. Each strand is made up of a series of four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - that are linked together by phosphate and sugar groups. The sequence of these bases along the length of the molecule encodes genetic information, with A always pairing with T and C always pairing with G. This base-pairing allows for the replication and transcription of DNA, which are essential processes in the functioning and reproduction of all living organisms.

B-lymphocytes, also known as B-cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a key role in the immune system's response to infection. They are responsible for producing antibodies, which are proteins that help to neutralize or destroy pathogens such as bacteria and viruses.

When a B-lymphocyte encounters a pathogen, it becomes activated and begins to divide and differentiate into plasma cells, which produce and secrete large amounts of antibodies specific to the antigens on the surface of the pathogen. These antibodies bind to the pathogen, marking it for destruction by other immune cells such as neutrophils and macrophages.

B-lymphocytes also have a role in presenting antigens to T-lymphocytes, another type of white blood cell involved in the immune response. This helps to stimulate the activation and proliferation of T-lymphocytes, which can then go on to destroy infected cells or help to coordinate the overall immune response.

Overall, B-lymphocytes are an essential part of the adaptive immune system, providing long-lasting immunity to previously encountered pathogens and helping to protect against future infections.

Myelodysplastic-myeloproliferative diseases (MDS/MPD) are a group of rare and complex bone marrow disorders that exhibit features of both myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). MDS is characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, leading to cytopenias, and dysplastic changes in the bone marrow. MPNs are clonal disorders of the hematopoietic stem cells resulting in increased proliferation of one or more cell lines, often leading to elevated blood counts.

MDS/MPD share features of both these entities, with patients showing signs of both ineffective hematopoiesis and increased cell production. These disorders have overlapping clinical, laboratory, and morphological characteristics, making their classification challenging. The World Health Organization (WHO) has recognized several MDS/MPD subtypes, including chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML), and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm, unclassifiable (MDS/MPN, U).

The pathogenesis of MDS/MPD involves genetic mutations that affect various cellular processes, such as signal transduction, epigenetic regulation, and splicing machinery. The prognosis for patients with MDS/MPD varies depending on the specific subtype, age, performance status, and the presence of certain genetic abnormalities. Treatment options may include supportive care, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, or stem cell transplantation.

A pancreatectomy is a surgical procedure in which all or part of the pancreas is removed. There are several types of pancreatectomies, including:

* **Total pancreatectomy:** Removal of the entire pancreas, as well as the spleen and nearby lymph nodes. This type of pancreatectomy is usually done for patients with cancer that has spread throughout the pancreas or for those who have had multiple surgeries to remove pancreatic tumors.
* **Distal pancreatectomy:** Removal of the body and tail of the pancreas, as well as nearby lymph nodes. This type of pancreatectomy is often done for patients with tumors in the body or tail of the pancreas.
* **Partial (or segmental) pancreatectomy:** Removal of a portion of the head or body of the pancreas, as well as nearby lymph nodes. This type of pancreatectomy is often done for patients with tumors in the head or body of the pancreas that can be removed without removing the entire organ.
* **Pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD):** A type of surgery used to treat tumors in the head of the pancreas, as well as other conditions such as chronic pancreatitis. In this procedure, the head of the pancreas, duodenum, gallbladder, and bile duct are removed, but the stomach and lower portion of the esophagus (pylorus) are left in place.

After a pancreatectomy, patients may experience problems with digestion and blood sugar regulation, as the pancreas plays an important role in these functions. Patients may need to take enzyme supplements to help with digestion and may require insulin therapy to manage their blood sugar levels.

Lymphopoiesis is the process of formation and development of lymphocytes, which are a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in the immune system. Lymphocytes include B cells, T cells, and natural killer (NK) cells, which are responsible for defending the body against infectious diseases and cancer.

Lymphopoiesis occurs in the bone marrow and lymphoid organs such as the spleen, lymph nodes, and tonsils. In the bone marrow, hematopoietic stem cells differentiate into common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs), which then give rise to B cells, T cells, and NK cells through a series of intermediate stages.

B cells mature in the bone marrow, while T cells mature in the thymus gland. Once matured, these lymphocytes migrate to the peripheral lymphoid organs where they can encounter foreign antigens and mount an immune response. The process of lymphopoiesis is tightly regulated by various growth factors, cytokines, and transcription factors that control the differentiation, proliferation, and survival of lymphocytes.

Peripheral nervous system (PNS) neoplasms refer to tumors that originate in the peripheral nerves, which are the nerves outside the brain and spinal cord. These tumors can be benign or malignant (cancerous). Benign tumors, such as schwannomas and neurofibromas, grow slowly and do not spread to other parts of the body. Malignant tumors, such as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), can invade nearby tissues and may metastasize (spread) to other organs.

PNS neoplasms can cause various symptoms depending on their location and size. Common symptoms include pain, weakness, numbness, or tingling in the affected area. In some cases, PNS neoplasms may not cause any symptoms until they become quite large. Treatment options for PNS neoplasms depend on several factors, including the type, size, and location of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

A lipoma is a common, benign (non-cancerous) soft tissue growth. It is composed of adipose or fatty tissue and typically found just beneath the skin, but they can also occur deeper within the body. Lipomas are usually round, moveable, and painless, although they may cause discomfort if they grow large enough to put pressure on nearby nerves or if they're located in a sensitive area. They generally grow slowly over time. Surgical removal is an option if the lipoma becomes bothersome or grows significantly in size. It's important to note that while lipomas are typically harmless, any new lumps or bumps should be evaluated by a healthcare professional to confirm the diagnosis and rule out other more serious conditions.

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EMH in the lymph nodes is usually associated with underlying hematopoietic neoplasms. Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) tend ... The following tissues may also be associated with EMH: thymus, heart, breast, prostate, fatty tissue, adrenal glands, kidney, ... Other manifestations occur in the thymus, heart, breast, prostate, broad ligaments, kidneys, adrenal glands, pleura, ... para-nasal sinuses and numerous types of benign/malignant neoplasms. The most common sites of EMH associated with neoplastic ...
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... the lung and the thymus. Neuroendocrine carcinomas are poorly differentiated high-grade neuroendocrine neoplasms and a ... G1 and G2 neuroendocrine neoplasms are called neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) - formerly called carcinoid tumours. G3 neoplasms ... Although there are many kinds of NETs, they are treated as a group of tissue because the cells of these neoplasms share common ... NETs include certain tumors of the gastrointestinal tract and of the pancreatic islet cells, certain thymus and lung tumors, ...
Spindle epithelial tumor with thymus-like differentiation (SETTLE) is a lobulated tumor composed of spindle cells and ... Thyroid neoplasm is a neoplasm or tumor of the thyroid. It can be a benign tumor such as thyroid adenoma, or it can be a ... Thyroid neoplasm might be classified as benign or malignant.[citation needed] Thyroid adenoma is a benign neoplasm of the ... The first step in diagnosing a thyroid neoplasm is a physical exam of the neck area. If any abnormalities exist, a doctor needs ...
... (T-ALL) is a type of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with aggressive malignant neoplasm of the ... Patients with immature thymocytes in the thymus begins T-ALL development. Furthermore, hereditary conditions such as Down ... T-ALL is a precursor for lymphoid neoplasm. Its clinical presentation most commonly includes infiltration of the central ... nervous system (CNS), and further identifies mediastinal mass presence originating from the thymus, along with extramedullary ...
Lobular and Medullary Neoplasms (8550-8559) Acinar cell neoplasms (8560-8580) Complex epithelial neoplasms The term carcinoma ... 2004). Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of the Lung, Pleura, Thymus and Heart (PDF). World Health Organization Classification ... Adnexal and Skin appendage Neoplasms (8430-8439) Mucoepidermoid Neoplasms (8440-8490) Cystic, Mucinous and Serous Neoplasms ( ... 8010-8045) Epithelial neoplasms, NOS (8050-8080) Squamous cell neoplasms (M8070/3) Squamous cell carcinoma, NOS (8090-8110) ...
... mental retardation Thymic carcinoma Thymic epithelial tumor Thymic renal anal lung dysplasia Thymoma Thymus neoplasm ... Temtamy-Shalash syndrome TEN Ter Haar-Hamel-Hendricks syndrome Ter Haar syndrome Teratocarcinosarcoma Teratoma Testes neoplasm ... syndrome Tolosa-Hunt syndrome Toluene antenatal infection Tomaculous neuropathy Tome-Brune-Fardeau syndrome Tongue neoplasm ... Trisomy 14 mosaicism Trisomy 2 mosaicism Trisomy 3 mosaicism Trisomy 6 Trisomy Trochlear dysplasia Trophoblastic Neoplasms ( ...
... is a neoplasm (neoplasia) originating from mast cells in the domestic dog, which occurs mainly in the skin ... 1. Rechtsfragen in der Pathologie; Einführung in die bioptische Diagnostik; Herz und Gefäßsystem; Hämatologie; Milz; Thymus. 2 ... G. A. Parker, C. A. Picut: Histopathologic features and post-surgical sequelae of 57 cutaneous neoplasms in ferrets (Mustela ... Apparently, mastocytomas in dogs are molecularly heterogeneous neoplasms. Mastocytomas in the German Boxer, one of the most ...
In the thymus, there is a correlation with CD5 expression and strength of the interaction of the T cell towards self-peptides. ... About 76% of T-cell neoplasms are reported to express CD5, and it is also found in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle cell ...
2004). Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of the Lung, Pleura, Thymus and Heart (PDF). World Health Organization Classification ... Berman JJ (November 2004). "Tumor taxonomy for the developmental lineage classification of neoplasms". BMC Cancer. 4 (1): 88. ... system lists a number of morphological subtypes and variants of malignant squamous-cell neoplasms, including: papillary thyroid ...
... is a very rare malignant neoplasm originating from bronchial glands. It is classified as a ... 2004). Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of the Lung, Pleura, Thymus and Heart (PDF). World Health Organization Classification ...
Historically, mature histiocytic and dendritic cell (HDC) neoplasms have been considered mature lymphoid neoplasms, since these ... CD7 It often presents as a mediastinal mass because of involvement of the thymus. It is highly associated with NOTCH1 mutations ... lymphoma classification should reflect in which lymphocyte population the neoplasm arises. Thus, neoplasms that arise from ... July 2009). "The 2008 revision of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemia: ...
Myeloid neoplasms always concern bone marrow cell lineage and are related to hematopoietic cells. Myeloid tissue can also be ... is not complete until they migrate to lymphatic organs such as the spleen and thymus for programming by antigen challenge. Thus ...
2004). Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of the Lung, Pleura, Thymus and Heart (PDF). World Health Organization Classification ... Lee SC (22 December 2022). "Salivary Gland Neoplasms". Medscape. Updated: Jan 13, 2021 Diagrams by Mikael Häggström, MD ...
Squamous cell carcinoma of eye tissues is one of the most frequent neoplasms of cattle. On third eyelid, papilloma-like (see ... 2004). Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of the Lung, Pleura, Thymus and Heart (PDF). World Health Organization Classification ... Berman JJ (November 2004). "Tumor taxonomy for the developmental lineage classification of neoplasms". BMC Cancer. 4: 88. doi: ...
Bernatz lectured actively and internationally on the surgery of the thymus, in the latter part of the twentieth century. He ... Kaiser LR: Surgical treatment of thymic epithelial neoplasms. Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2008; 22: 475-488. Skeie GO, Romi F: ... Bernatz, PE (1970). "Surgery of the thymus". J Miss State Med Assoc. 11 (12): 629-633. PMID 5490391. Bernatz PE, Khonsari S, ... Bernatz rapidly acquired clinical experience with the treatment of thymoma, a potentially-aggressive mediastinal neoplasm which ...
Mac Kenzie, William; Garner, F. (1973). "Comparison of Neoplasms in Six Sources of Rats". JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer ... have no thymus. The lack of this organ severely compromises their immune system, with infections of the respiratory tract and ... The Lewis rat suffers from several spontaneous pathologies: first, they can suffer from high incidences of neoplasms, with the ... A 1972 study compared neoplasms in Sprague Dawleys from six different commercial suppliers and found highly significant ...
CD3 is initially expressed in the cytoplasm of pro-thymocytes, the stem cells from which T-cells arise in the thymus. The pro- ... and can therefore be used to distinguish them from superficially similar B-cell and myeloid neoplasms. Zheng L, Lin J, Zhang B ...
Dendritic cell neoplasms are classified by the World Health Organization as follows: Langerhans cell histiocytosis Langerhans ... Throughout the body in locations such as mucous membranes, skin, lymph nodes, thymus, and spleen are cells known as antigen- ... Kairouz S, Hashash J, Kabbara W, McHayleh W, Tabbara IA (October 2007). "Dendritic cell neoplasms: an overview". American ...
2004). Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of the Lung, Pleura, Thymus and Heart (PDF). World Health Organization Classification ... is a highly malignant neoplasm arising from transformed epithelial cells originating in tissues within the pulmonary tree. It ...
"Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of the Lung, Pleura, Thymus and Heart". World Health Organization Classification of Tumours. ... has proved that lung cancers should be considered an extremely heterogeneous family of neoplasms with widely varying genetic, ... 2004). Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of the Lung, Pleura, Thymus and Heart (PDF). World Health Organization Classification ...
Thymus and Heart. Lyon: International Agency for Research on Cancer. ISBN 978-92-832-2436-5. Archived from the original on ... nuclear pleomorphism is one of the earliest hallmarks of cancer progression and a feature characteristic of malignant neoplasms ...
"Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of the Lung, Pleura, Thymus and Heart". World Health Organization Classification of Tumours. ... Adenocarcinomas are exceptionally heterogeneous neoplasms, occurring in four major tissue architectures (acinar, papillary, ... 2004). Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of the Lung, Pleura, Thymus and Heart (PDF). World Health Organization Classification ...
Although it is not normally considered a fast-growing malignant neoplasm, FA can exhibit high uptake on FDG-PET scanning. ... 2004). Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of the Lung, Pleura, Thymus and Heart (PDF). World Health Organization Classification ... "Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of the Lung, Pleura, Thymus and Heart". World Health Organization Classification of Tumours ...
Carcinoma is a term for malignant neoplasms derived from cells of epithelial lineage, and/or that exhibit cytological or tissue ... 2004). Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of the Lung, Pleura, Thymus and Heart (PDF). World Health Organization Classification ...
Kendall, M. D (1989). "The morphology of perivascular spaces in the thymus". Thymus. 13 (3-4): 157-64. PMID 2694455. Edelman, E ... These disorders are: cystic neoplasms lacunar infarctions cystic periventricular leukomalacia cryptococcosis multiple sclerosis ... Perivascular spaces, especially around fenestrated capillaries, are found in many organs, such as the thymus, liver, kidneys, ...
... , along with CD25, is used to track early T cell development in the thymus. CD44 expression is an indicative marker for ... On the contrary, in some neoplasms CD44 upregulation is associated with a favorable outcome. This is true of prostate cancer, ... and CD44-soluble proteins markedly reduces the malignant activities of various neoplasms, stressing the therapeutic potential ...
Janeway, H. H. (1920). The treatment of malignant tumors of the thymus gland by radium. Annals of surgery, 71(4), 460. Janeway ... A Model for a Curable Neoplasm" 2010 Charles M. Balch, M.D., Johns Hopkins Medical Institute - "Melanoma as an Example of ... "What the Study of Leukemia has Taught Us about the Common Neoplasms" 1995 Lester J. Peters, M.D., East Melbourne, Australia - " ...
The origin of the name thymus is unclear. It may have been named because the gland resembles the herb thyme, or the name may ... Pure spindle cell neoplasms seem to act as benign tumors, rarely causing death. No neoplasms smaller than 5 cm were reported to ... The role of the thymus is suspected on the basis of the following:. * The thymus gland is abnormal in 80% of patients (60% have ... Undescended thymus can be bilateral, but it is more commonly unilateral on the left side. Undescended thymus is usually ...
Thymus Cancer (thymoma) is rare. Symptoms include a cough that doesnt go away, chest pain, and trouble breathing. Explore your ... ClinicalTrials.gov: Thymus Neoplasms (National Institutes of Health) Journal Articles References and abstracts from MEDLINE/ ... The thymus is a small organ in your upper chest, under your breastbone. Before birth and during childhood, the thymus helps the ... Can Thymus Cancer Be Found Early? (American Cancer Society) * Stages of Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma (National Cancer Institute ...
Thymus disorder associated with abnormal immune function. *Primary immunodeficiencies. *Malignant neoplasms. *Transplantation ...
Dive into the research topics of Clear cell neoplasms of the endocrine system and thymus. Together they form a unique ...
Thymus Neoplasms / complications* * Thymus Neoplasms / diagnosis * Thymus Neoplasms / therapy * Treatment Outcome Substances * ...
Benign neoplasm of endocrine pancreas D13.9 Benign neoplasm of ill-defined sites within the digestive system ... Malignant carcinoid tumor of the thymus C7A.092 Malignant carcinoid tumor of the stomach ... Malignant neoplasm of intestinal tract, part unspecified D13.7 ...
Thymus Neoplasms / complications * Video Recording ...
Malignant neoplasms. *Thymus disorder associated with abnormal immune cell function. *Transplantation. PRECAUTIONS. *Age 6-8 ... Thymus Disorder. YF vaccine is contraindicated in people with a thymus disorder associated with abnormal immune cell function ( ... Organ transplant recipients and patients with malignant neoplasms are among those for whom YF vaccine is contraindicated (see ...
Thymomas are localized neoplasms caused by dysfunction of the thymus gland.30 Although they are not often found in birds, ... This is one of the more common malignant neoplasms diagnosed in pet birds. The subcutis of the wing, leg, commissure, neck, and ... Lymphomas have also been seen in the periorbital region.20 Malignant neoplasms are debilitating and cause chronic, untreatable ...
The MEN1 phenotype is inherited via an autosomal-dominant pattern and is associated with neoplasms of the pituitary gland, the ... Less frequently, neuroendocrine tumors of lung, thymus, and stomach or non-endocrine tumors such as lipomas, angiofibromas, and ... ependymomas are observed neoplasms. In a study of 12 sporadic carcinoid tumors of the lung, five cases involved inactivation of ...
Tissues examined for neoplasms included liver, kidney, spleen, gill, gonads, thymus, thyroid, heart, stomach, pyloric caeca, ... 1,1-DCE produced no neoplasms at the exposure levels used and no increase in liver weight. There was no evidence of any other ... thymus, larynx, and oesophagus) from animals receiving 250 mg/kg body weight per day and from control animals were examined ...
This definition excludes other tumors that may affect the thymus, such as lymphoma and germ cell tumors. ... Thymoma is a neoplasm of thymic epithelial cells. ... Thymoma is a neoplasm of thymic epithelial cells. This ... In the normal thymus, bone marrow-derived precursor cells destined to become thymocytes (or T lymphocytes) enter the thymus at ... Diseases of the thymus. Wyngaarden J, Smith LH, eds. Cecil Textbook of Medicine. WB Saunders Co; 1988. ...
120 Malignant neoplasm of eye and adnexa (C69). 121 1 Malignant neoplasms of meninges, brain and other parts of central nervous ... 094 Of thymus, heart, mediastinum and pleura (C37-C38) 095 Of other and ill-defined sites in respiratory system and ... 096 Malignant neoplasms of bone and articular cartilage (C40-C41). 097 1 Melanoma and other malignant neoplasms of skin (C43- ... 124 Malignant neoplasms of thyroid and other endocrine glands (C73-C75). 125 Other malignant neoplasms of other and unspecified ...
Histopathological evaluations revealed no significant differences between the two groups in numbers of neoplasms in all tissues ... studied (lymphoreticular tissue, thymus, respiratory, digestive and urinary tracts, reproductive, mammary and endocrine systems ...
The origin of the name thymus is unclear. It may have been named because the gland resembles the herb thyme, or the name may ... Pure spindle cell neoplasms seem to act as benign tumors, rarely causing death. No neoplasms smaller than 5 cm were reported to ... The role of the thymus is suspected on the basis of the following:. * The thymus gland is abnormal in 80% of patients (60% have ... Undescended thymus can be bilateral, but it is more commonly unilateral on the left side. Undescended thymus is usually ...
... thymus disorders, malignant neoplasms, transplant recipients, and persons with symptomatic HIV infection should not get the ...
With a diverse scientific program, the meeting covers a wide range of topics, including Thymus Pathology, hot topics in ... Haematopathology, Lymphoma, Bone Marrow, B-cell lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, myeloid neoplasms, Hematology, Pathology ... hematopathology, reactive and therapy-induced changes, myeloid neoplasms, novel mechanisms in lymphomagenesis, and the ...
THYMIC EPITHELIAL NEOPLASMS. Thymoma. Thymoma is the most common primary tumor of the anterior superior mediastinum and is a ... It occurs in all mediastinal compartments, mostly in anterior and posterior mediastinum; it can be originated from thymus ( ... Mesenchymal neoplasms of the mediastinum are very rare, and they only account for about 2% to 6% of mediastinum tumors.58,59 ... Vascular neoplasms in the mediastinum are more frequently seen among other mesenchymal tumors, and they account for 1% to 4.5% ...
Thymus Neoplasms 1 0 Hot Flashes 1 0 Hypertension, Pulmonary 1 0 ... Uterine Cervical Neoplasms 8 0 Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung 8 ...
Pancreatic DuctalThymus NeoplasmsAppendiceal NeoplasmsAdenocarcinoma, PapillarySoft Tissue NeoplasmsNeoplasms, Glandular and ... Pancreatic NeoplasmsNeoplasmsLymphatic MetastasisSkin NeoplasmsNeoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and SerousLung NeoplasmsNeoplasms, ... Cord NeoplasmsVaginal NeoplasmsAdrenal Gland NeoplasmsNervous System NeoplasmsPenile NeoplasmsNeoplasm SeedingGenital Neoplasms ... Uterine NeoplasmsBreast NeoplasmsColonic NeoplasmsBone Marrow NeoplasmsEndocrine Gland NeoplasmsIntestinal NeoplasmsNeoplasms, ...
No article was found for Thymus Neoplasms and CD274[original query]. File Formats Help:. How do I view different file formats ( ...
Thymus Neoplasms 8% * Genes 7% * Presenilin-1 7% * Brain 7% * Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation 7% ...
Thymic epithelial neoplasms (TEN) are rare malignancies arising from the epithelium of the thymic gland. They comprise three ... Epithelial tumor of thymus; Thymic epithelial tumor; Thymoma, adult. SNOMED CT: Thymic epithelial neoplasm (128621008). ... Neoplasm*Epithelial neoplasm*Thymic epithelial neoplasm*Combined Thymic Epithelial Neoplasm*Recurrent Combined Thymic ... Thymic Epithelial Neoplasm by AJCC v8 Stage*Stage I Thymic Epithelial Neoplasm AJCC v8*Stage I Thymoma AJCC v8 ...
MYELOPROLIFERATIVE DISORDERS OR POORLY DIFFERENTIATED NEOPLASMS WITH MAJOR O.R. PROCEDURE WITH CC ... Z85.238 Personal history of other malignant neoplasm of thymus. *Z85.29 Personal history of malignant neoplasm of other ... D49.81 Neoplasm of unspecified behavior of retina and choroid. *D49.89 Neoplasm of unspecified behavior of other specified ... Z85.41 Personal history of malignant neoplasm of cervix uteri. *Z85.42 Personal history of malignant neoplasm of other parts of ...
Malignant neoplasm of thymus, heart and mediastinum (disorder). Malignant neoplasm of thymus, heart and mediastinum. SNOMED- ... Malignant neoplasm of lip, oral cavity and/or pharynx (disorder). Malignant neoplasm of lip, oral cavity and/or pharynx. ... Malignant neoplasm of nasal cavities, middle ear and accessory sinuses (disorder). Malignant neoplasm of nasal cavities, ... Malignant neoplasm of primary, secondary, or uncertain origin (morphologic abnormality). Malignant neoplasm of primary, ...
Keywords: Carcinoid tumor, Thymus neoplasms, Neuroendocrine tumors Abstract. The atypical carcinoid (AC) of thymus is the most ... Atypical carcinoid of thymus in a 39-year-old-man: A case report * Lesli Alexandra García Floriano Facultad de Medicina- ... Atypical carcinoid of thymus in a 39-year-old-man: A case report. Acta Med Peru [Internet]. 2021Aug.23 [cited 2023Sep.23];38(2 ... aggressive and uncommon neoplasm in the anterior mediastinum, that belongs to the neuroendocrine primary tumors of thymus. Most ...
Nonmesotheliomatous cancers of the pleura include an assortment of malignant neoplasms that primarily or secondarily involve ... Neoplasms of the pleura. In: Tomashefski JF, Jr, Cagle PT, Farver CF, Fraire AE, eds. Dail and Hammars Pulmonary Pathology. ... Tumours of the lung, pleura, thymus and heart. Lyon: IARC Press; 2004. 141-144. ... 9] but, at the present time, SFT is not considered to be an asbestos-related neoplasm. [3, 8, 9] ...
  • Thymoma is a neoplasm of thymic epithelial cells. (medscape.com)
  • Staging of thymic epithelial neoplasms: thymoma and thymic carcinoma. (nih.gov)
  • Geralyn Johnson, a patient fighting with a thymoma - the malignant neoplasm of the thymus, talks about this rare disease and the activity of the International Thymic Malignancy Working Group (ITMIG). (itmig.org)
  • The origin of the name of the thymus gland is unclear. (medscape.com)
  • The first description of the thymus gland was by the Italian anatomist Giacomo da Capri (1470-1550). (medscape.com)
  • The Swiss physician Felix Platter reported the first case of suffocation due to hypertrophy of the thymus gland in 1614. (medscape.com)
  • The first indication of an association between myasthenia and the thymus gland was in 1901, when the German neurologist Hermann Oppenheim reported a tumor found growing from the thymic remnant at necropsy in a patient with myasthenia. (medscape.com)
  • In mammals, the thymus gland develops from the ventral portion of the third branchial pouch as tubular primordia elongate caudally and fuse at the midline, losing their connection with the pharynx and leaving the definitive thymus in the mediastinum. (medscape.com)
  • Thymus gland and surrounding structures. (medscape.com)
  • The MEN1 phenotype is inherited via an autosomal-dominant pattern and is associated with neoplasms of the pituitary gland, the parathyroid gland, and the pancreas (the 3 "P"s). (wikipedia.org)
  • Thymic epithelial neoplasms (TEN) are rare malignancies arising from the epithelium of the thymic gland. (nih.gov)
  • This definition excludes other tumors that may affect the thymus, such as lymphoma and germ cell tumors. (medscape.com)
  • The atypical carcinoid (AC) of thymus is the most aggressive and uncommon neoplasm in the anterior mediastinum, that belongs to the neuroendocrine primary tumors of thymus. (cmp.org.pe)
  • Methods of analysis of tumors of the DNS are also presented because some of these techniques are indispensable for the diagnosis of many neuroendocrine neoplasms. (basicmedicalkey.com)
  • PAX8 is highly expressed in several neoplasms: Epithelial tumors of the thyroid and parathyroid glands, kidney, thymus, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and female genital tract. (oncodianova.com)
  • Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare neoplasms originating from diffuse neuroendocrine cells. (oaepublish.com)
  • [ 2 ] Well- to moderately differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasms (WMD-NEN) are a highly heterogeneous group of tumors comprising low-grade (G1) and intermediate-grade (G2) NETs of the gastrointestinal tract, typical and atypical carcinoids of the lung and thymus, and other cancers such as medullary thyroid carcinoma and pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma. (oaepublish.com)
  • and (b) those of epithelial type, which include neuroendocrine neoplasms from many sites. (basicmedicalkey.com)
  • Although the term carcinoid tumor has been broadly used to refer to many neoplasms derived from the DNS ( 9 ), this term is being replaced by neuroendocrine neoplasms. (basicmedicalkey.com)
  • Many broad-spectrum IHC markers are available to aid in the diagnosis of neuroendocrine neoplasms. (basicmedicalkey.com)
  • Finally, despite the title of this post, many Neuroendocrine Neoplasms can be found easily once there is sufficient clinical suspicion (which sometimes needs doctors to think outside the box). (ronnyallan.net)
  • With a diverse scientific program, the meeting covers a wide range of topics, including Thymus Pathology, hot topics in hematopathology, reactive and therapy-induced changes, myeloid neoplasms, novel mechanisms in lymphomagenesis, and the boundaries between neoplastic and reactive lymphoproliferations. (conference-service.com)
  • Normal peripheral lymph nodes depend on seeding by small lymphocytes from the thymus. (medscape.com)
  • Transfer of a neoplasm from its primary site to lymph nodes or to distant parts of the body by way of the lymphatic system. (lookformedical.com)
  • 1990. Spleen, lymph nodes, and thymus. (nih.gov)
  • Highly aggressive, poorly differentiated neoplasms were defined as Grade-3 neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) when originating from the gastrointestinal tract, or as small- or large-cell NECs when appearing in the lung. (oaepublish.com)
  • Taddesse-Heath L. Multiple Primary Malignant Neoplasms in African Americans: A Case Series and Literature Review. (howard.edu)
  • Apart from thymomas or thymic lymphosarcomas, other primary neoplasms of the thymus are extremely rare. (eurotoxpath.org)
  • So as an example, a liver metastasis (liver met) of a primary Neuroendocrine Neoplasm isn't Liver Cancer. (ronnyallan.net)
  • Nonmesotheliomatous cancers of the pleura include an assortment of malignant neoplasms that primarily or secondarily involve pleura. (medscape.com)
  • Rare cancers of the thymus. (itmig.org)
  • Children under 6 months of age, persons with immune deficiencies or on immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory therapies, persons with allergies to egg proteins, thymus disorders, malignant neoplasms, transplant recipients, and persons with symptomatic HIV infection should not get the Yellow Fever vaccine. (iamat.org)
  • Paraneoplastic syndromes are rare disorders that are triggered by an altered immune system response to a neoplasm. (medscape.com)
  • The thymus is the first lymphoid organ that develops. (medscape.com)
  • By definition, pseudomesotheliomatous carcinoma refers to an epithelial neoplasm that secondarily involves the pleura and encases the lung, thereby simulating the radiologic and macroscopic appearance of malignant mesothelioma. (medscape.com)
  • WHO Classification of Tumours of the Lung, Pleura, Thymus and Heart. (crossref.org)
  • Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of the Lung, Pleura, Thymus and Heart. (crossref.org)
  • SFTs of the pleura are localized mesenchymal neoplasms composed of fibroblastlike cells believed to arise from the subpleural connective tissue. (medscape.com)
  • WHO Classification of Tumours of the Lung, Pleura, Thymus and Heart is the seventh volume in the 4th Edition of the WHO series on histological and genetic typing of human tumours. (who.int)
  • Thymus and parathyroid transplant are the only possible treatments. (medscape.com)
  • Muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor mRNA expression in hyperplastic and neoplastic myasthenia gravis thymus. (ox.ac.uk)
  • The thymus reaches its greatest size at puberty, after which time it undergoes slow involution and both cortical and T lymphocytes are reduced in peripheral blood. (medscape.com)
  • The epithelial cells and these other stromal tissues of the thymus influence the selection and maturation of the T lymphocytes. (medscape.com)
  • In the normal thymus, bone marrow-derived precursor cells destined to become thymocytes (or T lymphocytes) enter the thymus at the corticomedullary junction and differentiate as they pass through the thymus. (medscape.com)
  • Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms . (lookformedical.com)
  • The thymus is composed of two distinct lobes, each of which is surrounded by a collagenous capsule with septa that extend into the corticomedullary junction, dividing the cortex further into lobules. (medscape.com)
  • Neoplasms like paraganglioma or lipoma are very uncommon and may originate in tissues adjacent to the thymus. (eurotoxpath.org)
  • However, to communicate effectively with clinicians, the term carcinoid tumor can still be used in parenthesis for neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract and lungs. (basicmedicalkey.com)
  • The cells and neoplasms of the neuroendocrine and paracrine systems make up the DNS. (basicmedicalkey.com)
  • The principal cells and neoplasms that form the DNS are listed in Table 11.1 . (basicmedicalkey.com)
  • In the subcapsular region of the thymus, the parenchymal cholinergic fibers originate exclusively from phrenic nerve branching. (eurotoxpath.org)
  • He was best known for his work on neoplasms of the thyroid, thymus, and vascular system, but essentially there is no subspecialty area that did not receive his investigative attention. (who.int)
  • Splenic hemangiomas and hemangiosarcomas are neoplasms derived from the splenic vascular endothelium. (nih.gov)
  • Even though site of origin could sometimes be unknown, NETs frequently involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract (including endocrine pancreas), bronchopulmonary tree, thyroid, and thymus and have a wide range of malignant potential. (oaepublish.com)
  • Stage III thymic epithelial neoplasms are not homogeneous with regard to clinical, pathological, and prognostic features. (nih.gov)
  • Many of these neoplasms have distinct clinicopathologic features, so precise classification by the pathologist is necessary for optimal clinical management. (basicmedicalkey.com)
  • The development of the second neoplasm may or may not be related to the treatment for the previous neoplasm since genetic risk or predisposing factors may actually be the cause. (lookformedical.com)
  • The report by Oppenheim led the German thoracic surgeon Ernst Sauerbruch to perform a cervical thymectomy in 1911 on a 20-year-old woman with a radiologically enlarged thymus who had myasthenia. (medscape.com)
  • Thymus and fetal liver implants to reconstitute T- and B-cell function have met with some success. (medscape.com)
  • Undescended thymus is usually diagnosed in childhood. (medscape.com)
  • Before birth and during childhood, the thymus helps the body make a type of white blood cell. (medlineplus.gov)
  • There are a number of reasons why these Neoplasms are often difficult to correctly and quickly diagnose including but not limited to: - they grow silently, they often produce vague symptoms which can be mistaken for much more common illnesses, and their complexity is not fully understood. (ronnyallan.net)
  • Case # 13 showed the histopathological appearance of an atrophic thymus (normal involution, age-related) with a mixture of hyperplastic epithelial cords and an uncommon stromal proliferation. (eurotoxpath.org)