Methods of maintaining or growing biological materials in controlled laboratory conditions. These include the cultures of CELLS; TISSUES; organs; or embryo in vitro. Both animal and plant tissues may be cultured by a variety of methods. Cultures may derive from normal or abnormal tissues, and consist of a single cell type or mixed cell types.
A technique for maintaining or growing TISSUE in vitro, usually by DIFFUSION, perifusion, or PERFUSION. The tissue is cultured directly after removal from the host without being dispersed for cell culture.
Methods for maintaining or growing CELLS in vitro.
Techniques used in studying bacteria.
Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.
Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.
Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.
Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.
A group of islands in the Lesser Antilles in the West Indies, the three main islands being St. Croix, St. Thomas, and St. John. The capital is Charlotte Amalie. Before 1917 the U.S. Virgin Islands were held by the Danish and called the Danish West Indies but the name was changed when the United States acquired them by purchase.
A technique for maintenance or growth of animal organs in vitro. It refers to three-dimensional cultures of undisaggregated tissue retaining some or all of the histological features of the tissue in vivo. (Freshney, Culture of Animal Cells, 3d ed, p1)
Graphic representations, especially of the face, of real persons, usually posed, living or dead. (From Thesaurus for Graphic Materials II, p540, 1995)
Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.
One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.
The body fluid that circulates in the vascular system (BLOOD VESSELS). Whole blood includes PLASMA and BLOOD CELLS.
Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
The killing of infants at birth or soon after.
Techniques used in microbiology.
1861-1865 conflict between the Union (Northern states) and the 11 Southern states that seceded and were organized as the Confederate States of America.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
Methods for cultivation of cells, usually on a large-scale, in a closed system for the purpose of producing cells or cellular products to harvest.
Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.
Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Societies whose membership is limited to scientists.
Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Process of using a rotating machine to generate centrifugal force to separate substances of different densities, remove moisture, or simulate gravitational effects. It employs a large motor-driven apparatus with a long arm, at the end of which human and animal subjects, biological specimens, or equipment can be revolved and rotated at various speeds to study gravitational effects. (From Websters, 10th ed; McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
A funnel-shaped fibromuscular tube that conducts food to the ESOPHAGUS, and air to the LARYNX and LUNGS. It is located posterior to the NASAL CAVITY; ORAL CAVITY; and LARYNX, and extends from the SKULL BASE to the inferior border of the CRICOID CARTILAGE anteriorly and to the inferior border of the C6 vertebra posteriorly. It is divided into the NASOPHARYNX; OROPHARYNX; and HYPOPHARYNX (laryngopharynx).
A complex sulfated polymer of galactose units, extracted from Gelidium cartilagineum, Gracilaria confervoides, and related red algae. It is used as a gel in the preparation of solid culture media for microorganisms, as a bulk laxative, in making emulsions, and as a supporting medium for immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Solutions which, upon administration, will temporarily arrest cardiac activity. They are used in the performance of heart surgery.
A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
Procedures for collecting, preserving, and transporting of specimens sufficiently stable to provide accurate and precise results suitable for clinical interpretation.
A series of steps taken in order to conduct research.
A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria. Its organisms are normal inhabitants of the oral, respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital cavities of humans, animals, and insects. Some species may be pathogenic.
A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.
Commercially prepared reagent sets, with accessory devices, containing all of the major components and literature necessary to perform one or more designated diagnostic tests or procedures. They may be for laboratory or personal use.
Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.
The destruction of ERYTHROCYTES by many different causal agents such as antibodies, bacteria, chemicals, temperature, and changes in tonicity.
Material coughed up from the lungs and expectorated via the mouth. It contains MUCUS, cellular debris, and microorganisms. It may also contain blood or pus.
The complete absence, or (loosely) the paucity, of gaseous or dissolved elemental oxygen in a given place or environment. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.
A genus of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, coccoid bacteria. Its organisms occur singly, in pairs, and in tetrads and characteristically divide in more than one plane to form irregular clusters. Natural populations of Staphylococcus are found on the skin and mucous membranes of warm-blooded animals. Some species are opportunistic pathogens of humans and animals.
Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
Generating tissue in vitro for clinical applications, such as replacing wounded tissues or impaired organs. The use of TISSUE SCAFFOLDING enables the generation of complex multi-layered tissues and tissue structures.
The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.
A cytologic technique for measuring the functional capacity of stem cells by assaying their activity.
A technique of culturing mixed cell types in vitro to allow their synergistic or antagonistic interactions, such as on CELL DIFFERENTIATION or APOPTOSIS. Coculture can be of different types of cells, tissues, or organs from normal or disease states.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.
A procedure to stop the contraction of MYOCARDIUM during HEART SURGERY. It is usually achieved with the use of chemicals (CARDIOPLEGIC SOLUTIONS) or cold temperature (such as chilled perfusate).
Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.
Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.
Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.
Process of growing viruses in live animals, plants, or cultured cells.
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
A species of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria that produces TUBERCULOSIS in humans, other primates, CATTLE; DOGS; and some other animals which have contact with humans. Growth tends to be in serpentine, cordlike masses in which the bacilli show a parallel orientation.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
These are generally performed using tissue culture methods that rely on aseptic technique. Aseptic technique aims to avoid ... This vaccine was made possible by the cell culture research of John Franklin Enders, Thomas Huckle Weller, and Frederick ... Cell culture is a fundamental component of tissue culture and tissue engineering, as it establishes the basics of growing and ... establishing the methodology of tissue culture. Cell culture techniques were advanced significantly in the 1940s and 1950s to ...
It was Enders who got Weller involved in researching viruses and tissue-culture techniques for determining infectious disease ... 1954 The Cultivation of the Poliomyelitis Viruses in Tissue Culture Thomas Huckle Weller papers, 1896-2007 (inclusive), 1940- ... "Thomas Huckle Weller and the successful culture of poliovirus.", Mayo Clin. Proc. (published May 1997), 72 (5), p. 422, doi: ... Thomas Huckle Weller (June 15, 1915 - August 23, 2008) was an American virologist. He, John Franklin Enders and Frederick ...
In 1949, Enders, Thomas Huckle Weller, and Frederick Chapman Robbins reported successful in vitro culture of an animal virus- ... Prize motivation: for their discovery of the ability of poliomyelitis viruses to grow in cultures of various types of tissue. " ... Jonas Salk applied the Enders-Weller-Robbins technique to produce large quantities of poliovirus, and then developed a polio ... "for their discovery of the ability of poliomyelitis viruses to grow in cultures of various types of tissue". Meanwhile, ...
Thomas Huckle Weller, and Frederick Robbins would successfully grow poliovirus in laboratory cultures of non-nerve tissue in ... The mass immunization techniques that Sabin pioneered with his associates effectively eradicated polio in Cincinnati. Against ... This also suggested that polio virus could be grown in other tissues besides embryonic brain tissue, leading to easier and ...
Thomas Huckle Weller (2004). Growing Pathogens in Tissue Cultures: Fifty Years in Academic Tropical Medicine, Pediatrics, and ... The origin of viruses is unclear because they do not form fossils, so molecular techniques are used to investigate how they ... In 1949, John Franklin Enders, Thomas Weller, and Frederick Robbins grew poliovirus in cultured cells from aborted human ... In 1906 Ross Granville Harrison invented a method for growing tissue in lymph, and in 1913 E. Steinhardt, C. Israeli, and R.A. ...
This was finally proved by the first isolation of the virus in cell cultures, by the Nobel laureate Thomas Huckle Weller, in ... DNA techniques have made it possible to diagnose "mild" cases, caused by VZV or HSV, in which the symptoms include fever, ... Although VZV has been detected in autopsies of nervous tissue, there are no methods to find dormant virus in the ganglia of ... Although DNA analysis techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can be used to look for DNA of herpesviruses in spinal ...
Thomas Huckle Weller, and Frederick Chapman Robbins grew polio virus in cultures of living animal cells. Over 4,800 species of ... These techniques rely on the availability of ancient viral DNA or RNA, but most viruses that have been preserved and stored in ... Although many are very specific about which host species or tissue they attack, each species of virus relies on a particular ... Their origin remains unclear because they do not fossilize, so molecular techniques have been the best way to hypothesise about ...
This was finally proved by the first isolation of the virus in cell cultures, by the Nobel laureate Thomas Huckle Weller, in ... Although DNA analysis techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can be used to look for DNA of herpesviruses in spinal ... Although VZV has been detected in autopsies of nervous tissue,[36] there are no methods to find dormant virus in the ganglia of ... Thomas SL, Hall AJ (2004). "What does epidemiology tell us about risk factors for herpes zoster?". Lancet Infect. Dis. 4 (1): ...
It was Enders who got Weller involved in researching viruses and tissue-culture techniques for determining infectious disease ... Thomas Weller Thomas Huckle Weller, né le 15 juin 1915 à Ann Arbor dans le Michigan aux États-Unis et décédé le 23 août 2008 à ... Thomas Weller Thomas Huckle Weller, né le 15 juin 1915 à Ann Arbor dans le Michigan aux États-Unis et décédé le 23 août 2008 à ... 托马斯·哈克尔·韦勒(Thomas Huckle Weller,1915年6月15日-2008年8月23日)是一位美国病毒学家。1954年,他与约翰
These are generally performed using tissue culture methods that rely on aseptic technique. Aseptic technique aims to avoid ... This vaccine was made possible by the cell culture research of John Franklin Enders, Thomas Huckle Weller, and Frederick ... Cell culture is a fundamental component of tissue culture and tissue engineering, as it establishes the basics of growing and ... establishing the methodology of tissue culture. Cell culture techniques were advanced significantly in the 1940s and 1950s to ...
It was Enders who got Weller involved in researching viruses and tissue-culture techniques for determining infectious disease ... 1954 The Cultivation of the Poliomyelitis Viruses in Tissue Culture Thomas Huckle Weller papers, 1896-2007 (inclusive), 1940- ... "Thomas Huckle Weller and the successful culture of poliovirus.", Mayo Clin. Proc. (published May 1997), 72 (5), p. 422, doi: ... Thomas Huckle Weller (June 15, 1915 - August 23, 2008) was an American virologist. He, John Franklin Enders and Frederick ...
... establishing the methodology of tissue culture.[4] Cell culture techniques were advanced significantly in the 1940s and 1950s ... This vaccine was made possible by the cell culture research of John Franklin Enders, Thomas Huckle Weller, and Frederick ... Tissue culture and engineering. Cell culture is a fundamental component of tissue culture and tissue engineering, as it ... The historical development and methods of cell culture are closely interrelated to those of tissue culture and organ culture. ...
As conceptualized by Thomas Kuhn, science can either spring forth revolution or follow in its wake. Normal science may sound ... The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1954 was awarded jointly to John Franklin Enders, Thomas Huckle Weller and Frederick ... "for their discovery of the ability of poliomyelitis viruses to grow in cultures of various types of tissue." Awarded just a ... Their discovery was revolutionary in the sense that they established a technique for growing virus easily under cell culture ...
Thomas Huckle Weller & Fredrick Chapman Robbins conducted significant advances in cell culture techniques, which assisted in ... Callus Culture - a tissue culture technique that requires growth regulators and extracts from an organ or tissue culture ... Meristem - the embryonic tissue of plants Micropropagation - a plant tissue culture technique, where offspring are cloned from ... Important Cell Culture Techniques. There are two different ways to culture cells which are suspension and adherent cultures. ...
Growing Pathogens in Tissue Cultures: Fifty Years in Academic Tropical Medicine..., by Thomas Huckle Weller. - book suggestion. ... Impressed by John Northrops success in crystallizing proteins, Stanley applied those techniques to his extracts of the tobacco ... Thomas Huckle Weller was an American physician, microbiologist and virologist who was a co-recipient of the Nobel Prize for ... for the successful cultivation of poliomyelitis virus in tissue cultures. This made it possible to study the virus "in the test ...
Adipose tissues from various anatomical sites are characterized by different patterns of gene expression and regulation. ... Lower limb alactic anaerobic power output assessed with different techniques in mordib obesità. J Endocrinol Invest. 2002;25: ... Mayer EJ, Huckle W, Johnson RG Jr. et al. Characterization and quantitation of phospholamban and its phosphorylation state ... Methods in cardiomyocyte isolation, culture, and gene transfer. J Mol Cell Cardiol. 2011;51:288-98 ...
Cell Lines and Tissue Culture.. PC14PE6 cells were isolated from pleural effusions developed in a nude mouse injected i.v. with ... Goldman C. K., Kendall R. L., Cabrera G., Soroceanu L., Heike Y., Gillespie G. Y., Siegal G. P., Mao X., Bett A. J., Huckle W. ... In Situ mRNA Hybridization Technique.. Specific oligonucleotide DNA probes in the antisense orientation were designed ... R., Thomas K. A., Curiel D. T. Paracrine expression of a native soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibits ...
Thomas, Peter( 2009) The Gramscian Moment, Philosophy, Hegemony and order. Wikimedia Commons is arts typed to Antonio Gramsci. ... It continues discourse-based that this could engage the contrast of the complex own cultures, and the iframe might restore a ... Electrical Engineering: A " wisdom exposed with Cosmic Cast by a technique store and under the remnant of the accordance method ... 1185CrossRefGoogle ScholarEyras E, Reymond A, Castelo R, Bye JM, Camara F, Flicek novel, Huckle EJ, Parra G, Shteynberg DD, ...
Thomas Huckle Weller (2004). Growing Pathogens in Tissue Cultures: Fifty Years in Academic Tropical Medicine, Pediatrics, and ... The powerful techniques developed by life sciences are becoming the basis of engineering approaches towards nanomaterials, ... Thomas Weller, and Frederick Robbins grew poliovirus in cultured cells from aborted human embryonic tissue,[34] the first virus ... In 1906 Ross Granville Harrison invented a method for growing tissue in lymph, and in 1913 E. Steinhardt, C. Israeli, and R.A. ...
Hence, differential requirements for coatomer activity among embryonic tissues lead to tissue-specific developmental defects. ... Collins JE, Wright CL, Edwards CA, Davis MP, Grinham JA, Cole CG, Goward ME, Aguado B, Mallya M, Mokrab Y, Huckle EJ, Beare DM ... limiting recessive screens in culture. Cultured embryonic stem (ES) cells provide access to all of the genes required to ... Teixeira A, Tahiri-Alaoui A, West S, Thomas B, Ramadass A, Martianov I, Dye M, James W, Proudfoot NJ and Akoulitchev A ...
Thomas WG, Thekkumkara TJ, Motel TJ, Baker KM. Stable expression of a truncated AT1A receptor in CHO-K1 cells: the carboxyl- ... Huckle WR, Dy RC, Earp HS. Calcium-dependent increase in tyrosine kinase activity stimulated by angiotensin II. Proc Natl Acad ... Angiotensin II stimulates phospholipases C and A2 in cultured rat mesangial cells. Am J Physiol.. 1987;253:C113-C120. ... Tissue-specific expression of alternatively spliced gene products yields at least 14 different Src-related kinases.55 Three ...
This was finally proved by the first isolation of the virus in cell cultures, by the Nobel laureate Thomas Huckle Weller, in ... Although DNA analysis techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can be used to look for DNA of herpesviruses in spinal ... Although VZV has been detected in autopsies of nervous tissue,[36] there are no methods to find dormant virus in the ganglia of ... Thomas SL, Hall AJ (2004). "What does epidemiology tell us about risk factors for herpes zoster?". Lancet Infect. Dis. 4 (1): ...
John Franklin Enders, Thomas Huckle Weller and Frederick Chapman Robbins. "for their discovery of the ability of poliomyelitis ... viruses to grow in cultures of various types of tissue". The Nobel Prize in Literature 1954. Ernest Miller Hemingway. "for his ... "for pioneering contributions to the development of neutron scattering techniques for studies of condensed matter" ... Venkatraman Ramakrishnan, Thomas A. Steitz and Ada E. Yonath. "for studies of the structure and function of the ribosome" ...
Fraley, M.E., W.F. Hoffman, R.S. Rubino, R.W. Hungate, A.J. Tebben, R.Z. Rutledge, R.C. McFall, W.R. Huckle, R.L. Kendall, K.E ... We thank Tamlyn Thomas for technical assistance, Dr. Zheng-Gen Jin and Chelsea Wong for providing HUVECs, Karen Bentley and Ian ... B-F) ECs cultured on an elastic substrate were transiently transfected with Src, Yes, or Fyn siRNA or Lipofectamine 2000 alone ... Then, we used a siRNA technique to show that Fyn, not Src and Yes, was the kinase required for PECAM-1 phosphorylation in ...
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... we confirmed tissue-specific expression of ten of the novel isoforms. These findings suggest that alternative transcripts of ... Tissue specific expression of receptor isoforms The nucleotide sequences of the probes used in the GNF gene atlas arrays and ... Huckle WR, Roche RI: Post-transcriptional control of expression of sFlt-1, an endogenous inhibitor of vascular endothelial ... Kendall RL, Thomas KA: Inhibition of vascular endothelial cell growth factor activity by an endogenously encoded soluble ...
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John Franklin Enders, Thomas Huckle Weller and Frederick Chapman Robbins. "for their discovery of the ability of poliomyelitis ... viruses to grow in cultures of various types of tissue". The Nobel Prize in Literature 1954. Ernest Miller Hemingway. "for his ... "for pioneering contributions to the development of neutron scattering techniques for studies of condensed matter". Bertram N. ... Venkatraman Ramakrishnan, Thomas A. Steitz and Ada E. Yonath. "for studies of the structure and function of the ribosome" ...
John Franklin Enders, Thomas Huckle Weller and Frederick Chapman Robbins. "for their discovery of the ability of poliomyelitis ... viruses to grow in cultures of various types of tissue". The Nobel Prize in Literature 1954. Ernest Miller Hemingway. "for his ... "for pioneering contributions to the development of neutron scattering techniques for studies of condensed matter". Bertram N. ... Venkatraman Ramakrishnan, Thomas A. Steitz and Ada E. Yonath. "for studies of the structure and function of the ribosome" ...
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M. J. Murnane and S. W. Tam, "Isolation and characterization of RNA from snap-frozen tissues and cultured cells," The Journal ... C. W. Price, D. C. Leslie, and J. P. Landers, "Nucleic acid extraction techniques and application to the microchip," Lab on a ... D. Huckle, "The impact of new trends in POCTs for companion diagnostics, non-invasive testing and molecular diagnostics," ... M. Franzreb, M. Siemann-Herzberg, T. J. Hobley, and O. R. T. Thomas, "Protein purification using magnetic adsorbent particles ...
Tissue Engineering Lab [Blacksburg]. The Tissue Engineering Laboratory explores methods for developing engineered bone and ... These imaging techniques are being used in numerous collaborative projects ranging from temperature mapping to evaluate new ... One aim is to develop new engineering tools and in-vitro culture platforms to illuminate cellular response to ... Thomas Smith (Wake Forest School of Medicine); Shay Soker (Wake Forest School of Medicine); Harald Sontheimer; Joel Stitzel ( ...
John Franklin Enders, Thomas Huckle Weller and Frederick Chapman Robbins. "for their discovery of the ability of poliomyelitis ... viruses to grow in cultures of various types of tissue". The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1976 ... He demonstrated the technique used to suture together open vessels, and even to transplant whole organs from one animal to ... Thomas Addison, the English doctor, observed a rare disease with a fatal course, which was characterized chiefly by anemia, ...
Regulation of the nitric oxide system in human adipose tissue.. Engeli, S. and Janke, J. and Gorzelniak, K. and Boehnke, J. and ... Microscopy Research and Technique 64 (5-6): 435-440. August 2004 Adipositas - Warum fuer den Nephrologen von Interesse?. Jordan ... Efficiency of transgenic rat production is independent of transgene-construct and overnight embryo culture.. Popova, E. and ... and Huckle, E.J. and Chatterji, S. and Dewey, C. and Pachter, L. and Kouranov, A. and Mourelatos, Z. and Hatzigeorgiou, A.G. ...
Ahrens-Fath I, Politz O, Geserick C, Haendler B: Androgen receptor function is modulated by the tissue-specific AR45 variant. ... Huckle EJ, Hume J, Hunt PJ, Hunt AR, Isherwood J, Jacob L, Johnson D, Jones S, de Jong PJ, Joseph SS, Keenan S, Kelly S, ... Thomas K, Thorpe A, Timms K, Tracey A, Trevanion S, Tromans AC, dUrso M, Verduzco D, Villasana D, Waldron L, Wall M, Wang Q, ... Substitution of arginine-839 by cysteine or histidine in the androgen receptor causes different receptor phenotypes in cultured ...
Tissue Culture Lymph Vaccinia Poliovirus Ernest William Goodpasture Alice Miles Woodruff John Franklin Enders Thomas Huckle ... The powerful techniques developed by life sciences are becoming the basis of engineering approaches towards nanomaterials, ... Thomas Weller, and Frederick Robbins grew polio virus in cultured human embryo cells, the first virus to be grown without using ... In 1906, Ross Granville Harrison invented a method for growing tissue in lymph, and, in 1913, E. Steinhardt, C. Israeli, and R ...
A simple technique for obtaining functionally isolated guard cells in epidermal strips of Vicia faba. in: Planta , ISSN 1432- ... Increasing claims for soft tissue injuries in workers compensation: Cost shifting and moral hazard. in: Journal of risk and ... Thomas A. , Kasif, Simon , Kaspryzk, Arek , Kennedy, Scot , Kent, W. James , Kitts, Paul , Koonin, Eugene V. , Korf, Ian , Kulp ... Huckle, Elizabeth J. , Hume, Jennifer , Hunt, Paul J. , Hunt, Adrienne R. , Isherwood, Judith , Jacob, Leni , Johnson, David , ...
  • Thomas Huckle Weller (June 15, 1915 - August 23, 2008) was an American virologist. (dbpedia.org)
  • توماس هكل ولر (بالإنجليزية: Thomas Huckle Weller) ـ (15 يونيو 1915 ـ 23 أغسطس 2008) عالم فيروسات أمريكي، تقاسم 20 بك جائزة نوبل في الطب لعام 1954 مع مواطنيه جون إندرز وفردريك روبنز لاكتشافه طريقة لاستزراع فيروس شلل الأطفال معملياً مستخدماً أنسجة مأخوذة من القرود. (dbpedia.org)
  • Thomas H. Weller (Ann Arbor, Míchigan, Estados Unidos 15 de junio de 1915 - Needham (condado de Norfolk, Massachusetts) 23 de agosto de 2008). (dbpedia.org)
  • Thomas Huckle Weller (geboren am 15. (dbpedia.org)
  • It was Enders who got Weller involved in researching viruses and tissue-culture techniques for determining infectious disease causes. (dbpedia.org)
  • Thomas Weller Thomas Huckle Weller, né le 15 juin 1915 à Ann Arbor dans le Michigan aux États-Unis et décédé le 23 août 2008 à Needham dans le Massachusetts, est un microbiologiste américain. (dbpedia.org)
  • Thomas Huckle Weller (Ann Arbor, 15 juni 1915 - Needham, 23 augustus 2008) was een Amerikaans viroloog en Nobelprijswinnaar. (dbpedia.org)
  • Thomas Huckle Weller (Ann Arbor, 15 de junho de 1915 - Needham, 23 de agosto de 2008) foi um virologista estadunidense. (dbpedia.org)
  • This vaccine was made possible by the cell culture research of John Franklin Enders, Thomas Huckle Weller, and Frederick Chapman Robbins, who were awarded a Nobel Prize for their discovery of a method of growing the virus in monkey kidney cell cultures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Shampo, M A (1997), "Thomas Huckle Weller and the successful culture of poliovirus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Won Nobel Prize for Polio, Boston Globe, August 25, 2008 Thomas H. Weller on Nobelprize.org including the Nobel Lecture, December 11, 1954 The Cultivation of the Poliomyelitis Viruses in Tissue Culture Thomas Huckle Weller papers, 1896-2007 (inclusive), 1940-1990 (bulk). (wikipedia.org)
  • Throughout the 1940-1950s , John Franklin Enders, Thomas Huckle Weller & Fredrick Chapman Robbins conducted significant advances in cell culture techniques, which assisted in virology research, where viruses were developed within cell cultures to manufacture vaccines. (edu.au)
  • Thomas Huckle Weller was an American physician, microbiologist and virologist who was a co-recipient of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1954 (which shared with John Enders and Frederick Robbins ) for the successful cultivation of poliomyelitis virus in tissue cultures. (todayinsci.com)
  • He, John Franklin Enders and Frederick Chapman Robbins were awarded a Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1954 for showing how to cultivate poliomyelitis viruses in a test tube, using a combination of human embryonic skin and muscle tissue. (dbpedia.org)
  • In 1954 won hij samen met John Franklin Enders en Frederick Chapman Robbins de Nobelprijs voor de Fysiologie of Geneeskunde voor het ontdekken van een wijze om poliomyelitis virussen te kweken in een reageerbuis. (dbpedia.org)
  • Cells can be isolated from solid tissues by digesting the extracellular matrix using enzymes such as collagenase, trypsin, or pronase, before agitating the tissue to release the cells into suspension. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ross Granville Harrison, working at Johns Hopkins Medical School and then at Yale University, published results of his experiments from 1907 to 1910, establishing the methodology of tissue culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • The availability of appropriate nutrients and conditions will allow cells that are removed from various tissues and organs to continue to develop in vitro, where the cell acts as an independent unit. (edu.au)
  • Carrel further refined his technique to develop organs outside the body. (edu.au)
  • He demonstrated the technique used to suture together open vessels, and even to transplant whole organs from one animal to another with excellent results. (pharmaceuticalintelligence.com)
  • In 1885, Wilhelm Roux removed a portion of the medullary plate of an embryonic chicken and maintained it in a warm saline solution for several days, establishing the principle of tissue culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also in 1910 , with the assistance of Montrose Burrows, Burrows and Carrel successfully cultured embryonic and adult tissue from a variety of mammals. (edu.au)
  • Viral culture is also related, with cells as hosts for the viruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Growing viruses in cell cultures allowed preparation of purified viruses for the manufacture of vaccines. (wikipedia.org)
  • One complication of these blood-derived ingredients is the potential for contamination of the culture with viruses or prions, particularly in medical biotechnology applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell Culture arose in the 19th century when physiologist Sydney Ringer developed a salt solution that was able to sustain the beating of an animal heart outside the body, however the principle of tissue culture was first evident in 1885 when Ross Granville Harrison and Wilhelm Roux established the method known as tissue culture. (edu.au)
  • In 1906, Ross Granville Harrison invented a method for growing tissue in lymph, and, in 1913, E. Steinhardt, C. Israeli, and R. A. Lambert used this method to grow vaccinia virus in fragments of guinea pig corneal tissue. (metal-invest.pl)
  • Mononuclear cells can be released from soft tissues by enzymatic digestion with enzymes such as collagenase , trypsin , or pronase , which break down the extracellular matrix . (wikidoc.org)
  • Other adherent cultures cells can be grown on tissue culture plastic, which may be coated with extracellular matrix components (e.g. collagen or fibronectin ) to increase its adhesion properties and provide other signals needed for growth. (wikidoc.org)
  • The process of cell culture consists of the isolation of cells, the maintaining of cells within culture, the cross contamination of a cell line, the manipulation of cultured cells, establishing human cell lines and the development of a generation of hybridomas. (edu.au)
  • Most cells require a surface or an artificial substrate (adherent or monolayer culture) whereas others can be grown free floating in culture medium (suspension culture). (wikipedia.org)
  • The historical development and methods of cell culture are closely interrelated to those of tissue culture and organ culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common methods of cell culture are tissue and organ culture. (edu.au)
  • Throughout the 1930s Charles Lindbergh, with the assistance of his mentor Alexis Carrel, developed devices that improved tissue and organ culture. (edu.au)
  • [2] The technique of cell culture allows for numerous applications, such as the investigation of the biochemistry of cells, the generation of artificial tissues and has made significant impact in the research of virology through the testing of chemical compounds and drugs on specific cell types. (edu.au)
  • Cell culture techniques were advanced significantly in the 1940s and 1950s to support research in virology. (wikipedia.org)
  • The lifespan of most cells is genetically determined, but some cell culturing cells have been "transformed" into immortal cells which will reproduce indefinitely if the optimal conditions are provided. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cells within culture can either be genetically identical or may show genetic variation. (edu.au)
  • From 1907-1910 Harrison established the methodology of tissue culture, which became a common technique in the mid 1900s. (edu.au)
  • From 1910-1923 Alexis Carrel successfully developed the technique for organ transplantation. (edu.au)
  • A. I. Mutin and J. B. Christopher, "RNA isolation from yeast using silica matrices," Journal of Biomolecular Techniques , vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 316-317, 2005. (hindawi.com)
  • Cell culture research has assisted in manufacturing antibodies, vaccines and cell-produced drugs. (edu.au)
  • Arthur Ebling maintained Carrel's cell line, through Carrels meticulous aseptic techniques that reduced contamination, until 1946 when the culture was terminated. (edu.au)
  • Cell culture is the process by which cells are grown under controlled conditions, generally outside their natural environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell culture is the process by which either prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells are grown under controlled conditions. (wikidoc.org)
  • After the cells of interest have been isolated from living tissue, they can subsequently be maintained under carefully controlled conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • In practice, the term "cell culture" now refers to the culturing of cells derived from multicellular eukaryotes, especially animal cells, in contrast with other types of culture that also grow cells, such as plant tissue culture, fungal culture, and microbiological culture (of microbes). (wikipedia.org)
  • The laboratory technique of maintaining live cell lines (a population of cells descended from a single cell and containing the same genetic makeup) separated from their original tissue source became more robust in the middle 20th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cells can be isolated from tissues for ex vivo culture in several ways. (wikipedia.org)
  • however, only the white cells are capable of growth in culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alternatively, pieces of tissue can be placed in growth media, and the cells that grow out are available for culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cells that are cultured directly from a subject are known as primary cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • In practice the term "cell culture" has come to refer to the culturing of cells derived from multicellular eukaryotes, especially animal cells. (wikidoc.org)
  • Cells can be easily purified from blood, however only the white cellsare capable of growth in culture. (wikidoc.org)
  • Others require a surface, such as most cells derived from solid tissues. (wikidoc.org)
  • Cells grown unattached to a surface are referred to as suspension cultures . (wikidoc.org)
  • As cells generally continue to divide in culture, they generally grow to fill the available area or volume. (wikidoc.org)
  • Cell Culture is the process where cells are derived from an organism, such as a plant or animal and is placed within an artificially controlled environment to stimulate growth. (edu.au)
  • These flasks allowed the cells to be submerged in a larger medium rather than a hanging drop culture and were able to be maintained for a few weeks rather than a few days without subculturing. (edu.au)
  • Its Next download mindestbuchführung lies the figures of classifier techniques various, Usually is the norms of these cells for database elements. (sixpersimmons.com)
  • A simple technique for obtaining functionally isolated guard cells in epidermal strips of Vicia faba in: Planta , ISSN 1432-2048, Vol. 126 (3. (nationallizenzen.de)
  • Today, cell culture is a significant principle for research. (edu.au)
  • In 2006 the US Congress divided $1 billion to various pharmaceutical companies to develop cell cultured influenza vaccines and there have been significant advances through the establishment of various centers that specialize and support cell culture research. (edu.au)
  • This method is known as explant culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • Electrical Engineering: A " wisdom exposed with Cosmic Cast by a technique store and under the remnant of the accordance method. (sixpersimmons.com)
  • In this context, a close relationship has been observed between accumulation of adipose tissue and impairment of cardiac function in both human and experimental models [ 4 - 9 ]. (medsci.org)
  • Aside from temperature and gas mixture, the most commonly varied factor in culture systems is the cell growth medium. (wikipedia.org)
  • The expanding role of angiotensin II indicates that multiple signal transduction pathways are likely to be activated in a tissue-specific manner. (ahajournals.org)
  • Finally, by mining public gene expression data (MPSS and microarrays), we confirmed tissue-specific expression of ten of the novel isoforms. (biomedcentral.com)
  • With the exception of some derived from tumors, most primary cell cultures have limited lifespan. (wikipedia.org)
  • [1] Cell cultures consist of primary cultures, semi continuous cell cultures and continuous cell cultures. (edu.au)
  • Harrison utilized the process of tissue cell culture to analyze nerve fibres in vitro. (edu.au)
  • Culture conditions vary widely for each cell type, and variation of conditions for a particular cell type can result in different phenotypes being expressed. (wikidoc.org)
  • Steroid hormone receptors are ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate eukaryotic gene expression and affect cellular proliferation and differentiation in target tissues. (t3db.ca)
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