Psychological Theory: Principles applied to the analysis and explanation of psychological or behavioral phenomena.Theory of Mind: The ability to attribute mental states (e.g., beliefs, desires, feelings, intentions, thoughts, etc.) to self and to others, allowing an individual to understand and infer behavior on the basis of the mental states. Difference or deficit in theory of mind is associated with ASPERGER SYNDROME; AUTISTIC DISORDER; and SCHIZOPHRENIA, etc.Nursing Theory: Concepts, definitions, and propositions applied to the study of various phenomena which pertain to nursing and nursing research.Information Theory: An interdisciplinary study dealing with the transmission of messages or signals, or the communication of information. Information theory does not directly deal with meaning or content, but with physical representations that have meaning or content. It overlaps considerably with communication theory and CYBERNETICS.Quantum Theory: The theory that the radiation and absorption of energy take place in definite quantities called quanta (E) which vary in size and are defined by the equation E=hv in which h is Planck's constant and v is the frequency of the radiation.Systems Theory: Principles, models, and laws that apply to complex interrelationships and interdependencies of sets of linked components which form a functioning whole, a system. Any system may be composed of components which are systems in their own right (sub-systems), such as several organs within an individual organism.Decision Theory: A theoretical technique utilizing a group of related constructs to describe or prescribe how individuals or groups of people choose a course of action when faced with several alternatives and a variable amount of knowledge about the determinants of the outcomes of those alternatives.Game Theory: Theoretical construct used in applied mathematics to analyze certain situations in which there is an interplay between parties that may have similar, opposed, or mixed interests. In a typical game, decision-making "players," who each have their own goals, try to gain advantage over the other parties by anticipating each other's decisions; the game is finally resolved as a consequence of the players' decisions.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Ethical Theory: A philosophically coherent set of propositions (for example, utilitarianism) which attempts to provide general norms for the guidance and evaluation of moral conduct. (from Beauchamp and Childress, Principles of Biomedical Ethics, 4th ed)Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Mathematics: The deductive study of shape, quantity, and dependence. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Models, Chemical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of chemical processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Probability Theory: The branch of mathematics dealing with the purely logical properties of probability. Its theorems underlie most statistical methods. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Personal Construct Theory: A psychological theory based on dimensions or categories used by a given person in describing or explaining the personality and behavior of others or of himself. The basic idea is that different people will use consistently different categories. The theory was formulated in the fifties by George Kelly. Two tests devised by him are the role construct repertory test and the repertory grid test. (From Stuart Sutherland, The International Dictionary of Psychology, 1989)Thermodynamics: A rigorously mathematical analysis of energy relationships (heat, work, temperature, and equilibrium). It describes systems whose states are determined by thermal parameters, such as temperature, in addition to mechanical and electromagnetic parameters. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed)Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Selection, Genetic: Differential and non-random reproduction of different genotypes, operating to alter the gene frequencies within a population.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Models, Neurological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the neurological system, processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Germ Theory of Disease: The fundamental tenet of modern medicine that certain diseases are caused by microorganisms. It was confirmed by the work of Pasteur, Lister, and Koch.Biophysics: The study of PHYSICAL PHENOMENA and PHYSICAL PROCESSES as applied to living things.Philosophy: A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)Biophysical Phenomena: The physical characteristics and processes of biological systems.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.Human Development: Continuous sequential changes which occur in the physiological and psychological functions during the life-time of an individual.Stochastic Processes: Processes that incorporate some element of randomness, used particularly to refer to a time series of random variables.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Intention: What a person has in mind to do or bring about.Diffusion: The tendency of a gas or solute to pass from a point of higher pressure or concentration to a point of lower pressure or concentration and to distribute itself throughout the available space. Diffusion, especially FACILITATED DIFFUSION, is a major mechanism of BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Philosophy, MedicalCognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Competitive Behavior: The direct struggle between individuals for environmental necessities or for a common goal.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Existentialism: Philosophy based on the analysis of the individual's existence in the world which holds that human existence cannot be completely described in scientific terms. Existentialism also stresses the freedom and responsibility of the individual as well as the uniqueness of religious and ethical experiences and the analysis of subjective phenomena such as anxiety, guilt, and suffering. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Nonlinear Dynamics: The study of systems which respond disproportionately (nonlinearly) to initial conditions or perturbing stimuli. Nonlinear systems may exhibit "chaos" which is classically characterized as sensitive dependence on initial conditions. Chaotic systems, while distinguished from more ordered periodic systems, are not random. When their behavior over time is appropriately displayed (in "phase space"), constraints are evident which are described by "strange attractors". Phase space representations of chaotic systems, or strange attractors, usually reveal fractal (FRACTALS) self-similarity across time scales. Natural, including biological, systems often display nonlinear dynamics and chaos.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Molecular Conformation: The characteristic three-dimensional shape of a molecule.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.Sociology: A social science dealing with group relationships, patterns of collective behavior, and social organization.Social Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the interrelationships of individuals in a social environment including social organizations and institutions. Includes Sociology and Anthropology.Ecology: The branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their ENVIRONMENT, especially as manifested by natural cycles and rhythms, community development and structure, interactions between different kinds of organisms, geographic distributions, and population alterations. (Webster's, 3d ed)Judgment: The process of discovering or asserting an objective or intrinsic relation between two objects or concepts; a faculty or power that enables a person to make judgments; the process of bringing to light and asserting the implicit meaning of a concept; a critical evaluation of a person or situation.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Gestalt Theory: A system which emphasizes that experience and behavior contain basic patterns and relationships which cannot be reduced to simpler components; that is, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Entropy: The measure of that part of the heat or energy of a system which is not available to perform work. Entropy increases in all natural (spontaneous and irreversible) processes. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Electrons: Stable elementary particles having the smallest known negative charge, present in all elements; also called negatrons. Positively charged electrons are called positrons. The numbers, energies and arrangement of electrons around atomic nuclei determine the chemical identities of elements. Beams of electrons are called CATHODE RAYS.Life: The state that distinguishes organisms from inorganic matter, manifested by growth, metabolism, reproduction, and adaptation. It includes the course of existence, the sum of experiences, the mode of existing, or the fact of being. Over the centuries inquiries into the nature of life have crossed the boundaries from philosophy to biology, forensic medicine, anthropology, etc., in creative as well as scientific literature. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed; Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Behavior: The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.Signal Detection, Psychological: Psychophysical technique that permits the estimation of the bias of the observer as well as detectability of the signal (i.e., stimulus) in any sensory modality. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Genetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.Static Electricity: The accumulation of an electric charge on a objectAttention: Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.Sex Ratio: The number of males per 100 females.Genetic Fitness: The capability of an organism to survive and reproduce. The phenotypic expression of the genotype in a particular environment determines how genetically fit an organism will be.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Probability: The study of chance processes or the relative frequency characterizing a chance process.Human Characteristics: The fundamental dispositions and traits of humans. (Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Social Identification: The process by which an aspect of self image is developed based on in-group preference or ethnocentrism and a perception of belonging to a social or cultural group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Concept Formation: A cognitive process involving the formation of ideas generalized from the knowledge of qualities, aspects, and relations of objects.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Longevity: The normal length of time of an organism's life.Physics: The study of those aspects of energy and matter in terms of elementary principles and laws. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Cognitive Science: The study of the precise nature of different mental tasks and the operations of the brain that enable them to be performed, engaging branches of psychology, computer science, philosophy, and linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Adaptation, Biological: Changes in biological features that help an organism cope with its ENVIRONMENT. These changes include physiological (ADAPTATION, PHYSIOLOGICAL), phenotypic and genetic changes.Elasticity: Resistance and recovery from distortion of shape.Monte Carlo Method: In statistics, a technique for numerically approximating the solution of a mathematical problem by studying the distribution of some random variable, often generated by a computer. The name alludes to the randomness characteristic of the games of chance played at the gambling casinos in Monte Carlo. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Mathematical Computing: Computer-assisted interpretation and analysis of various mathematical functions related to a particular problem.Holistic Health: Health as viewed from the perspective that humans and other organisms function as complete, integrated units rather than as aggregates of separate parts.Logic: The science that investigates the principles governing correct or reliable inference and deals with the canons and criteria of validity in thought and demonstration. This system of reasoning is applicable to any branch of knowledge or study. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed & Sippl, Computer Dictionary, 4th ed)Fuzzy Logic: Approximate, quantitative reasoning that is concerned with the linguistic ambiguity which exists in natural or synthetic language. At its core are variables such as good, bad, and young as well as modifiers such as more, less, and very. These ordinary terms represent fuzzy sets in a particular problem. Fuzzy logic plays a key role in many medical expert systems.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Behavioral Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the study of human and animal behavior.Solutions: The homogeneous mixtures formed by the mixing of a solid, liquid, or gaseous substance (solute) with a liquid (the solvent), from which the dissolved substances can be recovered by physical processes. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Altruism: Consideration and concern for others, as opposed to self-love or egoism, which can be a motivating influence.Ego: The conscious portion of the personality structure which serves to mediate between the demands of the primitive instinctual drives, (the id), of internalized parental and social prohibitions or the conscience, (the superego), and of reality.Thinking: Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.Psychology, Clinical: The branch of psychology concerned with psychological methods of recognizing and treating behavior disorders.Viscosity: The resistance that a gaseous or liquid system offers to flow when it is subjected to shear stress. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Psychology, Social: The branch of psychology concerned with the effects of group membership upon the behavior, attitudes, and beliefs of an individual.Nerve Net: A meshlike structure composed of interconnecting nerve cells that are separated at the synaptic junction or joined to one another by cytoplasmic processes. In invertebrates, for example, the nerve net allows nerve impulses to spread over a wide area of the net because synapses can pass information in any direction.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Self Efficacy: Cognitive mechanism based on expectations or beliefs about one's ability to perform actions necessary to produce a given effect. It is also a theoretical component of behavior change in various therapeutic treatments. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Jungian Theory: A theoretical psychoanalytical system centered around symbols of the unconscious with the unconscious material derived from two sources - the personal unconscious (repressed or forgotten experiences, thoughts and feelings) and the collective or objective unconscious (the universal inherited qualities which dispose individuals to behave in ways similar to their ancestors).Anthropology: The science devoted to the comparative study of man.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Sexual Behavior, Animal: Sexual activities of animals.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.History, 16th Century: Time period from 1501 through 1600 of the common era.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Diffusion of Innovation: The broad dissemination of new ideas, procedures, techniques, materials, and devices and the degree to which these are accepted and used.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Knowledge: The body of truths or facts accumulated in the course of time, the cumulated sum of information, its volume and nature, in any civilization, period, or country.Virtues: Character traits that are considered to be morally praiseworthy. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Solvents: Liquids that dissolve other substances (solutes), generally solids, without any change in chemical composition, as, water containing sugar. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Body Size: The physical measurements of a body.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Ions: An atom or group of atoms that have a positive or negative electric charge due to a gain (negative charge) or loss (positive charge) of one or more electrons. Atoms with a positive charge are known as CATIONS; those with a negative charge are ANIONS.Feminism: The theory of the political, economic, and social equality of the sexes and organized activity on behalf of women's rights and interests. (Webster New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Empathy: An individual's objective and insightful awareness of the feelings and behavior of another person. It should be distinguished from sympathy, which is usually nonobjective and noncritical. It includes caring, which is the demonstration of an awareness of and a concern for the good of others. (From Bioethics Thesaurus, 1992)Energy Transfer: The transfer of energy of a given form among different scales of motion. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed). It includes the transfer of kinetic energy and the transfer of chemical energy. The transfer of chemical energy from one molecule to another depends on proximity of molecules so it is often used as in techniques to measure distance such as the use of FORSTER RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER.Data Interpretation, Statistical: Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.Uncertainty: The condition in which reasonable knowledge regarding risks, benefits, or the future is not available.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.Electrochemistry: The study of chemical changes resulting from electrical action and electrical activity resulting from chemical changes.Bayes Theorem: A theorem in probability theory named for Thomas Bayes (1702-1761). In epidemiology, it is used to obtain the probability of disease in a group of people with some characteristic on the basis of the overall rate of that disease and of the likelihood of that characteristic in healthy and diseased individuals. The most familiar application is in clinical decision analysis where it is used for estimating the probability of a particular diagnosis given the appearance of some symptoms or test result.Object Attachment: Emotional attachment to someone or something in the environment.Neurosciences: The scientific disciplines concerned with the embryology, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, etc., of the nervous system.Memory: Complex mental function having four distinct phases: (1) memorizing or learning, (2) retention, (3) recall, and (4) recognition. Clinically, it is usually subdivided into immediate, recent, and remote memory.Pattern Recognition, Visual: Mental process to visually perceive a critical number of facts (the pattern), such as characters, shapes, displays, or designs.Conflict (Psychology): The internal individual struggle resulting from incompatible or opposing needs, drives, or external and internal demands. In group interactions, competitive or opposing action of incompatibles: antagonistic state or action (as of divergent ideas, interests, or persons). (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Cultural Evolution: The continuous developmental process of a culture from simple to complex forms and from homogeneous to heterogeneous qualities.Biology: One of the BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE DISCIPLINES concerned with the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of animals, plants, and microorganisms.Organizational Innovation: Introduction of changes which are new to the organization and are created by management.Goals: The end-result or objective, which may be specified or required in advance.Economics: The science of utilization, distribution, and consumption of services and materials.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Factor Analysis, Statistical: A set of statistical methods for analyzing the correlations among several variables in order to estimate the number of fundamental dimensions that underlie the observed data and to describe and measure those dimensions. It is used frequently in the development of scoring systems for rating scales and questionnaires.Freedom: The rights of individuals to act and make decisions without external constraints.Mental Recall: The process whereby a representation of past experience is elicited.Models, Educational: Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Fractals: Patterns (real or mathematical) which look similar at different scales, for example the network of airways in the lung which shows similar branching patterns at progressively higher magnifications. Natural fractals are self-similar across a finite range of scales while mathematical fractals are the same across an infinite range. Many natural, including biological, structures are fractal (or fractal-like). Fractals are related to "chaos" (see NONLINEAR DYNAMICS) in that chaotic processes can produce fractal structures in nature, and appropriate representations of chaotic processes usually reveal self-similarity over time.Scattering, Radiation: The diversion of RADIATION (thermal, electromagnetic, or nuclear) from its original path as a result of interactions or collisions with atoms, molecules, or larger particles in the atmosphere or other media. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Principle-Based Ethics: An approach to ethics that focuses on theories of the importance of general principles such as respect for autonomy, beneficence/nonmaleficence, and justice.Mental Processes: Conceptual functions or thinking in all its forms.Predatory Behavior: Instinctual behavior pattern in which food is obtained by killing and consuming other species.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Chemistry, Physical: The study of CHEMICAL PHENOMENA and processes in terms of the underlying PHYSICAL PHENOMENA and processes.Molecular Structure: The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.Cybernetics: That branch of learning which brings together theories and studies on communication and control in living organisms and machines.History, Ancient: The period of history before 500 of the common era.Normal Distribution: Continuous frequency distribution of infinite range. Its properties are as follows: 1, continuous, symmetrical distribution with both tails extending to infinity; 2, arithmetic mean, mode, and median identical; and 3, shape completely determined by the mean and standard deviation.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Statistics as Topic: The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Comprehension: The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Computational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Biogenesis: The origin of life. It includes studies of the potential basis for life in organic compounds but excludes studies of the development of altered forms of life through mutation and natural selection, which is BIOLOGICAL EVOLUTION.Association Learning: The principle that items experienced together enter into a connection, so that one tends to reinstate the other.Semantics: The relationships between symbols and their meanings.Physical Phenomena: The entities of matter and energy, and the processes, principles, properties, and relationships describing their nature and interactions.Discrimination Learning: Learning that is manifested in the ability to respond differentially to various stimuli.United StatesSpace Perception: The awareness of the spatial properties of objects; includes physical space.Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Intuition: Knowing or understanding without conscious use of reasoning. (Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1994)History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Lipid Bilayers: Layers of lipid molecules which are two molecules thick. Bilayer systems are frequently studied as models of biological membranes.Empirical Research: The study, based on direct observation, use of statistical records, interviews, or experimental methods, of actual practices or the actual impact of practices or policies.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Reinforcement (Psychology): The strengthening of a conditioned response.Enzymes: Biological molecules that possess catalytic activity. They may occur naturally or be synthetically created. Enzymes are usually proteins, however CATALYTIC RNA and CATALYTIC DNA molecules have also been identified.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.Models, Organizational: Theoretical representations and constructs that describe or explain the structure and hierarchy of relationships and interactions within or between formal organizational entities or informal social groups.Feedback: A mechanism of communication within a system in that the input signal generates an output response which returns to influence the continued activity or productivity of that system.
... counseling theories; counseling methods or techniques (individual and group); research; lifestyle and career development; ... List of counseling topics Mental health counselor "WHO ARE LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELORS?" (PDF). Counseling.org. Retrieved ... A master's degree or doctoral degree in counseling or a related field. Academic course work in each of the following areas: ... The Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association, CCPA offers a distinct certification, Canadian Certified Counsellor ( ...
"Commentary II: A Developmental Theory of the Infant". Gestalt Review. 16 (3): 251-258. 2012. Hidden Treasure: A Map to the ... Counseling. 28 (1): 52. Retrieved 28 August 2015. (Subscription required (help)). Oaklander, Violet (2012). "Commentary II: A ... integrating Gestalt Therapy theory and practice with play therapy techniques. Her book on expressive therapy Windows to Our ... Developmental Theory of the Infant". Gestalt Review. 16 (3): 251-258. Retrieved 28 August 2015. (Subscription required (help ...
Journal of Employment Counseling. 41.1 (2004): 38-44. Bettman, James R. (1979). "An Information Processing Theory of Consumer ... See consumer theory. Game theory can also be used in some circumstances. Psychological models - psychological and cognitive ... Neuroscience is a useful tool and a source of theory development and testing in buyer decision-making research. Neuroimaging ... Myers, I. (1962) Introduction to Type: A description of the theory and applications of the Myers-Briggs type indicator, ...
Meditation Neural mechanisms of mindfulness meditation Seligman & Reichenberg, Linda & Lourie (2014). Theories of Counseling ... Theories behind these mindfulness-based approaches to psychological issues function on the idea that being aware of things in ... Like CBT, MBCT functions on the etiological theory that when individuals who have historically had depression become distressed ... Acceptance and Mindfulness in Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Understanding and Applying New Theories. Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, ...
ISBN 978-0-7391-0112-4. Stephen P. Kachmar and Kimberly Blair (2007). "Counseling Across the Life Span". In Jocelyn Gregoire ... Greg Cashman (2000). "International Interaction: Stimulus-Response Theory and Arms Races". What causes war?: an introduction to ... Statistical theory for linear models has been well developed for more than fifty years, and a standard form of analysis called ... theories of international conflict. Lexington Books. pp. 160-192. ...
Davis, Sally (2006). Rehabilitation: The Use of Theories and Models in Practice. Amsterdam: Elsevier Health Sciences. ISBN ... Blonna, Richard; Watter, Daniel (2005). Health Counseling: A Microskills Approach. Burlington, Massachusetts: Jones & Bartlett ...
Langs, R. (1998). Ground Rules in Psychotherapy and Counseling. London: Karnac Books. Langs, R. (1998). Current Theories of ... Langs' theory of mind, developed in the third phase of his work, highlights that what he terms the "deep unconscious system" is ... Lang's death anxiety theory also highly correlates to the ideas and findings of Stanislav Grof, a psychiatrist and one of the ... In contrast to classical psychoanalytic theory, which tends to view the unconscious mind as a chaotic mix of drives, needs, and ...
Arthur Lerner in Poetry Therapy; Lehman Engel in Musical Theory; Dr. Norman Feingold in Counseling Psychology; Dr. Anne de Vore ...
Female-Specific Theory and Mutual Help Group for Chemically Dependent Women". Journal of Addictions and Offender Counseling. 18 ... There are also elements of applied self-in-relation theory (the theory that a woman's sense of definition and value is strongly ... Theory. 3 (3): 231-243. doi:10.3109/16066359509005240. Manhal-Baugus, Monique (April 1998). "The Self-in-Relation Theory and ... Kaskutas, Lee Ann (1996). "Predictors of Self Esteem Among Members of Women for Sobriety". Addiction Research & Theory. 4 (3): ...
Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy. Belmost, CA: Brooks/Cole. Van Deurzen, Emmy. (2002). Existential ... and relationship counseling, although some counseling psychologists also work with the more serious problems that clinical ... There are fewer counseling psychology graduate programs than those for clinical psychology and they are more often housed in ... CBT is based on the theory that how we think (cognition), how we feel (emotion), and how we act (behavior) are related and ...
Counseling and Psychotherapy: Theories and Interventions. 4th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill Prentice Hall, 2003: See ... Body psychotherapy sees massage, movement as adjunct to counseling. Section: Fit; Page C1 Sutter, Cindy. (June 21, 2004) Daily ... The Hakomi Method combines Western psychology, systems theory, and body-centered techniques with the principles of mindfulness ... Hakomi Mindfulness-Centered Somatic Psychotherapy: A Comprehensive Guide to Theory and Practice', 2015, Norton, NY.Ny.Forward ...
Counseling and Spirituality: A Historical Review. Counseling and Values, Apr 2005, Vol.49(3), pp.217-225 Grof, Stanislav. (1975 ... "A Daniel Come To Judgement? Dennett and the Revisioning of Transpersonal Theory". Journal of Consciousness Studies, 13, No. 3, ... and the Analytical school of C.G Jung are often considered to be forerunners to the establishment of transpersonal theory. ...
Canada: Penguin Group Sue, D. W. & Sue, D. (2008). Counseling the culturally diverse: theory and practice. Hoboken, New Jersey ... Theories, concepts and methods are developed to correspond with psychological phenomena. Indigenous psychology explicitly ... Indigenous Psychology, as defined by Heelas and Lock (1981), consists of the cultural views, theories, classifications and ... Indigenous psychology is considered necessary since existing psychological theories are not necessarily universal, and may ...
p. 5. ISBN 978-0-465-02147-5. Richard Sharf (1 January 2015). Theories of Psychotherapy & Counseling: Concepts and Cases. ... He offers explanations on its widespread omission in the theory and practice of psychotherapy - in particular also by Sigmund ... This work is considered, aside his groundbreaking textbook on group therapy The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy ( ... Emmy van Deurzen; Raymond Kenward (12 May 2005). Dictionary of Existential Psychotherapy and Counselling. SAGE Publications. p ...
New York: Routledge Sue, Derald Wing; Sue, David (4 May 2011). Counseling the Culturally Diverse: Theory and Practice. John ... What Every Counseling Psychologist Should Know". The Counseling Psychologist. 1 (2): 1-50. doi:10.1177/0011000015573776. ... Having this in mind, eastern eudaimonistic theories of well-being accept the existence of negative feelings and anhedonia in a ... Since forgiveness is a key virtue in positive psychology and a relevant topic in counseling, it is important to research ...
Corey, Gerald (2012). Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy. Cengage Learning. p. 105. Paul R. Rasmussen, The ... Gerald Corey (2012) stated in his book, Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy, that personality can only be ... Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy. Cengage. p. 105. Rasmussen, P. R.,; Watkins, K. L. (2012). "Advice from ... The contemporary movement describes itself as a values-based, fully integrated theory of personality, model of psychopathology ...
Corey, G. (2009). Theory and practice of counseling and psychotherapy. Belmont, Calif: Thomson Brooks/Cole. Glasser, W. (1985 ... While traditional psycho-analysis and counseling often focus on past events, reality therapy and choice theory solutions lay in ... Choice theory attempts to explain, or give an account of, how each of us attempts to control our world and those within that ... Choice theory asserts that each of us is a self-determining being who can choose (many of our) future behaviors and hold ...
Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy. 9th Edition, 2012. Corey, G. ISBN 0840028547. World Council for ... The use of play therapy is often rooted in psychodynamic theory, but other approaches such as Solution Focused Brief Counseling ... Page 2. History of Counselling & Psychotherapy Greg Mulhauser, CounsellingResource Library, 2014 Theory and Practice of Nursing ... Counseling and psychotherapy must be adapted to meet the developmental needs of children. It is generally held to be one part ...
ISBN 0078035384 Fadul, Jose A. (2014). Encyclopedia of Theory & Practice in Psychotherapy & Counseling. Raleigh, NC: Lulu Press ... Illness dependent on stress "triggers". Psychoanalysis (Freud) Psychoanalytic theory is heavily based on the theory of the ... These and many others have gone on to elaborate on Freud's original theory and to add their own take on defense mechanisms or ... According to psychoanalytic theory, these repressions cause the disturbances that people experience in their daily lives and by ...
Kokotovic AM & Tracey TT (1987). Premature termination at a university counseling center. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 34 ... Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 44, 205-218. ...
Helms, J.E. & Cook, D.A. (1999). Using race and culture in counseling and psychotherapy: Theory and process. Boston: Allyn & ... 2] Sue, D.W., & Sue, D. (2003). Counseling the culturally diverse: Theory and practice (4th ed.). New York: Wiley.[3]. ... This theory was created in 1990 and revised in 1995. Although this theory has been updated, there are many other white identity ... This theory, heavily influenced by William Cross, has become the most referenced and studied theory on white identity ...
Counselling Psychology Quarterly (2006). Special issue: The dialogical approach to counselling theory, research, and practice, ... Theory & Psychology (2010), special issue on self and dialogue, vol. 20, no. 3, 2010, 299-360. New Directions for Child and ... Hermans, H.J.M. (2002). The person as a motivated storyteller: Valuation theory and the Self-Confrontation Method. In R.A. ... Theory & Psychology (2002). Special issue: the dialogical self, vol. 12, no. 2, 147-280. Journal of Constructivist Psychology ( ...
Robert T. Carter's (2007) theory of race-based traumatic stress implies that there are individuals of color who experience ... Carter, Robert T. (2016-06-30). "Racism and Psychological and Emotional Injury". The Counseling Psychologist. 35 (1): 13-105. ... Race-based traumatic stress combines theories of stress, trauma and race-based discrimination to describe a particular response ... Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy. 9 (6): 688-695. doi:10.1037/tra0000256. Comas-Díaz, Lillian. Racial trauma recovery: A ...
Journal of Counseling Psychology (Monograph). 28 (6): 545-579. Egalitarian Fiction Linda S. Gottfredson homepage (with online ... " "List of scholars" Gottfredson, L. S. (1981). "Circumscription and Compromise: A Developmental Theory of Occupational ...
Wade, Jay C. (1998). "Male reference group identity dependence: A theory of male identity". The Counseling Psychologist. 26 (3 ... The temporal self-appraisal theory argues that people have a tendency to maintain a positive self-evaluation by distancing ... "What Are The Effects Of The Self-Concept Theory In High School Students?". Western Connecticut State University. Overview of ... Shavelson, Richard J.; Bolus, Roger (1982). "Self concept: The interplay of theory and methods" (PDF). Journal of Educational ...
... or whose theory and practice is not part of biomedicine,[n 2][n 4][n 5][n 6] or whose theories or practices are directly ... Counseling stress therapies, hypnotherapy, Meditation, Reflexology, Shiatsu, Ayurvedic medicine, Nutritional medicine, and Yoga ... Martin, Hélène; Debons, Jérôme (2015). CAM and conventional medicine in Switzerland : divided in theory, united in practice. In ... Alternative medicine is defined loosely as a set of products, practices, and theories that are believed or perceived by their ...
Different theories of counseling inform practitioners about how to work with their clients to facility positive change and ... There are quite a few different theories of counseling. There are many different similarities and differences between different ... Retrieved from "https://en.wikiversity.org/w/index.php?title=Theories_of_counseling&oldid=1745603" ...
Theories and Applications of Counseling and Psychotherapy provides students with the foundational knowledge needed to implement ... Theories and Applications of Counseling and Psychotherapy Relevance Across Cultures and Settings ... Discussion of the relevance of each theory to current practice shows students how each theory is currently used, including ... Biographies of major leaders/contributors to a theory draw students into each theory chapter through an effective storytelling ...
... methods of nutrition counseling in a variety of settings. ... Theory and practice of nutritional education and dietary ... Theory and practice of nutritional education and dietary behavior change; methods of nutrition counseling in a variety of ...
This subject aims to introduce counselling theory based around the person-centred model developed by Carl Rogers. Alongside a ... via the study and contextual application of counselling microskills, an exploration of the links between theory and practice ... Person-centred counselling in action. Recommended. Mearns, D & Thorne, B 1988. SAGE, LONDON. ... An introduction to counselling. Prescribed. McLeod, J 2009. 4TH EDN, OUP, BUCKINGHAM. ...
Cognitive Analytic Therapy: Developments in Theory and Practice. Anthony Ryle (Editor). ISBN: 978-0-471-94355-6 August 1995 210 ... This book appears in The Wiley Series in Psychotherapy and Counselling Series Editors: Franz Epting, University of Florida, USA ...
Transcript of Counseling Theory & Practice Quick Reference Guide. Counseling Theory & Practice Quick Reference Guide. Concepts ... Correctional and rehabilitation counseling. • Group counseling. • Substance abuse programs. • Brief counseling. Existential ... Group counseling. • Marital & Family Therapy Reality Therapy. (choice theory). William Glasser Key Concepts. • Focus on overt ... Parent/child counseling. • Marital and family therapy. • Individual counseling - all age groups. • ...
Start studying Counseling Theories: Psychoanalysis - Reality Therapy. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games ...
Attachment theory is the understanding of how we seek proximity, or closeness and intimacy, with people in our lives. This ... Attachment theory is the understanding of how we seek proximity, or closeness and intimacy, with people in our lives. This ... Counselling Directory is not responsible for the articles published by members. The views expressed are those of the member who ... John Bowlby developed Attachment Theory from the late 1950s and it has been developed and researched by others since then. It ...
Substance Abuse Counsel Theory&prac&mhl Pkg (9780137141791) and a great selection of similar New, Used and Collectible Books ...
Attachment theory describes several behavioural systems, the function of which is to regulate human attachment, fear, ... Attachment theory emphasises the role of the parent as mediator, reflector and moderator of the childs mind and the childs ... In attachment theory, the main purpose of defence is the regulation of emotions. The primary mechanisms for achieving this are ... Counselling Directory is not responsible for the articles published by members. The views expressed are those of the member who ...
Counseling and Psychotherapy Theories in Context and Practice: Skills, Strategies, and Techniques, 3rd Edition. ... Get to know the origins, development, and key figures of each major counseling theory ... Counseling and Psychotherapy Theories in Context and Practice: Skills, Strategies, and Techniques, 3rd Edition. John Sommers- ... This comprehensive text covers all the major theories in counseling and psychotherapy along with an emphasis on how to use ...
These authors emphasize state-of-the-art scientific evidence that supports the effectiveness of various counseling approaches ... The book disseminates the expertise of many of the most esteemed leaders and academic scholars in rehabilitation counseling. ... Counseling Theories and Techniques for Rehabilitation and Mental Health Professionals. Publication Year: 2015. Edition: 2nd Ed. ... Focuses on counseling theories and techniques regarding rehabilitation and health and chronic illness and disability. - Serves ...
Find the top health care books on counseling, gerontology, nursing, healthcare administration, psychology, public health, ... Counseling Health Care Admin Nursing. Medicine, Neurology. Medicine, PM&R. Medicine, Medical Oncology. Medicine, Radiation ... Counseling Health Care Admin Nursing. Medicine, Neurology. Medicine, PM&R. Medicine, Medical Oncology. Medicine, Radiation ...
Program A (N=305) was eclectic in its basic counseling theory; program B (N=365) placed emphasis on Gestalt theory; and program ... treatment programs for juvenile offenders to determine if recidivism rates were related to differences in counseling theory and ... C (N=58) stressed Adlerian theory, placing added importance on peer-group techniques. Data were obtained from county juvenile ... Program A (N=305) was eclectic in its basic counseling theory; program B (N=365) placed emphasis on Gestalt theory; and program ...
Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy. Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy. by Gerald Corey, ... Gerald Corey is the author of Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy, published 2016 under ISBN 9781305263727 ...
Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy: Systems, Strategies, and Skills (3rd Edition). Theories of Counseling and ... Seligman, Linda W. is the author of Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy: Systems, Strategies, and Skills (3rd Edition), ...
Counseling and Psychotherapy Theories and Issues (volume 1, Third Edition). Author: Ard, Ben. ... Considers a variety of different theories (non-psychiatric and non-medical) of psychological counselling in the writings of the ... originators of those theories. Volume Two presents papers on a number of the important issues in psychological counselling. ... Topics include the appropriate relationship between counselling and classroom teaching, the meeting of psychological data and ...
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In theory, you can tap anywhere and impact emotional problems. Non-hsue skin areas, or "sham points," also have ... For further discussion of "five element" theory, see Chapter 7 of Donna Edens Energy Medicine (New York: Tarcher/Penguin ... 17 In the time-honored and strikingly sophisticated "five element theory" of traditional Chinese medicine (known as wu zing and ...
Descriptors: Anxiety, Attitude Change, Behavior Change, College Students, Counseling Techniques, Dating (Social), Higher ... Self-Perception Theory and Unobtrusively Biased Interactions: A Treatment for Heterosocial Anxiety. ...
Diffusion of Innovation Theory: A Bridge for the Research-Practice Gap in Counseling. UNCG Author/Contributor (non-UNCG co- ... Diffusion of Innovation Theory: A Bridge for the Research-Practice Gap in Counseling. PDF (Portable Document Format). 368 KB. ... Journal of Counseling and Development, Winter, Vol. 87 p. 108-116 (2009). Language: English. Date: 2009. Keywords. Innovation, ... The author describes the nature of the research-practice gap and presents an overview of diffusion of innovation theory. On the ...
The Use Of Counselling Skills. 1465 Words , 6 Pages. age matter? This is a question I have been considering throughout my time ... Theories Of Self-Efficacy In The Workplace. 1266 Words , 6 Pages. *. Self Effectivecy And The Theory Of Self-Cognitive Theory. ... Theory Of Motivation. 1337 Words , 6 Pages. two main theories of motivation in the field of Psychology. The two theories of ... Theories Of Albert Banduras Social Cognitive Theory. 1627 Words , 7 Pages. ALBERT BANDURAS SOCIAL COGNITIVE THEORY ...
Theories of Counselling. EDUC 870. Students examine analytic, phenomenological, existential, behavioral and cognitive ... Counselling Practicum II. EDUC 802. Advanced supervised clinical experience for students enrolled in the MEd or MA Counselling ... Group Counselling. EDUC 878. An examination of contemporary approaches to group counselling. Students with credit for EDUC 720 ... Counselling Practicum I. EDUC 801. Supervised clinical experience for students enrolled in the MEd or MA Counselling Psychology ...
... self-efficacy is an important component of Albert Banduras social cognitive theory. Self-efficacy refers to ... ... The corresponding theories are attribution theory, expectancy-value theory, and goal theory. In attribution theory, causal ... Betz, N. E. (2004). Contributions of self-efficacy theory to career counseling: A personal perspective. Career Development ... Betz, N. E. (1992). Counseling uses of career self-efficacy theory. Career Development Quarterly, 41, 22-27. ...
... like Keyness General Theory - A Retrospective View - A. C. Pigou from ebook-reader ... Theory And Design In Counseling And Psychotherapy - Cti Reviews. Facts101 is your complete guide to Theory and Design in ... Social Theory, The State And Modern Society - Cti Reviews. Facts101 is your complete guide to Social Theory, The State and ... Economics , Theory And Practice - Cti Reviews. Facts101 is your complete guide to Economics , Theory and Practice. In this book ...
  • The first year of the program begins with courses which help students to develop in-depth understandings of theories of counselling and become familiar with assessment procedures. (sfu.ca)
  • In Our Clients' Shoes conveniently assembles a number of important papers on the Therapeutic Assessment approach in one resource, explicating its history, theory, techniques, as well as its impact on clients and assessors. (crcpress.com)
  • methods of nutrition counseling in a variety of settings. (nyu.edu)
  • This study was conducted to examine existing treatment programs for juvenile offenders to determine if recidivism rates were related to differences in counseling theory and methods. (ed.gov)
  • Financial Therapy is the first full-length guide to the field, bridging theory, practical methods, and a growing cross-disciplinary evidence base to create a framework for improving this crucial aspect of clients' lives. (springer.com)
  • However, I will not discuss methods per se, focusing instead on the role of theory. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • This course covers the underlying theories, models and methods for effective counseling an academic/school setting. (merrimack.edu)
  • STP courses offer students the opportunity to learn theories, methods, and strategies that enable them to understand and critique social structures and processes and to become effective actors in struggles for justice. (umich.edu)
  • This is in contrast to the view that the effectiveness of psychotherapy and counseling is best explained by specific or unique factors (notably, particular methods or procedures) that are suited to treatment of particular problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lynda Beveridge BCIT Instructional Development Consultant, part-time teacher in a MEd program (School Counselling). (sfu.ca)
  • Most graduates of the Professional Counseling program obtain jobs in Murfreesboro and the middle Tennessee area. (mtsu.edu)
  • School counseling graduates are employed by school districts in which they provide services to students, school personnel, and parents in elementary, middle, and high school settings. (mtsu.edu)
  • The practicum, begining in the second year, is also crucial to student's development Throughout their practicum work, students integrate science and research into their work via theory-driven and evidencebased case conceptualizations. (bc.edu)
  • This program is designed to offer flexibility for students by holding most classes in the late afternoon/evenings at the Surrey or Burnaby campus and clinic courses at the SFU Surrey Counselling Centre . (sfu.ca)
  • The Supervised Clinic courses take place at the SFU Surrey Counselling Centre , which is housed in a secondary school in Surrey. (sfu.ca)
  • This CACREP-accredited , mental health master's program combines models and techniques of counseling with biblical principles for a strong and balanced approach to mental health counseling. (regent.edu)
  • Sherry Cormier, PhD, Professor Emerita, West Virginia University, coauthor of Interviewing and Change Strategies for Helpers'John and Rita Sommers-Flanagan have written an exceptionally practical text for students wishing to learn usable counseling principles. (readrate.com)
  • This course provides students with an opportunity to learn about the processes of group counseling by participating in experiential activities that demonstrate the basic principles of group counseling. (merrimack.edu)
  • Goldfried and Padawer argued that while therapists may talk about their theories using very different jargon, there is more commonality among skilled therapists at the (intermediate) level of principles or strategies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Seligman, Linda W. is the author of 'Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy: Systems, Strategies, and Skills (3rd Edition)', published 2009 under ISBN 9780135034767 and ISBN 0135034760. (valorebooks.com)
  • Counselling skills and strategies are analysed, practiced, and critically examined. (sfu.ca)
  • Choose one of the few PhD in Counselor Education and Supervision programs available online, and advance your teaching and counseling skills. (waldenu.edu)
  • Share your counseling skills and expertise as you solve problems and make recommendations in a range of settings, including primary and organizations, and business and industry. (waldenu.edu)
  • Apply the skills needed to meet the Virginia requirements for a career in professional counseling within the public school system. (regent.edu)
  • Addresses the skills necessary to carry out individual counseling and consultation in the school setting. (marymount.edu)
  • Joining Together introduces readers to the theory and research needed to understand how to make groups effective and, through exercises and thorough explanations, equips them with the skills required to apply that knowledge to practical situations. (ecampus.com)
  • He has written many journal articles, contributed chapters to books, and is the co-author of Joining Together: Group Theory and Group Skills . (ecampus.com)
  • He is the author of over 50 books, including Reaching Out: Interpersonal Effectiveness and Self-Actualization, Active Learning: Cooperation in the College Classroom, Cooperation in the Classroom, Creative Controversy, Teaching Students To Be Peacemakers, and Cooperation and Competition: Theory and Research. (ecampus.com)
  • Each style of counseling is evaluated and the relationship between the nature of the disturbance and the effectiveness of each approach is discussed. (aic.edu)
  • Differentiation of Self The core foundation of Bowen's theory asserts that individual family members develop the capacity to think independently, act with flexibility and reason when faced with everyday issues (Nichols, 2003). (bartleby.com)
  • In this book, you will learn topics such as The Theory of Consumer Choice, Individual and Market Demand, Using Consumer Choice Theory, and Exchange, Efficiency, and Prices. (tradebit.com)
  • This theory gives every individual the right to believe in whatever they want, without any repercussions, criticism, rewards, or punishments. (lifehack.org)
  • All Individual & Couple Counselling. (naturaltherapypages.com.au)
  • Phone-Delivered Support Counseling for HIV Treatment Adherence is an individual-level intervention delivered to HIV-clinic patients who are treatment experienced and self - reported less than 95% adherence. (cdc.gov)
  • In the past 40 years Jerry and Marianne Corey have conducted group counseling training workshops for mental health professionals at many universities in the United States as well as in Canada, Mexico, China, Hong Kong, Korea, Germany, Belgium, Scotland, England, and Ireland. (ebay.com.au)
  • Her Group Counseling class gave her "the opportunity to connect and be vulnerable with my peers in an authentic way, allowing me to see the true power of group counseling. (mtsu.edu)
  • The comparison group participants only received a Hepatitis B test and HIV pre-test counseling, along with post-test counseling if they elected to take an HIV test. (cdc.gov)