Sternotomy: Making an incision in the STERNUM.Thoracotomy: Surgical incision into the chest wall.Sternum: A long, narrow, and flat bone commonly known as BREASTBONE occurring in the midsection of the anterior thoracic segment or chest region, which stabilizes the rib cage and serves as the point of origin for several muscles that move the arms, head, and neck.Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted: Endoscopic surgery of the pleural cavity performed with visualization via video transmission.Mediastinitis: Inflammation of the mediastinum, the area between the pleural sacs.Surgical Wound Dehiscence: Pathologic process consisting of a partial or complete disruption of the layers of a surgical wound.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Thoracoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the pleural cavity.Wound Closure Techniques: Methods to repair breaks in tissue caused by trauma or to close surgical incisions.Pneumonectomy: The excision of lung tissue including partial or total lung lobectomy.Goiter, Substernal: An enlarged THYROID GLAND with at least 50% of the gland situated behind the STERNUM. It is an unusual presentation of an intrathoracic goiter. Substernal goiters frequently cause compression on the TRACHEA leading to deviation, narrowing, and respiratory symptoms.Manubrium: The upper or most anterior segment of the STERNUM which articulates with the CLAVICLE and first two pairs of RIBS.Surgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the aorta (or femoral artery) via an oxygenator thus bypassing both the heart and lungs.Thoracic Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the chest area.Pectoralis Muscles: The pectoralis major and pectoralis minor muscles that make up the upper and fore part of the chest in front of the AXILLA.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Subclavian Artery: Artery arising from the brachiocephalic trunk on the right side and from the arch of the aorta on the left side. It distributes to the neck, thoracic wall, spinal cord, brain, meninges, and upper limb.Intercostal Nerves: The ventral rami of the thoracic nerves from segments T1 through T11. The intercostal nerves supply motor and sensory innervation to the thorax and abdomen. The skin and muscles supplied by a given pair are called, respectively, a dermatome and a myotome.Thoracic Diseases: Disorders affecting the organs of the thorax.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Mediastinum: A membrane in the midline of the THORAX of mammals. It separates the lungs between the STERNUM in front and the VERTEBRAL COLUMN behind. It also surrounds the HEART, TRACHEA, ESOPHAGUS, THYMUS, and LYMPH NODES.Debridement: The removal of foreign material and devitalized or contaminated tissue from or adjacent to a traumatic or infected lesion until surrounding healthy tissue is exposed. (Dorland, 27th ed)Empyema, Pleural: Suppurative inflammation of the pleural space.Thoracic Surgery: A surgical specialty concerned with diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the heart, lungs, and esophagus. Two major types of thoracic surgery are classified as pulmonary and cardiovascular.Thoracic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the thoracic organs, most commonly the lungs and the heart.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy: The application of a vacuum across the surface of a wound through a foam dressing cut to fit the wound. This removes wound exudates, reduces build-up of inflammatory mediators, and increases the flow of nutrients to the wound thus promoting healing.Heart Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the heart.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of synthetic material to repair injured or diseased heart valves.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Chylothorax: The presence of chyle in the thoracic cavity. (Dorland, 27th ed)Surgical Flaps: Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.Drainage: The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.Mammary Arteries: Arteries originating from the subclavian or axillary arteries and distributing to the anterior thoracic wall, mediastinal structures, diaphragm, pectoral muscles and mammary gland.Benchmarking: Method of measuring performance against established standards of best practice.Pneumothorax: An accumulation of air or gas in the PLEURAL CAVITY, which may occur spontaneously or as a result of trauma or a pathological process. The gas may also be introduced deliberately during PNEUMOTHORAX, ARTIFICIAL.Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the THORACIC AORTA. This proximal descending portion of aorta gives rise to the visceral and the parietal branches above the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Hemothorax: Hemorrhage within the pleural cavity.Wounds, Penetrating: Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.Thoracostomy: Surgical procedure involving the creation of an opening (stoma) into the chest cavity for drainage; used in the treatment of PLEURAL EFFUSION; PNEUMOTHORAX; HEMOTHORAX; and EMPYEMA.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Pericardium: A conical fibro-serous sac surrounding the HEART and the roots of the great vessels (AORTA; VENAE CAVAE; PULMONARY ARTERY). Pericardium consists of two sacs: the outer fibrous pericardium and the inner serous pericardium. The latter consists of an outer parietal layer facing the fibrous pericardium, and an inner visceral layer (epicardium) resting next to the heart, and a pericardial cavity between these two layers.Iatrogenic Disease: Any adverse condition in a patient occurring as the result of treatment by a physician, surgeon, or other health professional, especially infections acquired by a patient during the course of treatment.Aortography: Radiographic visualization of the aorta and its branches by injection of contrast media, using percutaneous puncture or catheterization procedures.Mediastinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MEDIASTINUM.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Cardiovascular Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart or blood vessels.Mediastinal Cyst: Cysts of one of the parts of the mediastinum: the superior part, containing the trachea, esophagus, thoracic duct and thymus organs; the inferior middle part, containing the pericardium; the inferior anterior part containing some lymph nodes; and the inferior posterior part, containing the thoracic duct and esophagus.Pleural Cavity: Paired but separate cavity within the THORACIC CAVITY. It consists of the space between the parietal and visceral PLEURA and normally contains a capillary layer of serous fluid that lubricates the pleural surfaces.Thoracic Cavity: The region of the thorax that includes the PLEURAL CAVITY and MEDIASTINUM.Aortic Coarctation: A birth defect characterized by the narrowing of the AORTA that can be of varying degree and at any point from the transverse arch to the iliac bifurcation. Aortic coarctation causes arterial HYPERTENSION before the point of narrowing and arterial HYPOTENSION beyond the narrowed portion.Aorta, Thoracic: The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.Hemopneumothorax: Collection of air and blood in the pleural cavity.Esophagostomy: Surgical formation of an external opening (stoma) into the esophagus.Cardiac Tamponade: Compression of the heart by accumulated fluid (PERICARDIAL EFFUSION) or blood (HEMOPERICARDIUM) in the PERICARDIUM surrounding the heart. The affected cardiac functions and CARDIAC OUTPUT can range from minimal to total hemodynamic collapse.Surgical Fixation Devices: Devices used to hold tissue structures together for repair, reconstruction or to close wounds. They may consist of adsorbable or non-adsorbable, natural or synthetic materials. They include tissue adhesives, skin tape, sutures, buttons, staples, clips, screws, etc., each designed to conform to various tissue geometries.Mediastinal Diseases: Disorders of the mediastinum, general or unspecified.Bone Wires: Steel wires, often threaded through the skin, soft tissues, and bone, used to fix broken bones. Kirschner wires or apparatus also includes the application of traction to the healing bones through the wires.Pulmonary Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the lung.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Pleural DiseasesIntraoperative Period: The period during a surgical operation.Chest Tubes: Plastic tubes used for drainage of air or fluid from the pleural space. Their surgical insertion is called tube thoracostomy.Mediastinoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the anterior superior mediastinum of the thorax.Thymus Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the THYMUS GLAND.Radiography, Thoracic: X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.Aneurysm, False: Not an aneurysm but a well-defined collection of blood and CONNECTIVE TISSUE outside the wall of a blood vessel or the heart. It is the containment of a ruptured blood vessel or heart, such as sealing a rupture of the left ventricle. False aneurysm is formed by organized THROMBUS and HEMATOMA in surrounding tissue.Constriction: The act of constricting.Device Removal: Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.Paresthesia: Subjective cutaneous sensations (e.g., cold, warmth, tingling, pressure, etc.) that are experienced spontaneously in the absence of stimulation.Heart Valve Diseases: Pathological conditions involving any of the various HEART VALVES and the associated structures (PAPILLARY MUSCLES and CHORDAE TENDINEAE).Carcinoma, Bronchogenic: Malignant neoplasm arising from the epithelium of the BRONCHI. It represents a large group of epithelial lung malignancies which can be divided into two clinical groups: SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER and NON-SMALL-CELL LUNG CARCINOMA.Surgical Equipment: Nonexpendable apparatus used during surgical procedures. They are differentiated from SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, usually hand-held and used in the immediate operative field.Aortic Valve: The valve between the left ventricle and the ascending aorta which prevents backflow into the left ventricle.Bronchial Fistula: An abnormal passage or communication between a bronchus and another part of the body.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.Wounds, Stab: Penetrating wounds caused by a pointed object.Mitral Valve: The valve between the left atrium and left ventricle of the heart.Analgesia, Epidural: The relief of pain without loss of consciousness through the introduction of an analgesic agent into the epidural space of the vertebral canal. It is differentiated from ANESTHESIA, EPIDURAL which refers to the state of insensitivity to sensation.Inventions: A novel composition, device, or process, independently conceived de novo or derived from a pre-existing model.Fentanyl: A potent narcotic analgesic, abuse of which leads to habituation or addiction. It is primarily a mu-opioid agonist. Fentanyl is also used as an adjunct to general anesthetics, and as an anesthetic for induction and maintenance. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1078)Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Lacerations: Torn, ragged, mangled wounds.Respiratory Tract Fistula: An abnormal passage communicating between any component of the respiratory tract or between any part of the respiratory system and surrounding organs.Brachiocephalic Trunk: The first and largest artery branching from the aortic arch. It distributes blood to the right side of the head and neck and to the right arm.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Bronchogenic Cyst: A usually spherical cyst, arising as an embryonic out-pouching of the foregut or trachea. It is generally found in the mediastinum or lung and is usually asymptomatic unless it becomes infected.Thoracoscopes: Endoscopes for examining the pleural cavity.Aortic Aneurysm: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.Thymoma: A neoplasm originating from thymic tissue, usually benign, and frequently encapsulated. Although it is occasionally invasive, metastases are extremely rare. It consists of any type of thymic epithelial cell as well as lymphocytes that are usually abundant. Malignant lymphomas that involve the thymus, e.g., lymphosarcoma, Hodgkin's disease (previously termed granulomatous thymoma), should not be regarded as thymoma. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Pericarditis, Constrictive: Inflammation of the PERICARDIUM that is characterized by the fibrous scarring and adhesion of both serous layers, the VISCERAL PERICARDIUM and the PARIETAL PERICARDIUM leading to the loss of pericardial cavity. The thickened pericardium severely restricts cardiac filling. Clinical signs include FATIGUE, muscle wasting, and WEIGHT LOSS.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Foreign-Body Migration: Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Thymectomy: Surgical removal of the thymus gland. (Dorland, 28th ed)Heart-Assist Devices: Small pumps, often implantable, designed for temporarily assisting the heart, usually the LEFT VENTRICLE, to pump blood. They consist of a pumping chamber and a power source, which may be partially or totally external to the body and activated by electromagnetic motors.Pleura: The thin serous membrane enveloping the lungs (LUNG) and lining the THORACIC CAVITY. Pleura consist of two layers, the inner visceral pleura lying next to the pulmonary parenchyma and the outer parietal pleura. Between the two layers is the PLEURAL CAVITY which contains a thin film of liquid.Monitoring, Intraoperative: The constant checking on the state or condition of a patient during the course of a surgical operation (e.g., checking of vital signs).Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Bronchoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the bronchi.OsteomyelitisEmpyema: Presence of pus in a hollow organ or body cavity.Thorax: The upper part of the trunk between the NECK and the ABDOMEN. It contains the chief organs of the circulatory and respiratory systems. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Funnel Chest: A developmental anomaly in which the lower sternum is posteriorly dislocated and concavely deformed, resulting in a funnel-shaped thorax.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Heart Septal Defects, Atrial: Developmental abnormalities in any portion of the ATRIAL SEPTUM resulting in abnormal communications between the two upper chambers of the heart. Classification of atrial septal defects is based on location of the communication and types of incomplete fusion of atrial septa with the ENDOCARDIAL CUSHIONS in the fetal heart. They include ostium primum, ostium secundum, sinus venosus, and coronary sinus defects.Echocardiography, Transesophageal: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues using a transducer placed in the esophagus.
Median sternotomy - This is the primary incision used for cardiac procedures. It extends from the sternal notch to the xiphoid ... Thoracotomy - A division of the ribs from the side of the chest. Midline incision or midline laparotomy - The most common ...
These procedures are characterized by: No median sternotomy incision; instead, an endoscope and/or "mini-thoracotomy" incisions ... McClelland JH, Duke D, Reddy R (2007). "Preliminary results of a limited thoracotomy: new approach to treat atrial fibrillation ... These were performed epicardially, on the beating heart, without cardiopulmonary bypass or median sternotomy. Their method came ... a median sternotomy (vertical incision through the breastbone) and cardiopulmonary bypass (heart-lung machine; extracorporeal ...
... the unstable patient is immediately transferred to the operating room for exploration by thoracotomy or sternotomy. Survival ... Moribund patients will go through an emergency department thoracotomy. This measure is taken because at their arrival in the ... Van Waes, OJ; Van Riet, PA; Van Lieshout, EM; Hartoq, DD (October 2012). "Immediate thoracotomy for penetrating injuries: ten ... survival after emergency department thoracotomy was 25 percent. In other circumstances ...
... the surgeon enters the chest cavity through a mini-thoracotomy (a 2-to-3 inch incision between the ribs). MIDCAB surgery is no ... with traditional CABG and OPCAB a median sternotomy (dividing the breastbone) provides access to the heart; with MIDCAB, ...
Sternotomy and thoracotomy have been proven over decades to provide highly effective means of access to thoracic structures and ... The great advantage of VATS over sternotomy or thoracotomy is avoidance of muscle division and bone fractures that allows for ... Operations that traditionally were carried out with thoracotomy or sternotomy that today can be performed with VATS include: ... Sternotomy requires the use of a sternal saw to divide the sternum and requires spreading of the divided portions of the ...
... sternotomy or thoracotomy) using an ECC where the heart is stopped to allow a system of special cannulas to be placed. The hole ...
Mechanical heart valve Percutaneous implantation Stent framed Not framed Sternotomy/Thoracotomy implantation Ball and cage ...
Eliminating the need for median sternotomy greatly reduces the trauma and pain associated with open-chest surgery and improves ... MICS CABG is a beating-heart multi-vessel procedure performed under direct vision through an anterolateral mini-thoracotomy. ... The study also proved survival and durability on par with sternotomy. At the 2010 International Society for Minimally Invasive ... After a minimally invasive procedure, patients recover more quickly than from sternotomy and suffer fewer complications. Most ...
... sternotomy, thoracotomy, pericardial window, carotid endarterectomy, thyroidectomy, etc. Skin bulges indicating implanted ... Performed by cardiothoracic surgeons, a sternotomy is performed to open the chest and then grafts are performed. ...
There are many different approaches to thoracotomy. The most common modalities of thoracotomy follow. Median sternotomy ... Bilateral anterolateral thoracotomy combined with transverse sternotomy results in the "clamshell" incision, the largest ... Anterolateral thoracotomy is performed upon the anterior chest wall; left anterolateral thoracotomy is the incision of choice ... A thoracotomy is an incision into the pleural space of the chest. It is performed by surgeons (or emergency physicians under ...
Left anterior thoracotomy Isolated pulmonary artery banding (PAB) Left lateral thoracotomy PAB (when coarctation or aortic arch ... it is quite rare for palliative procedures to be done via median sternotomy. However, if a sternotomy is required for a ... The heart and vessels are accessed via median sternotomy, and a cardiopulmonary bypass machine is used; as this machine needs ... Median sternotomy PAB (when intracardiac procedures also required) Concomitant atrial septectomy In recent years, ...
Antero-Lateral Thoracotomy with Partial Sternotomy for Retrograde DeBakey III Type Closing Aortic Dissection 網際網路檔案館的存檔,存檔日期 ...
These "extra-anatomic bypasses" can be performed without an invasive thoracotomy. Another example in the abdominal aorta is the ... A commonly used hybrid repair procedure is the "frozen elephant trunk repair". This technique involves midline sternotomy. The ...
After a median sternotomy, a surgical retractor is placed by the surgeon to optimize exposure of the heart. At this time, ... open thoracotomy, and advanced airway procedures involving the trachea. Fellows achieve expertise in different techniques of ...
The patient is positioned with his or her left side up (see figure). A left anterior-lateral thoracotomy is performed between ... artery bypass surgery and have patent grafts Have had mediastinal radiation or infection after a prior median sternotomy Have ...
The use of chest tubes in postoperative thoracic care was reported in 1922, and they were regularly used post-thoracotomy in ... typically near the inferior aspect of the sternotomy incision. In some instances multiple drains may be used to evacuate the ...
... unlike the thoracotomy required by a septectomy, is performed through the minimally invasive surgical technique of cardiac ... The heart is accessed via median sternotomy, and the patient is given heparin to prevent the blood from clotting. A generous ...
2012). "HeartWare Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation Through Bilateral Anterior Thoracotomy". The Annals of Thoracic ... it was shown that the Heartware HVAD can be implanted through limited access without sternotomy. In a small number of cases ...
See a patient discussion about mitral valve surgery using a thoracotomy versus a sternotomy from female perspective for valve ... Not having the sternotomy I cant say which is better but I was told that the recovery time for the thoracotomy is much less. I ... The thoracotomy makes the sternotomy seem like a walk in the park. However, I have been extremely fortunate and have not had ... Thoracotomy Vs. Sternotomy For Vickis Mitral Valve Surgery… Any Female Perspectives?. By Adam Pick on September 16, 2008 ...
Keywords: Cosmetic, Mitral valve replacement, Sternotomy, Thoracotomy Abstract. This study was aimed to compare the peri- ... Early outcome of mitral valve replacement through right anterolateral thoracotomy versus standard median sternotomy * Heemel ... operative outcomes among the mitral valve replace-ment using anterolateral thoracotomy (n=17) and standard median sternotomy (n ... Early outcome of mitral valve replacement through right anterolateral thoracotomy versus standard median sternotomy. ...
Thoracotomy Versus Sternotomy for Patent Ductus Arteriosus Closure in Preterm Neonates. Verhaegh, A. J. F. P., Accord, R. E., ...
There are two basic approaches, either a mini-thoracotomy (small incision between the ribs) or a mini-sternotomy (small upper ... Minimally Invasive Approach: Mini-sternotomy, Mini-thoracotomy & TAVR. A minimally invasive approach is an option for patients ... This involves making a small incision between the ribs on the right side of the chest called a mini-thoracotomy. In selected ... The LIMA is then connected to the target coronary artery through a small incision (mini-thoracotomy) between the ribs. A one or ...
... right mini-thoracotomy - discharge; Mitral valve repair - partial upper sternotomy - discharge; Robotically-assisted endoscopic ... Mini-thoracotomy aortic valve - discharge; Mini-aortic replacement or repair - discharge; Cardiac valvular surgery - discharge ... Mini-sternotomy - discharge; Robotically-assisted endoscopic aortic valve repair - discharge; Mitral valve replacement - open ...
4 Thoracotomy 33. E. Christopher Orton. 5 Sternotomy 39. E. Christopher Orton. 6 Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery 43. Eric ...
Mini-Thoracotomy Incision. This 3 to 4 inch incision is made between the ribs whereby no bone is cut. ... Mini-Sternotomy Incision. This 4 to 5 inch incision just splits the upper third of the breastbone. ... Stays after minimally invasive operations are from 3 to 5 days compared to 5 to 7 days for traditional sternotomy-based cardiac ... Recovery times after minimally invasive operations are from 2 to 4 weeks compared to 6 to 8 weeks for standard sternotomy-based ...
I - Aortic valve : J-Sternotomy, right anterior thoracotomy or right parasternal incision. Various approaches are adopted, ... 2 - Hemi-sternotomy. Upper or lower Hemi-sternotomy is also performed to access the mitral valve. The consensus is to minimise ... 1 - J-Sternotomy. The Skin incision is mid-sternum extending from 5 to 7 cms. (Fig -1) Sternotomy is then performed extending ... 19) Hemi-sternotomy approach for aortic and mitral valve surgery. A. M. Gilliov, M. K. Banbury, and D. M. Cosgrove, Journal of ...
Techniques include min-thoracotomy, min-sternotomy, robot-assisted surgery, and percutaneous surgery. To perform the different ... Mini-thoracotomy aortic valve replacement or repair; Cardiac valvular surgery; Mini-sternotomy; Robotically-assisted aortic ... Lamelas J. Minimally invasive, mini-thoracotomy aortic valve replacement. In: Sellke FW, Ruel M, eds. Atlas of Cardiac Surgical ...
Mini-thoracotomy versus median sternotomy for atrial septal defect closure: Should mini-thoracotomy be applied as a standard ... Conclusion: Mini-thoracotomy should be kept in mind as a favorable alternative to sternotomy following a satisfactory learning ... who underwent atrial septal defect repair through mini-thoracotomy or median sternotomy in our clinic were retrospectively ... Background: This study aims to compare outcomes of minithoracotomy versus median sternotomy for atrial septal defect closure.. ...
Patient attitudes to sternotomy and thoracotomy scars. Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeon 2005, 53(2), 93-95. ...
thoracotomy. is a safe surgical approach and a reliable alternative to median sternotomy in patients undergoing OPCAB surgery. ... The anterolateral thoracotomy is a safe surgical approach and a reliable alternative to median sternotomy in patients ... Patients undergoing median sternotomy received more grafts than those undergoing left anterolateral thoracotomy (3.30+/-0.8 vs ... Patients undergoing sternotomy received more grafts than those undergoing left anterolateral thoracotomy (p. ...
Some common forms of thoracotomies include: *Median sternotomy provides wide access to the mediastinum and is the incision of ... Bilateral anterolateral thoracotomy combined with transverse sternotomy results in the "clamshell" incision ... Thoracotomy. A thoracotomy incision performed through the fourth or fifth intercostal space with rib spreaders to increase ... Anterolateral thoracotomy is performed upon the anterior chest wall; left anterolateral thoracotomy is the incision of choice ...
Two of the penetrating injuries patients underwent median sternotomy [7,9] and the next two underwent anterolateral thoracotomy ... Emergency Thoracotomy- Isolated Internal Thoracic Artery Injury. Islam S*, Shah J and Narayn Singh V Department of Clinical ... However, once cardiac arrest is witnessed 5 minutes prior to Ed or in ED ER thoracotomy should the performed, if there is a ... Emergency Thoracotomy- Isolated Internal Thoracic Artery Injury. Journal of Surgery [Jurnalul de chirurgie] 2014; 10(2):171-173 ...
... compared with sternotomy and fewer perioperative blood transfusions compared with both sternotomy and thoracotomy (37.7% vs. ... is usually performed through partial sternotomy or thoracotomy in the anterior chest wall. We adopted right lateral thoracotomy ... No conversion to sternotomy or thoracotomy. There was no early death and permanent pacemaker implantation in perioperation. ... Thoracotomy approach for LVAD implantation is getting popular because of its advantage over conventional sternotomy approach in ...
All MI cases were performed via mini-thoracotomy. Propensity matching on 18 preoperative risk factors was done using a logistic ... Abstract 13224: Minimally Invasive versus Traditional Sternotomy Mitral Valve Surgery: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis. Alexander ... Abstract 13224: Minimally Invasive versus Traditional Sternotomy Mitral Valve Surgery: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis ... Abstract 13224: Minimally Invasive versus Traditional Sternotomy Mitral Valve Surgery: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis ...
Thoracotomy Versus Sternotomy for Patent Ductus Arteriosus Closure in Preterm Neonates.. Verhaegh AJFP, Accord RE, Kooi EMW, ...
33365 TAVR, transaortic approach (eg, median sternotomy). 0318T TAVR, open transapical approach (eg, left thoracotomy) ...
midline sternotomy), typically a left anterior thoracotomy. The left internal mammary artery is dissected from the left chest ... The incision of choice can be a midline sternotomy or a left anterior thoracotomy (incision in the side). The midline ... The surgeon performs an alternative incision (rather than a midline sternotomy), typically a left anterior thoracotomy. The ... Conversion to a full sternotomy or sternotomy with cardiopulmonary bypass is expected in 1-2% of ...
Sternotomy. *Mini thoracotomy. *VATS. Lung biopsies*Need tissue to diagnose "Interstitial lung disease" ...
Re-sternotomy. The evolution of cardiac surgery has led to the popularization of various surgical approaches. Thoracotomy was ... 9. Ban, T. and Y. Soga, [Re-sternotomy]. Nippon Geka Gakkai Zasshi, 1998. 99(2): p. 63-7.. 10. Elami, A., H. Laks, and G. Merin ... An "inverted T" [20] partial upper re-sternotomy is then carried out to the 3rd or 4th intercostal space depending on the ... Repair of great vessel injuries is best done under CPB.[9] Active hemorrhage during a second sternotomy is usually due to ...
Here, access may be obtained by way of a thoracotomy, median sternotomy, or thoracostomy. Exemplary surgical probes are ...
left--, left anterior thoracotomy, can use left posterolateral thoracotomy to better expose arch, proximal left subclavian, ... right--, sternotomy. *proximal vertibral artery can be reached with transverse supraclavicular incision ...
Mitral valve repair - right mini-thoracotomy; Mitral valve repair - partial upper or lower sternotomy; Robotically-assisted ...
  • Recently the left anterolateral thoracotomy has been proposed as an alternative approach (1). (ispub.com)
  • In addition to this approval, new surgical implant tools tailored to assist physicians with the thoracotomy approach for the HVAD System are now available in the U.S. and in CE Marked countries. (yahoo.com)
  • The thoracotomy approach showed significant improvements in patients` quality of life and functional capacity, supported by strong safety and effectiveness data from the study," said David Steinhaus, M.D., vice president and general manager of the Heart Failure business, which is part of the Cardiac and Vascular Group at Medtronic. (yahoo.com)
  • Nonetheless, a minimally invasive thoracotomy represents a very different approach when compared to sternotomy because the operative field is external, the anatomical relationships are different, and with a small approach, the structures are difficult to observe and control. (ctsnet.org)
  • Anterolateral thoracotomy, like most surgical incisions, requires the use of tissue retractors -in this case, a "rib spreader" such as the Tuffier retractor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Any cancer that has grown into tissue around the thymus is removed at the same time as the thymus (also called an en bloc resection or an extended thymectomy), especially when the thymus cancer is associated with myasthenia gravis. (cancer.ca)