Radionuclide Imaging: The production of an image obtained by cameras that detect the radioactive emissions of an injected radionuclide as it has distributed differentially throughout tissues in the body. The image obtained from a moving detector is called a scan, while the image obtained from a stationary camera device is called a scintiphotograph.Radionuclide Angiography: The measurement of visualization by radiation of any organ after a radionuclide has been injected into its blood supply. It is used to diagnose heart, liver, lung, and other diseases and to measure the function of those organs, except renography, for which RADIOISOTOPE RENOGRAPHY is available.Radioisotopes: Isotopes that exhibit radioactivity and undergo radioactive decay. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Radionuclide Ventriculography: Imaging of a ventricle of the heart after the injection of a radioactive contrast medium. The technique is less invasive than cardiac catheterization and is used to assess ventricular function.Technetium: The first artificially produced element and a radioactive fission product of URANIUM. Technetium has the atomic symbol Tc, atomic number 43, and atomic weight 98.91. All technetium isotopes are radioactive. Technetium 99m (m=metastable) which is the decay product of Molybdenum 99, has a half-life of about 6 hours and is used diagnostically as a radioactive imaging agent. Technetium 99 which is a decay product of technetium 99m, has a half-life of 210,000 years.Radionuclide Generators: Separation systems containing a relatively long-lived parent radionuclide which produces a short-lived daughter in its decay scheme. The daughter can be periodically extracted (milked) by means of an appropriate eluting agent.Cesium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of cesium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Cs atoms with atomic weights of 123, 125-132, and 134-145 are radioactive cesium isotopes.Water Pollutants, Radioactive: Pollutants, present in water or bodies of water, which exhibit radioactivity.Sodium Pertechnetate Tc 99m: A gamma-emitting radionuclide imaging agent used for the diagnosis of diseases in many tissues, particularly in the gastrointestinal system, cardiovascular and cerebral circulation, brain, thyroid, and joints.Strontium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of strontium that decay or disintegrate spontaneously emitting radiation. Sr 80-83, 85, and 89-95 are radioactive strontium isotopes.Gated Blood-Pool Imaging: Radionuclide ventriculography where scintigraphic data is acquired during repeated cardiac cycles at specific times in the cycle, using an electrocardiographic synchronizer or gating device. Analysis of right ventricular function is difficult with this technique; that is best evaluated by first-pass ventriculography (VENTRICULOGRAPHY, FIRST-PASS).Soil Pollutants, Radioactive: Pollutants, present in soil, which exhibit radioactivity.Radiometry: The measurement of radiation by photography, as in x-ray film and film badge, by Geiger-Mueller tube, and by SCINTILLATION COUNTING.Radioactivity: The spontaneous transformation of a nuclide into one or more different nuclides, accompanied by either the emission of particles from the nucleus, nuclear capture or ejection of orbital electrons, or fission. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Rhenium: Rhenium. A metal, atomic number 75, atomic weight 186.2, symbol Re. (Dorland, 28th ed)Radiopharmaceuticals: Compounds that are used in medicine as sources of radiation for radiotherapy and for diagnostic purposes. They have numerous uses in research and industry. (Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1161)Alpha Particles: Positively charged particles composed of two protons and two NEUTRONS, i.e. equivalent to HELIUM nuclei, which are emitted during disintegration of heavy ISOTOPES. Alpha rays have very strong ionizing power, but weak penetrability.Ventriculography, First-Pass: Radionuclide ventriculography where a bolus of radionuclide is injected and data are recorded from one pass through the heart ventricle. Left and right ventricular function can be analyzed independently during this technique. First-pass ventriculography is preferred over GATED BLOOD-POOL IMAGING for assessing right ventricular function.Plutonium: Plutonium. A naturally radioactive element of the actinide metals series. It has the atomic symbol Pu, atomic number 94, and atomic weight 242. Plutonium is used as a nuclear fuel, to produce radioisotopes for research, in radionuclide batteries for pacemakers, and as the agent of fission in nuclear weapons.Pentetic Acid: An iron chelating agent with properties like EDETIC ACID. DTPA has also been used as a chelator for other metals, such as plutonium.Radioimmunotherapy: Radiotherapy where cytotoxic radionuclides are linked to antibodies in order to deliver toxins directly to tumor targets. Therapy with targeted radiation rather than antibody-targeted toxins (IMMUNOTOXINS) has the advantage that adjacent tumor cells, which lack the appropriate antigenic determinants, can be destroyed by radiation cross-fire. Radioimmunotherapy is sometimes called targeted radiotherapy, but this latter term can also refer to radionuclides linked to non-immune molecules (see RADIOTHERAPY).Food Contamination, RadioactiveIndium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of indium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. In atoms with atomic weights 106-112, 113m, 114, and 116-124 are radioactive indium isotopes.Radiation Dosage: The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).Iodine Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of iodine that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. I atoms with atomic weights 117-139, except I 127, are radioactive iodine isotopes.Yttrium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of yttrium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Y atoms with atomic weights 82-88 and 90-96 are radioactive yttrium isotopes.Beta Particles: High energy POSITRONS or ELECTRONS ejected from a disintegrating atomic nucleus.Radiation Monitoring: The observation, either continuously or at intervals, of the levels of radiation in a given area, generally for the purpose of assuring that they have not exceeded prescribed amounts or, in case of radiation already present in the area, assuring that the levels have returned to those meeting acceptable safety standards.Gold Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of gold that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Au 185-196, 198-201, and 203 are radioactive gold isotopes.Gallium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of gallium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Ga atoms with atomic weights 63-68, 70 and 72-76 are radioactive gallium isotopes.Holmium: Holmium. An element of the rare earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol Ho, atomic number 67, and atomic weight 164.93.Astatine: Astatine. A radioactive halogen with the atomic symbol At, atomic number 85, and atomic weight 210. Its isotopes range in mass number from 200 to 219 and all have an extremely short half-life. Astatine may be of use in the treatment of hyperthyroidism.Spectrometry, Gamma: Determination of the energy distribution of gamma rays emitted by nuclei. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Radioactive Fallout: The material that descends to the earth or water well beyond the site of a surface or subsurface nuclear explosion. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Chemical and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Radioactive Pollutants: Radioactive substances which act as pollutants. They include chemicals whose radiation is released via radioactive waste, nuclear accidents, fallout from nuclear explosions, and the like.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Radioactive Waste: Liquid, solid, or gaseous waste resulting from mining of radioactive ore, production of reactor fuel materials, reactor operation, processing of irradiated reactor fuels, and related operations, and from use of radioactive materials in research, industry, and medicine. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Polonium: Polonium. A radioactive element that is a member of the chalcogen family. It has the atomic symbol Po, atomic number 84, and the atomic weight of the isotope with the longest half-life (209Po) is 208.98. It decays by alpha-emission.Lutetium: Lutetium. An element of the rare earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol Lu, atomic number 71, and atomic weight 175.Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon: A method of computed tomography that uses radionuclides which emit a single photon of a given energy. The camera is rotated 180 or 360 degrees around the patient to capture images at multiple positions along the arc. The computer is then used to reconstruct the transaxial, sagittal, and coronal images from the 3-dimensional distribution of radionuclides in the organ. The advantages of SPECT are that it can be used to observe biochemical and physiological processes as well as size and volume of the organ. The disadvantage is that, unlike positron-emission tomography where the positron-electron annihilation results in the emission of 2 photons at 180 degrees from each other, SPECT requires physical collimation to line up the photons, which results in the loss of many available photons and hence degrades the image.Actinium: Actinium. A trivalent radioactive element and the prototypical member of the actinide family. It has the atomic symbol Ac, atomic number 89, and atomic weight 227.0278. Its principal isotope is 227 and decays primarily by beta-emission.Technetium Tc 99m Aggregated Albumin: A gamma-emitting radionuclide imaging agent used for the diagnosis of diseases in many tissues, particularly in cardiovascular and cerebral circulation.Technetium Tc 99m Medronate: A gamma-emitting radionuclide imaging agent used primarily in skeletal scintigraphy. Because of its absorption by a variety of tumors, it is useful for the detection of neoplasms.Thorium: Thorium. A radioactive element of the actinide series of metals. It has an atomic symbol Th, atomic number 90, and atomic weight 232.04. It is used as fuel in nuclear reactors to produce fissionable uranium isotopes. Because of its radioopacity, various thorium compounds are used to facilitate visualization in roentgenography.Technetium Tc 99m Sulfur Colloid: A gamma-emitting radionuclide imaging agent used for the diagnosis of diseases in many tissues, particularly in the gastrointestinal system, liver, and spleen.Technetium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain TECHNETIUM as an integral part of the molecule. Technetium 99m (m=metastable) is an isotope of technetium that has a half-life of about 6 hours. Technetium 99, which has a half-life of 210,000 years, is a decay product of technetium 99m.Organometallic Compounds: A class of compounds of the type R-M, where a C atom is joined directly to any other element except H, C, N, O, F, Cl, Br, I, or At. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Potassium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of potassium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. K atoms with atomic weights 37, 38, 40, and 42-45 are radioactive potassium isotopes.Radiobiology: Study of the scientific principles, mechanisms, and effects of the interaction of ionizing radiation with living matter. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Copper Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of copper that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Cu atoms with atomic weights 58-62, 64, and 66-68 are radioactive copper isotopes.Cineangiography: Motion pictures of the passage of contrast medium through blood vessels.Heterocyclic Compounds, 1-Ring: A class of organic compounds containing a ring structure made up of more than one kind of atom, usually carbon plus another atom. The ring structure can be aromatic or nonaromatic.Radioactive Hazard Release: Uncontrolled release of radioactive material from its containment. This either threatens to, or does, cause exposure to a radioactive hazard. Such an incident may occur accidentally or deliberately.Octreotide: A potent, long-acting synthetic SOMATOSTATIN octapeptide analog that inhibits secretion of GROWTH HORMONE and is used to treat hormone-secreting tumors; DIABETES MELLITUS; HYPOTENSION, ORTHOSTATIC; HYPERINSULINISM; hypergastrinemia; and small bowel fistula.Tin Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain tin as an integral part of the molecule.Radioisotope Renography: Graphic tracing over a time period of radioactivity measured externally over the kidneys following intravenous injection of a radionuclide which is taken up and excreted by the kidneys.Indium: A metallic element, atomic number 49, atomic weight 114.82, symbol In. It is named from its blue line in the spectrum. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Samarium: Samarium. An element of the rare earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol Sm, atomic number 62, and atomic weight 150.36. The oxide is used in the control rods of some nuclear reactors.Angiocardiography: Radiography of the heart and great vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Gamma Cameras: Electronic instruments that produce photographs or cathode-ray tube images of the gamma-ray emissions from organs containing radionuclide tracers.Technetium Tc 99m Pentetate: A technetium imaging agent used in renal scintigraphy, computed tomography, lung ventilation imaging, gastrointestinal scintigraphy, and many other procedures which employ radionuclide imaging agents.Americium: Americium. A completely man-made radioactive actinide with atomic symbol Am, atomic number 95, and atomic weight 243. Its valence can range from +3 to +6. Because of its nonmagnetic ground state, it is an excellent superconductor. It is also used in bone mineral analysis and as a radiation source for radiotherapy.Organotechnetium Compounds: Organic compounds that contain technetium as an integral part of the molecule. These compounds are often used as radionuclide imaging agents.Nuclear Medicine: A specialty field of radiology concerned with diagnostic, therapeutic, and investigative use of radioactive compounds in a pharmaceutical form.Thallium: A heavy, bluish white metal, atomic number 81, atomic weight [204.382; 204.385], symbol Tl.Isotope Labeling: Techniques for labeling a substance with a stable or radioactive isotope. It is not used for articles involving labeled substances unless the methods of labeling are substantively discussed. Tracers that may be labeled include chemical substances, cells, or microorganisms.Fukushima Nuclear Accident: Nuclear power accident that occurred following the Tohoku-Kanto earthquake of March 11, 2011 in the northern region of Japan.Radium: Radium. A radioactive element of the alkaline earth series of metals. It has the atomic symbol Ra, atomic number 88, and atomic weight 226. Radium is the product of the disintegration of uranium and is present in pitchblende and all ores containing uranium. It is used clinically as a source of beta and gamma-rays in radiotherapy, particularly BRACHYTHERAPY.Nuclear Reactors: Devices containing fissionable material in sufficient quantity and so arranged as to be capable of maintaining a controlled, self-sustaining NUCLEAR FISSION chain reaction. They are also known as atomic piles, atomic reactors, fission reactors, and nuclear piles, although such names are deprecated. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Radiotherapy Dosage: The total amount of radiation absorbed by tissues as a result of radiotherapy.Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation: The relationship between the dose of administered radiation and the response of the organism or tissue to the radiation.Body Burden: The total amount of a chemical, metal or radioactive substance present at any time after absorption in the body of man or animal.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Neuroendocrine Tumors: Tumors whose cells possess secretory granules and originate from the neuroectoderm, i.e., the cells of the ectoblast or epiblast that program the neuroendocrine system. Common properties across most neuroendocrine tumors include ectopic hormone production (often via APUD CELLS), the presence of tumor-associated antigens, and isozyme composition.3-Iodobenzylguanidine: A guanidine analog with specific affinity for tissues of the sympathetic nervous system and related tumors. The radiolabeled forms are used as antineoplastic agents and radioactive imaging agents. (Merck Index, 12th ed) MIBG serves as a neuron-blocking agent which has a strong affinity for, and retention in, the adrenal medulla and also inhibits ADP-ribosyltransferase.Whole-Body Counting: Measurement of radioactivity in the entire human body.Technetium Tc 99m Sestamibi: A technetium imaging agent used to reveal blood-starved cardiac tissue during a heart attack.Cardiac Volume: The volume of the HEART, usually relating to the volume of BLOOD contained within it at various periods of the cardiac cycle. The amount of blood ejected from a ventricle at each beat is STROKE VOLUME.Uranium: Uranium. A radioactive element of the actinide series of metals. It has an atomic symbol U, atomic number 92, and atomic weight 238.03. U-235 is used as the fissionable fuel in nuclear weapons and as fuel in nuclear power reactors.Positron-Emission Tomography: An imaging technique using compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides (such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18) to measure cell metabolism. It has been useful in study of soft tissues such as CANCER; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and brain. SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY is closely related to positron emission tomography, but uses isotopes with longer half-lives and resolution is lower.Relative Biological Effectiveness: The ratio of radiation dosages required to produce identical change based on a formula comparing other types of radiation with that of gamma or roentgen rays.19-Iodocholesterol: 19-Iodocholest-5-en-3 beta-ol. A cholesterol derivative usually substituted with radioactive iodine in the 19 position. The compound is an adrenal cortex scanning agent used in the assessment of patients suspected of having Cushing's syndrome, hyperaldosteronism, pheochromocytoma and adrenal remnants following total adrenalectomy.Power Plants: Units that convert some other form of energy into electrical energy.Ventricular Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.Heart Ventricles: The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.Radioimmunodetection: Use of radiolabeled antibodies for diagnostic imaging of neoplasms. Antitumor antibodies are labeled with diverse radionuclides including iodine-131, iodine-123, indium-111, or technetium-99m and injected into the patient. Images are obtained by a scintillation camera.Iridium: A metallic element with the atomic symbol Ir, atomic number 77, and atomic weight 192.22.Technology, Radiologic: The application of scientific knowledge or technology to the field of radiology. The applications center mostly around x-ray or radioisotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes but the technological applications of any radiation or radiologic procedure is within the scope of radiologic technology.Air Pollutants, Radioactive: Pollutants, present in air, which exhibit radioactivity.Nuclear Power Plants: Facilities that convert NUCLEAR ENERGY into electrical energy.Electrons: Stable elementary particles having the smallest known negative charge, present in all elements; also called negatrons. Positively charged electrons are called positrons. The numbers, energies and arrangement of electrons around atomic nuclei determine the chemical identities of elements. Beams of electrons are called CATHODE RAYS.Technetium Tc 99m Pyrophosphate: A radionuclide imaging agent used primarily in scintigraphy or tomography of the heart to evaluate the extent of the necrotic myocardial process. It has also been used in noninvasive tests for the distribution of organ involvement in different types of amyloidosis and for the evaluation of muscle necrosis in the extremities.Bismuth: A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Bi, atomic number 83 and atomic weight 208.98.Technetium Tc 99m Mertiatide: A technetium diagnostic aid used in renal function determination.Tin Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of tin that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Sn atoms with atomic weights 108-111, 113, 120-121, 123 and 125-128 are tin radioisotopes.Lead Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of lead that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Pb atoms with atomic weights 194-203, 205, and 209-214 are radioactive lead isotopes.Receptors, Somatostatin: Cell surface proteins that bind somatostatin and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. Somatostatin is a hypothalamic hormone, a pancreatic hormone, and a central and peripheral neurotransmitter. Activated somatostatin receptors on pituitary cells inhibit the release of growth hormone; those on endocrine and gastrointestinal cells regulate the absorption and utilization of nutrients; and those on neurons mediate somatostatin's role as a neurotransmitter.Thallium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of thallium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Tl atoms with atomic weights 198-202, 204, and 206-210 are thallium radioisotopes.Imino AcidsMicronesia: The collective name for islands of the Pacific Ocean east of the Philippines, including the Mariana, PALAU, Caroline, Marshall, and Kiribati Islands. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p761 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p350)Exercise Test: Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.Nuclear Fission: Nuclear reaction in which the nucleus of a heavy atom such as uranium or plutonium is split into two approximately equal parts by a neutron, charged particle, or photon.Tantalum: Tantalum. A rare metallic element, atomic number 73, atomic weight 180.948, symbol Ta. It is a noncorrosive and malleable metal that has been used for plates or disks to replace cranial defects, for wire sutures, and for making prosthetic devices. (Dorland, 28th ed)Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Heart Function Tests: Examinations used to diagnose and treat heart conditions.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Cobalt Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of cobalt that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Co atoms with atomic weights of 54-64, except 59, are radioactive cobalt isotopes.Cardiac Output: The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).Chernobyl Nuclear Accident: April 25th -26th, 1986 nuclear power accident that occurred at Chernobyl in the former USSR (Ukraine) located 80 miles north of Kiev.Tomography, Emission-Computed: Tomography using radioactive emissions from injected RADIONUCLIDES and computer ALGORITHMS to reconstruct an image.Ytterbium: Ytterbium. An element of the rare earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol Yb, atomic number 70, and atomic weight 173. Ytterbium has been used in lasers and as a portable x-ray source.Phantoms, Imaging: Devices or objects in various imaging techniques used to visualize or enhance visualization by simulating conditions encountered in the procedure. Phantoms are used very often in procedures employing or measuring x-irradiation or radioactive material to evaluate performance. Phantoms often have properties similar to human tissue. Water demonstrates absorbing properties similar to normal tissue, hence water-filled phantoms are used to map radiation levels. Phantoms are used also as teaching aids to simulate real conditions with x-ray or ultrasonic machines. (From Iturralde, Dictionary and Handbook of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Imaging, 1990)ComputersTomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Particle Accelerators: Devices which accelerate electrically charged atomic or subatomic particles, such as electrons, protons or ions, to high velocities so they have high kinetic energy.Receptors, Peptide: Cell surface receptors that bind peptide messengers with high affinity and regulate intracellular signals which influence the behavior of cells.Nuclear Weapons: A weapon that derives its destructive force from nuclear fission and/or fusion.Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Gastric Emptying: The evacuation of food from the stomach into the duodenum.Radiochemistry: The study of the chemical and physical phenomena of radioactive substances.Radiotherapy: The use of IONIZING RADIATION to treat malignant NEOPLASMS and some benign conditions.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Radiation ProtectionTin: A trace element that is required in bone formation. It has the atomic symbol Sn, atomic number 50, and atomic weight 118.71.Actinoid Series Elements: A series of radioactive elements from ACTINIUM, atomic number 89, to and including LAWRENCIUM, atomic number 103.Prenalterol: A partial adrenergic agonist with functional beta 1-receptor specificity and inotropic effect. It is effective in the treatment of acute CARDIAC FAILURE, postmyocardial infarction low-output syndrome, SHOCK, and reducing ORTHOSTATIC HYPOTENSION in the SHY-RAGER SYNDROME.Cerebrospinal Fluid Otorrhea: Discharge of cerebrospinal fluid through the external auditory meatus or through the eustachian tube into the nasopharynx. This is usually associated with CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE involving the TEMPORAL BONE;), NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES; or other conditions, but may rarely occur spontaneously. (From Am J Otol 1995 Nov;16(6):765-71)Water Pollution, RadioactiveZinc Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of zinc that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Zn atoms with atomic weights 60-63, 65, 69, 71, and 72 are radioactive zinc isotopes.Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced: Tumors, cancer or other neoplasms produced by exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation.IodobenzenesBronchopulmonary Sequestration: A developmental anomaly in which a mass of nonfunctioning lung tissue lacks normal connection with the tracheobroncheal tree and receives an anomalous blood supply originating from the descending thoracic or abdominal aorta. The mass may be extralobar, i.e., completely separated from normally connected lung, or intralobar, i.e., partly surrounded by normal lung.Dye Dilution Technique: Method for assessing flow through a system by injection of a known quantity of dye into the system and monitoring its concentration over time at a specific point in the system. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Cisterna Magna: One of three principal openings in the SUBARACHNOID SPACE. They are also known as cerebellomedullary cistern, and collectively as cisterns.Technetium Tc 99m Lidofenin: A nontoxic radiopharmaceutical that is used in RADIONUCLIDE IMAGING for the clinical evaluation of hepatobiliary disorders in humans.Scintillation Counting: Detection and counting of scintillations produced in a fluorescent material by ionizing radiation.Immunoconjugates: Combinations of diagnostic or therapeutic substances linked with specific immune substances such as IMMUNOGLOBULINS; MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES; or ANTIGENS. Often the diagnostic or therapeutic substance is a radionuclide. These conjugates are useful tools for specific targeting of DRUGS and RADIOISOTOPES in the CHEMOTHERAPY and RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY of certain cancers.Nuclear Physics: The study of the characteristics, behavior, and internal structures of the atomic nucleus and its interactions with other nuclei. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Methods: A series of steps taken in order to conduct research.UkraineStreptavidin: A 60-kDa extracellular protein of Streptomyces avidinii with four high-affinity biotin binding sites. Unlike AVIDIN, streptavidin has a near neutral isoelectric point and is free of carbohydrate side chains.Elementary Particles: Individual components of atoms, usually subatomic; subnuclear particles are usually detected only when the atomic nucleus decays and then only transiently, as most of them are unstable, often yielding pure energy without substance, i.e., radiation.Models, Structural: A representation, generally small in scale, to show the structure, construction, or appearance of something. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Gallium: A rare, metallic element designated by the symbol, Ga, atomic number 31, and atomic weight 69.72.Ethmoid Bone: A light and spongy (pneumatized) bone that lies between the orbital part of FRONTAL BONE and the anterior of SPHENOID BONE. Ethmoid bone separates the ORBIT from the ETHMOID SINUS. It consists of a horizontal plate, a perpendicular plate, and two lateral labyrinths.Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea: Discharge of cerebrospinal fluid through the nose. Common etiologies include trauma, neoplasms, and prior surgery, although the condition may occur spontaneously. (Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1997 Apr;116(4):442-9)Background Radiation: Radiation from sources other than the source of interest. It is due to cosmic rays and natural radioactivity in the environment.Krypton: A noble gas that is found in the atmosphere. It has the atomic symbol Kr, atomic number 36, atomic weight 83.80, and has been used in electric bulbs.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Half-Life: The time it takes for a substance (drug, radioactive nuclide, or other) to lose half of its pharmacologic, physiologic, or radiologic activity.Glomus Jugulare Tumor: A paraganglioma involving the glomus jugulare, a microscopic collection of chemoreceptor tissue in the adventitia of the bulb of the jugular vein. It may cause paralysis of the vocal cords, attacks of dizziness, blackouts, and nystagmus. It is not resectable but radiation therapy is effective. It regresses slowly, but permanent control is regularly achieved. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, pp1603-4)Germanium: A rare metal element with a blue-gray appearance and atomic symbol Ge, atomic number 32, and atomic weight 72.63.Evaluation Studies as Topic: Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.Monte Carlo Method: In statistics, a technique for numerically approximating the solution of a mathematical problem by studying the distribution of some random variable, often generated by a computer. The name alludes to the randomness characteristic of the games of chance played at the gambling casinos in Monte Carlo. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Metabolic Clearance Rate: Volume of biological fluid completely cleared of drug metabolites as measured in unit time. Elimination occurs as a result of metabolic processes in the kidney, liver, saliva, sweat, intestine, heart, brain, or other site.Ventricular Dysfunction, Left: A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.Spermatic Cord Torsion: The twisting of the SPERMATIC CORD due to an anatomical abnormality that left the TESTIS mobile and dangling in the SCROTUM. The initial effect of testicular torsion is obstruction of venous return. Depending on the duration and degree of cord rotation, testicular symptoms range from EDEMA to interrupted arterial flow and testicular pain. If blood flow to testis is absent for 4 to 6 h, SPERMATOGENESIS may be permanently lost.Radiotherapy, Computer-Assisted: Computer systems or programs used in accurate computations for providing radiation dosage treatment to patients.Iodohippuric Acid: An iodine-containing compound used in pyelography as a radiopaque medium. If labeled with radioiodine, it can be used for studies of renal function.Myocardial Contraction: Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.Fast Neutrons: Neutrons, the energy of which exceeds some arbitrary level, usually around one million electron volts.Brachytherapy: A collective term for interstitial, intracavity, and surface radiotherapy. It uses small sealed or partly-sealed sources that may be placed on or near the body surface or within a natural body cavity or implanted directly into the tissues.Chelating Agents: Chemicals that bind to and remove ions from solutions. Many chelating agents function through the formation of COORDINATION COMPLEXES with METALS.Drug Delivery Systems: Systems for the delivery of drugs to target sites of pharmacological actions. Technologies employed include those concerning drug preparation, route of administration, site targeting, metabolism, and toxicity.Heart Aneurysm: A localized bulging or dilatation in the muscle wall of a heart (MYOCARDIUM), usually in the LEFT VENTRICLE. Blood-filled aneurysms are dangerous because they may burst. Fibrous aneurysms interfere with the heart function through the loss of contractility. True aneurysm is bound by the vessel wall or cardiac wall. False aneurysms are HEMATOMA caused by myocardial rupture.Krypton Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of krypton that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Kr atoms with atomic weights 74-77, 79, 81, 85, and 87-94 are radioactive krypton isotopes.Vesico-Ureteral Reflux: Retrograde flow of urine from the URINARY BLADDER into the URETER. This is often due to incompetence of the vesicoureteral valve leading to ascending bacterial infection into the KIDNEY.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Physical Exertion: Expenditure of energy during PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. Intensity of exertion may be measured by rate of OXYGEN CONSUMPTION; HEAT produced, or HEART RATE. Perceived exertion, a psychological measure of exertion, is included.Nuclear Warfare: Warfare involving the use of NUCLEAR WEAPONS.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Osmium: Osmium. A very hard, gray, toxic, and nearly infusible metal element, atomic number 76, atomic weight 190.2, symbol Os. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Diphosphates: Inorganic salts of phosphoric acid that contain two phosphate groups.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Lanthanoid Series Elements: Elements of the lanthanoid series including atomic number 57 (LANTHANUM) through atomic number 71 (LUTETIUM).Tellurium: Tellurium. An element that is a member of the chalcogen family. It has the atomic symbol Te, atomic number 52, and atomic weight 127.60. It has been used as a coloring agent and in the manufacture of electrical equipment. Exposure may cause nausea, vomiting, and CNS depression.Technetium Tc 99m Disofenin: A radiopharmaceutical used extensively in cholescintigraphy for the evaluation of hepatobiliary diseases. (From Int Jrnl Rad Appl Inst 1992;43(9):1061-4)Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Radiotherapy Planning, Computer-Assisted: Computer-assisted mathematical calculations of beam angles, intensities of radiation, and duration of irradiation in radiotherapy.Antibodies, Bispecific: Antibodies, often monoclonal, in which the two antigen-binding sites are specific for separate ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS. They are artificial antibodies produced by chemical crosslinking, fusion of HYBRIDOMA cells, or by molecular genetic techniques. They function as the main mediators of targeted cellular cytotoxicity and have been shown to be efficient in the targeting of drugs, toxins, radiolabeled haptens, and effector cells to diseased tissue, primarily tumors.Phosphorus Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of phosphorus that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. P atoms with atomic weights 28-34 except 31 are radioactive phosphorus isotopes.Pentanones: 5-carbon straight-chain or branched-chain ketones.Decontamination: The removal of contaminating material, such as radioactive materials, biological materials, or CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS, from a person or object.Nuclear Energy: Energy released by nuclear fission or nuclear fusion.Infusions, Intralesional: The administration of medication or fluid directly into localized lesions, by means of gravity flow or INFUSION PUMPS.Colloids: Two-phase systems in which one is uniformly dispersed in another as particles small enough so they cannot be filtered or will not settle out. The dispersing or continuous phase or medium envelops the particles of the discontinuous phase. All three states of matter can form colloids among each other.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Ventricular Function, Right: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the right HEART VENTRICLE.beta-Aminoethyl Isothiourea: A radiation-protective agent that can inhibit DNA damage by binding to the DNA. It also increases the susceptibility of blood cells to complement-mediated lysis.Sphenoid Bone: An irregular unpaired bone situated at the SKULL BASE and wedged between the frontal, temporal, and occipital bones (FRONTAL BONE; TEMPORAL BONE; OCCIPITAL BONE). Sphenoid bone consists of a median body and three pairs of processes resembling a bat with spread wings. The body is hollowed out in its inferior to form two large cavities (SPHENOID SINUS).Mice, Nude: Mutant mice homozygous for the recessive gene "nude" which fail to develop a thymus. They are useful in tumor studies and studies on immune responses.Iron Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of iron that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Fe atoms with atomic weights 52, 53, 55, and 59-61 are radioactive iron isotopes.Esophageal Diseases: Pathological processes in the ESOPHAGUS.Geological Phenomena: The inanimate matter of Earth, the structures and properties of this matter, and the processes that affect it.Molecular Imaging: The use of molecularly targeted imaging probes to localize and/or monitor biochemical and cellular processes via various imaging modalities that include RADIONUCLIDE IMAGING; ULTRASONOGRAPHY; MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; FLUORESCENCE IMAGING; and MICROSCOPY.
Practical Molecular Imaging and Radionuclide Therapies. Society of Nuclear Medicine, January 2007. ISBN 978-0-9726478-8-5 Ell P ... The end result of the nuclear medicine imaging process is a "dataset" comprising one or more images. In multi-image datasets ... Radionuclide therapy can be used to treat conditions such as hyperthyroidism, thyroid cancer, and blood disorders. In nuclear ... Although the earliest use of I-131 was devoted to therapy of thyroid cancer, its use was later expanded to include imaging of ...
... therapy of low-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Planar imaging Most radionuclides give off gamma-rays when they decay. A 2- ... Radiation oncologists perform all forms of radiation therapy, sometimes including radionuclide therapy. Some endocrinologists ... renal function imaging for various renal disorders, thyroid imaging for hyperthyroidism, thyroid whole body imaging for thyroid ... Today, nuclear medicine is based on the use of the tracer principle applied to diagnostic imaging and therapy. Examples of the ...
Therapy: Neuroendocrine cancer--are two radionuclides better than one? Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2012 May 1;8(6):326-8. doi: 10.1038/ ... Diagn Interv Imaging. 2013 Sep 11. pii: S2211-5684(13)00232-5. doi: 10.1016/j.diii.2013.07.006. [Epub ahead of print] ... Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) for GEP-NETs. Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol. 2012 Dec;26(6):867-81. doi: ... Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of neuroendocrine tumors with 90Y-DOTATOC: Is treatment response predictable by pre- ...
... in Nuclear Medicine and his research is focused on molecular imaging with PET and PET/MRI and targeted radionuclide therapies ( ... has focused on translational molecular imaging in with PET and PET/MRI and on development of targeted radionuclide therapies ( ... fluorescence imaging and PET for image-guided surgery in head and neck cancer: proof-of-concept in orthotopic xenograft model. ... In addition, the use of molecular imaging for study of pathophysiology in other diseases, e.g. atherosclerosis, has been a ...
Breast Cancer Imaging I: Number 3, Breast Cancer Imaging II: Pet Clinics, Radiation Therapy Planning with PET: Number 2, Modern ... His work included the integration of functional radionuclide imaging and treatment which assisted in providing personalized ... Sandip Basu (2014). "Potential Clinical Utility of Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy with 177Lu-DOTATATE: the sociétal ... The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging selected oe of his articles, Beta-cell Imaging: Opportunities and ...
Pendetide acts as a chelating agent for the radionuclide indium-111. Following an intravenous injection of Prostascint, imaging ... Expert Review of Anticancer Therapy. 8 (2): 175-81. doi:10.1586/14737140.8.2.175. PMID 18279057. WHO Drug Information Kahn, ... Indium (111In) capromab pendetide (trade name Prostascint) is used to image the extent of prostate cancer. Capromab is a mouse ...
... is an amide of the acid DOTA (top left in the image), which acts as a chelator for a radionuclide, and (Tyr3)- ... A course of therapy consists of four infusions at three monthly intervals. Lu177 octreotate therapy is currently available ... "Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with 177Lu-DOTATATE: The IEO phase I-II study". European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and ... PET/CT for imaging neuroendocrine and other somatostatin expressing tumours". Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology ...
... with alpha-particle emitting radionuclides. Q J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2004 Dec;48(4):289-96. ... Antibody-targeted radiation cancer therapy. Nature Rev Drug Discovery 2004; 3:488-98. ... Radioimmunotherapy uses an antibody labeled with a radionuclide to deliver cytotoxic radiation to a target cell.[1] In cancer ... therapy, an antibody with specificity for a tumor-associated antigen is used to deliver a lethal dose of radiation to the tumor ...
Chemotherapy is one of the most important components of therapy for metastatic breast cancer. Therapy of choice is based on ... The role of imaging in patients with suspected brain metastases is a very good modality to aid in diagnosis. According to Weil ... X-ray radiography is recommended if there is abnormal radionuclide uptake from the bone scan and in assessing the risk of ... either because patients pass up effective conventional therapies such as chemotherapy or anti-estrogen therapy in favor of ...
Scintigraphy/Radionuclide Imaging[edit]. Scintigraphy can be used to measure the extent and distribution of the amyloid ... For light-chain amyloidosis early detection leads to best possibility of therapies prolonging the period of remission.[2] ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging[edit]. Magnetic resonance imaging is capable of measuring the thickness of different areas of the ... Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging[edit]. Cardiac magnetic resonance shows the characterization of myocardial tissue through ...
Merck manuals > Radionuclide Imaging Last full review/revision May 2009 by Michael J. Shea, MD. Content last modified May 2009 ... and in theory may identify patients for whom aggressive therapies should improve outcome. But this is "only a hypothesis, not a ... Many radionuclides used for myocardial perfusion imaging, including rubidium-82, technetium-99m and thallium-201 have similar ... In keeping with the concept of comparison images, the second "stress" image was taken 4 hours after "stress" and compared with ...
RNT contrasts with sealed-source therapy (brachytherapy) where the radionuclide remains in a capsule or metal wire during ... "MIBG in Neuroblastoma Diagnostic Imaging and Therapy". RadioGraphics. 36 (1): 258-278. doi:10.1148/rg.2016150099. PMID 26761540 ... p. 7. IAEA; ICRP (2009). Release of patients after radionuclide therapy. Vienna, Austria: International Atomic Energy Agency. ... Nicol, Alice; Waddington, Wendy (2011). Dosimetry for radionuclide therapy. York: Institute of Physics and Engineering in ...
... peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is considered when the Krenning score is greater than 2. Grade 1: uptake < normal ... The Krenning score is used to grade the uptake intensity of neuroendocrine tumors on somatostatin receptor imaging such as ... "Somatostatin receptor imaging". Seminars in nuclear medicine. 32 (2): 84-91. doi:10.1053/snuc.2002.31022. PMID 11965603. ...
... light ion beam therapy equipment and radionuclide beam therapy equipment For example, IEC 60601-1-9 for Environmentally ... Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of X-ray-based image-guided radiotherapy equipment for ... Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of short-wave therapy equipment IEC 60601-2-4 Medical ... Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of gamma beam therapy equipment IEC 60601-2-16 Medical ...
The limitations apply to all imaging modalities, including plain radiography, radionuclide studies, CT scans, and magnetic ... This form of therapy has been shown to prevent loss of bone mineral density (BMD) as a result of a reduction in bone turnover. ... It is certainly not visible clinically and routine imaging techniques such as radiographs are not effective for that sort of ... Zarychanski R; Elphee E; Walton P; Johnston J (2006). "Osteonecrosis of the jaw associated with pamidronate therapy". Am. J. ...
Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a type of radioisotope therapy (RIT) in which a peptide or hormone conjugated ... Imaging with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET may be valuable to image some neuroendocrine tumors. This scan is ... Advances in nuclear medicine imaging, also known as molecular imaging, has improved diagnostic and treatment paradigms in ... "Modifying the Poor Prognosis Associated with 18F-FDG-Avid NET with Peptide Receptor Chemo-Radionuclide Therapy (PRCRT)". ...
... is an area of nuclear medicine which specialises in imaging to show the functionality of the right and ... or medical therapy, to assess the efficacy of the treatment With low cardiac output after open-heart surgery Who are undergoing ... The resulting images show that the volumetrically derived blood pools in the chambers of the heart and timed images may be ... MUGA scanning is also called equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography, radionuclide ventriculography (RNVG), or gated blood ...
The treatment plan may include ordering additional medical laboratory tests and medical imaging studies, starting therapy, ... and a radionuclide (usually either a gamma-emitter or a positron emitter). There is a degree of overlap between nuclear ... physical therapy, labor and delivery, endoscopy units, diagnostic laboratory and medical imaging services, hospice centers, etc ... Diagnostic radiology is concerned with imaging of the body, e.g. by x-rays, x-ray computed tomography, ultrasonography, and ...
... and therapies of the disease as well as the complications arising from therapy using molecular imaging as the primary tool. The ... the positron emitting radionuclide used in production of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). FDG, as a marker of glucose metabolism, ... "Proton Therapy". TRIUMF. Retrieved February 9, 2016. "Proton Therapy Facility". TRIUMF. TRIUMF. Retrieved February 9, 2016. " ... TRIUMF's proton therapy centre is operated in conjunction with the British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA) and the University of ...
... to enable peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) for the treatment of unresectable neuroendocrine tumours. Octreotide can ... Octreotide is used in nuclear medicine imaging by labelling with indium-111 (Octreoscan) to noninvasively image neuroendocrine ... In a small clinical trial in eighteen pediatric patients with intractable weight gain following therapy for ALL or brain tumors ... More recently, it has been radiolabelled with carbon-11 as well as gallium-68, enabling imaging with positron emission ...
"The role of radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging for asymptomatic individuals". Journal of Nuclear Cardiology. 18 (1): 3- ... "Optimal Medical Therapy with or without PCI for Stable Coronary Disease," New England Journal of Medicine Stress test ... echocardiogram images are obtained. The two echocardiogram images are then compared to assess for any abnormalities in wall ... The images obtained are similar to the ones obtained during a full surface echocardiogram, commonly referred to as ...
PET imaging is best performed using a dedicated PET scanner. However, it is possible to acquire PET images using a conventional ... PET has an expanding role as a method to assess the response to therapy, in particular, cancer therapy, where the risk to the ... The minimization of radiation dose to the subject is an attractive feature of the use of short-lived radionuclides. Besides its ... Imaging infections with molecular imaging technologies can improve diagnosis and treatment follow-up. PET has been widely used ...
Gibb's work started with X-ray images, not CT or MRI images, for the reconstruction of a human phantom which was used for ... Although many efforts were undertaken to diversify and extend its applications in radiation protection, radiation therapy, and ... 2010). "Statistical construction of a Japanese male liver phantom for internal radionuclide dosimetry." Radiat Prot Dosimetry. ... First, they must obtain the raw data, from CT scans, MRI imaging, or direct imaging through photography. Second, the components ...
Imaging tests such as stress radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging or stress echocardiography can confirm a diagnosis when ... suspicious for acute injury and a possible candidate for acute reperfusion therapy with thrombolytics or primary PCI), those ... "ACCF/ASNC/ACR/AHA/ASE/SCCT/SCMR/SNM 2009 Appropriate Use Criteria for Cardiac Radionuclide Imaging". Journal of the American ... It should be determined if a person is at high risk for myocardial infarction before conducting imaging tests to make a ...
... then can be imaged through dual modality imagery (an imaging strategy that uses x-rays and radionuclide imaging) and through ... are used in cancer therapy and bio-imaging enhancement. Theranostic probes - capable of detection and treatment of cancer in a ... "Nanoshell-enabled photonics-based imaging and therapy of cancer" (Free full text). Technology in cancer research & treatment. 3 ... Bardan, R; Lal, S; Joshi, A; Halas, Nj (May 2011). "Theranostic Nanoshells: From Probe Design to Imaging and Treatment of ...
Small animal imagingEdit. PET technology for small animal imaging: A miniature PE tomograph has been constructed that is small ... PET has an expanding role as a method to assess the response to therapy, in particular, cancer therapy,[57] where the risk to ... Radionuclides used in PET scanning are typically isotopes with short half-lives[3] such as carbon-11 (~20 min), nitrogen-13 (~ ... PET imaging is best performed using a dedicated PET scanner. It is also possible to acquire PET images using a conventional ...
Information about the open-access journal Molecular Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy in DOAJ. DOAJ is an online directory that ... radionuclide therapy, radionuclide imaging, perfusion imaging, scintigraphy, positron-emission tomography, molecular imaging ...
NOGA Angiogenesis Revascularization Therapy: Evaluation by RadioNuclide Imaging - The Northern Trial. The safety and scientific ... Canadian Cardiovascular Class III-IV angina despite treatment with maximal medical therapy ... PCI or CABG are either not possible or not ideal.Secondary objective will be to determine the effects of VEGF gene therapy on ...
... is seeking applications from highly motivated candidates for a Postdoc position in molecular imaging and therapy using novel ... Postdoc (f/m) Molecular imaging and radionuclide therapy in prostate cancer. Veröffentlicht am 14. Dezember 2017 (vor 37 ... "Molecular imaging and radionuclide therapy in prostate cancer" Description:. The Technische Universität München (TUM) is ... in the SFB 824 is focussed on therapy assessment in prostate cancer using novel probes for PET-imaging and radionuclide therapy ...
Home , Riviste , The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging , Fascicoli precedenti , The Quarterly Journal ... Radionuclide therapy and integrated protocols for bone metastases. Chiacchio S. 1, Mazzarri S. 1, Lorenzoni A. 1, Nyakale N. E ... In selected clinical conditions, radionuclide therapy can also constitute an effective systemic treatment beyond bone pain ... or hormonal therapy, bisphosponates, external beam radiation therapy, and surgery. Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals play an ...
... peptide receptor radionuclide therapy, neodjuvant treatment, pancreatic surgery, molecular imaging, receptor PET/CT ... Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) has emerged as a powerful palliative therapy. I.v ... Role of Molecular Imaging using Ga-68 Somatostatin-Receptor PET/CT in Predicting Survival after Peptide Receptor Radionuclide ... Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRT) is an emerging therapeutic modality that involves the targeted delivery of an ...
... metallic radionuclides for radionuclide therapy by applying the same peptide proves that personalized radionuclide therapy ... Click on the image to enlarge.). Fig 3 Monitoring of molecular response to peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with Lu-177/Y- ... Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy as a potential tool for neoadjuvant therapy in patients with inoperable neuroendocrine ... THERANOSTICS: From Molecular Imaging Using Ga-68 Labeled Tracers and PET/CT to Personalized Radionuclide Therapy - The Bad ...
Quantitative imaging of 223Ra-chloride (Alpharadin) for targeted alpha-emitting radionuclide therapy of bone metastases.. ... of 100 kBq/kg of Ra-chloride proved the feasibility of quantitative imaging of patients who have received radionuclide therapy ... Basic imaging parameters were determined from phantom studies, and the accuracy of activity quantification was tested in a ... RESULTS: Imaging parameters were determined for the three most suitable photon peaks from the acquired energy spectrum (82, 154 ...
Stress images were taken 45 minutes after 10 mCi 99mTc-sestamibi injection, with resting images obtained 4 hours after initial ... Each image took 35 seconds and a total of 32 images were obtained. ... Received Date: 14.12.2015 Accepted Date: 13.05.2016 Mol Imaging Radionucl Ther 2016;25(3):121-127 PMID: 27751974 ... GATED-MPS images were taken with a low energy, high resolution, double head gamma camera (GE, Infinia) fitted with a parallel- ...
Increased HIG accumulation on early images persisting on late images (24th hour images) was accepted as active inflammation ... A parallel hole, low energy, high resolution collimator was used for planar and whole body imaging and the images were recorded ... The disease activity in patient group was determined by comparing the patient images with the images of control group. ... Received Date: 12.08.2011 Accepted Date: 19.09.2011 Mol Imaging Radionucl Ther 2011;20(2):52-58 PMID: 23486228 ...
... ... Here, a review of the recent developments in PSMA-based diagnostic imaging and therapy in patients with PCa with radiolabeled ... represented the state-of-the-art radionuclide imaging technique for these purposes. However, its application is limited to ... At present, imaging of PCa has become increasingly important for staging, restaging, and treatment selection. Until recently, ...
Medical Physics Staffing Needs in Diagnostic Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy: An Activity Based Approach. ...
A case of follicular thyroid cancer with intense focal Methionine uptake on 11C-Methionine PET/CT is reported here. The use of 11C-Methionine PET in differentiated thyroid cancer is currently being investigated as a surrogate tracer compared to the more widely used 18F-FDG PET. This case illustrates the potential incremental value of this modality, not only in the localizing of parathyroid adenoma, but also indicating that 11C-Methionine PET might have a potential of increasing the pretest likelihood of thyroid malignancy in a cold nodule with highly increased Sestamibi uptake. ...
SPECT image segmentation for estimation of tumour volume and activity concentration in ,sup>177,/sup>Lu-DOTATATE radionuclide ... SPECT image segmentation for estimation of tumour volume and activity concentration in 177Lu-DOTATATE radionuclide therapy. ... Dosimetry in radionuclide therapy has the potential to allow for a treatment tailored to the individual patient. One ... The differences between the tumour volumes estimated from the SPECT images and the volumes estimated from morphological images ...
D. Radionuclide Testing in Risk Assessment: Prognosis and Assessment of Therapy After NSTEMI or UA. The ACC/AHA 2002 Guideline ... C. Radionuclide Testing in Risk Assessment: Prognosis and Assessment of Therapy After STEMI. As discussed in the ACC/AHA ... b. Radionuclide Imaging After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention. The ACC/AHA 2002 Guideline Update for Exercise Testing22 ... c. Radionuclide Imaging After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy can be useful in ...
... radionuclide imaging Procedure: single photon emission computed tomography Radiation: radiation therapy Radiation: yttrium Y 90 ... Patients must have undergone radiation therapy alone, or radiation therapy plus systemic therapy (which includes chemotherapy ... Procedure: radionuclide imaging Approximately 1-3 hours, 1 day, 2 days, 3-5 days and 6-7 days post infusion. ... Giving radiation therapy and combination chemotherapy together before radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy may kill more ...
Medical Physics Staffing Needs in Diagnostic Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy: An Activity Based Approach .... IAEA Human ... Nuclear Cardiology: Guidance on the Implementation of SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging .... IAEA Human Health Series No. 23 ( ... Clinical PET/CT Atlas: A Casebook of Imaging in Oncology .... IAEA Human Health Series No. 32 ... Atlas of Skeletal SPECT/CT Clinical Images .... IAEA Human Health Series No. 34 ...
15 Non-imaging Procedures and Radionuclide Therapy Karen Ramer, Eleanor Mantel, Janet S. Reddin, Gang Cheng, Abass Alavi ... 2.Nuclear Medicine/Molecular ImagingUniversity of PennsylvaniaHammontonUSA. *3.Radiology/Nuclear MedicineUniversity of ... of positron emission tomography and other new procedures and practices in the field of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging. ...
This article is part of the themed collection: Frontiers in Radionuclide Imaging and Therapy ...
Molecular Imaging and therapy with radionuclides of prostate cancer * Adriano Duatti University of Ferrara, Ferrara ... Besides diagnostic imaging, radiolabeled PSMA ligands also have potential for radionuclide therapy of PC and a new therapeutic ... conventional imaging of PC does not contribute to patient management and do not allow tumor-specific imaging. Radionuclide ... At present, imaging of PC is indicated for primary diagnosis, staging and re-staging, as well as for the detection of ( ...
Molecular Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy, 24(3), 100-104. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4745401 ... Imaging tests. A doctor may also perform thyroid imaging tests. These include a thyroid ultrasound. This test uses sound waves ... A doctor may also recommend thyroidectomy if a person is not a good candidate for radioiodine therapy. This is especially true ... A doctor will often diagnose multinodular goiters while conducting a physical exam or imaging study for another unrelated cause ...
Radionuclide Imaging and 131I Therapy in Follicular Thyroid Carcinoma. Pages 797-798 ... Stunning by 131I Scanning: Untoward Effect of 131I Thyroid Imaging Prior to Radioablation Therapy ... Octreotide and FDG-PET scanning and other alternative imaging modalities. There is a valuable reference atlas of scan images ... and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An indispensable reference source with chapters written by the fields leading ...
Seventeen patients with advanced breast cancer were imaged with a specially collimated gamma camera to study tumor uptake of 2 ... 18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) before and during therapy. Fourteen... ... Breast neoplasms Radionuclide imaging Fluorodeoxyglucose Cancer chemotherapy Therapy response This is a preview of subscription ... Ten patients were reimaged later to assess the effect of therapy on FDG uptake. Increased uptake was associated with clinical ...
... radionuclide imaging. Humans. Intra-Aortic Balloon Pumping*. Male. Middle Aged. Myocardial Infarction / complications, therapy* ... Cardiac Output, Low / complications, therapy. Catecholamines / therapeutic use*. Dobutamine / therapeutic use*. ... Counterpulsation effectively maintained an adequate arterial pressure and dopamine therapy was discontinued. Counterpulsation, ... case of right ventricular infarct complicated by shock in which the simultaneous use of counterpulsation and dobutamine therapy ...
Upper endoscopy can help determine if the patient has a mechanical problem (eg, anastomotic stricture). Radionuclide imaging is ... While the diagnosis is primarily made based on clinical findings, radionuclide imaging helps confirm the diagnosis by ... Medical Therapy. Acute ALS. In patients with acute ALS, a favorable outcome is correlated with an expedient diagnosis and ... Surgical Therapy. The treatment of ALS is surgical. Conservative measures can be temporarily used to resuscitate the patient, ...
  • High resolution MRI, CT, and ultrasound as well as optically based imaging are established technologies within the pharmaceutical industries' armamentarium and a core facility for the experimental researcher. (stanford.edu)
  • Ultrasound imaging is a widely available, relatively inexpensive, and real-time imaging modality that does not expose patients to radiation and which is the first-line imaging modality for assessment of many organs. (stanford.edu)
  • My dissertation focus is to evolve Molecular Breast Imaging as a complementary tool to mammography and ultrasound to better characterize breast cancer, to track disease progression, and to predict patient outcomes to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. (mdanderson.org)
  • Conventional imaging, such as ultrasound and CT scan can be helpful in diagnosis and staging of NETs. (bccancer.bc.ca)
  • CT, X-ray and ultrasound imaging are the most commonly used modalities in interventional procedures, but these have major disadvantages: the ionizing X-rays are potentially dangerous for both patient and physician, and their contrast is limited to bone or iodine-containing contrast agents. (zeit.de)
  • In addition to an updated section on ultrasonography of the thyroid gland, new sections have been added, including ones on ultrasonography of cervical lymph nodes and imaging for thyroid cancer employing computerized tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). (springer.com)
  • FDG may be valuable in monitoring treatment response, but positron emission tomography (PET) would probably be more appropriate than planar imaging for this purpose. (springer.com)
  • Amyloid (abnormal protein) plaques in the brain are a feature of Alzheimer disease and imaging the brain with positron emission tomography can detect them. (news-medical.net)
  • Cerveau Technologies, Inc. today announced a research collaboration agreement with Eisai Inc., which will enable Eisai to use Cerveau's [F-K-6240, an investigational imaging agent, in Positron Emission Tomography scans to assess the status and progression of neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. (news-medical.net)
  • The diagnostic tests involve the formation of an image using a gamma camera or positron emission tomography . (bionity.com)
  • Positron emission tomography (PET) uses coincidence detection to image functional processes. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1950, human imaging of both gamma and positron emitting radioisotopes was performed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Finally, the available data on combination therapies showing encouraging results as to potential anti-tumor efficacy are also reviewed. (minervamedica.it)
  • Despite significant efforts, conventional imaging of PC does not contribute to patient management and do not allow tumor-specific imaging. (edu.mk)
  • Seventeen patients with advanced breast cancer were imaged with a specially collimated gamma camera to study tumor uptake of 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) before and during therapy. (springer.com)
  • furthermore, it could also provide clear tumor imaging for monitoring tumor growth in vivo. (dovepress.com)
  • This prospective trial aims to achieve increased tumor doses in 90Y radioembolization therapy through patient specific, 99mTc-MAA-based treatment planning. (mdanderson.org)
  • The lab combines bioinformatics, bioconjugate chemistry, radiochemistry, molecular biology, and animal models to identify tumor-selective molecules then engineer and screen agents for subsequent use in cancer imaging and therapy. (cancer.gov)
  • Due to these limitations, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be used for MII as well the possibility to measure temperature differences during tumor ablation. (zeit.de)
  • Molecular imaging is a rapidly evolving field in biomedical research and provides powerful techniques to noninvasively study a variety of important characteristics of cancers, such as tumor metabolism, proliferation, hypoxia, and receptor expression [ 1 - 3 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Over 18 years, tumor progression was managed with 131 I-MIBG (iodine-metaiodobenzylguanidine) and 177 Lutetium-octreotate therapy. (scielo.br)
  • Due to the widespread location of breast cancer cells, particularly in the bone marrow, which harbors the tumor cells as well as vital stem cells , the risk of toxicity is even higher with conventional therapies. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The preferred imaging modality should be one that provides a good contrast between background and the target signal under study, achieving a large signal-to-noise ratio. (stembook.org)
  • Thus, an ideal imaging modality should be flexible across different imaging modalities, both in terms of spatial resolution and system sensitivity (the lowest amount of activity or numbers of cells that can be detected by that specific modality). (stembook.org)
  • Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) overexpression is a predictor of response to anti-HER2 therapy in breast and gastric cancer. (jove.com)
  • Currently, HER2 status is assessed by tumour biopsy, but this may not be representative of the larger tumour mass or other metastatic sites, risking misclassification and selection of suboptimal therapy. (jove.com)
  • We review the utility of PET cardiac imaging to evaluate the toxic effects of chemotherapy on metabolism. (omicsonline.org)
  • In this review we focus on the cardiotoxic effects of chemotherapy, and the potential to evaluate its impact on metabolic pathways by position emission tomography (PET) cardiac imaging. (omicsonline.org)
  • Improved cardiac imaging to detect chemotherapy-related toxicity could lead to a reduction in the health care cost related to complications arising from advanced disease and merits further investigation. (omicsonline.org)
  • The term theranostics epitomizes the inseparability of diagnosis and therapy, the pillars of medicine. (thno.org)
  • Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit unique properties which have led to their applications in the biomedical field as novel delivery systems for diagnosis and therapy purposes. (jove.com)
  • The MIP is focused on the development and translation of in vivo molecular imaging agents for early detection, monitoring, and therapy. (cancer.gov)
  • Quantitative analysis of the therapeutic effect of magnolol on MPTP-induced mouse model of Parkinson's disease using in vivo 18F-9-fluoropropyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenazine PET imaging. (amedeo.com)
  • These results suggest that radiolabeled annexin V can be used in vivo as a noninvasive means to detect and serially image tissues and organs undergoing programmed cell death. (pnas.org)
  • We performed scintigraphic imaging studies with derivatized annexin V to determine its ability in vivo to detect sites of apoptotic cell death occurring in Fas-mediated hepatocyte apoptosis, acute cardiac allograft rejection, and cyclophosphamide treatment of B cell lymphoma. (pnas.org)
  • In the setting of PET imaging, this involves combining heavier radionuclides with the tracer (radioligand therapy, RLT). (urotoday.com)
  • Radioligand therapy involves the intravenous administration of a radiopharmaceutical which emits (in this instance) a β -particle and targets a specific receptor over-expressed on cancer cells in order to deliver targeted radiation to cancer cells. (scielo.org.za)
  • Regional functional imaging with tissue phase mapping and DENSE will be reviewed. (stanford.edu)
  • The main objective of cell-based therapies is to repopulate the damaged tissue with functional cells, with the final goal that these cells will integrate with the remaining functional native cells and contribute to the recuperation of the lost function. (stembook.org)
  • Both MWNTs were doubly functionalized by 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and amidation reactions, allowing the appended functional groups to be further conjugated with radionuclide chelating moieties and antibodies or antibody fragments. (jove.com)
  • After leading a highly successful molecular imaging program in Sherbrooke, Québec, he relocated to British Columbia in 2008, where he was awarded the BC Leadership Chair in Functional Cancer Imaging. (bccancer.bc.ca)
  • Therapies such as photodynamic therapy (PDT), involving light and a photosensitizing chemical substance, which used in conjunction with molecular oxygen can cause cell death, offer a high degree of control that is effectively used to manage cancer in early to advanced stages. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Three major families of transcription factors have emerged as important players in human cancer and are validated targets in drug discovery for cancer therapy: 1) the NF-kB and AP-1 families of transcription factors, 2) the STAT family members and 3) the steroids receptors. (eurekaselect.com)