Surgical removal of an obstructing clot or foreign material from a blood vessel at the point of its formation. Removal of a clot arising from a distant site is called EMBOLECTOMY.
Procedures to cause the disintegration of THROMBI by physical interventions.
A vein on either side of the body which is formed by the union of the external and internal iliac veins and passes upward to join with its fellow of the opposite side to form the inferior vena cava.
The removal of secretions, gas or fluid from hollow or tubular organs or cavities by means of a tube and a device that acts on negative pressure.
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in a blood vessel within the SKULL. Intracranial thrombosis can lead to thrombotic occlusions and BRAIN INFARCTION. The majority of the thrombotic occlusions are associated with ATHEROSCLEROSIS.
Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.
The vein accompanying the femoral artery in the same sheath; it is a continuation of the popliteal vein and becomes the external iliac vein.
The formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) within a vein.
A flexible, tubular device that is used to carry fluids into or from a blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity.
Coagulation of blood in any of the CORONARY VESSELS. The presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) often leads to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
Surgical removal of an obstructing clot or foreign material which has been transported from a distant vessel by the bloodstream. Removal of a clot at its original site is called THROMBECTOMY.
Use of infusions of FIBRINOLYTIC AGENTS to destroy or dissolve thrombi in blood vessels or bypass grafts.
Radiographic visualization or recording of a vein after the injection of contrast medium.
Blocking of a blood vessel by an embolus which can be a blood clot or other undissolved material in the blood stream.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.
Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the SUPERIOR SAGITTAL SINUS or the inferior sagittal sinus. Sagittal sinus thrombosis can result from infections, hematological disorders, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; and NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES. Clinical features are primarily related to the increased intracranial pressure causing HEADACHE; NAUSEA; and VOMITING. Severe cases can evolve to SEIZURES or COMA.
Surgical shunt allowing direct passage of blood from an artery to a vein. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
The venous trunk which receives blood from the lower extremities and from the pelvic and abdominal organs.
Microsurgical revascularization to improve intracranial circulation. It usually involves joining the extracranial circulation to the intracranial circulation but may include extracranial revascularization (e.g., subclavian-vertebral artery bypass, subclavian-external carotid artery bypass). It is performed by joining two arteries (direct anastomosis or use of graft) or by free autologous transplantation of highly vascularized tissue to the surface of the brain.
Methods of creating machines and devices.
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the CRANIAL SINUSES, large endothelium-lined venous channels situated within the SKULL. Intracranial sinuses, also called cranial venous sinuses, include the superior sagittal, cavernous, lateral, petrous sinuses, and many others. Cranial sinus thrombosis can lead to severe HEADACHE; SEIZURE; and other neurological defects.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.
Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.
Markedly reduced or absent REPERFUSION in an infarct zone following the removal of an obstruction or constriction of an artery.
Catheters inserted into various locations within the heart for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.
NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).
A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)
Expendable and nonexpendable equipment, supplies, apparatus, and instruments that are used in diagnostic, surgical, therapeutic, scientific, and experimental procedures.
Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to FIBRINOLYSIN.
Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.
Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.
The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.
A condition caused by one or more episodes of DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS, usually the blood clots are lodged in the legs. Clinical features include EDEMA; PAIN; aching; heaviness; and MUSCLE CRAMP in the leg. When severe leg swelling leads to skin breakdown, it is called venous STASIS ULCER.
Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.
A family of percutaneous techniques that are used to manage CORONARY OCCLUSION, including standard balloon angioplasty (PERCUTANEOUS TRANSLUMINAL CORONARY ANGIOPLASTY), the placement of intracoronary STENTS, and atheroablative technologies (e.g., ATHERECTOMY; ENDARTERECTOMY; THROMBECTOMY; PERCUTANEOUS TRANSLUMINAL LASER ANGIOPLASTY). PTCA was the dominant form of PCI, before the widespread use of stenting.
Agents that prevent clotting.
Localized reduction of blood flow to brain tissue due to arterial obstruction or systemic hypoperfusion. This frequently occurs in conjunction with brain hypoxia (HYPOXIA, BRAIN). Prolonged ischemia is associated with BRAIN INFARCTION.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.
Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.
Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.
The continuation of the femoral artery coursing through the popliteal fossa; it divides into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries.
Minimally invasive procedures, diagnostic or therapeutic, performed within the BLOOD VESSELS. They may be perfomed via ANGIOSCOPY; INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; INTERVENTIONAL RADIOGRAPHY; or INTERVENTIONAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.
Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.
Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.
Pathological processes involving the integrity of blood circulation. Hemostasis depends on the integrity of BLOOD VESSELS, blood fluidity, and BLOOD COAGULATION. Majority of the hemostatic disorders are caused by disruption of the normal interaction between the VASCULAR ENDOTHELIUM, the plasma proteins (including BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS), and PLATELETS.
The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.
Reconstruction or repair of a blood vessel, which includes the widening of a pathological narrowing of an artery or vein by the removal of atheromatous plaque material and/or the endothelial lining as well, or by dilatation (BALLOON ANGIOPLASTY) to compress an ATHEROMA. Except for ENDARTERECTOMY, usually these procedures are performed via catheterization as minimally invasive ENDOVASCULAR PROCEDURES.

The surgical management of acute limb ischaemia due to native vessel occlusion. (1/518)

OBJECTIVES: Data from the STILE study have indicated that for patients with subacute limb ischaemia due to native vessel occlusion, surgery is both more effective, and durable than thrombolysis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of an aggressive surgical approach in patients presenting with acute limb-threatening ischaemia. DESIGN: Details of patients presenting with salvageable acute limb ischaemia due to native artery occlusion over a 6-year period in a University hospital vascular unit setting were obtained from the vascular audit and the outcome of the surgical management of these patients was analysed. RESULTS: One hundred and seventy-four consecutive patients underwent surgery for acute native vessel limb ischaemia (76% lower, 24% upper limb). Fogarty thrombectomy or embolectomy was initially performed in 153 (89%) patients. Of these, 37 (24%) immediately underwent a further procedure: 28 (18%) had on-table thrombolysis and 14 (9%) underwent vascular reconstruction. Twenty-six patients (15%) underwent further limb salvage surgery within 30 days. Life table analysis demonstrated a limb salvage rate of 88% and 76% at 30 days and 2 years, respectively. Patient survival was 75% and 48% at the same time intervals. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that a role for aggressive surgical intervention still exists, resulting in high limb salvage rates.  (+info)

Rapid thrombectomy of superior sagittal sinus and transverse sinus thrombosis with a rheolytic catheter device. (2/518)

Thrombosis of the dural venous sinuses is a potentially lethal condition that remains a diagnostic dilemma. Clinical outcome is typically dependent on the timeliness of diagnosis and definitive treatment. We report a case of successful rapid thrombectomy of extensive thrombus within the superior sagittal and transverse sinuses using a rheolytic catheter device. This appears to be a promising treatment option, particularly in those patients who do not respond to other, more established, forms of therapy.  (+info)

Application of a rheolytic thrombectomy device in the treatment of dural sinus thrombosis: a new technique. (3/518)

We present a novel application of a transvascular rheolytic thrombectomy system in the treatment of symptomatic dural sinus thrombosis in a 54-year-old woman with somnolence and left-sided weakness. The diagnosis of bilateral transverse and superior sagittal sinus thrombosis was made and the patient was treated with anticoagulant therapy. After an initial period of improvement, she became comatose and hemiplegic 8 days after presentation. After excluding intracerebral hemorrhage by MR imaging, we performed angiography and transfemoral venous thrombolysis with a hydrodynamic thrombectomy catheter, followed by intrasinus urokinase thrombolytic therapy over the course of 2 days. This technique resulted in dramatic sinus thrombolysis and near total neurologic recovery. Six months after treatment, the patient showed mild cognitive impairment and no focal neurologic deficit. Our preliminary experience suggests that this technique may play a significant role in the endovascular treatment of this potentially devastating disease.  (+info)

Right heart thrombus: the importance of early intervention. (4/518)

A case report of mobile, right heart thrombus in the accident and emergency (A&E) department is presented. Though frequently associated with major pulmonary embolism, recognition is usually at postmortem examination. Detection of the presence of mobile thrombus in the right heart by early echocardiogram and prompt treatment may be life saving. Surgical or medical treatment options are dependent on local facilities. Early specialist involvement with a contingency plan in A&E departments are advised.  (+info)

Arterialisation of the portal vein with an aortoportal jump graft for portal vein thrombosis following liver resection for malignancy. (5/518)

Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FHCC) is a variant of hepatocellular carcinoma, which mainly affects a young age group and carries a relatively good prognosis. It is widely accepted that aggressive curative resection is still the best option for FHCC. We report here a case of successful arterialisation of the portal vein with an aortoportal jump graft for portal vein thrombosis, which developed postoperatively in an already comprised portal vein with tumour invasion following an extensive liver resection for FHCC.  (+info)

Spinal cord ischemia after abdominal aortic operation: is it preventable? (6/518)

PURPOSE: Spinal cord ischemia after operation on the abdominal aorta is a rare event that is attributed to variations in the spinal cord blood supply. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible causes of this devastating event. METHODS: A survey of patients among the members of the Southern Association for Vascular Surgery was performed, and 18 patients were identified with spinal cord ischemia manifested by paraplegia or paraparesis after abdominal aortic operation. RESULTS: Preoperative computed tomographic, magnetic resonance, and aortographic results did not visualize the greater radicular artery (Adamkiewicz's artery) in any patient. Eleven patients underwent resection of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs): seven of these patients had tube grafts, three had aortobifemoral grafts, and one had an aortobiiliac graft. Five other patients underwent placement of aortobifemoral grafts, and one patient underwent aortobiiliac graft placement for occlusive disease. One patient underwent suprarenal AAA resection with an interposition graft to a previous aortobiiliac graft. The mean operative time was 3 hours and 39 minutes (range, 2 hours and 45 minutes to 6 hours and 30 minutes), with a mean aortic cross-clamp time of 48 minutes (range, 24 to 97 minutes). Sixteen aortic cross-clamps were placed infrarenally and two suprarenally (one in a case of ruptured AAA, the other a suprarenal AAA). Seventeen proximal anastomoses were end to end. The average minimum systolic blood pressure during the aortic cross-clamping was 96 mm Hg (range, 80 to 130 mm Hg). All the patients had internal iliac artery flow preserved with either prograde perfusion (10 patients) or retrograde perfusion (eight patients), and one patient underwent unilateral internal iliac artery ligation because of aneurysmal disease. One aortobifemoral-graft limb necessitated thrombectomy, but no cases of massive peripheral embolization occurred. When paraplegia was suspected after operation (6 to 20 hours after surgery), five patients underwent lumbar drainage. No clinical improvement was noted. CONCLUSION: Interference with pelvic blood supply from prolonged aortic cross clamping, intraoperative hypotension, aortic embolization, and interruption of internal iliac artery circulation have all been suggested as possible causes of spinal cord ischemia. In this survey, none of these factors proved to be significant as the sole cause of spinal cord ischemia. In the performance of an aortic operation with an end-to-end proximal anastomosis in the presence of severe external or internal iliac artery disease, there may be an increased incidence of spinal cord ischemia despite appropriate surgical techniques to ensure internal iliac perfusion. Spinal cord ischemia after abdominal aortic operations appears to be a tragically unpredictable, random, and unpreventable event.  (+info)

Removal of a thrombus from the sigmoid and transverse sinuses with a rheolytic thrombectomy catheter. (7/518)

A rheolytic thrombectomy catheter was used to remove thrombus without thrombolytics from the sigmoid and transverse sinuses of a 34-year-old woman. Using small, high-flow fluid jets and Venturi-effect suction, this catheter allowed mechanical removal of thrombus. This technique may obviate the need for thrombolytic agents and the risks associated with their use.  (+info)

Eversion endarterectomy versus open thromboendarterectomy and patch plasty for the treatment of internal carotid artery stenosis. (8/518)

OBJECTIVE: in 1996 we changed our treatment for stenosis of the internal carotid artery (ICA) from open thromboendarterectomy and PTFE-patch plasty (TEA) to eversion endarterectomy (EEA). DESIGN: retrospective study. METHODS: a total of 475 EEAs of the ICA were performed between 2/96 and 11/96. These results were compared to the results of TEA carried out between 2/94 and 11/94 (n=388). RESULTS: clamping and operation time were significantly shorter for EEA. Neurological complications included transient ischaemic attacks in 1. 0% in the EEA group versus 1.3% after TEA (p=0.72), minor strokes (0. 6% vs. 1.8%, p=0.10) and major strokes in 1.5% versus 1.1% (p=0.59). The rate of restenosis >50% was 2.5% after EEA and 10.2% after TEA. The only detectable difference of statistical significance in complication rates was in the lesions of the hypoglossal nerve (5.3% vs. 2.6%, p=0.04). CONCLUSIONS: EEA of the ICA is a safe procedure for carotid reconstruction with the additional advantages of short clamping time, possibility of simultaneous shortening of an elongated ICA, and no requirement for patching.  (+info)

A thrombectomy is a medical procedure that involves the removal of a blood clot (thrombus) from a blood vessel. This is typically performed to restore blood flow in cases where the clot is causing significant blockage, which can lead to serious complications such as tissue damage or organ dysfunction.

During a thrombectomy, a surgeon makes an incision and accesses the affected blood vessel, often with the help of imaging guidance. Specialized tools are then used to extract the clot, after which the blood vessel is usually repaired. Thrombectomies can be performed on various blood vessels throughout the body, including those in the brain, heart, lungs, and limbs.

This procedure may be recommended for patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), or certain types of stroke, depending on the specific circumstances and the patient's overall health. It is generally considered when anticoagulation therapy or clot-dissolving medications are not sufficient or appropriate to treat the blood clot.

Mechanical thrombolysis is a procedure used to remove blood clots (thrombi) from the blood vessels by mechanical means, as opposed to pharmacological thrombolysis which uses drugs to dissolve the clots. In mechanical thrombolysis, specialized medical devices are used to physically disrupt, extract or break down the clot, thereby restoring blood flow and preventing further complications such as tissue damage or organ dysfunction.

The procedure is often performed under imaging guidance, such as fluoroscopy or ultrasound, to ensure accurate placement of the device and effective removal of the thrombus. Mechanical thrombolysis may be used in various clinical settings, including deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), and arterial thromboembolism, such as stroke or peripheral artery disease.

Some of the commonly used mechanical thrombectomy devices include:

1. Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT): A catheter is inserted into the affected blood vessel and a clot-dissolving drug is administered directly to the thrombus.
2. AngioJet Rheolytic Thrombectomy System: This device uses high-pressure saline jets to break up and remove the clot.
3. Rotational or ultrasonic thrombectomy devices: These use rotating or vibrating components to macerate and extract the clot.
4. Aspiration thrombectomy: A catheter with a large lumen is used to aspirate (suction) the clot out of the blood vessel.
5. Stent retriever thrombectomy: A stent-like device is deployed in the affected vessel and then retrieved, taking the clot with it.

The choice of mechanical thrombolysis technique depends on various factors, including the location, size, and composition of the thrombus, as well as the patient's overall clinical condition.

The iliac veins are a pair of large veins in the human body that carry deoxygenated blood from the lower extremities and the pelvic area back to the heart. They are formed by the union of the common iliac veins, which receive blood from the lower abdomen and legs, at the level of the fifth lumbar vertebra.

The combined iliac vein is called the inferior vena cava, which continues upward to the right atrium of the heart. The iliac veins are located deep within the pelvis, lateral to the corresponding iliac arteries, and are accompanied by the iliac lymphatic vessels.

The left common iliac vein is longer than the right because it must cross the left common iliac artery to join the right common iliac vein. The external and internal iliac veins are the two branches of the common iliac vein, with the external iliac vein carrying blood from the lower limbs and the internal iliac vein carrying blood from the pelvic organs.

It is essential to maintain proper blood flow in the iliac veins to prevent deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a condition that can lead to serious complications such as pulmonary embolism.

In medical terms, suction refers to the process of creating and maintaining a partial vacuum in order to remove fluids or gases from a body cavity or wound. This is typically accomplished using specialized medical equipment such as a suction machine, which uses a pump to create the vacuum, and a variety of different suction tips or catheters that can be inserted into the area being treated.

Suction is used in a wide range of medical procedures and treatments, including wound care, surgical procedures, respiratory therapy, and diagnostic tests. It can help to remove excess fluids such as blood or pus from a wound, clear secretions from the airways during mechanical ventilation, or provide a means of visualizing internal structures during endoscopic procedures.

It is important to use proper technique when performing suctioning, as excessive or improperly applied suction can cause tissue damage or bleeding. Medical professionals are trained in the safe and effective use of suction equipment and techniques to minimize risks and ensure optimal patient outcomes.

Intracranial thrombosis refers to the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) within the intracranial vessels, which supply blood to the brain. This condition can occur in any of the cerebral arteries or veins and can lead to serious complications such as ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), or venous sinus thrombosis.

The formation of an intracranial thrombus can be caused by various factors, including atherosclerosis, cardiac embolism, vasculitis, sickle cell disease, hypercoagulable states, and head trauma. Symptoms may vary depending on the location and extent of the thrombosis but often include sudden onset of headache, weakness or numbness in the face or limbs, difficulty speaking or understanding speech, vision changes, and loss of balance or coordination.

Diagnosis of intracranial thrombosis typically involves imaging studies such as computed tomography (CT) angiography, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), or digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Treatment options may include anticoagulation therapy, thrombolysis, endovascular intervention, or surgical intervention, depending on the underlying cause and severity of the condition.

Thrombosis is the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) inside a blood vessel, obstructing the flow of blood through the circulatory system. When a clot forms in an artery, it can cut off the supply of oxygen and nutrients to the tissues served by that artery, leading to damage or tissue death. If a thrombus forms in the heart, it can cause a heart attack. If a thrombus breaks off and travels through the bloodstream, it can lodge in a smaller vessel, causing blockage and potentially leading to damage in the organ that the vessel supplies. This is known as an embolism.

Thrombosis can occur due to various factors such as injury to the blood vessel wall, abnormalities in blood flow, or changes in the composition of the blood. Certain medical conditions, medications, and lifestyle factors can increase the risk of thrombosis. Treatment typically involves anticoagulant or thrombolytic therapy to dissolve or prevent further growth of the clot, as well as addressing any underlying causes.

The femoral vein is the large vein that runs through the thigh and carries oxygen-depleted blood from the lower limbs back to the heart. It is located in the femoral triangle, along with the femoral artery and nerve. The femoral vein begins at the knee as the popliteal vein, which then joins with the deep vein of the thigh to form the femoral vein. As it moves up the leg, it is joined by several other veins, including the great saphenous vein, before it becomes the external iliac vein at the inguinal ligament in the groin.

Venous thrombosis is a medical condition characterized by the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) in the deep veins, often in the legs (deep vein thrombosis or DVT), but it can also occur in other parts of the body such as the arms, pelvis, or lungs (pulmonary embolism).

The formation of a venous thrombus can be caused by various factors, including injury to the blood vessel wall, changes in blood flow, and alterations in the composition of the blood. These factors can lead to the activation of clotting factors and platelets, which can result in the formation of a clot that blocks the vein.

Symptoms of venous thrombosis may include swelling, pain, warmth, and redness in the affected area. In some cases, the clot can dislodge and travel to other parts of the body, causing potentially life-threatening complications such as pulmonary embolism.

Risk factors for venous thrombosis include advanced age, obesity, smoking, pregnancy, use of hormonal contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy, cancer, recent surgery or trauma, prolonged immobility, and a history of previous venous thromboembolism. Treatment typically involves the use of anticoagulant medications to prevent further clotting and dissolve existing clots.

A catheter is a flexible tube that can be inserted into the body to treat various medical conditions or to perform certain medical procedures. Catheters are used to drain fluids, deliver medications, or provide access to different parts of the body for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. They come in various sizes and materials, depending on their intended use.

In a general sense, catheters can be classified into two main categories:

1. **External catheters:** These are applied to the outside of the body and are commonly used for urinary drainage. For example, a condom catheter is an external collection device that fits over the penis to drain urine into a bag. Similarly, a Texas or Foley catheter can be used in females, where a small tube is inserted into the urethra and inflated with a balloon to keep it in place.
2. **Internal catheters:** These are inserted into the body through various openings or surgical incisions. They have different applications based on their placement:
* **Urinary catheters:** Used for bladder drainage, similar to external catheters but inserted through the urethra.
* **Vascular catheters:** Inserted into veins or arteries to administer medication, fluids, or to perform diagnostic tests like angiography.
* **Cardiovascular catheters:** Used in procedures such as cardiac catheterization to diagnose and treat heart conditions.
* **Neurological catheters:** Placed in the cerebrospinal fluid spaces of the brain or spinal cord for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes, like draining excess fluid or delivering medication.
* **Gastrointestinal catheters:** Used to provide enteral nutrition, drain fluids, or perform procedures within the gastrointestinal tract.

Proper care and maintenance of catheters are crucial to prevent infection and other complications. Patients with indwelling catheters should follow their healthcare provider's instructions for cleaning, handling, and monitoring the catheter site.

Coronary thrombosis is a medical condition that refers to the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) inside a coronary artery, which supplies oxygenated blood to the heart muscle. The development of a thrombus can partially or completely obstruct blood flow, leading to insufficient oxygen supply to the heart muscle. This can cause chest pain (angina) or a heart attack (myocardial infarction), depending on the severity and duration of the blockage.

Coronary thrombosis often results from the rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque, a buildup of cholesterol, fat, calcium, and other substances in the inner lining (endothelium) of the coronary artery. The ruptured plaque exposes the underlying tissue to the bloodstream, triggering the coagulation cascade and resulting in the formation of a thrombus.

Immediate medical attention is crucial for managing coronary thrombosis, as timely treatment can help restore blood flow, prevent further damage to the heart muscle, and reduce the risk of complications such as heart failure or life-threatening arrhythmias. Treatment options may include medications, such as antiplatelet agents, anticoagulants, and thrombolytic drugs, or interventional procedures like angioplasty and stenting to open the blocked artery. In some cases, surgical intervention, such as coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), may be necessary.

An embolectomy is a surgical procedure to remove an embolus, which is a blockage in a blood vessel caused by a clot or air bubble that has traveled from another part of the body. During an embolectomy, the surgeon makes an incision in the affected blood vessel and removes the embolus using specialized surgical instruments. This procedure is often performed as an emergency treatment to restore blood flow and prevent tissue damage in the affected area of the body.

Thrombolytic therapy, also known as thrombolysis, is a medical treatment that uses medications called thrombolytics or fibrinolytics to dissolve or break down blood clots (thrombi) in blood vessels. These clots can obstruct the flow of blood to vital organs such as the heart, lungs, or brain, leading to serious conditions like myocardial infarction (heart attack), pulmonary embolism, or ischemic stroke.

The goal of thrombolytic therapy is to restore blood flow as quickly and efficiently as possible to prevent further damage to the affected organ and potentially save lives. Commonly used thrombolytic drugs include alteplase (tPA), reteplase, and tenecteplase. It's essential to administer these medications as soon as possible after the onset of symptoms for optimal treatment outcomes. However, there are risks associated with thrombolytic therapy, such as an increased chance of bleeding complications, which must be carefully weighed against its benefits in each individual case.

Phlebography is a medical imaging technique used to visualize and assess the veins, particularly in the legs. It involves the injection of a contrast agent into the veins, followed by X-ray imaging to capture the flow of the contrast material through the veins. This allows doctors to identify any abnormalities such as blood clots, blockages, or malformations in the venous system.

There are different types of phlebography, including ascending phlebography (where the contrast agent is injected into a foot vein and travels up the leg) and descending phlebography (where the contrast agent is injected into a vein in the groin or neck and travels down the leg).

Phlebography is an invasive procedure that requires careful preparation and monitoring, and it is typically performed by radiologists or vascular specialists. It has largely been replaced by non-invasive imaging techniques such as ultrasound and CT angiography in many clinical settings.

An embolism is a medical condition that occurs when a substance, such as a blood clot or an air bubble, blocks a blood vessel. This can happen in any part of the body, but it is particularly dangerous when it affects the brain (causing a stroke) or the lungs (causing a pulmonary embolism). Embolisms can cause serious harm by preventing oxygen and nutrients from reaching the tissues and organs that need them. They are often the result of underlying medical conditions, such as heart disease or deep vein thrombosis, and may require immediate medical attention to prevent further complications.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

Vascular patency is a term used in medicine to describe the state of a blood vessel (such as an artery or vein) being open, unobstructed, and allowing for the normal flow of blood. It is an important concept in the treatment and management of various cardiovascular conditions, such as peripheral artery disease, coronary artery disease, and deep vein thrombosis.

Maintaining vascular patency can help prevent serious complications like tissue damage, organ dysfunction, or even death. This may involve medical interventions such as administering blood-thinning medications to prevent clots, performing procedures to remove blockages, or using devices like stents to keep vessels open. Regular monitoring of vascular patency is also crucial for evaluating the effectiveness of treatments and adjusting care plans accordingly.

A stent is a small mesh tube that's used to treat narrow or weak arteries. Arteries are blood vessels that carry blood away from your heart to other parts of your body. A stent is placed in an artery as part of a procedure called angioplasty. Angioplasty restores blood flow through narrowed or blocked arteries by inflating a tiny balloon inside the blocked artery to widen it.

The stent is then inserted into the widened artery to keep it open. The stent is usually made of metal, but some are coated with medication that is slowly and continuously released to help prevent the formation of scar tissue in the artery. This can reduce the chance of the artery narrowing again.

Stents are also used in other parts of the body, such as the neck (carotid artery) and kidneys (renal artery), to help maintain blood flow and prevent blockages. They can also be used in the urinary system to treat conditions like ureteropelvic junction obstruction or narrowing of the urethra.

Sagittal sinus thrombosis is a medical condition that refers to the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) in the sagittal sinus, which is a venous structure located in the brain. The sagittal sinus runs along the midline of the brain and receives blood from the superficial veins of the brain.

Sagittal sinus thrombosis can occur as a result of various conditions, such as head trauma, infection, cancer, or certain medical disorders that cause hypercoagulability (an increased tendency to form blood clots). The formation of a blood clot in the sagittal sinus can obstruct the flow of blood from the brain, leading to symptoms such as headache, seizures, altered consciousness, and focal neurological deficits.

Diagnosis of sagittal sinus thrombosis typically involves imaging studies such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, which can show the presence of a blood clot in the sagittal sinus. Treatment may involve administering anticoagulant medications to prevent further growth of the blood clot and reduce the risk of complications such as pulmonary embolism or cerebral infarction. In some cases, surgical intervention may be necessary to remove the blood clot or alleviate pressure on the brain.

An arteriovenous shunt is a surgically created connection between an artery and a vein. This procedure is typically performed to reroute blood flow or to provide vascular access for various medical treatments. In a surgical setting, the creation of an arteriovenous shunt involves connecting an artery directly to a vein, bypassing the capillary network in between.

There are different types of arteriovenous shunts used for specific medical purposes:

1. Arteriovenous Fistula (AVF): This is a surgical connection created between an artery and a vein, usually in the arm or leg. The procedure involves dissecting both the artery and vein, then suturing them directly together. Over time, the increased blood flow to the vein causes it to dilate and thicken, making it suitable for repeated needle punctures during hemodialysis treatments for patients with kidney failure.
2. Arteriovenous Graft (AVG): An arteriovenous graft is a synthetic tube used to connect an artery and a vein when a direct AVF cannot be created due to insufficient vessel size or poor quality. The graft can be made of various materials, such as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) or Dacron. Grafts are more prone to infection and clotting compared to native AVFs but remain an essential option for patients requiring hemodialysis access.
3. Central Venous Catheter (CVC): A central venous catheter is a flexible tube inserted into a large vein, often in the neck or groin, and advanced towards the heart. CVCs can be used as temporary arteriovenous shunts for patients who require immediate hemodialysis access but do not have time to wait for an AVF or AVG to mature. However, they are associated with higher risks of infection and thrombosis compared to native AVFs and AVGs.

In summary, a surgical arteriovenous shunt is a connection between an artery and a vein established through a medical procedure. The primary purpose of these shunts is to provide vascular access for hemodialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease or to serve as temporary access when native AVFs or AVGs are not feasible.

The inferior vena cava (IVC) is the largest vein in the human body that carries deoxygenated blood from the lower extremities, pelvis, and abdomen to the right atrium of the heart. It is formed by the union of the left and right common iliac veins at the level of the fifth lumbar vertebra. The inferior vena cava is a retroperitoneal structure, meaning it lies behind the peritoneum, the lining that covers the abdominal cavity. It ascends through the posterior abdominal wall and passes through the central tendon of the diaphragm to enter the thoracic cavity.

The inferior vena cava is composed of three parts:

1. The infrarenal portion, which lies below the renal veins
2. The renal portion, which receives blood from the renal veins
3. The suprahepatic portion, which lies above the liver and receives blood from the hepatic veins before draining into the right atrium of the heart.

The inferior vena cava plays a crucial role in maintaining venous return to the heart and contributing to cardiovascular function.

Cerebral revascularization is a surgical procedure aimed at restoring blood flow to the brain. This is often performed in cases where there is narrowing or blockage of the cerebral arteries, a condition known as cerebrovascular disease. The most common type of cerebral revascularization is called carotid endarterectomy, which involves removing plaque buildup from the carotid artery in the neck to improve blood flow to the brain. Another type is extracranial-intracranial bypass, where a new connection is created between an external carotid artery and an intracranial artery to bypass a blockage.

Equipment design, in the medical context, refers to the process of creating and developing medical equipment and devices, such as surgical instruments, diagnostic machines, or assistive technologies. This process involves several stages, including:

1. Identifying user needs and requirements
2. Concept development and brainstorming
3. Prototyping and testing
4. Design for manufacturing and assembly
5. Safety and regulatory compliance
6. Verification and validation
7. Training and support

The goal of equipment design is to create safe, effective, and efficient medical devices that meet the needs of healthcare providers and patients while complying with relevant regulations and standards. The design process typically involves a multidisciplinary team of engineers, clinicians, designers, and researchers who work together to develop innovative solutions that improve patient care and outcomes.

Intracranial sinus thrombosis is a medical condition characterized by the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) within the intracranial venous sinuses, which are responsible for draining blood from the brain. The condition can lead to various neurological symptoms and complications, such as increased intracranial pressure, headaches, seizures, visual disturbances, and altered consciousness. Intracranial sinus thrombosis may result from various factors, including hypercoagulable states, infections, trauma, and malignancies. Immediate medical attention is necessary for proper diagnosis and treatment to prevent potential long-term neurological damage or even death.

An acute disease is a medical condition that has a rapid onset, develops quickly, and tends to be short in duration. Acute diseases can range from minor illnesses such as a common cold or flu, to more severe conditions such as pneumonia, meningitis, or a heart attack. These types of diseases often have clear symptoms that are easy to identify, and they may require immediate medical attention or treatment.

Acute diseases are typically caused by an external agent or factor, such as a bacterial or viral infection, a toxin, or an injury. They can also be the result of a sudden worsening of an existing chronic condition. In general, acute diseases are distinct from chronic diseases, which are long-term medical conditions that develop slowly over time and may require ongoing management and treatment.

Examples of acute diseases include:

* Acute bronchitis: a sudden inflammation of the airways in the lungs, often caused by a viral infection.
* Appendicitis: an inflammation of the appendix that can cause severe pain and requires surgical removal.
* Gastroenteritis: an inflammation of the stomach and intestines, often caused by a viral or bacterial infection.
* Migraine headaches: intense headaches that can last for hours or days, and are often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light and sound.
* Myocardial infarction (heart attack): a sudden blockage of blood flow to the heart muscle, often caused by a buildup of plaque in the coronary arteries.
* Pneumonia: an infection of the lungs that can cause coughing, chest pain, and difficulty breathing.
* Sinusitis: an inflammation of the sinuses, often caused by a viral or bacterial infection.

It's important to note that while some acute diseases may resolve on their own with rest and supportive care, others may require medical intervention or treatment to prevent complications and promote recovery. If you are experiencing symptoms of an acute disease, it is always best to seek medical attention to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment.

Catheterization is a medical procedure in which a catheter (a flexible tube) is inserted into the body to treat various medical conditions or for diagnostic purposes. The specific definition can vary depending on the area of medicine and the particular procedure being discussed. Here are some common types of catheterization:

1. Urinary catheterization: This involves inserting a catheter through the urethra into the bladder to drain urine. It is often performed to manage urinary retention, monitor urine output in critically ill patients, or assist with surgical procedures.
2. Cardiac catheterization: A procedure where a catheter is inserted into a blood vessel, usually in the groin or arm, and guided to the heart. This allows for various diagnostic tests and treatments, such as measuring pressures within the heart chambers, assessing blood flow, or performing angioplasty and stenting of narrowed coronary arteries.
3. Central venous catheterization: A catheter is inserted into a large vein, typically in the neck, chest, or groin, to administer medications, fluids, or nutrition, or to monitor central venous pressure.
4. Peritoneal dialysis catheterization: A catheter is placed into the abdominal cavity for individuals undergoing peritoneal dialysis, a type of kidney replacement therapy.
5. Neurological catheterization: In some cases, a catheter may be inserted into the cerebrospinal fluid space (lumbar puncture) or the brain's ventricular system (ventriculostomy) to diagnose or treat various neurological conditions.

These are just a few examples of catheterization procedures in medicine. The specific definition and purpose will depend on the medical context and the particular organ or body system involved.

Graft occlusion in the context of vascular surgery refers to the complete or partial blockage of a blood vessel that has been surgically replaced or repaired with a graft. The graft can be made from either synthetic materials or autologous tissue (taken from another part of the patient's body).

Graft occlusion can occur due to various reasons, including:

1. Thrombosis: Formation of a blood clot within the graft, which can obstruct blood flow.
2. Intimal hyperplasia: Overgrowth of the inner lining (intima) of the graft or the adjacent native vessel, causing narrowing of the lumen and reducing blood flow.
3. Atherosclerosis: Deposition of cholesterol and other substances in the walls of the graft, leading to hardening and narrowing of the vessel.
4. Infection: Bacterial or fungal infection of the graft can cause inflammation, weakening, and ultimately occlusion of the graft.
5. Mechanical factors: Kinking, twisting, or compression of the graft can lead to obstruction of blood flow.

Graft occlusion is a significant complication following vascular surgery, as it can result in reduced perfusion to downstream tissues and organs, leading to ischemia (lack of oxygen supply) and potential tissue damage or loss.

The "no-reflow" phenomenon is a term used in the medical field, particularly in interventional cardiology and neurology. It refers to the inability to restore blood flow to an organ or tissue despite successful removal of the obstruction in the blood vessel that supplies it. This can occur during procedures such as angioplasty and stenting, where the opening of a narrowed or blocked artery is attempted.

The no-reflow phenomenon is thought to be caused by several factors, including damage to the blood vessel walls, formation of microthrombi (small blood clots), and spasm of the blood vessels. This can lead to further tissue damage and poor clinical outcomes, such as reduced organ function or even death of the tissue in extreme cases.

In the context of cardiology, the no-reflow phenomenon is often seen during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures, where the goal is to open up a blocked artery in the heart (coronary artery) to improve blood flow to the heart muscle. Despite successful restoration of blood flow through the use of balloons and stents, some areas of the heart muscle may not receive adequate blood flow due to the no-reflow phenomenon.

In neurology, the no-reflow phenomenon can occur during procedures aimed at restoring blood flow to the brain, such as mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke. The presence of the no-reflow phenomenon in this context has been associated with worse clinical outcomes and increased risk of disability or death.

A cardiac catheter is a thin, flexible tube that is inserted into the heart or adjacent blood vessels during a cardiac catheterization procedure. This procedure is typically performed to diagnose and treat various cardiovascular conditions such as heart disease, heart defects, or abnormal heart rhythms.

Cardiac catheters can be used for several purposes:

1. To measure the pressure and oxygen levels in different chambers of the heart and blood vessels.
2. To inject dye into the coronary arteries to visualize blockages or narrowing through angiography.
3. To perform interventions such as balloon angioplasty, stent placement, or valvuloplasty to open up blocked or narrowed blood vessels or repair damaged heart valves.
4. To collect samples of heart muscle tissue for biopsy, which can help diagnose conditions like cardiomyopathy or myocarditis.

There are various types of cardiac catheters, including:

1. Diagnostic catheters - used to measure pressure and oxygen levels in the heart and blood vessels.
2. Guiding catheters - used to guide other interventional devices like balloons or stents into place.
3. Angioplasty balloon catheters - used to inflate a balloon at the tip of the catheter, which helps open up blocked or narrowed blood vessels.
4. Thermodilution catheters - used to measure cardiac output and other hemodynamic parameters.
5. Microcatheters - smaller, more flexible catheters used for complex interventions or accessing difficult-to-reach areas of the heart and blood vessels.

Cardiac catheterization is a minimally invasive procedure that usually requires only local anesthesia and mild sedation. The recovery time is typically short, with most patients returning home within 24 hours after the procedure.

Myocardial infarction (MI), also known as a heart attack, is a medical condition characterized by the death of a segment of heart muscle (myocardium) due to the interruption of its blood supply. This interruption is most commonly caused by the blockage of a coronary artery by a blood clot formed on the top of an atherosclerotic plaque, which is a buildup of cholesterol and other substances in the inner lining of the artery.

The lack of oxygen and nutrients supply to the heart muscle tissue results in damage or death of the cardiac cells, causing the affected area to become necrotic. The extent and severity of the MI depend on the size of the affected area, the duration of the occlusion, and the presence of collateral circulation.

Symptoms of a myocardial infarction may include chest pain or discomfort, shortness of breath, nausea, lightheadedness, and sweating. Immediate medical attention is necessary to restore blood flow to the affected area and prevent further damage to the heart muscle. Treatment options for MI include medications, such as thrombolytics, antiplatelet agents, and pain relievers, as well as procedures such as percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG).

A stroke, also known as cerebrovascular accident (CVA), is a serious medical condition that occurs when the blood supply to part of the brain is interrupted or reduced, leading to deprivation of oxygen and nutrients to brain cells. This can result in the death of brain tissue and cause permanent damage or temporary impairment to cognitive functions, speech, memory, movement, and other body functions controlled by the affected area of the brain.

Strokes can be caused by either a blockage in an artery that supplies blood to the brain (ischemic stroke) or the rupture of a blood vessel in the brain (hemorrhagic stroke). A transient ischemic attack (TIA), also known as a "mini-stroke," is a temporary disruption of blood flow to the brain that lasts only a few minutes and does not cause permanent damage.

Symptoms of a stroke may include sudden weakness or numbness in the face, arm, or leg; difficulty speaking or understanding speech; vision problems; loss of balance or coordination; severe headache with no known cause; and confusion or disorientation. Immediate medical attention is crucial for stroke patients to receive appropriate treatment and prevent long-term complications.

'Equipment and Supplies' is a term used in the medical field to refer to the physical items and materials needed for medical care, treatment, and procedures. These can include a wide range of items, such as:

* Medical equipment: This includes devices and machines used for diagnostic, monitoring, or therapeutic purposes, such as stethoscopes, blood pressure monitors, EKG machines, ventilators, and infusion pumps.
* Medical supplies: These are consumable items that are used once and then discarded, such as syringes, needles, bandages, gowns, gloves, and face masks.
* Furniture and fixtures: This includes items such as hospital beds, examination tables, chairs, and cabinets that are used to create a functional medical space.

Having the right equipment and supplies is essential for providing safe and effective medical care. The specific items needed will depend on the type of medical practice or facility, as well as the needs of individual patients.

Fibrinolytic agents are medications that dissolve or break down blood clots by activating plasminogen, which is converted into plasmin. Plasmin is a proteolytic enzyme that degrades fibrin, the structural protein in blood clots. Fibrinolytic agents are used medically to treat conditions such as acute ischemic stroke, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and myocardial infarction (heart attack) by restoring blood flow in occluded vessels. Examples of fibrinolytic agents include alteplase, reteplase, and tenecteplase. It is important to note that these medications carry a risk of bleeding complications and should be administered with caution.

Angioplasty, balloon refers to a medical procedure used to widen narrowed or obstructed blood vessels, particularly the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle. This procedure is typically performed using a catheter-based technique, where a thin, flexible tube called a catheter is inserted into an artery, usually through the groin or wrist, and guided to the site of the narrowing or obstruction in the coronary artery.

Once the catheter reaches the affected area, a small balloon attached to the tip of the catheter is inflated, which compresses the plaque against the artery wall and stretches the artery, thereby restoring blood flow. The balloon is then deflated and removed, along with the catheter.

Balloon angioplasty is often combined with the placement of a stent, a small metal mesh tube that helps to keep the artery open and prevent it from narrowing again. This procedure is known as percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary angioplasty and stenting.

Overall, balloon angioplasty is a relatively safe and effective treatment for coronary artery disease, although complications such as bleeding, infection, or re-narrowing of the artery can occur in some cases.

Angiography is a medical procedure in which an x-ray image is taken to visualize the internal structure of blood vessels, arteries, or veins. This is done by injecting a radiopaque contrast agent (dye) into the blood vessel using a thin, flexible catheter. The dye makes the blood vessels visible on an x-ray image, allowing doctors to diagnose and treat various medical conditions such as blockages, narrowing, or malformations of the blood vessels.

There are several types of angiography, including:

* Cardiac angiography (also called coronary angiography) - used to examine the blood vessels of the heart
* Cerebral angiography - used to examine the blood vessels of the brain
* Peripheral angiography - used to examine the blood vessels in the limbs or other parts of the body.

Angiography is typically performed by a radiologist, cardiologist, or vascular surgeon in a hospital setting. It can help diagnose conditions such as coronary artery disease, aneurysms, and peripheral arterial disease, among others.

The femoral artery is the major blood vessel that supplies oxygenated blood to the lower extremity of the human body. It is a continuation of the external iliac artery and becomes the popliteal artery as it passes through the adductor hiatus in the adductor magnus muscle of the thigh.

The femoral artery is located in the femoral triangle, which is bound by the sartorius muscle anteriorly, the adductor longus muscle medially, and the biceps femoris muscle posteriorly. It can be easily palpated in the groin region, making it a common site for taking blood samples, measuring blood pressure, and performing surgical procedures such as femoral artery catheterization and bypass grafting.

The femoral artery gives off several branches that supply blood to the lower limb, including the deep femoral artery, the superficial femoral artery, and the profunda femoris artery. These branches provide blood to the muscles, bones, skin, and other tissues of the leg, ankle, and foot.

Postthrombotic syndrome (PTS), also known as postphlebitic syndrome, is a chronic complication that can occur after deep vein thrombosis (DVT). It's characterized by a combination of symptoms including pain, swelling, cramping, itching, and skin changes in the affected limb. PTS happens when the damaged valves in the veins are unable to properly move blood back to the heart, leading to venous hypertension and fluid accumulation in the lower extremities.

The symptoms of PTS can vary in severity, but they often worsen with prolonged standing or sitting. In some cases, patients may develop open sores (ulcers) on the skin, particularly around the ankles. The risk of developing PTS is higher in individuals who have experienced a recurrent DVT, those with more extensive clotting, and those who do not receive appropriate anticoagulation therapy after their initial DVT diagnosis.

Preventive measures such as early mobilization, use of compression stockings, and maintaining adequate anticoagulation can help reduce the risk of developing PTS following a DVT.

Arterial occlusive diseases are medical conditions characterized by the blockage or narrowing of the arteries, which can lead to a reduction in blood flow to various parts of the body. This reduction in blood flow can cause tissue damage and may result in serious complications such as tissue death (gangrene), organ dysfunction, or even death.

The most common cause of arterial occlusive diseases is atherosclerosis, which is the buildup of plaque made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances in the inner lining of the artery walls. Over time, this plaque can harden and narrow the arteries, restricting blood flow. Other causes of arterial occlusive diseases include blood clots, emboli (tiny particles that travel through the bloodstream and lodge in smaller vessels), inflammation, trauma, and certain inherited conditions.

Symptoms of arterial occlusive diseases depend on the location and severity of the blockage. Common symptoms include:

* Pain, cramping, or fatigue in the affected limb, often triggered by exercise and relieved by rest (claudication)
* Numbness, tingling, or weakness in the affected limb
* Coldness or discoloration of the skin in the affected area
* Slow-healing sores or wounds on the toes, feet, or legs
* Erectile dysfunction in men

Treatment for arterial occlusive diseases may include lifestyle changes such as quitting smoking, exercising regularly, and eating a healthy diet. Medications to lower cholesterol, control blood pressure, prevent blood clots, or manage pain may also be prescribed. In severe cases, surgical procedures such as angioplasty, stenting, or bypass surgery may be necessary to restore blood flow.

Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI), also known as coronary angioplasty, is a non-surgical procedure that opens up clogged coronary arteries to improve blood flow to the heart. It involves inserting a thin, flexible catheter into an artery in the groin or wrist and guiding it to the blocked artery in the heart. A small balloon is then inflated to widen the narrowed or blocked artery, and sometimes a stent (a tiny mesh tube) is placed to keep the artery open. This procedure helps to restore and maintain blood flow to the heart muscle, reducing symptoms of angina and improving overall cardiac function.

Anticoagulants are a class of medications that work to prevent the formation of blood clots in the body. They do this by inhibiting the coagulation cascade, which is a series of chemical reactions that lead to the formation of a clot. Anticoagulants can be given orally, intravenously, or subcutaneously, depending on the specific drug and the individual patient's needs.

There are several different types of anticoagulants, including:

1. Heparin: This is a naturally occurring anticoagulant that is often used in hospitalized patients who require immediate anticoagulation. It works by activating an enzyme called antithrombin III, which inhibits the formation of clots.
2. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH): LMWH is a form of heparin that has been broken down into smaller molecules. It has a longer half-life than standard heparin and can be given once or twice daily by subcutaneous injection.
3. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs): These are newer oral anticoagulants that work by directly inhibiting specific clotting factors in the coagulation cascade. Examples include apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran.
4. Vitamin K antagonists: These are older oral anticoagulants that work by inhibiting the action of vitamin K, which is necessary for the formation of clotting factors. Warfarin is an example of a vitamin K antagonist.

Anticoagulants are used to prevent and treat a variety of conditions, including deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), atrial fibrillation, and prosthetic heart valve thrombosis. It is important to note that anticoagulants can increase the risk of bleeding, so they must be used with caution and regular monitoring of blood clotting times may be required.

Brain ischemia is the medical term used to describe a reduction or interruption of blood flow to the brain, leading to a lack of oxygen and glucose delivery to brain tissue. This can result in brain damage or death of brain cells, known as infarction. Brain ischemia can be caused by various conditions such as thrombosis (blood clot formation), embolism (obstruction of a blood vessel by a foreign material), or hypoperfusion (reduced blood flow). The severity and duration of the ischemia determine the extent of brain damage. Symptoms can range from mild, such as transient ischemic attacks (TIAs or "mini-strokes"), to severe, including paralysis, speech difficulties, loss of consciousness, and even death. Immediate medical attention is required for proper diagnosis and treatment to prevent further damage and potential long-term complications.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

A blood vessel prosthesis is a medical device that is used as a substitute for a damaged or diseased natural blood vessel. It is typically made of synthetic materials such as polyester, Dacron, or ePTFE (expanded polytetrafluoroethylene) and is designed to mimic the function of a native blood vessel by allowing the flow of blood through it.

Blood vessel prostheses are used in various surgical procedures, including coronary artery bypass grafting, peripheral arterial reconstruction, and the creation of arteriovenous fistulas for dialysis access. The choice of material and size of the prosthesis depends on several factors, such as the location and diameter of the vessel being replaced, the patient's age and overall health status, and the surgeon's preference.

It is important to note that while blood vessel prostheses can be effective in restoring blood flow, they may also carry risks such as infection, thrombosis (blood clot formation), and graft failure over time. Therefore, careful patient selection, surgical technique, and postoperative management are crucial for the success of these procedures.

Cerebral angiography is a medical procedure that involves taking X-ray images of the blood vessels in the brain after injecting a contrast dye into them. This procedure helps doctors to diagnose and treat various conditions affecting the blood vessels in the brain, such as aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, and stenosis (narrowing of the blood vessels).

During the procedure, a catheter is inserted into an artery in the leg and threaded through the body to the blood vessels in the neck or brain. The contrast dye is then injected through the catheter, and X-ray images are taken to visualize the blood flow through the brain's blood vessels.

Cerebral angiography provides detailed images of the blood vessels in the brain, allowing doctors to identify any abnormalities or blockages that may be causing symptoms or increasing the risk of stroke. Based on the results of the cerebral angiography, doctors can develop a treatment plan to address these issues and prevent further complications.

Coronary balloon angioplasty is a minimally invasive medical procedure used to widen narrowed or obstructed coronary arteries (the blood vessels that supply oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle) and improve blood flow to the heart. This procedure is typically performed in conjunction with the insertion of a stent, a small mesh tube that helps keep the artery open.

During coronary balloon angioplasty, a thin, flexible catheter with a deflated balloon at its tip is inserted into a blood vessel, usually through a small incision in the groin or arm. The catheter is then guided to the narrowed or obstructed section of the coronary artery. Once in position, the balloon is inflated to compress the plaque against the artery wall and widen the lumen (the inner space) of the artery. This helps restore blood flow to the heart muscle.

The procedure is typically performed under local anesthesia and conscious sedation to minimize discomfort. Coronary balloon angioplasty is a relatively safe and effective treatment for many people with coronary artery disease, although complications such as bleeding, infection, or re-narrowing of the artery (restenosis) can occur in some cases.

The popliteal artery is the continuation of the femoral artery that passes through the popliteal fossa, which is the area behind the knee. It is the major blood vessel that supplies oxygenated blood to the lower leg and foot. The popliteal artery divides into the anterior tibial artery and the tibioperoneal trunk at the lower border of the popliteus muscle. Any damage or blockage to this artery can result in serious health complications, including reduced blood flow to the leg and foot, which may lead to pain, cramping, numbness, or even tissue death (gangrene) if left untreated.

Endovascular procedures are minimally invasive medical treatments that involve accessing and repairing blood vessels or other interior parts of the body through small incisions or punctures. These procedures typically use specialized catheters, wires, and other tools that are inserted into the body through an artery or vein, usually in the leg or arm.

Endovascular procedures can be used to treat a wide range of conditions, including aneurysms, atherosclerosis, peripheral artery disease, carotid artery stenosis, and other vascular disorders. Some common endovascular procedures include angioplasty, stenting, embolization, and thrombectomy.

The benefits of endovascular procedures over traditional open surgery include smaller incisions, reduced trauma to surrounding tissues, faster recovery times, and lower risks of complications such as infection and bleeding. However, endovascular procedures may not be appropriate for all patients or conditions, and careful evaluation and consideration are necessary to determine the best treatment approach.

Cardiac catheterization is a medical procedure used to diagnose and treat cardiovascular conditions. In this procedure, a thin, flexible tube called a catheter is inserted into a blood vessel in the arm or leg and threaded up to the heart. The catheter can be used to perform various diagnostic tests, such as measuring the pressure inside the heart chambers and assessing the function of the heart valves.

Cardiac catheterization can also be used to treat certain cardiovascular conditions, such as narrowed or blocked arteries. In these cases, a balloon or stent may be inserted through the catheter to open up the blood vessel and improve blood flow. This procedure is known as angioplasty or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

Cardiac catheterization is typically performed in a hospital cardiac catheterization laboratory by a team of healthcare professionals, including cardiologists, radiologists, and nurses. The procedure may be done under local anesthesia with sedation or general anesthesia, depending on the individual patient's needs and preferences.

Overall, cardiac catheterization is a valuable tool in the diagnosis and treatment of various heart conditions, and it can help improve symptoms, reduce complications, and prolong life for many patients.

Coronary angiography is a medical procedure that uses X-ray imaging to visualize the coronary arteries, which supply blood to the heart muscle. During the procedure, a thin, flexible catheter is inserted into an artery in the arm or groin and threaded through the blood vessels to the heart. A contrast dye is then injected through the catheter, and X-ray images are taken as the dye flows through the coronary arteries. These images can help doctors diagnose and treat various heart conditions, such as blockages or narrowing of the arteries, that can lead to chest pain or heart attacks. It is also known as coronary arteriography or cardiac catheterization.

Hemostatic disorders are medical conditions that affect the body's ability to stop bleeding (hemorrhage) after an injury or surgery. The hemostatic system includes blood vessels, platelets, and clotting factors that work together to form a clot and prevent further blood loss.

Disorders of hemostasis can be broadly classified into three categories:

1. Bleeding disorders: These are conditions in which the body is unable to form a clot or forms clots that are too weak, leading to excessive bleeding. Examples include hemophilia, von Willebrand disease, and platelet function disorders.
2. Thrombotic disorders: These are conditions in which the body forms clots that are too large or inappropriately located, leading to obstruction of blood flow. Examples include deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC).
3. Combined disorders: These are conditions in which both bleeding and thrombotic tendencies may be present, depending on the specific circumstances. Examples include antiphospholipid syndrome and thrombotic microangiopathies.

Hemostatic disorders can be inherited or acquired, and their diagnosis and management require a thorough understanding of the underlying pathophysiology and clinical context.

Pathological constriction refers to an abnormal narrowing or tightening of a body passage or organ, which can interfere with the normal flow of blood, air, or other substances through the area. This constriction can occur due to various reasons such as inflammation, scarring, or abnormal growths, and can affect different parts of the body, including blood vessels, airways, intestines, and ureters. Pathological constriction can lead to a range of symptoms and complications depending on its location and severity, and may require medical intervention to correct.

Angioplasty is a medical procedure used to open narrowed or blocked blood vessels, often referred to as coronary angioplasty when it involves the heart's blood vessels (coronary arteries). The term "angio" refers to an angiogram, which is a type of X-ray image that reveals the inside of blood vessels.

The procedure typically involves the following steps:

1. A thin, flexible catheter (tube) is inserted into a blood vessel, usually through a small incision in the groin or arm.
2. The catheter is guided to the narrowed or blocked area using real-time X-ray imaging.
3. Once in place, a tiny balloon attached to the tip of the catheter is inflated to widen the blood vessel and compress any plaque buildup against the artery walls.
4. A stent (a small mesh tube) may be inserted to help keep the blood vessel open and prevent it from narrowing again.
5. The balloon is deflated, and the catheter is removed.

Angioplasty helps improve blood flow, reduce symptoms such as chest pain or shortness of breath, and lower the risk of heart attack in patients with blocked arteries. It's important to note that angioplasty is not a permanent solution for coronary artery disease, and lifestyle changes, medications, and follow-up care are necessary to maintain long-term cardiovascular health.

Mechanical thrombectomy, or simply thrombectomy, is the removal of a blood clot (thrombus) from a blood vessel, often and ... Open vascular surgery versions of thrombectomy also exist. The effectiveness of thrombectomy for strokes was confirmed in ... 42% of thrombectomy units only operated during office hours and Monday to Friday, largely due to a shortage of ... These trials showed that mechanical thrombectomy is a safe and effective treatment for individuals who have an acute ischemic ...
Mechanical thrombectomies can be surgical (surgical thrombectomy) or percutaneous (percutaneous thrombectomy). Surgical ... A pulmonary thrombectomy is an emergency surgical procedure used to remove blood clots from the pulmonary arteries. ... Pulmonary thrombectomies and pulmonary thromboendarterectomies (PTEs) are both operations that remove thrombus. Aside from this ... PTEs are done on a nonemergency basis while pulmonary thrombectomies are typically done as an emergency procedure. PTEs ...
For example, the drug tPA and mechanical thrombectomy devices all target the occlusion which is at the top of the chain of ... Pairing cerebroprotective drugs with approved methods to restore blood flow, such as tPA or mechanical thrombectomy, may ... Munich SA, Vakharia K, Levy EI (July 2019). "Overview of Mechanical Thrombectomy Techniques". Neurosurgery. 85 (suppl_1): S60- ... to have salvageable tissue have been used to great effect in clinical trials that showed the benefit of mechanical thrombectomy ...
Costalat, Doctor (13 October 2021) [13 October 2021]. "SLICE Worldwide 2021 - Failed Thrombectomy". Master & Fellows.{{cite web ...
Thrombectomy is the removal of thrombi (blood clots). Thymectomy is the surgical removal of the thymus gland. Thyroidectomy is ...
Imaging of clot porosity prior to endovascular thrombectomy. Cerebral Large Artery Disease Posters, poster presentation at ... or have contra-indications for intravenous thrombolysis can still be eligible for endovascular thrombectomy only. Even with ... of the proximal anterior intracranial circulation consists of intravenous thrombolysis followed by endovascular thrombectomy ...
... percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy and thrombolytic therapies". American Journal of Therapeutics. 21 (2): 131-6. doi:10.1097/ ...
This term may also apply to pulmonary thrombectomy. Trendelenburg position, in which the patient is placed on a bed which is ...
Thrombectomy involves using a device to remove the clot directly. The goal of endovascular therapy is to revascularize an ... Thrombolysis and thrombectomy: The body forms blood clots as a natural protective mechanism against bleeding. However, when ... These procedures are referred to as mechanical thrombectomy or thrombolysis, and several factors are considered before the ... Vascular interventional radiologists may use thrombectomy devices or clot dissolving medications to remove or dissolve the clot ...
This may be surgical thrombectomy or catheter-directed thrombolysis.[citation needed] Phlegmasia alba dolens literally means " ...
"Q&A: The benefits and technology behind mechanical thrombectomy". Med-Tech Innovation. 2021-02-22. Retrieved 2021-10-01. " ...
Balloon thrombectomy using a Fogarty catheter may also be used. In the arms, balloon thrombectomy is an effective treatment for ... In the legs, below the inguinal ligament, percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy is a rapid and effective way of removing ... "Percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy in the treatment of lower extremity thromboembolic occlusions". Diagnostic and ...
"Video-assisted cardioscopy for left ventricular thrombectomy in a child". The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 66 (1): 248-50. doi: ...
It's about time." Thrombectomy is currently recommended by the guidelines written by the main American (AHA/ASA) and European ( ... "Stent-Retriever Thrombectomy after Intravenous t-PA vs. t-PA Alone in Stroke". New England Journal of Medicine. 372 (24): 2285- ... "Thrombectomy within 8 Hours after Symptom Onset in Ischemic Stroke". New England Journal of Medicine. 372 (24): 2296-2306. doi: ... regarding the role of mechanical thrombectomy in the treatment of ischemic stroke, demonstrating that if it is performed in ...
"Thrombectomy as Pathogenetic Therapy of the Superior Mesenteric Artery Thrombosis". Клінічна анатомія та оперативна хірургія. ...
... a Thrombectomy-Capable Stroke Center (TCSC) must be able to perform a surgical thrombectomy. According to Johns Hopkins ... Comprehensive Stroke Center "Surgical Thrombectomy". Johns Hopkins Medicine. The Johns Hopkins University (The Johns Hopkins ... comprehensive stroke center thrombectomy-capable stroke center primary stroke center acute stroke-ready hospital The Stroke ... Thrombectomy-Capable Stroke Certification, and Comprehensive Stroke Certification to qualifying hospitals. "A Summary of ...
1, 2003 Oğuzkurt L, Ozkan U, Gümüş B, Coşkun I, Koca N, Gülcan O (March 2010). "Percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy in the ... It usually involves removal of thrombi (blood clots), and is then referred to as thromboembolectomy or thrombectomy. ... Goyal, Mayank (Apr 2016). "Endovascular thrombectomy after large-vessel ischaemic stroke: a meta-analysis of individual patient ... Mistry EA (26 July 2017). "Mechanical Thrombectomy Outcomes With and Without Intravenous Thrombolysis in Stroke Patients: A ...
There are also surgical procedures for removal of a thrombus (thrombectomy). The rate of LVT formation after AMI is thought to ...
DENSFORD, FINK (2018). "Penumbra acquires 90% interest in MVI Health JV, launches thrombectomy devices". Mass Device. "Penumbra ...
Norwich is to be equipped to perform thrombectomies. In September 2020 Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation ...
Baldock handed a petition of 4,147 names to Health Secretary Jeane Freeman requesting restoration of thrombectomy as an option ... "Chest Heart & Stroke Scotland call on Scottish Government to Bring Back Thrombectomy". Chest Heart & Stroke Scotland. Retrieved ... and the local newspaper front-page after Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon confirmed that the life-saving thrombectomy ...
Lin, P.H. (2010). "Catheter-directed thrombectomy and thrombolysis for symptomatic lower-extremity deep vein thrombosis". ...
Reimer, S. B. (2006). "Use of rheolytic thrombectomy in the treatment of feline distal aortic thromboembolism". Journal of ... thrombectomy), as long established in human medicine for occlusive diseases such as cerebral infarction or myocardial ...
Mistry EA, Mistry AM, Nakawah MO, Chitale RV, James RF, Volpi JJ, Fusco MR (September 2017). "Mechanical Thrombectomy Outcomes ... Alteplase used in conjunction with mechanical thrombectomy is associated with better outcomes. As of 2019, alteplase is the ... People with an acute ischemic stroke may also receive other therapies including mechanical thrombectomy. Given that alteplase ...
2008). "Mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke: final results of the Multi MERCI trial". Stroke. 39 (4): 1205-12. ... Flint AC, Duckwiler GR, Budzik RF, Liebeskind DS, Smith WS (2007). "Mechanical thrombectomy of intracranial internal carotid ... Smith WS (June 1, 2006). "Safety of mechanical thrombectomy and intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in acute ischemic ... thrombectomy). The more rapidly blood flow is restored to the brain, the fewer brain cells die. In increasing numbers of ...
Phlegmasia cerulea dolens might be treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis and/or thrombectomy. In DVT in the arm, the ... Catheter-directed thrombolysis with thrombectomy against iliofemoral DVT has been associated with a reduction in the severity ... "NICE Interventional procedures guidance 651: Percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy for acute deep vein thrombosis of the leg" ... A mechanical thrombectomy device can remove DVT clots, particularly in acute iliofemoral DVT (DVT of the major veins in the ...
Drapanas, T; Curran, WL (1966). "Thrombectomy in the treatment of "effort" thrombosis of the axillary and subclavian veins". ... Some have also recommended thrombolysis with catheter directed alteplase or mechanical thrombectomy with a large bore catheter ...
June 2015). "Stent-Retriever Thrombectomy after Intravenous t-PA vs. t-PA Alone in Stroke" (PDF). New England Journal of ... He collaborated on major studies that defined the current indications for mechanical thrombectomy for the treatment of acute ... Lopes also conducted research on the efficacy and safety of endovascular thrombectomy in 2018. In July 2018, Lopes joined ... "Stent-retriever thrombectomy after intravenous t-PA vs. t-PA alone in stroke" (PDF). N Engl J Med. 372 (24): 2285-95. doi: ...
"Safety and Efficacy of a 3-Dimensional Stent Retriever With Aspiration-Based Thrombectomy vs Aspiration-Based Thrombectomy ... A partial list of articles is provided below: Thrombectomy 6 to 24 Hours after Stroke with Mismatch between Deficit and Infarct ... April 23, 2016). "Endovascular thrombectomy after large-vessel ischaemic stroke: a meta-analysis of individual patient data ... Safety and Efficacy of a 3-Dimensional Stent Retriever With Aspiration-Based Thrombectomy vs Aspiration-Based Thrombectomy ...
Mistry EA (2017). "Mechanical Thrombectomy Outcomes With and Without Intravenous Thrombolysis in Stroke Patients: A Meta- ...
Mechanical thrombectomy, or simply thrombectomy, is the removal of a blood clot (thrombus) from a blood vessel, often and ... Open vascular surgery versions of thrombectomy also exist. The effectiveness of thrombectomy for strokes was confirmed in ... 42% of thrombectomy units only operated during office hours and Monday to Friday, largely due to a shortage of ... These trials showed that mechanical thrombectomy is a safe and effective treatment for individuals who have an acute ischemic ...
Treatment of acute PE with the Inari thrombectomy catheter rapidly, safely boosted hemodynamics in the FLASH registry study ... Thrombectomy catheters of varying designs are available for removing the clots causing PE, but its an interventional arena ... "Thats exactly why this mechanical thrombectomy presents an advantage." Also, Toma said, "a third of the patients wouldnt even ... Cite this: Positive Data on Thrombectomy Catheter That Avoids Thrombolytics in Acute PE - Medscape - Sep 23, 2022. ...
Advanced imaging techniques, the management of extremely debilitated patients with a host of hypercoagulable risk factors, and the growing use of indwelling catheters and medical devices will likely increase the number veterinary patients identified with clinically detectable thrombosis. While many of these patients will not require intervention for these problems, a growing proportion will as the underlying disease processes are now being better managed. The most common underlying diseases to investigate in a complete evaluation include cardiac, endocrine, inflammatory, hepatic, renal, and neoplastic processes. In addition, idiopathic thrombosis can also occur when an underlying condition is not identified. The complete diagnostic work-up for a patient with thrombosis is beyond the scope of this lecture, which will focus primarily on interventional management options when the clinician feels they are indicated. Standards-of-care have not yet been determined or evaluated in veterinary patients ...
Philips expands peripheral vascular disease portfolio with the QuickClear mechanical thrombectomy system for blood clot removal ... Powerfully simple thrombectomy solution provides physicians with an all-in-one, single-use aspiration catheter and pump system ... "This novel thrombectomy system is the latest addition to Philips market-leading portfolio for the diagnosis and treatment of ... The Philips QuickClear Mechanical Thrombectomy System is U.S. FDA 510(k) cleared and available for sale in the U.S., with ...
Vetex Medical won FDA clearance for its ReVene Thrombectomy Catheter, for dual-action clot removal in a single session with no ... Vetex Medical Receives FDA Clearance for Revene Thrombectomy Catheter Patented Dynamic Cage Technology Designed to Predictably ... The median thrombectomy time was only 23 minutes, and as short as three minutes. In 89 percent of cases, no thrombolytics were ... The ReVene Thrombectomy Catheter is the companys first innovation in a range of products specifically engineered for use in ...
... thrombectomy-capable] sites. And certainly thrombolytics are critical at those hospitals where transfer to thrombectomy center ... Dont Ditch the tPA in Stroke Thrombectomy Yet. - Direct endovascular therapy dealt a blow in MR CLEAN-NO IV. by Nicole Lou, ... Outcomes after stroke thrombectomy were not better with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) withheld, according to the MR CLEAN- ... Investigators randomized 547 people, all tPA- and EVT-eligible, to IV alteplase followed by EVT (0.9 mg/kg) or thrombectomy ...
PAD Thrombectomy System Checks Out for Safety, Efficacy. - No device-related adverse events in small arterial occlusion trial. ... The Indigo thrombectomy system safely revascularized peripheral and visceral arterial occlusions, according to final results ... Source Reference: Teigen C, et al "Penumbra/Indigo System provides a novel aspiration thrombectomy tool in treatment of ...
Mechanical thrombectomy system Find similar products The QuickClear mechanical thrombectomy system is a simple solution that ...
Download the citation for this article by clicking on one of the following citation managers:. ...
The global thrombectomy devices market is estimated to reach USD 1.45 billion by 2022; growing at a CAGR of 6.7% during the ... HOME › Press Releases › Thrombectomy Devices Market worth $1.45 Billion by 2022 Thrombectomy Devices Market worth $1.45 Billion ... The report "Thrombectomy Devices Market by Type (Hydrodynamic, Ultrasound, Aspiration, Mechanical Thrombectomy), Application ( ... and ultrasonic thrombectomy devices. The mechanical/fragmentation thrombectomy devices segment accounted for the largest share ...
... an operation called thrombectomy saved his life. But this was only available because his stroke happened on holiday. ... Thrombectomy must be available in Scotland. The care for stroke survivors in Scotland used to be considered one of the best in ... Without thrombectomy treatment, Norrie may have been paralysed for life and left unable to speak. Our family is one of the ... I welcome the movement towards a thrombectomy service in Scotland but it must be available to everyone who needs it as a matter ...
Help support Wordnik (and make this page ad-free) by adopting the word thrombectomies. ...
Interpretation: Mechanical thrombectomy combined with standard intravenous thrombolysis improves functional independence in ... We aimed to determine whether mechanical thrombectomy in addition to intravenous thrombolysis improves clinical outcome in ... had to be started within 4 h and thrombectomy within 5 h of symptom onset. Occlusions had to be confirmed by CT or magnetic ... Common adverse events related to thrombectomy were vasospasm (33 [23%] patients) and embolisation in a new territory (nine [6 ...
Home » Documents » Stroke Thrombectomy Microguide Summary Nov 2019. ...
AngioJet Peripheral Thrombectomy System for venous use with AngioJet ZelanteDVT thrombectomy catheter specifically designed to ... Products Thrombectomy Systems AngioJet™ Ultra Peripheral Thrombectomy System Venous AngioJet™ Peripheral Thrombectomy Catheter ... DVT Thrombectomy. ZelanteDVT Catheter. The AngioJet ZelanteDVT thrombectomy catheter is specifically designed to treat deep ... AV Access Thrombectomy. Thrombus narrowing or restricting flow within AV access fistulas and grafts can prevent a patient from ...
Operative note states, e.g., "Attempted mechanical thrombectomy of M1 occlusion, S/P unsuccessful mechanical thrombectomy. ... If a mechanical thrombectomy procedure was attempted and down coded to the root ICD-10-PCS Principal or Other Procedure Code ... Refer to Appendix A, Table 8.1c Thrombectomy Root Procedures for examples of acceptable ICD-10-PCS procedure codes. Patients ... Was a mechanical thrombectomy procedure attempted but unsuccessful or aborted before removal of the LVO?. ...
... the neurovascular thrombectomy devices market in Greece was valued at 0.20 in 2022 ... Neurovascular thrombectomy devices are used for the removal of a blood clot in the neurovascular vessels during an acute ... The neurovascular thrombectomy devices market in Greece can expand or contract due to a variety of reasons including population ... Neurovascular thrombectomy devices market in Greece: market size trends. Brought to you by ...
Stroke thrombectomy, also known as mechanical thrombectomy, can help reverse paralysis from stroke in more than 60% of patients ... Mission Thrombectomy 2020 Aims to Help Reduce Disability from Stroke. Nov 22, 2016 , Stroke , 0 , ... "Mission Thrombectomy 2020 advances the overall mission of SVIN of innovation to improve outcomes of the largest number of ... "In 2015, mechanical thrombectomy was definitively proven to be enormously beneficial in reversing stroke disability and become ...
Penumbra has obtained CE Mark for its Indigo Aspiration System with Lightning 7 and Lightning 12 mechanical thrombectomy ... Penumbra obtains CE Mark for mechanical thrombectomy technologies. Lightning intelligent aspiration can distinguish between ... Penumbra has obtained CE Mark for its Indigo Aspiration System with Lightning 7 and Lightning 12 mechanical thrombectomy ...
A Meta-Analysis of Prognostic Factors in Patients with Posterior Circulation Stroke after Mechanical Thrombectomy ... After mechanical thrombectomy (MT), the recanalization rate of posterior circulation obstruction is significantly increased, ... A Meta-Analysis of Prognostic Factors in Patients with Posterior Circulation Stroke after Mechanical Thrombectomy. Cerebrovasc ...
... detection software for acute stroke triage can improve endovascular thrombectomy treatment times, according to new research ... Prompt endovascular thrombectomy-a minimally invasive surgical procedure involving the removal of a blood clot from a blocked ... Study shows AI software improves endovascular thrombectomy treatment times for stroke patients. by University of Texas Health ... More information: Youngran Kim et al, Automated large vessel occlusion detection software and thrombectomy treatment times: A ...
The value of intra-arterial thrombolytics as a potential therapy for incomplete reperfusions after mechanical thrombectomy ... Partial (SAVE) versus Complete (Solumbra) Stent Retriever Retraction Technique for Mechanical Thrombectomy: A Randomized In ... who had undergone mechanical thrombectomy and had incomplete reperfusion (expanded TICI 2a-2c) and available 24 hour perfusion ... and lower rates of new infarction in the residually hypoperfused territory after mechanical thrombectomy (adjusted OR = 0.3; 95 ...
These cookies are strictly necessary to provide you with services available through our website and to use some of its features.. Because these cookies are strictly necessary to deliver the website, refusing them will have impact how our site functions. You always can block or delete cookies by changing your browser settings and force blocking all cookies on this website. But this will always prompt you to accept/refuse cookies when revisiting our site.. We fully respect if you want to refuse cookies but to avoid asking you again and again kindly allow us to store a cookie for that. You are free to opt out any time or opt in for other cookies to get a better experience. If you refuse cookies we will remove all set cookies in our domain.. We provide you with a list of stored cookies on your computer in our domain so you can check what we stored. Due to security reasons we are not able to show or modify cookies from other domains. You can check these in your browser security settings.. ...
Table 32: Thrombectomy Procedures, South Korea, 2015-2020. Table 33: Thrombectomy Procedures, South Korea, 2021-2025. Table 34 ... Table 8: Thrombectomy Procedures, Australia, 2015-2020. Table 9: Thrombectomy Procedures, Australia, 2021-2025. Table 10: Clot ... Table 14: Thrombectomy Procedures, China, 2015-2020. Table 15: Thrombectomy Procedures, China, 2021-2025. Table 16: Clot ... Table 20: Thrombectomy Procedures, India, 2015-2020. Table 21: Thrombectomy Procedures, India, 2021-2025. Table 22: Clot ...
The balloon-assisted tracking technique was effective in traversing the step-off to enable TICI 3 aspiration thrombectomy. This ... Balloon-assisted tracking technique to overcome intracranial stenosis during thrombectomy for stroke ... Balloon-assisted tracking technique to overcome intracranial stenosis during thrombectomy for stroke ... obstacles such as an intracranial stenosis in stroke are challenging and may lead to delayed clot access for thrombectomy. We ...
Latest Results on Catheter Assisted Thrombolysis and Thrombectomy for Submassive and Massive PE * ...
Intra-arterial (IA) thrombectomy techniques, particularly stent-retriever devices, have much higher recanalisation rates. IA ... Intra-arterial thrombectomy improves functional outcome when administered up to 6 h after stroke ... Intra-arterial thrombectomy improves functional outcome when administered up to 6 h after stroke ...
The Penumbra System is a fully-integrated system designed specifically for mechanical thrombectomy, ... The Penumbra System™ is a fully-integrated system designed specifically for mechanical thrombectomy, first receiving 510(k) ...
Penumbras Indigo Aspiration System, launched in 2014, is designed to remove clot from arteries and veins in the peripheral vasculature, and for the treatment of pulmonary embolism.
  • Mechanical thrombectomy, or simply thrombectomy, is the removal of a blood clot (thrombus) from a blood vessel, often and especially endovascularly as an interventional radiology procedure called endovascular thrombectomy (EVT). (wikipedia.org)
  • The implementation of artificial intelligence-powered large vessel occlusion (LVO) detection software for acute stroke triage can improve endovascular thrombectomy treatment times, according to new research from University of Texas Health Houston. (medicalxpress.com)
  • The benefit of endovascular thrombectomy on functional recovery is time-sensitive, so early identification of patients with strokes with large vessel occlusions, and process improvements to accelerate in-hospital care, are critical," Kim said. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Objective: Recent randomised controlled trials demonstrated the benefit of intracranial endovascular thrombectomy (EVT) in acute ischaemic stroke. (lu.se)
  • Background: Data on outcome of endovascular treatment in patients with acute ischaemic stroke due to large vessel occlusion suffering from intravenous thrombolysis-associated intracranial haemorrhage prior to mechanical thrombectomy remain scarce. (uni-koeln.de)
  • and SELECT 2 ) have shown that patients with large core infarcts can still benefit from endovascular thrombectomy. (mdedge.com)
  • Endovascular thrombectomy (EVT) has emerged as one of the most important treatment strategies for acute stroke patients with large-vessel occlusion. (j-stroke.org)
  • Two new clinical trials - DAWN and DEFUSE 3 - showing large benefits of removing the clot with endovascular intervention in selected patients with ischemic stroke presenting after 6 hours look set to revolutionize the field, substantially expanding the pool of patients eligible for thrombectomy and allowing many more patients experiencing large strokes to achieve good outcomes. (medscape.com)
  • Surgical thrombectomy followed by intraoperative endovascular reconstruction for symptomatic ilio-femoral venous thrombosis // Eur. (cesurg.ru)
  • A comprehensive assessment of cerebral collaterals using the CCC model is strongly associated with edema growth and functional independence in acute stroke patients successfully treated by endovascular thrombectomy . (bvsalud.org)
  • Amsterdam, the Netherlands - Royal Philips (NYSE: PHG, AEX: PHIA), a global leader in health technology, today announced the launch of the innovative QuickClear mechanical thrombectomy system. (philips.com)
  • The Philips QuickClear Mechanical Thrombectomy System has received U.S. FDA 510(k) clearance and is available for sale in the U.S. (philips.com)
  • QuickClear is a simple and easy to use mechanical thrombectomy system," said Bryan Fisher, MD, Chief of Vascular Surgery, Tristar Centennial Medical Center, Nashville, U.S. "The system is significantly smaller than other systems without compromising aspiration power. (philips.com)
  • The QuickClear mechanical thrombectomy system is a simple solution that provides an all-in-one, single-use aspiration pump and catheter for peripheral arterial and venous cases. (philips.com)
  • Patients aged 18-80 years with acute ischaemic stroke and proximal cerebral artery occlusion were randomly assigned to receive either intravenous thrombolysis alone (IVT group) or intravenous thrombolysis plus mechanical thrombectomy (IVTMT group). (nih.gov)
  • Documentation demonstrates that a mechanical thrombectomy procedure was attempted to remove a large vessel cerebral occlusion (LVO) but was unsuccessful and/or aborted. (jointcommission.org)
  • Attempted mechanical thrombectomy of M1 occlusion, S/P unsuccessful mechanical thrombectomy. (jointcommission.org)
  • Youngran Kim et al, Automated large vessel occlusion detection software and thrombectomy treatment times: A cluster randomized clinical trial, JAMA Neurology (2023). (medicalxpress.com)
  • BACKGROUND: Recent clinical trials demonstrated the efficacy of thrombectomy for ischemic stroke against acute large vessel occlusion (LVO). (minervamedica.it)
  • Methods: A retrospective analysis of consecutive acute ischaemic stroke patients treated with mechanical thrombectomy due to large vessel occlusion despite the pre-interventional occurrence of intravenous thrombolysis-associated intracranial haemorrhage was performed at five tertiary care centres between January 2010-September 2020. (uni-koeln.de)
  • 1 Given the recent paradigm shift in the treatment of acute IS and large vessel occlusion (LVO), the number of patients ≥80 years old receiving mechanical thrombectomy (MT) will grow in the upcoming years. (neurology.org)
  • The study included 300 stroke patients with anterior circulation large‐vessel occlusion (NIHSS of 6 or more) with a large‐core infarction (investigator read ASPECTS Score 2-5), selected on the basis of noncontrast CT scan, who were randomized to undergo intra-arterial thrombectomy or best medical management (control) up to 24 hours from last known well. (mdedge.com)
  • Data from the TOPMOST study suggest that mechanical thrombectomy (MT) for posterior circulation is a safe and feasible therapy option for patients that experienced stroke attributed to primary distal medium vessel occlusion (DMVO) of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) of the P2 or P3 segment when compared to standard medical treatment (SMT) with or without intravenous thrombectomy (IVT). (neurologylive.com)
  • GALWAY, Ireland--( BUSINESS WIRE )-- Vetex Medical Ltd. today announced U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance for the ReVene® Thrombectomy Catheter . (businesswire.com)
  • The ReVene Thrombectomy Catheter is the company's first innovation in a range of products specifically engineered for use in the treatment of venous disease. (businesswire.com)
  • Vetex Medical won FDA clearance for its ReVene Thrombectomy Catheter, for dual-action clot removal in a single session with no thrombolytics required. (businesswire.com)
  • The AngioJet ZelanteDVT thrombectomy catheter is specifically designed to treat deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in large-diameter upper and lower peripheral veins ≥ 6 mm. (bostonscientific.com)
  • ZelanteDVT is the most powerful thrombectomy catheter in the market-leading AngioJet portfolio. (bostonscientific.com)
  • We describe a simple and effective technique to overcome the step-off between the intermediate catheter and an intracranial vessel stenosis during thrombectomy. (bmj.com)
  • Randomized Controlled Trial of Mechanical Thrombectomy vs Catheter-Dir" by Carin F. Gonsalves, C Michael Gibson et al. (jefferson.edu)
  • METHODS: The PEERLESS study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT05111613) is a currently enrolling multinational RCT comparing large-bore mechanical thrombectomy (MT) with the FlowTriever System (Inari Medical, Irvine, CA) vs catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT). (jefferson.edu)
  • Percutaneous transcatheter treatment of patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) consists of thrombus removal with catheter-directed thrombolysis, mechanical thrombectomy, angioplasty, and/or stenting of venous obstructions. (medscape.com)
  • Spurred primarily by advances in catheter technology as well as the thrombectomy device itself, we are now able to achieve higher recanalization rates than ever before. (bmj.com)
  • 10 patients received a venous hybrid operation comprising balloon-catheter thrombectomy and stenting of residual stenosis of iliac vein. (cesurg.ru)
  • On the basis of type, the global thrombectomy devices market is segmented into aspiration, mechanical/fragmentation, rheolytic/hydrodynamic, and ultrasonic thrombectomy devices. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • On the basis of application, the global thrombectomy devices market is segmented into neurovascular, cardiovascular, and peripheral vascular applications. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • On the basis of end users, the global thrombectomy devices market is segmented into hospitals & surgical centers, ambulatory surgical centers, research laboratories & academic institutes, and other end users. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • The global Thrombectomy Devices market was valued at 107.44 Million USD in 2021 and will grow with a CAGR of 5.41% from 2021 to 2027, based on researcher'snewly published report. (industryresearch.biz)
  • These trials showed that mechanical thrombectomy is a safe and effective treatment for individuals who have an acute ischemic stroke, even (in some cases) out to 24 hours after symptom onset. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neurovascular thrombectomy devices are used for the removal of a blood clot in the neurovascular vessels during an acute ischemic stroke. (medicaldevice-network.com)
  • Although not quite meeting its primary endpoint, a new trial (TESLA) has added to evidence suggesting that patients with large ischemic strokes who have a significant amount of brain tissue damage may still benefit from thrombectomy. (mdedge.com)
  • Since its approval in 1995, the administration of systemic intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the only FDA-approved treatment modality for acute ischemic stroke, 1 , 2 despite rapid advances in thrombectomy devices. (bmj.com)
  • We determined whether a comprehensive assessment of cerebral collateral blood flow is associated with ischemic lesion edema growth in patients successfully treated by thrombectomy . (bvsalud.org)
  • This was a multicenter retrospective study of ischemic stroke patients who underwent thrombectomy treatment of large vessel occlusions. (bvsalud.org)
  • After mechanical thrombectomy (MT), the recanalization rate of posterior circulation obstruction is significantly increased, but prognosis remains poor. (karger.com)
  • 5 Intra-arterial techniques were attempted to treat large vessel occlusions, initially using urokinase and prourokinase as described in the PROACT I and II trials, 6 , 7 which was followed by the development of devices designed for intra-arterial thrombectomy and thromboaspiration. (bmj.com)
  • Stent-Retriever Thrombectomy after Intravenous t-PA vs. t-PA Alone in Stroke" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • We aimed to determine whether mechanical thrombectomy in addition to intravenous thrombolysis improves clinical outcome in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. (nih.gov)
  • Intravenous thrombolysis (alteplase 0·9 mg/kg [maximum 90 mg], with an initial bolus of 10% of the total dose followed by infusion of the remaining dose over 60 min) had to be started within 4 h and thrombectomy within 5 h of symptom onset. (nih.gov)
  • Mechanical thrombectomy combined with standard intravenous thrombolysis improves functional independence in patients with acute cerebral ischaemia, with no evidence of increased mortality. (nih.gov)
  • Conclusion: Mechanical thrombectomy in patients with intravenous thrombolysis-associated intracranial haemorrhage is technically feasible. (uni-koeln.de)
  • The AngioJet™ Thrombectomy System provides the power and flexibility to remove venous thrombus and restore flow in the most challenging of DVT cases. (bostonscientific.com)
  • L'incidence du thrombus intraventriculaire gauche est relativement faible en absence d'une cardiopathie hypokinétique sévère avec altération de la fraction d'éjection. (bvsalud.org)
  • Nous rapportant le cas d'un homme de 37 ans infecté par le SARS-CoV-2 présentant un thrombus intraventriculaire gauche en absence de cardiopathie connue. (bvsalud.org)
  • The Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology (SVIN) launches Mission Thrombectomy 2020, an initiative to help increase the practice of stroke thrombectomy among eligible patients and reduce the global rate of stroke disability. (rehabpub.com)
  • Mission Thrombectomy 2020 advances the overall mission of SVIN of innovation to improve outcomes of the largest number of stroke patients all over the world," says Raul Nogueira, MD, President of SVIN. (rehabpub.com)
  • In 2015, the results of five trials from different countries were published in the New England Journal of Medicine, demonstrating the safety and efficacy of mechanical thrombectomy with stent-retrievers in improving outcomes and reducing mortality for patients who present within six hours from their time last known well. (wikipedia.org)
  • This large share is attributed to the ongoing commercialization of mechanical thrombectomy products, favorable reimbursement scenario, established therapeutic efficacy, growing market demand for stent retrievers among medical professionals, and rising end-user preference for minimally invasive thrombectomy procedures. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • Several secondary efficacy endpoints also showed suggestions of benefits with thrombectomy. (mdedge.com)
  • citation needed] Direct aspiration has not been studied as thoroughly as stent-retriever thrombectomy, but it is still widely performed because of its relative simplicity and low cost. (wikipedia.org)
  • Intra-arterial (IA) thrombectomy techniques, particularly stent-retriever devices, have much higher recanalisation rates. (bmj.com)
  • In 2015, mechanical thrombectomy was definitively proven to be enormously beneficial in reversing stroke disability and become standard of care for stroke patients with blockage of one of the main brain arteries. (rehabpub.com)
  • SVIN has set an ambitious worldwide goal to treat every eligible stroke patients emergently with mechanical thrombectomy, but this can only be achieved if we maximize access to hospitals with mechanical thrombectomy capability of severe stroke with within 6 hours of their symptoms," he adds, in the release. (rehabpub.com)
  • The hospital is one of a few community hospitals capable of performing lifesaving thrombectomy procedures for stroke patients. (mountainsidehosp.com)
  • Anatomical vessel obstacles such as an intracranial stenosis in stroke are challenging and may lead to delayed clot access for thrombectomy. (bmj.com)
  • citation needed] Patients in London who suffered stroke were found to be much more likely to get thrombectomy in 2022 than those in other parts of England. (wikipedia.org)
  • Six-month outcomes from the VETEX clinical study of acute iliofemoral DVT patients, the majority of whom had severe disease with chronic clot noted during thrombectomy, showed significant improvements in symptoms, leg swelling and quality of life, with no device-related adverse events or major bleeding reported. (businesswire.com)
  • Thus, [I] don't see much evidence to change current practice of IV thrombolytics prior to EVT for patients who come directly to [thrombectomy-capable] sites. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Patients with ICD-10-PCS procedure codes on Table 8.1c Thrombectomy Root Procedures, if medical record documentation states that the mechanical thrombectomy procedure was attempted but unsuccessful or aborted before removal of the LVO. (jointcommission.org)
  • Stroke thrombectomy, also known as mechanical thrombectomy, can help reverse paralysis from stroke in more than 60% of patients if performed within 6 hours of stroke symptoms, according to a media release from Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology. (rehabpub.com)
  • Critically, implementation of automated LVO detection software led to patients experiencing, on average, a statistically significant reduction of 11 minutes in time to thrombectomy initiation. (medicalxpress.com)
  • And a new meta-analysis (MAGNA) of previous studies in a similar population has provided more detailed estimates of the treatment benefit of thrombectomy in these patients. (mdedge.com)
  • The TESLA trial, which included patients with large-core infarcts (ASPECTS score 2-5) within 24 hours of symptom onset, showed encouraging trends towards a benefit with thrombectomy for the primary outcome of 90-day utility-weighted scores on the modified Rankin scale (mRS), but this did not reach the prespecified Bayesian superiority threshold. (mdedge.com)
  • However, our results suggest that when using noncontrast CT only to select patients, the gain or treatment effect of thrombectomy seems to be smaller than when using sophisticated advanced imaging to make the decision to go for thrombectomy or not as in the other trials," he added. (mdedge.com)
  • A separate analysis in a population of patients selected by core-lab read noncontrast CT scan, showed a Bayesian probability of benefit with thrombectomy of 0.98, "similar" to one-sided P value of .02. (mdedge.com)
  • and a good functional outcome (mRS 0-3) was achieved in 30% of thrombectomy patients vs. 20% of those in the control group ( P = .03). (mdedge.com)
  • Major neurological improvement (NIHSS scale of 0-2 or improvement of 8 points or more) occurred in 26% of thrombectomy patients vs. 13% of controls ( P = .0008). (mdedge.com)
  • To identify exactly which patients are now eligible for late thrombectomy, the patients enrolled into DAWN and DEFUSE 3 have to be considered. (medscape.com)
  • The prospective cohort study included 65 patients, who underwent transfemoral venous thrombectomy (VT) in acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis. (cesurg.ru)
  • The effectiveness of thrombectomy for strokes was confirmed in several randomised clinical trials conducted at various medical centers throughout the United States, as reported in a seminal multistudy report in 2015. (wikipedia.org)
  • During the same ISC session, the SHRINE study, which pooled individual patient-level data from the DEVT and SKIP trials, was shown to have come close but ultimately failed to demonstrate noninferiority of direct thrombectomy over the bridging strategy. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Thrombectomy catheters of varying designs are available for removing the clots causing PE, but it's an interventional arena with scant randomized trial data for guidance. (medscape.com)
  • Teigen C, et al "Penumbra/Indigo System provides a novel aspiration thrombectomy tool in treatment of peripheral and visceral arterial occlusions -- final results of the PRISM trial" SIR 2016. (medpagetoday.com)
  • The mechanical/fragmentation thrombectomy devices segment accounted for the largest share of the market in 2016. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • In addition to updating necessary policies, conducting patient education, and completing physician and team member education, the hospital partnered with local emergency medical services (EMS) for "Code Stroke" drills, an exercise that simulates a patient's stroke journey from EMS response following a 9-1-1 call, to the hospital's Emergency Department and the patient's admission to the interventional catheterization lab for thrombectomy treatment. (mountainsidehosp.com)
  • The highest CAGR of the ambulatory surgical centers segment is mainly attributed to increasing availability of reimbursement for thrombectomy procedures in outpatient settings, ongoing advancements in minimally invasive surgical techniques, increasing number of image-guided surgeries performed at ASCs, and rising market demand for miniaturized therapeutic devices. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • Healthcare company Penumbra has obtained CE Mark for its Indigo Aspiration System with Lightning 7 and Lightning 12 mechanical thrombectomy technologies. (medicaldevice-network.com)
  • The Penumbra System ™ is a fully-integrated system designed specifically for mechanical thrombectomy, first receiving 510(k) clearance by the FDA in December 2007. (penumbrainc.com)
  • We review the critical advancements in thrombectomy technique that have evolved and the key anatomic and technical challenges they address, from first-generation Merci retrieval systems to second-generation Penumbra aspiration systems and third-generation stent retrievers, as well as nuances of their uses to maximize their effectiveness. (bmj.com)
  • Outcomes after stroke thrombectomy were not better with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) withheld, according to the MR CLEAN-NO IV trial. (medpagetoday.com)
  • The Indigo thrombectomy system safely revascularized peripheral and visceral arterial occlusions, according to final results from the small PRISM trial. (medpagetoday.com)
  • This study suggested that, although rarely performed at comprehensive stroke centers, mechanical thrombectomy for posterior circulation DMVO is a safe, and technically feasible treatment option for occlusions of the P2 or P3 segment of the PCA compared with standard medical treatment with or without IVT," wrote first author Lukas Meyer, MD, radiology resident, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, and colleagues. (neurologylive.com)
  • The balloon-assisted tracking technique was effective in traversing the step-off to enable TICI 3 aspiration thrombectomy. (bmj.com)
  • Its intuitive design simplifies the entire thrombectomy procedure workflow. (philips.com)
  • QuickClear simplifies the entire thrombectomy procedure workflow. (philips.com)
  • With ReVene, there is the exciting possibility that we may not only make thrombectomy a better procedure for the patient themselves, but also for the healthcare system," said Stephen A. Black, MD, Consultant Vascular Surgeon, Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and Professor of Venous Surgery, Kings College Hospital, London. (businesswire.com)
  • Was a mechanical thrombectomy procedure attempted but unsuccessful or aborted before removal of the LVO? (jointcommission.org)
  • Y (YES) There is documentation that a mechanical thrombectomy procedure was attempted but unsuccessful or aborted before removal of the LVO. (jointcommission.org)
  • N (No) There is no documentation that a mechanical thrombectomy procedure was attempted but unsuccessful or aborted before removal of the LVO, OR unable to determine from medical record documentation. (jointcommission.org)
  • When documentation clearly indicates that a mechanical thrombectomy procedure was attempted but unsuccessful or aborted before removal of the LVO, select "Yes. (jointcommission.org)
  • If a mechanical thrombectomy procedure was attempted and down coded to the root ICD-10-PCS Principal or Other Procedure Code due to extirpation procedure failure, select "Yes. (jointcommission.org)
  • If medical record documentation includes only an ICD-10-PCS Principal or Other Procedure Code on Table 8.1c Thrombectomy Root Procedures and no documentation of extirpation procedure failure, select "No. (jointcommission.org)
  • If unable to be determined from medical record documentation that the procedure attempted was a mechanical thrombectomy for removal of a LVO, select "No"/UTD. (jointcommission.org)
  • Refer to Appendix A, Table 8.1c Thrombectomy Root Procedures for examples of acceptable ICD-10-PCS procedure codes. (jointcommission.org)
  • The databook report provides procedure volumes within segments - Inferior Vena Cava Filters (IVCF) Procedures and Thrombectomy Procedures. (researchandmarkets.com)
  • GlobalData uses proprietary data and analytics to provide a comprehensive report on the neurovascular thrombectomy devices market in Greece. (medicaldevice-network.com)
  • The neurovascular thrombectomy devices market in Greece can expand or contract due to a variety of reasons including population demographics, disease incidence and prevalence, macroeconomic issues, and geopolitical considerations. (medicaldevice-network.com)
  • Aim - to assess the effectiveness of open surgical thrombectomy in acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis. (cesurg.ru)
  • According to selective indications open surgical thrombectomy in iliofemoral venous thrombosis with using current methods of deep vein restoration patency increases the effectiveness of treatment of this severe pathology and prevents from progression of postthrombotic syndrome. (cesurg.ru)
  • Ignatyev I.M., Evseeva V.V., Gradusov E.G. Surgical thrombectomy for treatment of acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis. (cesurg.ru)
  • 2. Hölper P., Kotelis D., Attigah N., Hyhlik-Dürr A., Böckler D. Long-term results after surgical thrombectomy and simultaneous stenting for symptomatic iliofemoral venous thrombosis // Eur. (cesurg.ru)
  • On occasion, surgical thrombectomy may be necessary, especially after major cardiac surgery or if thrombolytic agents fail or are contraindicated. (medscape.com)
  • mainly due to significant adoption of technologically advanced thrombectomy products, growing number of clinical trials, and significant medical reimbursement available in the U.S. for thrombectomy procedures. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • Mechanical thrombectomy aims at recanalizing occluded carotid or cerebral arteries as well as ensuring secondary prevention of stroke. (siemens-healthineers.com)
  • Open vascular surgery versions of thrombectomy also exist. (wikipedia.org)
  • This novel thrombectomy system is the latest addition to Philips' market-leading portfolio for the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral vascular diseases," said Chris Landon, Senior Vice President and General Manager Image Guided Therapy Devices at Philips. (philips.com)
  • Here his partner Annie describes that terrifying day and why thrombectomy treatment may have saved his life. (chss.org.uk)
  • Without thrombectomy treatment, Norrie may have been paralysed for life and left unable to speak. (chss.org.uk)
  • edema growth (ΔNWU) after successful thrombectomy treatment . (bvsalud.org)
  • And certainly thrombolytics are critical at those hospitals where transfer to thrombectomy center is going to take some time," said Joseph Broderick, MD, of University of Cincinnati, who was not involved with the trial. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Rapid advances in devices and approaches have marked the evolution of thrombectomy over the past decade from rudimentary mechanical disruption, followed by intra-arterial thrombolytic infusions to increasingly effective thrombectomy devices. (bmj.com)
  • Thrombectomy 6 to 24 Hours after Stroke with a Mismatch between Deficit and Infarct. (snacc.org)
  • Investigators randomized 547 people, all tPA- and EVT-eligible, to IV alteplase followed by EVT (0.9 mg/kg) or thrombectomy alone. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Acute stroke thrombectomy approaches have evolved rapidly. (bmj.com)
  • Used for thrombectomy of both synthetic grafts and natural fistulae, the AngioJet System utilizes powerful Cross-Stream technology to remove thrombotic materials from the dialysis access conduit with minimal vessel wall trauma, potentially decreasing the risk for future thrombotic events. (bostonscientific.com)
  • Brain edema growth after thrombectomy is associated with comprehensive collateral blood flow. (bvsalud.org)
  • This is primarily due to the presence of large target patient population, increasing healthcare expenditure, increase in localized manufacturing & strengthening of distribution networks, and rising awareness among surgeons related to the benefits offered by thrombectomy devices. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • Thrombectomy devices are used to treat blood clots present in the arteries, veins, and capillaries. (industryresearch.biz)
  • In this article, the authors discuss different mechanical thrombectomy devices and the literature available for their use in acute coronary syndrome. (elsevierpure.com)