Laboratories: Facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.TokyoClinical Laboratory Techniques: Techniques used to carry out clinical investigative procedures in the diagnosis and therapy of disease.Countercurrent Distribution: A method of separation of two or more substances by repeated distribution between two immiscible liquid phases that move past each other in opposite directions. It is a form of liquid-liquid chromatography. (Stedman, 25th ed)Quality Control: A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Chemistry Techniques, Analytical: Methodologies used for the isolation, identification, detection, and quantitation of chemical substances.Reference Standards: A basis of value established for the measure of quantity, weight, extent or quality, e.g. weight standards, standard solutions, methods, techniques, and procedures used in diagnosis and therapy.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Specimen Handling: Procedures for collecting, preserving, and transporting of specimens sufficiently stable to provide accurate and precise results suitable for clinical interpretation.Laboratories, Hospital: Hospital facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.Evaluation Studies as Topic: Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.False Positive Reactions: Positive test results in subjects who do not possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of healthy persons as diseased when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Clinical Laboratory Information Systems: Information systems, usually computer-assisted, designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information for planning, organizing, directing, and controlling administrative and clinical activities associated with the provision and utilization of clinical laboratory services.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Clinical Chemistry Tests: Laboratory tests demonstrating the presence of physiologically significant substances in the blood, urine, tissue, and body fluids with application to the diagnosis or therapy of disease.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Diagnostic Tests, Routine: Diagnostic procedures, such as laboratory tests and x-rays, routinely performed on all individuals or specified categories of individuals in a specified situation, e.g., patients being admitted to the hospital. These include routine tests administered to neonates.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Medical Laboratory Personnel: Health care professionals, technicians, and assistants staffing LABORATORIES in research or health care facilities.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis: Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.Chemistry, Clinical: The specialty of ANALYTIC CHEMISTRY applied to assays of physiologically important substances found in blood, urine, tissues, and other biological fluids for the purpose of aiding the physician in making a diagnosis or following therapy.Hematologic Tests: Tests used in the analysis of the hemic system.Animals, LaboratoryLogical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes: A vocabulary database of universal identifiers for laboratory and clinical test results. Its purpose is to facilitate the exchange and pooling of results for clinical care, outcomes management, and research. It is produced by the Regenstrief Institute. (LOINC and RELMA [Internet]. Indianapolis: The Regenstrief Institute; c1995-2001 [cited 2002 Apr 2]. Available from http://www.regenstrief.org/loinc)Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Clinical Laboratory Services: Organized services provided by MEDICAL LABORATORY PERSONNEL for the purpose of carrying out CLINICAL LABORATORY TECHNIQUES used for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.Pathology, Clinical: A subspecialty of pathology applied to the solution of clinical problems, especially the use of laboratory methods in clinical diagnosis. (Dorland, 28th ed.)Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures: Methods, procedures, and tests performed to diagnose disease, disordered function, or disability.Point-of-Care Systems: Laboratory and other services provided to patients at the bedside. These include diagnostic and laboratory testing using automated information entry.Blood Chemical Analysis: An examination of chemicals in the blood.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Diagnostic Errors: Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.Hematology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with morphology, physiology, and pathology of the blood and blood-forming tissues.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Rodenticides: Substances used to destroy or inhibit the action of rats, mice, or other rodents.Blood Sedimentation: Measurement of rate of settling of erythrocytes in anticoagulated blood.Laboratory Personnel: Professionals, technicians, and assistants staffing LABORATORIES.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Physical Examination: Systematic and thorough inspection of the patient for physical signs of disease or abnormality.Immunologic Tests: Immunologic techniques involved in diagnosis.Serology: The study of serum, especially of antigen-antibody reactions in vitro.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Laboratory Proficiency Testing: Assessments aimed at determining agreement in diagnostic test results among laboratories. Identical survey samples are distributed to participating laboratories, with results stratified according to testing methodologies.Liver Function Tests: Blood tests that are used to evaluate how well a patient's liver is working and also to help diagnose liver conditions.Neurosyphilis: Infections of the central nervous system caused by TREPONEMA PALLIDUM which present with a variety of clinical syndromes. The initial phase of infection usually causes a mild or asymptomatic meningeal reaction. The meningovascular form may present acutely as BRAIN INFARCTION. The infection may also remain subclinical for several years. Late syndromes include general paresis; TABES DORSALIS; meningeal syphilis; syphilitic OPTIC ATROPHY; and spinal syphilis. General paresis is characterized by progressive DEMENTIA; DYSARTHRIA; TREMOR; MYOCLONUS; SEIZURES; and Argyll-Robertson pupils. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp722-8)Laboratory Animal Science: The science and technology dealing with the procurement, breeding, care, health, and selection of animals used in biomedical research and testing.Syphilis Serodiagnosis: Serologic tests for syphilis.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Physicians' Offices: The room or rooms in which the physician and staff provide patient care. The offices include all rooms in the physician's office suite.Blood Coagulation Disorders: Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of abnormalities in blood coagulation due to a variety of factors such as COAGULATION PROTEIN DISORDERS; BLOOD PLATELET DISORDERS; BLOOD PROTEIN DISORDERS or nutritional conditions.Immunoassay: A technique using antibodies for identifying or quantifying a substance. Usually the substance being studied serves as antigen both in antibody production and in measurement of antibody by the test substance.Diagnostic Services: Organized services for the purpose of providing diagnosis to promote and maintain health.Rodent Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous rodents through chemical, biological, or other means.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Aspartate Aminotransferases: Enzymes of the transferase class that catalyze the conversion of L-aspartate and 2-ketoglutarate to oxaloacetate and L-glutamate. EC 2.6.1.1.United States4-Hydroxycoumarins: Substances found in many plants, containing the 4-hydroxycoumarin radical. They interfere with vitamin K and the blood clotting mechanism, are tightly protein-bound, inhibit mitochondrial and microsomal enzymes, and are used as oral anticoagulants.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Hemorrhagic Disorders: Spontaneous or near spontaneous bleeding caused by a defect in clotting mechanisms (BLOOD COAGULATION DISORDERS) or another abnormality causing a structural flaw in the blood vessels (HEMOSTATIC DISORDERS).Drug Monitoring: The process of observing, recording, or detecting the effects of a chemical substance administered to an individual therapeutically or diagnostically.Health Services Misuse: Excessive, under or unnecessary utilization of health services by patients or physicians.Medical Laboratory Science: The specialty related to the performance of techniques in clinical pathology such as those in hematology, microbiology, and other general clinical laboratory applications.Forms and Records Control: A management function in which standards and guidelines are developed for the development, maintenance, and handling of forms and records.Serologic Tests: Diagnostic procedures involving immunoglobulin reactions.Alanine Transaminase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-alanine and 2-oxoglutarate to pyruvate and L-glutamate. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 2.6.1.2.Phlebotomy: The techniques used to draw blood from a vein for diagnostic purposes or for treatment of certain blood disorders such as erythrocytosis, hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, and porphyria cutanea tarda.Reagent Kits, Diagnostic: Commercially prepared reagent sets, with accessory devices, containing all of the major components and literature necessary to perform one or more designated diagnostic tests or procedures. They may be for laboratory or personal use.Medical History Taking: Acquiring information from a patient on past medical conditions and treatments.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Erythrocyte Indices: ERYTHROCYTE size and HEMOGLOBIN content or concentration, usually derived from ERYTHROCYTE COUNT; BLOOD hemoglobin concentration; and HEMATOCRIT. The indices include the mean corpuscular volume (MCV), the mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC).Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.IsraelDouble-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Rhabdomyolysis: Necrosis or disintegration of skeletal muscle often followed by myoglobinuria.Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Liver Diseases: Pathological processes of the LIVER.Diagnosis: The determination of the nature of a disease or condition, or the distinguishing of one disease or condition from another. Assessment may be made through physical examination, laboratory tests, or the likes. Computerized programs may be used to enhance the decision-making process.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Microbiology: The study of microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, algae, archaea, and viruses.Blood Cell Count: The number of LEUKOCYTES and ERYTHROCYTES per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD. A complete blood count (CBC) also includes measurement of the HEMOGLOBIN; HEMATOCRIT; and ERYTHROCYTE INDICES.Partial Thromboplastin Time: The time required for the appearance of FIBRIN strands following the mixing of PLASMA with phospholipid platelet substitute (e.g., crude cephalins, soybean phosphatides). It is a test of the intrinsic pathway (factors VIII, IX, XI, and XII) and the common pathway (fibrinogen, prothrombin, factors V and X) of BLOOD COAGULATION. It is used as a screening test and to monitor HEPARIN therapy.Hemoglobinometry: Measurement of hemoglobin concentration in blood.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Thyroid Diseases: Pathological processes involving the THYROID GLAND.Unnecessary Procedures: Diagnostic, therapeutic, and investigative procedures prescribed and performed by health professionals, the results of which do not justify the benefits or hazards and costs to the patient.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Ambulatory Care Facilities: Those facilities which administer health services to individuals who do not require hospitalization or institutionalization.Blood Specimen Collection: The taking of a blood sample to determine its character as a whole, to identify levels of its component cells, chemicals, gases, or other constituents, to perform pathological examination, etc.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Rheumatic Diseases: Disorders of connective tissue, especially the joints and related structures, characterized by inflammation, degeneration, or metabolic derangement.Urinalysis: Examination of urine by chemical, physical, or microscopic means. Routine urinalysis usually includes performing chemical screening tests, determining specific gravity, observing any unusual color or odor, screening for bacteriuria, and examining the sediment microscopically.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Monitoring, Physiologic: The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.Platelet Count: The number of PLATELETS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.Hospitals, University: Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.ROC Curve: A graphic means for assessing the ability of a screening test to discriminate between healthy and diseased persons; may also be used in other studies, e.g., distinguishing stimuli responses as to a faint stimuli or nonstimuli.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Prothrombin Time: Clotting time of PLASMA recalcified in the presence of excess TISSUE THROMBOPLASTIN. Factors measured are FIBRINOGEN; PROTHROMBIN; FACTOR V; FACTOR VII; and FACTOR X. It is used for monitoring anticoagulant therapy with COUMARINS.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Laboratories, Dental: Facilities for the performance of services related to dental treatment but not done directly in the patient's mouth.Methods: A series of steps taken in order to conduct research.BrazilCost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Rheumatology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of inflammatory or degenerative processes and metabolic derangement of connective tissue structures which pertain to a variety of musculoskeletal disorders, such as arthritis.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Reagins: Antibodies, especially IGE, that bind to tissue of the same species so that ANTIGENS induce release of HISTAMINE and other vasoactive agents. HYPERSENSITIVITY is the clinical manifestation.Molecular Diagnostic Techniques: MOLECULAR BIOLOGY techniques used in the diagnosis of disease.Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Direct: A form of fluorescent antibody technique utilizing a fluorochrome conjugated to an antibody, which is added directly to a tissue or cell suspension for the detection of a specific antigen. (Bennington, Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984)Urticaria: A vascular reaction of the skin characterized by erythema and wheal formation due to localized increase of vascular permeability. The causative mechanism may be allergy, infection, or stress.Statistics as Topic: The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Syphilis: A contagious venereal disease caused by the spirochete TREPONEMA PALLIDUM.Treponema pallidum: The causative agent of venereal and non-venereal syphilis as well as yaws.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Vaginal Discharge: A common gynecologic disorder characterized by an abnormal, nonbloody discharge from the genital tract.C-Reactive Protein: A plasma protein that circulates in increased amounts during inflammation and after tissue damage.Bilirubin: A bile pigment that is a degradation product of HEME.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Clinical Enzyme Tests: Analyses for a specific enzyme activity, or of the level of a specific enzyme that is used to assess health and disease risk, for early detection of disease or disease prediction, diagnosis, and change in disease status.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Leukocyte Count: The number of WHITE BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in venous BLOOD. A differential leukocyte count measures the relative numbers of the different types of white cells.Jaundice: A clinical manifestation of HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA, characterized by the yellowish staining of the SKIN; MUCOUS MEMBRANE; and SCLERA. Clinical jaundice usually is a sign of LIVER dysfunction.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Medical Order Entry Systems: Information systems, usually computer-assisted, that enable providers to initiate medical procedures, prescribe medications, etc. These systems support medical decision-making and error-reduction during patient care.False Negative Reactions: Negative test results in subjects who possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of diseased persons as healthy when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Cost Savings: Reductions in all or any portion of the costs of providing goods or services. Savings may be incurred by the provider or the consumer.Thrombocytopenia: A subnormal level of BLOOD PLATELETS.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Ultrasonography: The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.Leptospirosis: Infections with bacteria of the genus LEPTOSPIRA.Hemagglutination Tests: Sensitive tests to measure certain antigens, antibodies, or viruses, using their ability to agglutinate certain erythrocytes. (From Stedman, 26th ed)Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Typhoid-Paratyphoid Vaccines: Vaccines used to prevent TYPHOID FEVER and/or PARATYPHOID FEVER which are caused by various species of SALMONELLA. Attenuated, subunit, and inactivated forms of the vaccines exist.Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic: A chronic, relapsing, inflammatory, and often febrile multisystemic disorder of connective tissue, characterized principally by involvement of the skin, joints, kidneys, and serosal membranes. It is of unknown etiology, but is thought to represent a failure of the regulatory mechanisms of the autoimmune system. The disease is marked by a wide range of system dysfunctions, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and the formation of LE cells in the blood or bone marrow.Patient Care: The services rendered by members of the health profession and non-professionals under their supervision.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Immunoglobulin M: A class of immunoglobulin bearing mu chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN MU-CHAINS). IgM can fix COMPLEMENT. The name comes from its high molecular weight and originally being called a macroglobulin.Decision Support Systems, Clinical: Computer-based information systems used to integrate clinical and patient information and provide support for decision-making in patient care.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Abdominal Pain: Sensation of discomfort, distress, or agony in the abdominal region.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Serum Albumin: A major protein in the BLOOD. It is important in maintaining the colloidal osmotic pressure and transporting large organic molecules.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Fluorescent Treponemal Antibody-Absorption Test: Serologic assay that detects antibodies to Treponema pallidum, the etiologic agent of syphilis. After diluting the patient's serum to remove non-specific antibodies, the serum is mixed on a glass slide with Nichol's strain of Treponema pallidum. An antigen-antibody reaction occurs if the test is positive and the bound antibodies are detected with fluoresceinated antihuman gamma-globulin antibody.Insecticides: Pesticides designed to control insects that are harmful to man. The insects may be directly harmful, as those acting as disease vectors, or indirectly harmful, as destroyers of crops, food products, or textile fabrics.Blood Transfusion: The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)Blood Viscosity: The internal resistance of the BLOOD to shear forces. The in vitro measure of whole blood viscosity is of limited clinical utility because it bears little relationship to the actual viscosity within the circulation, but an increase in the viscosity of circulating blood can contribute to morbidity in patients suffering from disorders such as SICKLE CELL ANEMIA and POLYCYTHEMIA.Blood Coagulation Tests: Laboratory tests for evaluating the individual's clotting mechanism.Thyroid Function Tests: Blood tests used to evaluate the functioning of the thyroid gland.Fever: An abnormal elevation of body temperature, usually as a result of a pathologic process.Thyroxine: The major hormone derived from the thyroid gland. Thyroxine is synthesized via the iodination of tyrosines (MONOIODOTYROSINE) and the coupling of iodotyrosines (DIIODOTYROSINE) in the THYROGLOBULIN. Thyroxine is released from thyroglobulin by proteolysis and secreted into the blood. Thyroxine is peripherally deiodinated to form TRIIODOTHYRONINE which exerts a broad spectrum of stimulatory effects on cell metabolism.Arthritis, Rheumatoid: A chronic systemic disease, primarily of the joints, marked by inflammatory changes in the synovial membranes and articular structures, widespread fibrinoid degeneration of the collagen fibers in mesenchymal tissues, and by atrophy and rarefaction of bony structures. Etiology is unknown, but autoimmune mechanisms have been implicated.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Urine: Liquid by-product of excretion produced in the kidneys, temporarily stored in the bladder until discharge through the URETHRA.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Hematocrit: The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Sentinel Surveillance: Monitoring of rate of occurrence of specific conditions to assess the stability or change in health levels of a population. It is also the study of disease rates in a specific cohort such as in a geographic area or population subgroup to estimate trends in a larger population. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Hemostasis: The process which spontaneously arrests the flow of BLOOD from vessels carrying blood under pressure. It is accomplished by contraction of the vessels, adhesion and aggregation of formed blood elements (eg. ERYTHROCYTE AGGREGATION), and the process of BLOOD COAGULATION.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Reminder Systems: Systems used to prompt or aid the memory. The systems can be computerized reminders, color coding, telephone calls, or devices such as letters and postcards.Anticoagulants: Agents that prevent clotting.Travel: Aspects of health and disease related to travel.Genetic Testing: Detection of a MUTATION; GENOTYPE; KARYOTYPE; or specific ALLELES associated with genetic traits, heritable diseases, or predisposition to a disease, or that may lead to the disease in descendants. It includes prenatal genetic testing.Filtration: A process of separating particulate matter from a fluid, such as air or a liquid, by passing the fluid carrier through a medium that will not pass the particulates. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Ferritins: Iron-containing proteins that are widely distributed in animals, plants, and microorganisms. Their major function is to store IRON in a nontoxic bioavailable form. Each ferritin molecule consists of ferric iron in a hollow protein shell (APOFERRITINS) made of 24 subunits of various sequences depending on the species and tissue types.Bacterial Infections: Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.CaliforniaCreatine Kinase: A transferase that catalyzes formation of PHOSPHOCREATINE from ATP + CREATINE. The reaction stores ATP energy as phosphocreatine. Three cytoplasmic ISOENZYMES have been identified in human tissues: the MM type from SKELETAL MUSCLE, the MB type from myocardial tissue and the BB type from nervous tissue as well as a mitochondrial isoenzyme. Macro-creatine kinase refers to creatine kinase complexed with other serum proteins.Probability: The study of chance processes or the relative frequency characterizing a chance process.Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Hypocalcemia: Reduction of the blood calcium below normal. Manifestations include hyperactive deep tendon reflexes, Chvostek's sign, muscle and abdominal cramps, and carpopedal spasm. (Dorland, 27th ed)
In the laboratory, biochemical tests can be diagnostic. Oxidase and catalase tests are positive for most members of the genus ... PCR testing for fluid and tissue samples other than blood has also been described. A history of animal contact is pivotal; in ... developed the agglutination test, diagnostic of the disease. In 1905, Zammit, a Maltese physician, identified goats as the ... Laboratory-acquired brucellosis is common. This most often happens when the disease is not thought of until cultures become ...
A sample DNA test report for HPV Genotype from a laboratory. Skin infection ("cutaneous" infection) with HPV is very widespread ... However, the tests are approved by the FDA for only two indications: for follow-up testing of women who seem to have abnormal ... test[111][112] as an adjunct to Pap testing. The test may be performed during a routine Pap smear. It detects the DNA of 13 " ... Qiagen HPV test *^ "Qiagen to Buy Digene, Maker of Tests for Cancer-Causing Virus". The New York Times. 4 June 2007. Archived ...
Samples are mailed daily to the laboratory responsible for testing. In the United States and Canada, newborn screening is ... or by performing other corroboratory or disproving tests. The confirmatory test varies depending on the positive results on the ... If a sample is collected from an infant who is less than 24 hours old, the laboratory will often request a repeat specimen be ... As additional tests are discussed for addition to the panels, issues arise. Many question if the expanded testing still falls ...
... early laboratory testing was completed on fecal samples submitted the day before. E. coli O157 was found in at least one sample ... When actual testing was performed, the 15-minute timeframe of the test was often cut short, resulting in higher-than-reality ... Well 7 was not running during this time period and was not tested. May 1, 2000 tests showed similar results, with Well 5 being ... the laboratory notified Stan Koebel on May 17 that submitted samples had tested positive for E. coli and fecal coliform. ...
Poultry samples have been sent for testing at an external laboratory. A history of exposure to diseased birds has been found ... Test results indicate this low pathogenic avian influenza poses no threat to humans. The agencies say the ducks were sampled in ... Bosnia's veterinary office said that tests at the European Union reference laboratory confirmed its first case of the deadly ... The other two strategies involve domestic bird testing and environmental sampling of water and wild-bird droppings. [...] A map ...
... LIMS automates laboratory processes and logs samples, tests, and results. It was created to automate clerical ... environmental and water testing. Their software is used to test for water, soil, food and air quality in the US, Ireland, ... LabWare is a company that develops and implements Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) and Electronic Laboratory ... and chemical manufacturing laboratories. LabWare also develops Electronic Laboratory Notebooks (ELN), a digital version of ...
Laboratory testing requires a blood sample (arterial or venous) and laboratory analysis on a CO-Oximeter. Additionally, a ... Clinical tests involving humans have been performed, however the results have not yet been released.[17] ... noninvasive carboxyhemoglobin (SpCO) test method from Pulse CO-Oximetry exists and has been validated compared to invasive ... Laboratory preparation[edit]. Carbon monoxide is conveniently produced in the laboratory by the dehydration of formic acid or ...
To test this, skin samples were taken from places likely to be painted and tested against samples from areas where painting was ... Early tests at different laboratories returned conflicting dates for the body; later tests suggested a date between 2 BC and ... As the peat was cleaned off the body in the laboratory, it became clear that Lindow Man had suffered a violent death. The ... Dating Lindow Man is problematic as samples from the body and surrounding peat have produced dates spanning a 900-year period. ...
Blood sampling done for laboratory testing can easily remove enough blood to produce anemia. Obladen, Sachsenweger and Stahnke ... They found that the mean volume of blood drawn for the 578 tests exceeded that requested by the hospital laboratory by 19.0% ± ... A study was done by Adams, Benitz, Geaghan, Kumar, Madan and Widness (2005) to test this theory by conducting a retrospective ... Preterm infants are often anemic and typically experience heavy blood losses from frequent laboratory testing in the first few ...
The soil samples tested can be any type include remolded, undisturbed, and compacted samples. Oedometer test This can be used ... Subsurface exploration usually involves soil sampling and laboratory tests of the soil samples retrieved. Surface exploration ... R-Value test California Test 301 This test measures the lateral response of a compacted sample of soil or aggregate to a ... A test to determine the aptitude of a soil or aggregate sample as a road subgrade. A plunger is pushed into a compacted sample ...
Each material on the mission had to be individually tested in the laboratory prior to being selected. The ultimate test for the ... About 1,508 samples are being tested on the MISSE project. Samples range from components such as switches, sensors and mirrors ... Back on the ground, tests will be conducted to determine the effects of its exposure. These tests will determine which ... After exposure in space, MISSE is retrieved in the same manner as it was deployed, the material samples are tested to see if ...
... laboratory tests and endoscopy.[56] Specific testing may include the following:[17][57] ... The best test for diagnosis of ulcerative colitis remains endoscopy, which is examination of the internal surface of the bowel ... Biopsy sample (H&E stain) that demonstrates marked lymphocytic infiltration (blue/purple) of the intestinal mucosa and ... Laboratory tests[edit]. Blood and stool tests serve primarily to assess disease severity, level of inflammation and rule out ...
At that time, it took as much as five days to test a sample because of the volume of samples that needed to be tested. On 2 ... Freetown, Sierra Leone had one laboratory that could do Ebola testing. WHO estimated on 21 September that Sierra Leone's ... "Spanish nurse tests negative for Ebola after treatment". DW.DE. Retrieved 27 October 2014. "Third Doctor Dies From Ebola in ... However, some samples taken for Lassa fever testing turned out to be Ebola virus disease when re-tested for Ebola in 2014, ...
The urine B-sample went missing en route to a testing laboratory, prompting a flurry of media interest. On 9 November, testing ... Passino, Carla (9 November 2004). "O'Connor's B sample tests positive". Horse & Hound. Archived from the original on 24 April ... Retrieved on 2008-09-25 Specific "Medallist's horse failed doping test". RTÉ.ie. 8 October 2004. Retrieved 30 July 2012. " ... On 8 October 2004, the International Federation for Equestrian Sports (FEI) announced that the A-samples from four Olympic ...
Laboratory hemoglobin test methods require a blood sample (arterial, venous, or capillary) and analysis on hematology analyzer ... For example, it is typically tested before or after blood donation. Results are reported in g/L, g/dL or mol/L. 1 g/dL equals ... "Lab Tests Online. American Association for Clinical Chemistry. 2007-11-10. Retrieved 2008-10-12.. ... This test is especially useful for diabetics.[96] The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) machine uses the signal from ...
... portions of the other samples tested by the French laboratory. Four of those samples also showed the presence of synthetic ... Armstrong expressed skepticism of the French laboratory that conducted Landis's drug test, noting it is the same laboratory ... If the tests were so unreliable that there were hundreds of possible reasons, there would be no point in performing the tests ... The B sample confirmed the A sample, and also tested positive for an unnatural source of testosterone. Following the reported ...
Samples had been sent for testing at one of the six laboratories authorised by the government. According to the Water Supplies ... for the name of the laboratory that conducted the tests. Wong herself refused to identify the laboratory she mandated, and ... "Test results of water samples taken from public rental housing estates" (PDF). Information Services Department. 10 September ... One sample was found to contain 220 mg of lead per litre of water; two other samples, from the kitchen and canteen, were found ...
The test samples are not selected and submitted by olive oil producers. Brands pay for the testing through a yearly licensing ... The samples are provided by the producers. The testing is primarily sensory with some chemical tests. The Extra Virgin Alliance ... Samples were shipped to the Australian Oils Research Laboratory in Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, and were analyzed by their ... The testing includes both sensory (taste/smell) and chemical tests for purity. Samples are purchased from the retail ...
In addition site investigation will often include subsurface sampling and laboratory testing of the soil samples retrieved. The ... Subsurface exploration usually involves in-situ testing (two common examples of in-situ tests are the standard penetration test ... consolidation test, triaxial shear test, vane shear test, standard penetration test). Design the foundation in the safest and ... To measure these properties in the laboratory, high quality sampling is required. Common tests to measure the strength and ...
The Veterinary Laboratories Agency (VLA) began testing blood samples from the wild swan on 3 April 2006. The Scottish Executive ... announced a positive test of the blood samples on 5 April 2006, and the strain was identified as the highly pathogenic H5N1 ... "The Statistical Accounts of Scotland:". Swan tests confirm deadly virus, BBC News, 6 April 2006 "Bird flu swan was from outside ...
A sample of sputum is placed in a sterile container and sent to the laboratory for testing. Sampling may be performed by sputum ... A sputum culture is a test to detect and identify bacteria or fungi that infect the lungs or breathing passages. Sputum is a ... If bacteria or fungi that can cause infection grow in the culture, other tests can determine which antimicrobial agent will ... For this reason, laboratory processing of sputum for respiratory pathogens are performed with the aid of a biological safety ...
The liquid sample is placed in a cuvette, and the cuvette is then placed in a spectrophotometer for testing. The cuvette can be ... Before the rectangular cuvette was created, researchers used standard test tubes for laboratory work. As innovation motivated ... but some tests can be performed by reflection and therefore only need a single transparent side. For fluorescence, two more ... The smallest units are capable of holding 70 µL, while the largest can test samples of 2.5 mL or more. Some cuvettes will be ...
There are a number of standard tests in which a sample to be tested is mixed a colour reagent. In such tests, the resulting ... If a more exact measurement is required other tests can be conducted in a laboratory. It is used in chemistry lab where the pH ... color indicates the concentration of the sample under test. Results can be approximate compared to other testing techniques, ... A sample is put in a glass tube. The tube is inserted in the comparator and compared with a series of coloured glass discs ...
Not all patients diagnosed with ILI are tested, and not all test results are reported. Samples are selected for testing based ... laboratory and radiographic tests to determine the cause of the ILI. During the 2009 flu pandemic, many thousands of cases of ... depending on requirements of the laboratory that will test the sample. A sample may be obtained from around the nose simply by ... These centers receive samples obtained from patients diagnosed with ILI, and test the samples for the presence of an influenza ...
... laboratory tests for CMV antibody should be performed by using paired serum samples. One blood sample should be taken upon ... Laboratory testing for antibody to CMV can be performed to determine if a woman has already had CMV infection. However, routine ... The major disadvantage of the pp65 assay is that only limited number of samples can be processed per test batch. CMV should be ... However, if antibody tests of paired serum samples show a fourfold rise in IgG antibody and a significant level of IgM antibody ...
After Sequenom launched its test on the market, several other companies began to market similar tests and cut prices. Sequenom ... Mayo Collaborative Services v. Prometheus Laboratories, Inc., 566 U.S. 66 (2012). See also Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank Int'l, 134 S ... Revolutionary diagnostic testing methods that cost tens of millions of dollars to produce should be the flagship of the modern ... There was a problem, however, of how to ascertain which DNA in the sample was that of the fetus and which was the mother's ( ...
Clinical chemistry test includes testing of blood and urine samples in the patients as an initial step to diagnose a disease or ... By Test Type (Clinical Chemistry, Medical Microbiology & Cytology, Human & Tumor Genetics, Other Esoteric Tests), Service ... Laboratories are offering additional services such as web-based booking of test/service and free home pick-up of test samples, ... Clinical chemistry test was the dominant segment in the global clinical laboratory services market, accounting for more than 40 ...
Clinical chemistry test includes testing of blood and urine samples in the patients as an initial step to diagnose a disease or ... By Test Type (Clinical Chemistry, Medical Microbiology & Cytology, Human & Tumor Genetics, Other Esoteric Tests), Service ... Laboratories are offering additional services such as web-based booking of test/service and free home pick-up of test samples, ... Clinical chemistry test was the dominant segment in the global clinical laboratory services market, accounting for more than 40 ...
Tests performed on ricin-suspicious samples include the following: *Time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay: In this test, the ... Testing for ricin in environmental samples When a reference laboratory receives an environmental sample suspected of containing ... LRN reference laboratories that test for ricin in environmental samples are public health and partner laboratories with ... This is a brief outline of how laboratory testing is done on environmental samples or human clinical specimens that may contain ...
If swabs are needed, AHL prefers virus transport medium swabs for virology PCR diagnostic tests. For some testing - e.g., as ... Animal Health Laboratory Toggle navigation *Client Access *Client Login. *Test Results. *Bill Payment ... AHL LabNote 36-Clinical sampling for Virology testing at AHL - Sampling supplies. ... of diagnostic work is the actual sampling and handling of the samples prior to being received at the diagnostic laboratory. The ...
Clinicians depend on laboratories to detect these endogenous interferences. Laboratories must have a means to detect these ... are common conditions that cause significant interferences with laboratory results. ... Endogenous compounds can interfere with laboratory tests, decreasing accuracy and threatening patient safety. Elevated ... Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing. *Point of Care Blood Glucose Testing in Acute and Chronic Care ...
Laboratory testing requirements for diagnosis and follow-up of multiple myeloma and related plasma cell dyscrasias by Willrich ... Dolci A, Giavarina D, Pasqualetti S, Szőke D, Panteghini M. Total laboratory automation: do stat tests still matter? Clin ... Suppressing all test results in grossly hemolyzed samples: is this approach appropriate in every case? ... Suppressing all test results in grossly hemolyzed samples: is this approach appropriate in every case?. ...
The NOW! Test enables you to check your scopes for gram-neg ... NOW Test Flexible Endoscope Sampling Kit Nelson Laboratories ... Developed in partnership with Nelson Laboratories, everything necessary to collect and send a sample for testing is included. ... The NOW! Test enables you to check your scopes for gram-negative bacteria. An easy-to-read fluorometer detects harmful enzymes ... To perform random testing of your duodenoscopes in compliance with CDC guidelines, theres Healthmarks Flexible Endoscope ...
Test Parameters: This assay will detect mutations present in exon 4 of IDH1. The sensitivity of the Sanger sequencing assay is ... Sample Requirements:. 10 mL peripheral blood, 2-5mL bone marrow aspirate, 5g purified DNA, or 4-10 unstained tissue sections ... This test is performed by PCR-based Sanger sequencing of DNA to examine the mutation status of codons 80 to 138 in exon 4 of ... As part of our mission to eliminate cancer, MD Anderson researchers conduct hundreds of clinical trials to test new treatments ...
Hair Testing for Drugs & Alcohol. We work with one of the UKs leading testing laboratories to provide hair sample analysis. ... EtG testing is the most reliable hair test when determining the levels of alcohol consumed. The EtG test is designed to show a ... so when tested in a laboratory each 1cm of hair sample represents 1 month of metabolites. This is why hair testing is able to ... Disadvantages of hair testing:. *Hair tests cannot precisely determine the quantity of substances used by the donor ...
Sample Handling. Please call 216-844-5227 to arrange for a courier pick-up of a local specimen. Specimens being sent from ... IMPORTANT: if less than 20 mg of CVS or less than 20 ml of amniotic fluid are received, there is no guarantee all testing ... Sample Requirements. *For Aneuvysion ONLY: *At least 5 ml of amniotic fluid aseptically collected via trans-abdominal ... Aneuvysion FISH analysis can be performed using a sample of chorionic villus or amniotic fluid obtained from the patients ...
Results for laboratory testing services from FLUXANA, Gelman, Quality&Quantity and other leading brands. Compare and contact a ... Laboratory Tests Services. HydroThane performs laboratory tests such as: Biodegradability test,Toxicity test,Biomass activity ... Laboratory Analyses and Tests. "Our dedicated laboratory staff has been trained to handle your samples quickly and with ... "laboratory testing ": laboratory testing service services , laboratory testing standard services , laboratory testing ...
Laboratory tests.. Serum creatinine, potassium, and lipid concentration and other routine laboratory parameters were measured ... Wilcoxons rank-sum test, Somers d test for directional measures, or χ2 test, as appropriate. Correlation analysis was done by ... Sample size estimation. Main study.. The sample size was calculated on the basis of an expected difference in the primary ... This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions. ...
Results for water sampling laboratory equipment from AccuFoamer, AppliTek Ra-COMBO, aquaMostra and other leading brands. ... Laboratory Water Test Kit. Fastest turnaround laboratory water testing service. Post sample bottle to laboratory. Receive email ... Mobile sample unit for a safe, controlled sampling of clean steam systems for laboratory tests by means of condensation of ... water sampling laboratory equipment Related terms for "water sampling laboratory": water sampling equipment , water sampling ...
In order to do so, direct and indirect laboratory tests have been developed to identify the virus or part of its structure that ... and serology tests to the use of detection molecular tests and quantification of genetic material that are described in this ... the following laboratory test interpretations need to be followed:*. When a sample taken from the acute phase is positive for ... and even some urine samples [12]. Other commercial testing like FilmArray Global fever panel has the capacity of detecting ...
Sample collection and laboratory testing. Trained collectors used double rayon-tipped, plastic-shafted swabs to scratch ... Laboratory tests showed the penetration of particles through the cloth masks to be very high (97%) compared with medical masks ... To test the filtration performance, the filter is challenged by a known concentration of sodium chloride particles of a ... The laboratory results were blinded and laboratory testing was conducted in a blinded fashion. As facemask use is a visible ...
Chemical Material Sample Picking up and Laboratory Test FOB Price: $148 - $250 / MANDAY Min. Order: 1 MANDAY ... Rotary Evaporator Instrument with Digital Display for Lab Chemical Testing Min. Order: 1 Piece ... Test Parameters: Urs-10t,Urs-11. *Wavelength: 558nm, 635nm, 720nm. *Test Speed: up to 120 Tests/Hour at Continuous ... UV Spectrophotometer Laboratory Instruments UV1700 for Chemical Test FOB Price: $1500 - $3000 / Piece Min. Order: 1 Piece ...
Blood samples and routine laboratory tests. Serum samples for antibody detection were stored at −200 C until tested ... Categorical data were analysed by Pearsons χ2 test or Fishers exact test. To estimate dependencies between the presence of ... Routine laboratory tests (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C reactive protein, blood cell count, Treponema pallidum ... A visual acuity test, tonometry, a slit lamp examination, and an evaluation of the fundus with a 90 diopter lens, or indirect ...
Competitive ELISA has now largely replaced the virus neutralization test.. Samples required for laboratory testing The chances ... some laboratory tests need to be carried out. These tests may detect the virus itself, evidence of the presence of the virus ( ... Always sample several animals in an outbreak. * Keep samples cool during transfer to the laboratory (preferably on melting ice ... Mark sample bottles carefully with an indelible pen and record details of each samples origin for submission to the laboratory ...
... including the potency tests, heavy metal testing, bio-contaminant tests, and pesticide testing. ... is the most popular method of testing samples in third party laboratories. The method entails dissolving the sample in a ... The secret to identifying the best quality hemp products is subjecting samples to further testing in a third-party laboratory. ... Only Work with Laboratories that Use the Latest Technologies. To test your cannabis products, a laboratory should have the ...
OTHER TESTS. Test. Immunohistochemistry. Sample. Formalin-fixed tissues. Use/advantage. Used on fixed tissues when fresh ... AHL LabNote 29-Summary of Influenza A virus testing. K. Harron Assoc Dip Ag, Jim Fairles DVM, MBA and D. Ojkic DVM, MSc, PhD ... Primary screening test targeting a conserved influenza virus gene.. Detects all common Influenza A virus subtypes in multiple ... Primary screening test, detects antibody from all common Influenza A virus subtypes in multiple animal species. ...
... you can use obtained test results to evaluate the fertility status of soils and ... TISSUE TESTING. Introduction. Testing Kits. Preparation of Reagents for Conductiong Tissue Tests Using Filter Paper. Sampling ... Sampling. Transport to the Laboratory. Preparation of the Laboratory SampleWeighing versus Scooping. Sample Aliquot ... Laboratory Guide for Conducting Soil Tests and Plant Analysis describes the basis and procedures for each test in detail, ...
Laboratory Tests. When patients are admitted for labor and delivery, most have blood drawn for a complete blood count (CBC) and ... In addition, tests for HIV antibodies and hepatitis B surface antigen and a screening test for syphilis are done, if these have ... Preoperative lab samples are drawn. If a difficult procedure is anticipated with an increased risk for blood loss, cross- ... If fetal heart rate testing is reassuring, the patient is discharged to await spontaneous labor, or she may be induced if the ...
Geographical Location/Testing Laboratory. *Location/Laboratory:. Analysis conducted at a particular geographical place or ... Very often in the mining industry, there are various physical, chemical, acid and other tests that are to be conducted to ... In the Origin of Results data configured, Z1 to Z8 are analysis values with reference to the Parties conducting the Test ( ... For example, Laboratory, Oman, New York etc., 3. Mining Industry Requirement. As the quality parameter values vary frequently, ...
... learn assessment steps for diagnosis of Alzheimers and other dementias including genetic testing, neurologic exams and brain ... Collect blood or urine samples for laboratory testing.. Information from a physical exam and laboratory tests can help identify ... Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) and the Mini-Cog test The MMSE and Mini-Cog test are two commonly used assessments.. During the ... Computerized tests have several advantages, including giving tests exactly the same way each time. Using both clinical tests ...
... baseline tests, for the purpose of this report. A patient was counted as having a baseline test if they had the test within one ... Data for Sample Medical Centre †. Number of registered patients who started a course of isotretinoin:. 20. ... Laboratory testing for isotretinoin. Oral isotretinoin is a highly effective treatment for severe acne, however it is ... of patients had all three baseline tests as recommended, and only 13% of patients had all three tests both before and during ...
  • This is a brief outline of how laboratory testing is done on environmental samples or human clinical specimens that may contain ricin, a poisonous protein from the castor bean plant. (cdc.gov)
  • Biological agents are detected in environmental samples and clinical specimens using specialized tests, including rapid DNA-based tests that yield results within hours. (cdc.gov)
  • Haemolysis: an overview of the leading cause of unsuitable specimens in clinical laboratories. (degruyter.com)
  • 5.2 During design of an engineered fill, testing performed to determine shear, consolidation, permeability, or other properties requires test specimens to be prepared by compacting the soil at a prescribed molding water content to obtain a predetermined unit weight. (astm.org)
  • Test specimens are compacted at a selected molding water content ( w ), either wet or dry of optimum ( w opt ) or at optimum ( w opt ), and at a selected dry unit weight related to a percentage of maximum dry unit weight (γ dmax ). (astm.org)
  • Sample preparation capabilities include a remotely operated electric discharge machine ( EDM ) for cutting precise test specimens from irradiated materials. (anl.gov)
  • Hansvedt DS - 2 Electric Discharge Wire-Cutting Machine with Computer Numeric Control ( CNC ) for remote machining of precise test specimens from irradiated materials. (anl.gov)
  • With the help of this guide, you can use obtained test results to evaluate the fertility status of soils and the nutrient element status of plants for crop production purposes. (routledge.com)
  • It serves as an instructional manual on the techniques used to perform chemical and physical characteristic tests on soils. (routledge.com)
  • For such soils, there is no ASTM test method to control their compaction and very few laboratories are equipped to determine the laboratory maximum unit weight (density) of such soils (USDI Bureau of Reclamation, Denver, CO and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS). Although Test Methods D4914 and D5030 determine the "field" dry unit weight of such soils, they are difficult and expensive to perform. (astm.org)
  • 5.3.1.1 One method to design and control the compaction of such soils is to use a test fill to determine the required degree of compaction and the method to obtain that compaction. (astm.org)
  • If federal law enforcement officers feel the threat is credible, or if a hospital or commercial laboratory cannot rule out the presence of a threatening agent, they transfer suspicious samples to a nearby Laboratory Response Network (LRN) facility or to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) where high-confidence tests can be performed to identify the threat agent. (cdc.gov)
  • If swabs are needed, AHL prefers virus transport medium swabs for virology PCR diagnostic tests. (uoguelph.ca)
  • Diagnostic tests providing a proper identification of DENV infection by any of its four serotypes in symptomatic or asymptomatic cases in the population, and especially in areas that have more than one arbovirus or another micro-organism (virus, bacteria or parasite) producing similar signs and symptoms are the key aspect of any dengue research and surveillance programs [ 2 ]. (intechopen.com)
  • Undoubtedly much of this increased recognition is owing to greater awareness and the availability of new laboratory diagnostic tests. (fao.org)
  • It may therefore be necessary to use hair testing in conjunction with other methods, like oral fluid (saliva) testing. (breathalyzer.co.uk)
  • PCD 7) Reprography Unit, BIS, New Delhi, Indi IS : 1350 ( Part ni)- 1969 Indian Standard METHODS OF TEST FOR COAL AND COKE PART III DETERMINATION OF SULPHUR (First Revision) Solid Mineral Fuels Sectional Committee, CDC 14 Chairman Representing Dr a. (kbt.co.za)
  • SCOPE 1.1 This standard (Part 1 ) prescribes the methods of test for coal and coke relating to proximate analysis including determination of moisture under different conditions. (kbt.co.za)
  • At Randox Testing Services we utilise discreet and non-invasive methods of drug & alcohol testing for comfort and fast sample collection. (randox.com)
  • Offering a choice of a urine test, hair drug test, saliva drug test or a combination of tests, our drug testing methods ensure the possibility for short-term and long-term drug abuse profiling. (randox.com)
  • With different drug testing methods having different windows of detection, we offer advice on which methods to utilise depending upon your company's drug testing requirements, ensuring the best method or combination of methods is chosen to ensure all your testing needs are fulfilled. (randox.com)
  • Our drug testing methods ensure fast and simple sample collection. (randox.com)
  • We have a variety of non-invasive methods for patient comfort including use of a urine sample, hair strand or oral fluid sample to test for specified drugs. (randox.com)
  • Utilisation of different testing methods also ensures flexibility of drug abuse profiling with the ability to offer short-term drug abuse profiling via oral fluid and urine testing, long-term drug abuse profiling via hair testing or a combination of both. (randox.com)
  • Though genetic testing is the most reliable standard, older methods also exist, including ABO blood group typing, analysis of various other proteins and enzymes, or using human leukocyte antigen antigens. (wikipedia.org)
  • Test reagents" are chemicals that react in specific ways to help determine whether an agent, such as ricin, is present. (cdc.gov)
  • Intertek sulfur testing laboratories are staffed by experienced chemists with years of industry experience. (kbt.co.za)
  • Through our network of over 44,000 people in 1,000 laboratories and offices in 100 countries, Intertek provides quality and safety solutions to a wide range of industries around the world. (intertek.com)
  • Inspectors and auditors trained to the Intertek level of excellence measure and test the quality and quantity of oilseeds such as soybeans, canola and sunflower as per the latest commercial and industry requirements. (intertek.com)
  • Polymerase chain reaction (PCR): PCR is a test used to locate and make copies of parts of the DNA contained in the castor bean plant. (cdc.gov)
  • Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), separated by density gradient centrifugation, were studied for Salmonella and Yersinia antigens by means of an immunofluorescence test, and for C pneumoniae DNA with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). (bmj.com)
  • The current techniques for paternity testing are using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). (wikipedia.org)
  • The time frame of detection required dictates the amount of hair required for the sample. (breathalyzer.co.uk)
  • They range from the use of cell cultures, animal models, inoculation by insects, and serology tests to the use of detection molecular tests and quantification of genetic material that are described in this chapter herein, a brief explanation of this methodology, its strengths and weaknesses, and its application in the dengue research. (intechopen.com)
  • Laboratory tests are based on the detection of the virus, part of its genome or structure, or specific result from an infected person or animal as immune response. (intechopen.com)
  • There are no specific clinically validated assays for detection of ricin that can be performed by the hospital/healthcare facility clinical laboratory. (cdc.gov)
  • Below we will provide a breakdown of each sample type and accompanying detection windows for the presence of illicit substances. (randox.com)
  • A hair drugs test offers a longer window of detection than alternative testing and provides a detailed month-on-month view of overall picture of drug use. (randox.com)
  • Typically, up to 90 days using a 3cm sample (1cm of head hair = 1-month detection). (randox.com)
  • BRASILIA (Reuters) - Brazilian Senator Flavio Bolsonaro, the eldest son of president Jair Bolsonaro, has tested positive for the novel coronavirus, according to a statement by Flavio's spokesman. (yahoo.com)
  • Serum antibodies to Salmonellae , Yersiniae , Klebsiella pneumoniae , Escherichia coli , Proteus mirabilis , Campylobacter jejuni , and Borrelia burgdorferi were measured using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia pneumoniae by microimmunofluorescence test. (bmj.com)
  • FTA has performed fracture-mechanics testing, including fatigue-crack growth rate (FCGR) testing to ASTM E647 and non-linear fracture-toughness testing (NLFT) to ASTM E1820 and E1921. (industrialheating.com)
  • Modified Instron 8500 and 8800 dynamic testing systems capable of fracture toughness and fatigue studies ( 1 / 4 or 1 / 2 -T CT ) in water or gas environment up to 320 °C. (anl.gov)
  • The current recommendations state that patients prescribed isotretinoin should have a full blood count, fasting lipids and liver function tests performed at baseline (see Note) and at least once during a 16 to 30 week course of isotretinoin. (bpac.org.nz)
  • Because of the difficulty of placing the catheter tip within the small adrenal veins, the sample is often obtained from near the orifice of the vein, where the concentration of adrenal hormones is diluted by other blood. (aacc.org)
  • In contrast, cortisol measurement during AVS can overcome technical difficulties by giving the radiologist immediate feedback on whether selective blood sampling from each adrenal vein was achieved. (aacc.org)
  • The stool guaiac test looks for hidden (occult) blood in a stool sample. (medlineplus.gov)
  • It is the most common type of fecal occult blood test (FOBT). (medlineplus.gov)
  • A negative test result means that there is no blood in the stool. (medlineplus.gov)
  • This blood test shows if you have antibodies against the virus that causes COVID-19. (medlineplus.gov)
  • A blood sample is needed. (medlineplus.gov)
  • the blood samples were then drawn before the midweek dialysis session. (hindawi.com)
  • Doctors may one day be able to diagnose Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of severe dementia, and monitor a patient's response to treatment by doing a simple blood test. (news-medical.net)
  • Using a new blood test that's in development, University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers identified characteristics that could be used to personalize treatment for patients with a type of head and neck cancer linked to HPV infection. (news-medical.net)
  • One of the keys to quickly diagnosing anti-malarial drug resistance -- potentially saving lives -- lies in testing whole blood instead of extracting DNA, eliminating processing steps that can take hours or days. (news-medical.net)
  • Researchers have developed a blood test that flags up heart failure early on and a "pumping" patch that could help to repair heart damage after an attack. (news-medical.net)
  • In humans, the disease is acquired from unpasteurised milk and products or undercooked meat (consumers), laboratory inhalation (lab workers), accidental skin penetration or abrasion (farmers, slaughterhouse workers, and veterinarians) and (rarely) conjunctival contact, blood transfusion, transplacental, and person-to-person. (wikipedia.org)
  • Paternity testing can now also be performed while the woman is still pregnant from a blood draw. (wikipedia.org)
  • This allows for accurate fetal DNA paternity testing during pregnancy from a blood draw with no risk of miscarriage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Furthermore, intraprocedural cortisol testing can provide radiologists with an awareness of previously failed attempts that could be relevant as a self-training confirmation or exclusion with respect to morphological views. (aacc.org)
  • Laboratory compaction tests provide the basis for determining the percent compaction and molding water content needed to achieve the required engineering properties, and for controlling construction to assure that the required compaction and water contents are achieved. (astm.org)
  • Standard Laboratories, Inc. has the facilities to provide a wide variety of coal sampling and testing, as well as other support services for the coal mining and processing industries. (kbt.co.za)
  • This report uses data from the pharmaceutical collection and laboratory claims collection to provide an update on diabetes monitoring. (bpac.org.nz)
  • The facility has also been used to provide data for development and testing of advanced alloy materials for the DOE fusion program. (anl.gov)
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate liver function capacity with the LiMAx® test in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. (hindawi.com)
  • Liver function capacity was determined by the LiMAx® test (enzymatic capacity of cytochrome P450 1A2). (hindawi.com)
  • A laboratory report containing the relative's mutation information, the specific biological relationship of this patient and the tested relative and the clinical status of this patient (symptomatic or asymptomatic) must be submitted with the specimen. (bcm.edu)
  • A paternity test establishes genetic proof whether a man is the biological father of an individual, and a maternity test establishes whether a woman is the biological mother of an individual. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tests can also determine the likelihood of someone being a biological grandparent to a grandchild. (wikipedia.org)
  • Current advances in genetic testing has led to the ability to determine who the biological father is while the woman is still pregnant through a non-invasive method. (wikipedia.org)
  • Participants will be Victorian women age 30-69 years, for whom there is either no record on the Victorian Cervical Cytology Registry (VCCR) of a Pap test (never-screened) or the last recorded Pap test was between five to fifteen years ago (under-screened). (biomedcentral.com)
  • A Pap test (also called cervical cytology) is a test performed during a pelvic exam. (hhs.gov)
  • Is a Pap test (cervical cytology) the same as a pelvic exam? (hhs.gov)
  • If the hysterectomy was done because of cervical cancer or precancerous cell changes, she may still need Pap tests. (hhs.gov)