Thoracic Wall: The outer margins of the thorax containing SKIN, deep FASCIA; THORACIC VERTEBRAE; RIBS; STERNUM; and MUSCLES.Thoracic NeoplasmsThorax: The upper part of the trunk between the NECK and the ABDOMEN. It contains the chief organs of the circulatory and respiratory systems. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Ribs: A set of twelve curved bones which connect to the vertebral column posteriorly, and terminate anteriorly as costal cartilage. Together, they form a protective cage around the internal thoracic organs.Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the THORACIC AORTA. This proximal descending portion of aorta gives rise to the visceral and the parietal branches above the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Thoracotomy: Surgical incision into the chest wall.Spinal Cord Ischemia: Reduced blood flow to the spinal cord which is supplied by the anterior spinal artery and the paired posterior spinal arteries. This condition may be associated with ARTERIOSCLEROSIS, trauma, emboli, diseases of the aorta, and other disorders. Prolonged ischemia may lead to INFARCTION of spinal cord tissue.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Paraplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function in the lower extremities and lower portions of the trunk. This condition is most often associated with SPINAL CORD DISEASES, although BRAIN DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause bilateral leg weakness.Cell Wall: The outermost layer of a cell in most PLANTS; BACTERIA; FUNGI; and ALGAE. The cell wall is usually a rigid structure that lies external to the CELL MEMBRANE, and provides a protective barrier against physical or chemical agents.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Celiac Artery: The arterial trunk that arises from the abdominal aorta and after a short course divides into the left gastric, common hepatic and splenic arteries.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Thoracic Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the chest area.Aortic Aneurysm: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.Aortography: Radiographic visualization of the aorta and its branches by injection of contrast media, using percutaneous puncture or catheterization procedures.Heart Bypass, Left: Diversion of the flow of blood from the pulmonary veins directly to the aorta, avoiding the left atrium and the left ventricle (Dorland, 27th ed). This is a temporary procedure usually performed to assist other surgical procedures.Mesenteric Artery, Superior: A large vessel supplying the whole length of the small intestine except the superior part of the duodenum. It also supplies the cecum and the ascending part of the colon and about half the transverse part of the colon. It arises from the anterior surface of the aorta below the celiac artery at the level of the first lumbar vertebra.Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Hernia, Diaphragmatic, Traumatic: The type of DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA caused by TRAUMA or injury, usually to the ABDOMEN.Aneurysm, Dissecting: Aneurysm caused by a tear in the TUNICA INTIMA of a blood vessel leading to interstitial HEMORRHAGE, and splitting (dissecting) of the vessel wall, often involving the AORTA. Dissection between the intima and media causes luminal occlusion. Dissection at the media, or between the media and the outer adventitia causes aneurismal dilation.Aorta, Thoracic: The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure: Manometric pressure of the CEREBROSPINAL FLUID as measured by lumbar, cerebroventricular, or cisternal puncture. Within the cranial cavity it is called INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE.Aortic Rupture: The tearing or bursting of the wall along any portion of the AORTA, such as thoracic or abdominal. It may result from the rupture of an aneurysm or it may be due to TRAUMA.Viscera: Any of the large interior organs in any one of the three great cavities of the body, especially in the abdomen.Wounds, Stab: Penetrating wounds caused by a pointed object.Constriction: The act of constricting.Hemibody Irradiation: Irradiation of one half or both halves of the body in the treatment of disseminated cancer or widespread metastases. It is used to treat diffuse metastases in one session as opposed to multiple fields over an extended period. The more frequent treatment modalities are upper hemibody irradiation (UHBI) or lower hemibody irradiation (LHBI). Less common is mid-body irradiation (MBI). In the treatment of both halves of the body sequentially, hemibody irradiation permits radiotherapy of the whole body with larger doses of radiation than could be accomplished with WHOLE-BODY IRRADIATION. It is sometimes called "systemic" hemibody irradiation with reference to its use in widespread cancer or metastases. (P. Rubin et al. Cancer, Vol 55, p2210, 1985)Paraparesis: Mild to moderate loss of bilateral lower extremity motor function, which may be a manifestation of SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; MUSCULAR DISEASES; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; parasagittal brain lesions; and other conditions.Thoracic Arteries: Arteries originating from the subclavian or axillary arteries and distributing to the anterior thoracic wall, mediastinal structures, diaphragm, pectoral muscles, mammary gland and the axillary aspect of the chest wall.Drainage: The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.Abdominal Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving organs in the abdominal cavity.Replantation: Restoration of an organ or other structure to its original site.Endovascular Procedures: Minimally invasive procedures, diagnostic or therapeutic, performed within the BLOOD VESSELS. They may be perfomed via ANGIOSCOPY; INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; INTERVENTIONAL RADIOGRAPHY; or INTERVENTIONAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Monitoring, Intraoperative: The constant checking on the state or condition of a patient during the course of a surgical operation (e.g., checking of vital signs).Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Abdomen: That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.Polyethylene Terephthalates: Polyester polymers formed from terephthalic acid or its esters and ethylene glycol. They can be formed into tapes, films or pulled into fibers that are pressed into meshes or woven into fabrics.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Cerebrospinal Fluid: A watery fluid that is continuously produced in the CHOROID PLEXUS and circulates around the surface of the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and in the CEREBRAL VENTRICLES.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Plethysmography: Recording of change in the size of a part as modified by the circulation in it.Renal Artery: A branch of the abdominal aorta which supplies the kidneys, adrenal glands and ureters.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Aneurysm, Infected: Aneurysm due to growth of microorganisms in the arterial wall, or infection arising within preexisting arteriosclerotic aneurysms.Evoked Potentials, Motor: The electrical response evoked in a muscle or motor nerve by electrical or magnetic stimulation. Common methods of stimulation are by transcranial electrical and TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION. It is often used for monitoring during neurosurgery.Evoked Potentials, Somatosensory: The electric response evoked in the CEREBRAL CORTEX by stimulation along AFFERENT PATHWAYS from PERIPHERAL NERVES to CEREBRUM.Abdominal Cavity: The region in the abdomen extending from the thoracic DIAPHRAGM to the plane of the superior pelvic aperture (pelvic inlet). The abdominal cavity contains the PERITONEUM and abdominal VISCERA, as well as the extraperitoneal space which includes the RETROPERITONEAL SPACE.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Wounds, Penetrating: Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.
Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms involve both the thoracic and abdominal aorta. Most intact aortic aneurysms do not produce ... with thoracic and thoracoabdominal aneurysms making up 1% to 4% of the total. An aortic aneurysm can rupture from wall weakness ... is reduced in the abdominal aorta as compared to the thoracic aorta. Another is that the abdominal aorta does not possess vasa ... Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are more common than their thoracic counterpart. One reason for this is that elastin, the ...
17) posteriorly (forming part of the abdominal wall) reverses the inhalatory movement, while compressing the abdominal contents ... This is an upwardly domed sheet of muscle that separates the thoracic cavity from the abdominal cavity. When it contracts the ... Inhalation and exhalation are brought about by alternately increasing and decreasing the volume of the entire thoraco-abdominal ... The forward and downward movement of, particularly, the posterior end of the sternum pulls the abdominal wall downwards, ...
Anatomy photo:35:04-0100 at the SUNY Downstate Medical Center - "Anterior Abdominal Wall: Thoracoabdominal Nerves" Anatomy ... and eleventh thoracic intercostal nerves are continued anteriorly from the intercostal spaces into the abdominal wall; hence ... they are named thoraco-abdominal nerves (or thoracicoabdominal intercostal nerves). They have the same arrangement as the upper ... The lower intercostal nerves supply the Intercostales and abdominal muscles; the last three send branches to the Serratus ...
... the greater the respiratory drive in the presence of coordinated thoraco-abdominal or even moderately discoordinated thoraco-abdominal ... During inhalation, both the thoracic and abdominal cavities simultaneously expand in volume, and thus in girth as well. If ... is a method of evaluating pulmonary ventilation by measuring the movement of the chest and abdominal wall. Accurate measurement ... Due to differences in posture and thoraco-abdominal respiratory synchronization it is not possible to obtain accurate ...
Thoracic abdominal aneurysm is defined as a diameter exceeding the following cutoff: 4.5 cm in the United States 4.0 cm in ... Acute aortic dissection, a life-threatening event due to a tear in the aortic wall, affects 5 to 10 patients per million ... Younger patients may develop aortic aneurysms of the thoracoabdominal aorta after an aortic dissection. It can also be caused ... Thoracic aneurysms are less common than an abdominal aortic aneurysm. However, a syphilitic aneurysm is more likely to be a ...
17) posteriorly (forming part of the abdominal wall) reverses the inhalatory movement, while compressing the abdominal contents ... The increase in volume of the entire trunk cavity reduces the air pressure in all the thoraco-abdominal air sacs, causing them ... This is an upwardly domed sheet of muscle that separates the thoracic cavity from the abdominal cavity. When it contracts the ... The forward and downward movement of, particularly, the posterior end of the sternum pulls the abdominal wall downwards, ...
Cervical Thoracic Thoracoabdominal Abdominal Thoracic and thoraco-abdominal ectopia cordis constitute the vast majority of ... Normally, the lateral body walls are responsible for fusion at the midline to form the ventral wall. Corruption of this process ... Location of the defect Cervical Thoracic Thoracoabdominal Abdominal Extent of the cardiac displacement Presence or absence of ... Defective ventral body wall formation yields a heart unprotected by the pericardium, sternum, or skin. Other organs may also ...
... and therefore use their intercostal and abdominal muscles to expand and contract their entire thoraco-abdominal cavities, thus ... The walls of these air sacs do not have a good blood supply and so do not play a direct role in gas exchange. They act like a ... Passerines possess seven air sacs, as the clavicular air sacs may interconnect or be fused with the anterior thoracic sacs. ... These parabronchi have honeycombed walls. The cells of the honeycomb are dead-end air vesicles, called atria, which project ...
An abdominal muscle strain, also called a pulled abdominal muscle, is an injury to one of the muscles of the abdominal wall. A ... "Thoracic Wall: The Anterior Thoracic Wall" Anatomy figure: 35:06-07 at Human Anatomy Online, SUNY Downstate Medical Center - " ... The muscles are innervated by thoraco-abdominal nerves, these are continuations of the T7-T11 intercostal nerves and pierce the ... Anterior abdominal wall. Deep dissection. Anterior view. Example of a man with a visible rectus abdominis Divarication of ...
... or thoraco-abdominal syndrome) is a rare syndrome that causes defects involving the diaphragm, abdominal wall, pericardium, ... After appropriate growth of the thoracic cavity and lungs, the second stage consists of the repair of cardiac defects and ... Parvari R, Weinstein Y, Ehrlich S, Steinitz M, Carmi R (February 1994). "Linkage localization of the thoraco-abdominal syndrome ... CANTRELL JR, HALLER JA, RAVITCH MM (November 1958). "A syndrome of congenital defects involving the abdominal wall, sternum, ...
The transverse abdominal is innervated by the lower intercostal nerves (thoracoabdominal, nerve roots T7-T11), as well as the ... The transverse abdominal helps to compress the ribs and viscera, providing thoracic and pelvic stability. This is explained ... Diagram of a transverse section of the posterior abdominal wall, to show the disposition of the lumbodorsal fascia. Posterior ... Diagram of a transverse section through the anterior abdomina wall, below the linea semicircularis. The abdominal inguinal ring ...
Thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) involve the aorta in the chest and abdomen. As such, major branch arteries to the ... EVAR is also used for rupture of the abdominal and descending thoracic aorta, and in rare cases used to treat pathology of the ... Type IV - Leakage through the graft wall due to the quality (porosity) of the graft material. Seen in first-generation grafts, ... 2013). "EndoAnchor Placement in Thoracic and Thoracoabdominal Stent-Grafts to Repair Complications of Nonalignment". J Endovasc ...
... and therefore use their intercostal and abdominal muscles to expand and contract their entire thoraco-abdominal cavities, thus ... Trunk (dorsal or thoracic) vertebrae usually fused in the notarium.. *Synsacrum (fused vertebrae of the back also fused to the ... These parabronchi have honeycombed walls. The cells of the honeycomb are dead-end air vesicles, called atria, which project ... Passerines possess seven air sacs, as the clavicular air sacs may interconnect or be fused with the anterior thoracic sacs. ...
... abdominal and post-thoracic) differ in that the right abdominal air sac is relatively small, lying to the right of the ... Inspired air moves into the respiratory system as a result of the expansion of thoraco abdominal cavity; controlled by ... As a result, the capillaries in the parabronchi have thinner walls, permitting more efficient gaseous exchange.[61] In ... abdominal, pre-thoracic, and lateral clavicular sacs.[62] The adult common ostrich lung lacks connective tissue known as ...
Thoracic aortic aneurysm, ruptured (I71.2) Thoracic aortic aneurysm, without mention of rupture (I71.3) Abdominal aortic ... Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm, ruptured (I71.6) Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm, without mention of rupture (I71.8) Aortic ... Rupture of cardiac wall without haemopericardium as current complication following acute myocardial infarction (I23.4) Rupture ... aneurysm, ruptured (I71.4) Abdominal aortic aneurysm, without mention of rupture (I71.5) ...
The thoracoabdominal approach opens the abdominal and thoracic cavities together, the two-stage Ivor Lewis (also called Lewis- ... This involves the passing of a flexible tube with a light and camera down the esophagus and examining the wall, and is called ... Abdominal obesity seems to be of particular relevance, given the closeness of its association with this type of cancer, as well ... Shields TW, LoCicero JW, Reed CE, Feins RH (2009). General Thoracic Surgery. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. pp. 2047-. ISBN 978 ...
Thoraco-abdominal nerves - T7-T11. *Subcostal - T12. *posterior *Posterior branches of thoracic nerves ... It pierces the lateral abdominal wall and runs medially at the level of the inguinal ligament where it supplies motor branches ... Lateral to this muscle, it pierces the transversus abdominis to run above the iliac crest between that muscle and abdominal ... Its terminal branch then runs parallel to the inguinal ligament to exit the aponeurosis of the abdominal external oblique above ...
... (OEP) is a method to evaluate ventilation through an external measurement of the chest wall surface motion. A number of small reflective markers are placed on the thoraco-abdominal surface by hypoallergenic adhesive tape. A system for human motion analysis measures the three-dimensional coordinates of these markers and the enclosed volume is computed by connecting the points to form triangles. From OEP it is thus possible to obtain volume variations of the entire chest wall and its different compartments. The chest wall can be modeled as being composed of three different compartments: pulmonary rib cage (RCp), abdominal rib cage (RCa), and the abdomen (AB). This model is the most appropriate for the study of chest wall kinematics in the majority of conditions, including exercise. It takes into consideration the fact that the lung- and diaphragm-apposed parts of the rib cage (RCp and RCa, respectively) ...
In anatomy, the scapula (plural scapulae or scapulas; also known as shoulder blade or wing bone) is the bone that connects the humerus (upper arm bone) with the clavicle (collar bone). Like their connected bones the scapulae are paired, with the scapula on either side of the body being roughly a mirror image of the other. In early Roman times, people thought the bone resembled a trowel, a small shovel. The shoulder blade is also called omo in Latin medical terminology. The scapula forms the back of the shoulder girdle. In humans, it is a flat bone, roughly triangular in shape, placed on a posterolateral aspect of the thoracic cage. The scapula is a wide, flat bone lying on the thoracic wall that provides an attachment for three different groups of muscles. The intrinsic muscles of the scapula include the muscles of the rotator cuff-the subscapularis, teres minor, supraspinatus, and ...
Elastofibroma, also called elastofibroma dorsi, is an ill-defined fibroelastic tumor-like condition made up of enlarged and irregular elastic fibers. Patient will present with a slow growing, deep-seated, firm mass, often presenting bilaterally. There may be pain or tenderness, but this is rare. There are several theories about origin: There is support for a genetic predisposition, as there are alterations of short arm of chromosome 1; Multifocality may suggest systemic enzymatic defect, resulting in abnormal elastogenesis; Repeated trauma or friction seems unlikely, but is still a possibility. By computed tomography, there is a poorly circumscribed, heterogeneous soft tissue mass, with a signal intensity similar to skeletal muscle. The fact that the lesion may be bilateral, helps eliminate a sarcoma from further consideration. At US, elastofibromas are depicted deep to the musculature as a multilayered pattern of hypoechoic linear areas of fat deposition intermixed with echogenic fibroelastic ...
Although a formal definition of what constitutes a "Great Wall" has not been agreed upon, making the full course of the Great Wall difficult to describe in its entirety,[49] the course of the main Great Wall line following Ming constructions can be charted.. The Jiayu Pass, located in Gansu province, is the western terminus of the Ming Great Wall. Although Han fortifications such as Yumen Pass and the Yang Pass exist further west, the extant walls leading to those passes are difficult to trace. From Jiayu Pass the wall travels discontinuously down the Hexi Corridor and into the deserts of Ningxia, where it enters the western edge of the Yellow River loop at Yinchuan. Here the first major walls erected during the Ming dynasty cuts through the Ordos Desert to the eastern edge of the Yellow River loop. There at Piantou Pass (t 偏頭關, s 偏头关, Piāntóuguān) in Xinzhou, Shanxi province, the Great ...
Although a formal definition of what constitutes a "Great Wall" has not been agreed upon, making the full course of the Great Wall difficult to describe in its entirety,[49] the course of the main Great Wall line following Ming constructions can be charted.. The Jiayu Pass, located in Gansu province, is the western terminus of the Ming Great Wall. Although Han fortifications such as Yumen Pass and the Yang Pass exist further west, the extant walls leading to those passes are difficult to trace. From Jiayu Pass the wall travels discontinuously down the Hexi Corridor and into the deserts of Ningxia, where it enters the western edge of the Yellow River loop at Yinchuan. Here the first major walls erected during the Ming dynasty cuts through the Ordos Desert to the eastern edge of the Yellow River loop. There at Piantou Pass (t 偏頭關, s 偏头关, Piāntóuguān) in Xinzhou, Shanxi province, the Great ...
Although a formal definition of what constitutes a "Great Wall" has not been agreed upon, making the full course of the Great Wall difficult to describe in its entirety,[51] the course of the main Great Wall line following Ming constructions can be charted. The Jiayu Pass, located in Gansu province, is the western terminus of the Ming Great Wall. Although Han fortifications such as Yumen Pass and the Yang Pass exist further west, the extant walls leading to those passes are difficult to trace. From Jiayu Pass the wall travels discontinuously down the Hexi Corridor and into the deserts of Ningxia, where it enters the western edge of the Yellow River loop at Yinchuan. Here the first major walls erected during the Ming dynasty cuts through the Ordos Desert to the eastern edge of the Yellow River loop. There at Piantou Pass (t 偏頭關, s 偏头关, Piāntóuguān) in Xinzhou, Shanxi province, the Great ...
... (also known as "lentiginous melanoma on sun-damaged skin") is a melanoma in situ that consists of malignant cells but does not show invasive growth. Lentigo maligna is not the same as lentigo maligna melanoma, and should be discussed separately. It typically progresses very slowly and can remain in a non-invasive form for years. The transition to true melanoma is marked by the appearance of a bumpy surface (itself a marker of vertical growth and invasion), at which point it is called lentigo maligna melanoma. It is normally found in the elderly (peak incidence in the 9th decade), on skin areas with high levels of sun exposure like the face and forearms. Some authors do not consider lentigo maligna to be a melanoma. It is commonly thought of as a melanoma precursor. Incidence of evolution to lentigo maligna melanoma is very low, about 2.2% to 5% in elderly patients. It is also known as "Hutchinson's melanotic freckle". This is named for Jonathan Hutchinson. Characteristics include ...
Elastofibroma, also called elastofibroma dorsi, is an ill-defined fibroelastic tumor-like condition made up of enlarged and irregular elastic fibers. Patient will present with a slow growing, deep-seated, firm mass, often presenting bilaterally. There may be pain or tenderness, but this is rare. There are several theories about origin: There is support for a genetic predisposition, as there are alterations of short arm of chromosome 1; Multifocality may suggest systemic enzymatic defect, resulting in abnormal elastogenesis; Repeated trauma or friction seems unlikely, but is still a possibility. By computed tomography, there is a poorly circumscribed, heterogeneous soft tissue mass, with a signal intensity similar to skeletal muscle. The fact that the lesion may be bilateral, helps eliminate a sarcoma from further consideration. At US, elastofibromas are depicted deep to the musculature as a multilayered pattern of hypoechoic linear areas of fat deposition intermixed with echogenic fibroelastic ...
A cystic hygroma, also known as cystic lymphangioma and macrocystic lymphatic malformation, is an often congenital multiloculated lymphatic lesion that can arise anywhere, but is classically found in the left posterior triangle of the neck and armpits. This is the most common form of lymphangioma. It contains large cyst-like cavities containing lymph, a watery fluid that circulates throughout the lymphatic system. Microscopically, cystic hygroma consists of multiple locules filled with lymph. In the depth, the locules are quite big but they decrease in size towards the surface. Cystic hygromas are benign, but can be disfiguring. It is a condition which usually affects children; very rarely it can present in adulthood. Cystic hygroma is also known as lymphatic malformation. Currently, the medical field prefers to use the term lymphatic malformation because the term cystic hygroma means water tumor. Lymphatic malformation is more commonly used now because it is a sponge-like collection of abnormal ...
പുക്കിൾ ഭാഗത്ത് ഈ മുറിവ് ഒരല്പം ഇടത്തേക്ക് മാറീയതിനുശേഷമാണ് താഴേക്ക് നീളുന്നത്.മനുഷ്യശരീരത്തിലെ സുപ്രധാനഭാഗങ്ങളായ നെഞ്ച് (Thorax), വയർ (adbomen) എന്നീ രണ്ടു അറകളിലേയും ആന്തരികാവയങ്ങളെ നേരില് കണ്ടു മനസ്സിലാക്കുവാനും പഠിക്കുവാനും ഈ രീതിയിലുള്ള മുറിക്കൽ ഏറെ സഹായകരമാണ്. രക്തചംക്രമണത്തിന്റേയും, രക്തസമ്മർദ്ദത്തിന്റെയും അടിസ്ഥാനമായ ഹൃദയമിടിപ്പ് മരിച്ച വ്യക്തിയിൽ ഇല്ലാത്തതിനാൽ, ...
A polysomnogram will typically record a minimum of 12 channels requiring a minimum of 22 wire attachments to the patient. These channels vary in every lab and may be adapted to meet the doctor's requests. There is a minimum of three channels for the EEG, one or two measure airflow, one or two are for chin muscle tone, one or more for leg movements, two for eye movements (EOG), one or two for heart rate and rhythm, one for oxygen saturation, and one each for the belts, which measure chest wall movement and upper abdominal wall movement. The movement of the belts is typically measured with piezoelectric sensors or respiratory inductance plethysmography. This movement is equated to effort and produces a low-frequency sinusoidal waveform as the patient inhales and exhales. Because movement is equated to effort, this system of measurement can produce false negatives. It is possible, especially during obstructive apneas, for effort to be made without measurable ...
... is a moth of the Micronoctuidae family. It is found in southern Nepal (it was described from Tarai). The wingspan is about 13 mm. The head, patagia, anterior part of tegulae and the prothorax are black grey, while the rest of the thorax and tegulae are whitish beige. The forewing ground colour is whitish beige, but the terminal area is blackish grey. The basal patch of the costa and the costal part of the triangular medial area are whitish beige, outlined in black. The crosslines are obsolete, except the terminal line, which is indicated by black interveinal dots. The hindwing ground colour is light grey with an indistinct discal spot. The abdomen is whitish beige. Fibiger, M. 2011: Revision of the Micronoctuidae (Lepidoptera: Noctuoidea). Part 4, Taxonomy of the subfamilies Tentaxinae and Micronoctuinae. ISSN 1175-5326 Zootaxa, 2842: 1-188. ...
പുക്കിൾ ഭാഗത്ത് ഈ മുറിവ് ഒരല്പം ഇടത്തേക്ക് മാറീയതിനുശേഷമാണ് താഴേക്ക് നീളുന്നത്.മനുഷ്യശരീരത്തിലെ സുപ്രധാനഭാഗങ്ങളായ നെഞ്ച് (Thorax), വയർ (adbomen) എന്നീ രണ്ടു അറകളിലേയും ആന്തരികാവയങ്ങളെ നേരില് കണ്ടു മനസ്സിലാക്കുവാനും പഠിക്കുവാനും ഈ രീതിയിലുള്ള മുറിക്കൽ ഏറെ സഹായകരമാണ്. രക്തചംക്രമണത്തിന്റേയും, രക്തസമ്മർദ്ദത്തിന്റെയും അടിസ്ഥാനമായ ഹൃദയമിടിപ്പ് മരിച്ച വ്യക്തിയിൽ ഇല്ലാത്തതിനാൽ, ...
When implanting an aortic prosthesis, a sufficient contact between the covered segment and the healthy vessel wall is advisable ... No thoracic/abdominal pain, neurological symptoms or arm claudication were reported. The patient presented free of symptoms, ... The circumscribed thoracoabdominal dissection had to be treated as well due to progression. Considered therapeutic options were ... Herein, we report a case in which a thoracic aortic stent graft was distally extended in order to successfully treat a ...
Branched Thoracic Endovascular Grafts for the Treatment of Thoraco-abdominal Aortic. Official Title ICMJE Branched Thoracic ... Aortic seal zone no less than 15 mm and no greater than 38 mm or Iliac seal zone with an outer wall diameter of no less than 8 ... Branched Thoracic Endovascular Grafts for the Treatment of Thoraco-abdominal Aortic (B-TEVAR). The safety and scientific ... The patient has a thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm where necessary visceral branch vessels (i.e. the celiac, superior ...
Aortic dissection management Thoracic surgery • Lung cancer surgery • Minimally invasive surgery • Pleura & chest wall & ... Thoraco-abdominal aortic surgery & spinal cord protection • Hybrid surgery • Advanced endovascular surgery • Imaging & ... 30th Annual Congress of the Association of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeons of Asia (ATCSA2021) is organized by Wild Blue ... The meeting will cover the updated topics for cardiac and thoracic surgeons, cardiothoracic nurses, perfusionists by the ...
Depending on the location of the heart, ectopia cordis can be thoracic, thoracoabdominal, abdominal, and cervical. ... It is the result of defective fusion of the anterior chest wall. ...
Depending on the location of the heart, ectopia cordis can be thoracic, thoracoabdominal, abdominal, and cervical. ... It is the result of defective fusion of the anterior chest wall. ... non-penetrating impact to the precordial region of chest wall. ...
Imaging in thoracic non-Hodgkin lymphoma begins with standard chest radiography. After a mediastinal lesion is identified, CT ... MRI is also superior to CT scanning for defining masses impinging on the thoracic inlet or at the thoraco-abdominal level. MRI ... Thoracic wall disease. Invasion of the thoracic wall as a direct extension from mediastinal disease is more common in NHL, ... although primary involvement of the thoracic wall may occur. Thoracic wall involvement may appear as a destructive rib or ...
Thoraco-Abdominal Deflection Responses of Post Mortem Human Surrogates in Side Impacts. 2012-10-29 ... Thoracic trauma was graded according to the Abbreviated Injury Scale based on autopsy findings. Peak thoracic deformations were ... non-modular load-wall oblique and non-modular load-wall pure lateral impacts. The thorax and abdomen peak deflections were ... Two chestbands were used on each dummy at the thoracic and abdominal regions. Internal sensors were also used. Effective peak ...
Anatomy photo:35:04-0100 at the SUNY Downstate Medical Center - "Anterior Abdominal Wall: Thoracoabdominal Nerves" Anatomy ... and eleventh thoracic intercostal nerves are continued anteriorly from the intercostal spaces into the abdominal wall; hence ... they are named thoraco-abdominal nerves (or thoracicoabdominal intercostal nerves). They have the same arrangement as the upper ... The lower intercostal nerves supply the Intercostales and abdominal muscles; the last three send branches to the Serratus ...
The reduction in thoraco-abdominal compliance could be explained by a decrease in thoracic wall and/or diaphragmatic wall ... the thoracic cage) and the content (the lung). A thoracic shape (chest wall and lung) more similar to a triangle in the supine ... since the intra-abdominal pressure did not change, it could be supposed that the decrease in thoraco-abdominal compliance ... In addition, the magnitude of the decrease in thoraco-abdominal compliance observed in the prone position was related to the ...
17) posteriorly (forming part of the abdominal wall) reverses the inhalatory movement, while compressing the abdominal contents ... This is an upwardly domed sheet of muscle that separates the thoracic cavity from the abdominal cavity. When it contracts the ... Inhalation and exhalation are brought about by alternately increasing and decreasing the volume of the entire thoraco-abdominal ... The forward and downward movement of, particularly, the posterior end of the sternum pulls the abdominal wall downwards, ...
Ectopia cordis is an extremely rare anterior thoraco-abdominal wall defect. Embryologically it should be thought of as sternal ... They divided these patients into 5 groups: cervical, thoracocervical, thoracic, thoracoabdominal and abdominal. The most common ... Cantrell JR, Haliex JA and Ravitch MM: A syndrome of congenital defects involving the abdominal wall, sternum, diaphragm, ... abdominal wall at five to six weeks. Abnormalities may present as a spectrum varying from simple defects of the sternum to ...
Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms involve both the thoracic and abdominal aorta. Most intact aortic aneurysms do not produce ... with thoracic and thoracoabdominal aneurysms making up 1% to 4% of the total. An aortic aneurysm can rupture from wall weakness ... is reduced in the abdominal aorta as compared to the thoracic aorta. Another is that the abdominal aorta does not possess vasa ... Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are more common than their thoracic counterpart. One reason for this is that elastin, the ...
thoracoabdominal aneurysms extend from the chest into the abdomen. * abdominal aortic aneurysms occur in the abdominal portion ... Most people with thoracic or abdominal aortic aneurysms have no symptoms and are discovered while the patient is having an x- ... Fenestrated Endograft: In about 10 percent of patients with an abdominal aortic aneurysm, the defect in the aorta wall occurs ... Thoraco-Abdominal Aneurysm Repair (TAA): Aneurysms that affect the portion of the aorta above the kidneys into the chest are ...
... thoracic and thoraco-abdominal). He has been invited to give lectures on these topics and he is also Assistant Professor in ... 37 Updates in the management of abdominal wall hernias emergencies and reconstruction.- 38 Updates in the management of ... 30 Updates in the management of non-traumatic thoracic and thoraco-abdominal vascular emergencies.- 31 Updates in the ... 21 Damage control and open abdomen in abdominal injury.- 22.- Operative techniques in abdominal injury.- 23.- Operative ...
... thoracoabdominal nerves and anterior rami of inferior thoracic nervesrectus abdominis:action,flexes trunk and compresses ... abdominal viscera, stabilizes and controls tilt of pelvis ... thoracoabdominal nerves and anterior rami of inferior thoracic ... thoracoabdominal nerves and subcostal nerve external oblique: action compress and support abdominal viscera, flex and rotate ... thoracoabdominal anterior rami of inferior six thoracic nerves; first lumbar nerve internal oblique: action compress and ...
... only 264 patients with abdominal, thoracoabdominal, or combined thoracic and abdominal wounds, and 112 of these were listed as ... laparotomy and simple closure of the wound in the chest wall. No patients were seen who had been treated by the ... One surgeon stated that the thoracic approach might be used if the chest wound was large and the intra-abdominal wound small. ... Abdominal wounds. - Only a small number of patients with abdominal injuries were found in the German hospitals which were ...
... and thoraco-abdominal aneurysms (10%) occur less often. In 25% of patients with ATAA, concomitant abdominal aortic aneurysm is ... The incidence of thoracic aneurysms has been classically estimated to be 2-5 cases per 100 000/year; however, in recent series ... linear wall stress increases, which in turn directly increases the risk of spontaneous aortic rupture-an event with extremely ... Age at onset for TAA is 10 years earlier than for abdominal aneurysms (65 vs 75 years); abdominal aneurysms are more ...
Buy The Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Genetics, Pathophysiology, and Molecular Biology (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences ... Genetic Basis of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections: Potential Relevance to. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Dianna Milewicz ... 3. Long-term Relationship of Wall Stress to the Natural History of AAAs (Finite Element Analysis and Other Methods): Mark F. ... Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracoabdominal Aneurysm, Juxtarenal Aneurysm, Fenestrated Endografts, Branched Endografts, Endovascular ...
I71.01, Dissection of thoracic aorta;. • I71.02, Dissection of abdominal aorta;. • I71.03, Dissection of thoracoabdominal aorta ... A pseudoaneurysm (false aneurysm) is an aneurysm that does not have some or all of the aortic wall layers. Often due to an ... Abdominal (441.4); if ruptured, use 441.3.. An abdominal aortic aneurysm is the most common type. If an aortic aneurysm is ... 441.03, Thoracoabdominal.. Aortic dissections may be classified as type A or B. Type A is defined as involving the ascending ...
The twelfth (subcostal) thoracic nerve is distributed to the abdominal wall and groin. ... hence they are named thoraco-abdominal nerves or thoracicoabdominal intercostal nerves.. The tenth intercostal nerve terminates ... abdominal peritoneum: The serous membrane that forms the lining of the abdominal cavity. It covers most of the intra-abdominal ... of the thoracic spinal nerves T1 to T11. The intercostal nerves are distributed chiefly to the thoracic pleura and abdominal ...
Other branches of the intercostal nerves supply the abdominal wall and the thoracic wall. These nerves enter the muscles of the ... Now thoraco-abdominal nerves, they communicate with the peritoneum, pleura, and diaphragm. The intercostal nerves are ... abdominal wall, passing in between the rectus abdominis and its posterior sheath wall. These nerves branch out to the rectus ... The Thoracic Wall and Mediastinum. Retrieved from http://www.dartmouth.edu/~humananatomy/part_4/chapter_20.html ...
3), suggesting thoracic hypoplasia. Despite the omphalocele, the abdominal wall was raised more than the chest wall, which may ... Plain chest radiograph taken 3 hours after birth showing the thoracoabdominal frontal view. The thorax is small and bell-shaped ... thoracic hypoplasia (higher coat hanger angle in a chest X-ray, bell-shaped chest), abdominal wall abnormalities (omphalocele, ... In conclusion, cases presenting with abnormalities of the abdominal wall, such as polyhydramnios and omphalocele, and ...
... or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the THORACIC AORTA. This proximal descending portion of aorta gives rise to the visceral ... 10/01/2000 - "A thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm involves vessel damage and wall weakening in the thoracic and abdominal ... Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic; Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Aneurysm, Thoracic Aortic; Aneurysm, Thoracoabdominal Aortic; ... Subscribe to New Research on Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the THORACIC ...
... or in the lower descending thoracic aorta and upper abdominal aorta. *Abdominal aneurysms originate in the abdominal aorta, ... It result from degeneration of the medial wall, which occurs as a normal part of the aging process as well as with hypertension ... Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm may originate in the ascending aorta and aortic arch (frequent site of dissection) ... Persistent or intermittent abdominal pain, often localized to middle or lower left side of abdomen. ...
Pathophysiology of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm - Genetic Factors and Homocysteine Metabolism , IntechOpen, Published on: 2011-09- ... Thoracoabdominal and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms, book edited by R.T. Grundmann, ISBN 978-953-307-466-5, Published: September 12 ... In the normal aorta, arterial wall structures elastin, collagen and smooth muscle bear the vast majority of wall stress and act ... MMP-9 has also been implicated in asymmetrical regional wall expansion in the anterior wall of aorta (Sinha et al, 2006). Its ...
  • Thoracic nerve branches exit the spine and go directly to the paravertebral ganglia of the autonomic nervous system, where they are involved in the functions of organs and glands in the head, neck, thorax, and abdomen. (lumenlearning.com)
  • Persistent or intermittent abdominal pain, often localized to middle or lower left side of abdomen. (nursingcrib.com)
  • Omphalocele (common) - a rare abdominal wall defect in which the intestines, liver, and occasionally other organs remain outside of the abdomen in a sac. (medindia.net)
  • Presentation of the thoracic and abdominal cavities is permitted by reflecting the thoraco-abdominal wall with a frontal cut,as if opening a door, All organs of the thorax and abdomen are well exposed and are presented in situ, All the pelvic organs show it. (meiwoplastination.com)
  • This later cellular migration process continues through late embryonic stages, and complete migration and fusion of the secondary body wall elements is fully achieved by E15.5 in the thorax and E16.5 in the abdomen ( Kaufman and Bard, 1999 ). (biologists.org)
  • Anteriorly, the abdominal wall includes the rectus abdominis muscles, and the aponeuroses of the three muscles (the external and internal oblique and the transversus) that form much of the side of the abdomen. (dartmouth.edu)
  • They supply the rectus abdominis muscle and terminate as anterior cutaneous branches of the abdomen supplying the cutaneous sensation to the anterior abdominal wall. (radiopaedia.org)
  • The chest wall motion, measured as Irc, was paradoxic to the abdomen in the most severe state, but with resolution of the clinical illness, the motion became temporally displaced rather than paradoxic. (pcdior.com)
  • Humans have 31 left-right pairs of spinal nerves, each roughly corresponding to a segment of the vertebral column: eight cervical spinal nerve pairs (C1-C8), 12 thoracic pairs (T1-T12), five lumbar pairs (L1-L5), five sacral pairs (S1-S5), and one coccygeal pair. (lumenlearning.com)
  • Iniencephaly is a abnormality of the occipital bone in addition to a spina bifida deformity of the cervical and upper thoracic spine. (fetalsono.com)
  • The third group were those fetuses with Pentalogy of Cantrell, described in the 1950's as a mesodermal defect consisting of a deficiency of the anterior diaphragm, a midline supraumbilical anterior abdominal wall defect often with an omphalocele, a defect in the diaphragmatic pericardium, congenital cardiac abnormalities, consisting of a ventricular septal defect or ventricular aneurysm and a defect of the lower sternum. (fetalsono.com)
  • Cantrell JR, Haliex JA and Ravitch MM: A syndrome of congenital defects involving the abdominal wall, sternum, diaphragm, pericardium and heart. (fetalsono.com)
  • Pentalogy of Cantrell is a rare disorder described by Cantrell in 1958 and characterized by heart anomalies, involving defects of the diaphragm, abdominal wall, supraumbilical region and pericardium. (scirp.org)
  • Regarded as a lethal condition, pentalogy of Cantrell is a rare congenital syndrome that presents in its complete form the following five defects: defect of the abdominal wall closure at the superior part, sternal fusion defect, cardiac malformations, defect of the diaphragm, and defect of the pericardium. (medichub.ro)
  • This syndrome associates five defects: defect in the closure of the anterior superior abdominal wall, defect in the sternal fusion, heart malformations, defect of the diaphragm and defect of the pericardium. (medichub.ro)
  • The complete spectrum of chest trauma includes pneumothorax, hemothorax, destruction of the integrity of the chest wall and diaphragm, thoracic visceral damage, and combined thoracoabdominal injuries. (thoracickey.com)
  • Combined congenital defects of the anterior abdominal wall, sternum, diaphragm, pericardium, and heart: A case report and review of the syndrome. (prolekare.cz)
  • Splenic tissue gains access to the left pleural space and derives its blood supply from the pleura, chest wall or diaphragm. (bmj.com)
  • Diaphragmatic rupture is a tear of the diaphragm as a result of blunt abdominal or lower thoracic trauma. (eurorad.org)
  • Among the 903 thoracoabdominal injuries treated in the period 1943-45 by the 2d Auxiliary Surgical Group, there were 66 (7.3 percent) in which the diaphragm was perforated from below. (army.mil)
  • 7. Vargas Lуpez AJ, Fernбndez Carballal C, Panadero Useros T, Aracil Gonzбlez C, Garbizu Vidorreta JM, Gonzбlez Rodrigбlvarez R. [Anterior and anterolateral approach in the treatment of thoracic and lumbar vertebral metastasis causing spinal cord compression]. (theunj.org)
  • Ravitch MM: Congenital deformities of the chest wall and their operative correction. (fetalsono.com)
  • The entitled syndrome of Cantrell is detected at birth, and was first described by Cantrell in 1958, constituting, until today a surgical challenge for the complexity of the congenital malformations, and included the presence of five main malformations: upper abdominal wall abnormality, sternal defect, anterior diaphragmatic defect, pericardium defect, and congenital heart abnormalities . (scirp.org)
  • Pentalogia lui Cantrell este un sindrom congenital rar, considerat letal, care asociază în forma sa completă următoarele cinci defecte: defect la nivelul peretelui abdominal anterior superior, defect de închidere a sternului, malformaţii cardiace şi defecte ale diafragmului şi ale pericardului. (medichub.ro)
  • Ventral body wall (VBW) defects are among the most common congenital malformations, yet their embryonic origin and underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly characterised. (biologists.org)
  • congenital condition in which the heart is exposed on the thoracic wall because of maldevelopment of the sternum and pericardium. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Pentalogy of Cantrell is a low frequency disease within multiple pregnancy, characterized with malformations with five anomalies defects: lower sternal defect, midline supraumbilical abdominal wall defect, diaphragmatic pericardial defect, anterior diaphragmatic defect and various intracardiac malformations. (bvsalud.org)
  • Abdominal wall defects are common in humans and cause significant morbidity and mortality ( Wilson and Johnson, 2004 ). (biologists.org)
  • 2 EC with a midline supraumbilical abdominal-wall defect (omphalocele), caudosternal cleft, anterior diaphragmatic hernia along with pericardial and intracardiac defects constitute pentalogy of Cantrell association. (omjournal.org)
  • The infant was a male child with a birth weight of 3188 g, and was suspected to have Kagami-Ogata syndrome after birth based on thoracic hypoplasia, swallowing function abnormalities, and peculiar facial features. (springer.com)
  • It result from degeneration of the medial wall, which occurs as a normal part of the aging process as well as with hypertension, atherosclerosis, trauma or infection, immunologic conditions, and as a complication of Marfan Syndrome. (nursingcrib.com)
  • Individuals who are born with Marfan syndrome, which is a genetic condition affecting the connective tissue, are at a higher risk for thoracic aortic aneurysm. (epainassist.com)
  • Individuals with connective tissue disorders (Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome) are at a significantly higher risk for developing thoracic aortic aneurysm. (epainassist.com)
  • Embryologically it should be thought of as sternal cleft defect resulting from a failure of fusion of the mesenchymal primordia that will form the cartilaginous sternum and the ventral abdominal wall at five to six weeks. (fetalsono.com)
  • It frequently results from left upper abdominal trauma with concomitant splenic damage and left diaphragmatic tear. (bmj.com)
  • Methods: Data of 14 cases, which have been diagnosed with diaphragmatic injury after trauma or during surgical procedure that was performed because of concomitant abdominal or intra-thoracic injury between January 2008 and April 2013, were retrospectively reviewed. (scirp.org)