A true neoplasm composed of a number of different types of tissue, none of which is native to the area in which it occurs. It is composed of tissues that are derived from three germinal layers, the endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. They are classified histologically as mature (benign) or immature (malignant). (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1642)
Tumors or cancer of the TESTIS. Germ cell tumors (GERMINOMA) of the testis constitute 95% of all testicular neoplasms.
The body region between (and flanking) the SACRUM and COCCYX.
A tumor consisting of displaced ectodermal structures along the lines of embryonic fusion, the wall being formed of epithelium-lined connective tissue, including skin appendages, and containing keratin, sebum, and hair. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Tumors or cancer of the MEDIASTINUM.
Neoplasms composed of primordial GERM CELLS of embryonic GONADS or of elements of the germ layers of the EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the gonads or present in an embryo or FETUS.
A malignant ovarian neoplasm, thought to be derived from primordial germ cells of the sexually undifferentiated embryonic gonad. It is the counterpart of the classical seminoma of the testis, to which it is both grossly and histologically identical. Dysgerminomas comprise 16% of all germ cell tumors but are rare before the age of 10, although nearly 50% occur before the age of 20. They are generally considered of low-grade malignancy but may spread if the tumor extends through its capsule and involves lymph nodes or blood vessels. (Dorland, 27th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1646)
Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.
Retroperitoneal neoplasms are a diverse group of tumors that originate in the retroperitoneal space, which is the area behind the peritoneum and includes the kidneys, adrenal glands, pancreas, and major blood vessels.
Cells derived from the BLASTOCYST INNER CELL MASS which forms before implantation in the uterine wall. They retain the ability to divide, proliferate and provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.
A malignant neoplasm of the germinal tissue of the GONADS; MEDIASTINUM; or pineal region. Germinomas are uniform in appearance, consisting of large, round cells with vesicular nuclei and clear or finely granular eosinophilic-staining cytoplasm. (Stedman, 265th ed; from DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, pp1642-3)
Marked developmental anomalies of a fetus or infant.
Metacentric chromosomes produced during MEIOSIS or MITOSIS when the CENTROMERE splits transversely instead of longitudinally. The chromosomes produced by this abnormal division are one chromosome having the two long arms of the original chromosome, but no short arms, and the other chromosome consisting of the two short arms and no long arms. Each of these isochromosomes constitutes a simultaneous duplication and deletion.
A rare tumor of the female genital tract, most often the ovary, formerly considered to be derived from mesonephric rests. Two varieties are recognized: (1) clear cell carcinoma, so called because of its histologic resemblance to renal cell carcinoma, and now considered to be of muellerian duct derivation and (2) an embryonal tumor (called also ENDODERMAL SINUS TUMOR and yolk sac tumor), occurring chiefly in children. The latter variety may also arise in the testis. (Dorland, 27th ed)
A rare teratoid tumor of the ovary composed almost entirely of thyroid tissue, with large follicles containing abundant colloid. Occasionally there are symptoms of hyperthyroidism. 5-10% of struma ovarii become malignant, the only absolute criterion for which is the presence of metastasis. (Dorland, 27th ed; Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
The last bone in the VERTEBRAL COLUMN in tailless primates considered to be a vestigial tail-bone consisting of three to five fused VERTEBRAE.
Cells that can give rise to cells of the three different GERM LAYERS.
General term for CYSTS and cystic diseases of the OVARY.
Cells from adult organisms that have been reprogrammed into a pluripotential state similar to that of EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS.
An area occupying the most posterior aspect of the ABDOMINAL CAVITY. It is bounded laterally by the borders of the quadratus lumborum muscles and extends from the DIAPHRAGM to the brim of the true PELVIS, where it continues as the pelvic extraperitoneal space.
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
The first alpha-globulins to appear in mammalian sera during FETAL DEVELOPMENT and the dominant serum proteins in early embryonic life.
An unusual and aggressive tumor of germ-cell origin that reproduces the extraembryonic structures of the early embryo. It is the most common malignant germ cell tumor found in children. It is characterized by a labyrinthine glandular pattern of flat epithelial cells and rounded papillary processes with a central capillary (Schiller-Duval body). The tumor is rarely bilateral. Before the use of combination chemotherapy, the tumor was almost invariably fatal. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1189)
Two or more abnormal growths of tissue occurring simultaneously and presumed to be of separate origin. The neoplasms may be histologically the same or different, and may be found in the same or different sites.
An octamer transcription factor that is expressed primarily in totipotent embryonic STEM CELLS and GERM CELLS and is down-regulated during CELL DIFFERENTIATION.
A subclass of SOX transcription factors that are expressed in neuronal tissue where they may play a role in the regulation of CELL DIFFERENTIATION. Members of this subclass are generally considered to be transcriptional activators.
A malignant metastatic form of trophoblastic tumors. Unlike the HYDATIDIFORM MOLE, choriocarcinoma contains no CHORIONIC VILLI but rather sheets of undifferentiated cytotrophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts (TROPHOBLASTS). It is characterized by the large amounts of CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN produced. Tissue origins can be determined by DNA analyses: placental (fetal) origin or non-placental origin (CHORIOCARCINOMA, NON-GESTATIONAL).
Degenerative or inflammatory conditions affecting the central or peripheral nervous system that develop in association with a systemic neoplasm without direct invasion by tumor. They may be associated with circulating antibodies that react with the affected neural tissue. (Intern Med 1996 Dec;35(12):925-9)
Spinal neoplasms are abnormal growths or tumors that develop within the spinal column, which can be benign or malignant, and originate from cells within the spinal structure or spread to the spine from other parts of the body (metastatic).
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
Conjoined twins are a rare type of monozygotic twinning where genetically identical individuals form a single organism with varying degrees of physical connection and shared anatomy due to incomplete division during embryonic development.
A radiosensitive, malignant neoplasm of the testis, thought to be derived from primordial germ cells of the sexually undifferentiated embryonic gonad. There are three variants: classical (typical), the most common type; anaplastic; and spermatocytic. The classical seminoma is composed of fairly well differentiated sheets or cords of uniform polygonal or round cells (seminoma cells), each cell having abundant clear cytoplasm, distinct cell membranes, a centrally placed round nucleus, and one or more nucleoli. In the female, a grossly and histologically identical neoplasm, known as dysgerminoma, occurs. (Dorland, 27th ed)
A highly malignant, primitive form of carcinoma, probably of germinal cell or teratomatous derivation, usually arising in a gonad and rarely in other sites. It is rare in the female ovary, but in the male it accounts for 20% of all testicular tumors. (From Dorland, 27th ed & Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1595)

Carcinoid heart disease from ovarian primary presenting with acute pericarditis and biventricular failure. (1/1513)

A case is described of a 54 year old woman who had acute pericarditis with large exudative effusion accompanied by severe right and left ventricular failure. The patient was finally diagnosed with carcinoid heart disease from an ovarian carcinoid teratoma. She was treated with octreotide--a somatostatin analogue--followed by radical surgical resection of the neoplasm. At one year follow up only mild carcinoid tricuspid regurgitation remained. Only 16 cases of carcinoid heart disease from an ovarian primary have been described in literature. Moreover clinically manifest acute, nonmetastatic pericarditis and left heart failure are not considered as possible presentations of carcinoid heart disease, whatever the origin. In a recent series a small pericardial effusion was considered an infrequent and unexpected echocardiographic finding in carcinoid heart patients. One case of "carcinoid pericarditis" has previously been described as a consequence of pericardial metastasis. Left sided heart involvement is usually caused by bronchial carcinoids or patency of foramen ovale; both were excluded in the case presented.  (+info)

Regulation of I-branched poly-N-acetyllactosamine synthesis. Concerted actions by I-extension enzyme, I-branching enzyme, and beta1,4-galactosyltransferase I. (2/1513)

I-branched poly-N-acetyllactosamine is a unique carbohydrate composed of N-acetyllactosamine branches attached to linear poly-N-acetyllactosamine, which is synthesized by I-branching beta1, 6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase. I-branched poly-N-acetyllactosamine can carry bivalent functional oligosaccharides such as sialyl Lewisx, which provide much better carbohydrate ligands than monovalent functional oligosaccharides. In the present study, we first demonstrate that I-branching beta1, 6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase cloned from human PA-1 embryonic carcinoma cells transfers beta1,6-linked GlcNAc preferentially to galactosyl residues of N-acetyllactosamine close to nonreducing terminals. We then demonstrate that among various beta1, 4-galactosyltransferases (beta4Gal-Ts), beta4Gal-TI is most efficient in adding a galactose to linear and branched poly-N-acetyllactosamines. When a beta1,6-GlcNAc branched poly-N-acetyllactosamine was incubated with a mixture of beta4Gal-TI and i-extension beta1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase, the major product was the oligosaccharide with one N-acetyllactosamine extension on the linear Galbeta1-->4GlcNAcbeta1-->3 side chain. Only a minor product contained galactosylated I-branch without N-acetyllactosamine extension. This finding was explained by the fact that beta4Gal-TI adds a galactose poorly to beta1,6-GlcNAc attached to linear poly-N-acetyllactosamines, while beta1, 3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase and beta4Gal-TI efficiently add N-acetyllactosamine to linear poly-N-acetyllactosamines. Together, these results strongly suggest that galactosylation of I-branch is a rate-limiting step in I-branched poly-N-acetyllactosamine synthesis, allowing poly-N-acetyllactosamine extension mostly along the linear poly-N-acetyllactosamine side chain. These findings are entirely consistent with previous findings that poly-N-acetyllactosamines in human erythrocytes, PA-1 embryonic carcinoma cells, and rabbit erythrocytes contain multiple, short I-branches.  (+info)

Ovarian teratomas appearing as solid masses on ultrasonography. (3/1513)

The purposes of this study were to evaluate the prevalence and imaging characteristics of ovarian teratomas that appear as solid masses on ultrasonography and to compare the ultrasonographic imaging features of the tumors with their pathologic findings. The ultrasonographic images of 202 ovarian teratomas were reviewed retrospectively. Solid-appearing masses were selected from among them and were evaluated in terms of internal echotexture, the presence or lack of peripheral hypoechogenicity, posterior sonic attenuation, and tumoral calcification. Seventy-six (37.6%) masses of 202 belonged to the atypical solid-appearing masses on ultrasonography. Of 76 masses, 57 (75.0%) had peripheral hypoechogenicity; 38 masses had well-defined thin hypoechoic rims, whereas 19 had poorly demarcated peripheral hypoechogenicity. Posterior sonic attenuation was evident in 18 (23.7%) masses. The presence of peripheral hypoechogenicity, which is suggestive of the fluid portion of the tumor, might be one of the characteristic findings of solid-appearing ovarian teratomas on ultrasonography.  (+info)

Microdissection-based analysis of mature ovarian teratoma. (4/1513)

The genotypic features of mature ovarian teratomas (MOTs) are controversial. Early studies detected a homozygous genotype in MOTs suggesting that these tumors are composed of germ cells that have undergone meiosis I. Other studies, however, revealed a heterozygous genotype in a substantial proportion of MOTs suggesting an origin either from premeiotic germ cells or from a somatic cell line. In view of the complex morphology of MOTs and to increase the sensitivity of teratoma genotyping, we applied tissue microdissection before genetic analysis of teratomatous tissue. This approach allowed selective analysis of different heterotopic tissue elements as well as the lymphoid tissues within MOTs the origin of which is unknown. After DNA extraction, the tissue samples were polymerase chain reaction amplified using a random panel of highly informative genetic markers for different chromosomes to evaluate heterozygosity versus homozygosity. In all seven cases that were analyzed, heterotopic tissues consistently revealed a homozygous genotype with several markers; in two cases, heterozygosity was detected with a single marker, indicating a meiotic recombination event. Lymphoid aggregates within MOTs were heterozygous and derived from host tissue rather than from teratomatous growth. However, well differentiated thymic tissue was consistently homozygous, suggesting lymphoid differentiation capability of MOTs. We conclude that potential pitfalls in genotyping of teratomas including meiotic recombination and host cell participation can be avoided by a microdissection-based approach in combination with a panel of genetic markers.  (+info)

Antenatal sonographic diagnosis of epignathus at 15 weeks of pregnancy. (5/1513)

Epignathus is a rare, benign, congenital teratoma of the hard palate. Most of these teratomas are unidirectional and protrude through the mouth. Hence, the prognosis depends on the size of the tumor and the degree of face distortion and airway obstruction that it causes. However, some epignathi protrude bidirectionally, involving and destroying the brain tissue, resulting in a poor prognosis. This report presents a case of ultrasonographic detection of a bidirectional epignathus at 15 weeks of pregnancy.  (+info)

Pathogenesis of testicular germ cell tumours. (6/1513)

Human germ cell tumours comprise a heterogeneous group of neoplasms. In the testis, three entities are distinguished, the teratomas-yolk sac tumours of the infantile testis, the seminomas and nonseminomas of adolescents and adults, and the spermatocytic seminomas. Studies on epidemiology, histology, clinical behaviour, and chromosomal constitution of these tumours support the concept of distinct entities derived from germ cells but each with a different pathogenesis. Either the teratomas of the infantile testis show no chromosomal aberrations, or display a pattern of over- and under-representation of (parts of) chromosomes as detected in the yolk sac tumours of the infantile testis. In contrast, the seminomas and nonseminomas reveal a consistent pattern of losses and gains, that is, chromosomes 11, 13 and 18, and 7, 8 and X, respectively, that is different from that found in the infantile testis teratomas and yolk sac tumours. The most consistent structural chromosomal abnormality is an isochromosome 12p. Tumours lacking i(12p) have other structural abnormalities of 12p, among them amplification of 12p11.2-p12.1. The pathogenetically relevant genes on 12p11.2-p12.1 are probably on a fragment of about 1.7 mb. Gain of 12p sequences may be related to invasive growth. Gain of chromosome 9 is the only consistent chromosomal anomaly of spermatocytic seminomas. Infantile teratomas and spermatocytic seminomas are benign tumours. Infantile yolk sac tumour is a malignant germ cell tumour. Seminomas and nonseminomas are malignant, and the most common cancer in young Caucasian males. The cure rate of seminomas and non-seminomas with radio- and chemotherapy is over 90%, which is higher than that of any other solid cancer in adults. In addition, the precursor lesions of these tumours can be treated readily, justifying efforts to develop means for early diagnosis. Finally, the pathogenetic relationship between seminomas and nonseminomas, and the available animal models for the three groups of testicular germ cell tumours are discussed.  (+info)

Forced expression of the homeobox-containing gene Pem blocks differentiation of embryonic stem cells. (7/1513)

Similarities in the differentiation of mouse embryos and ES cell embryoid bodies suggest that aspects of early mammalian embryogenesis can be studied in ES cell embryoid bodies. In an effort to understand the regulation of cellular differentiation during early mouse embryogenesis, we altered the expression of the Pem homeobox-containing gene in ES cells. Pem is normally expressed in the preimplantation embryo and expressed in a lineage-restricted fashion following implantation, suggesting a role for Pem in regulating cellular differentiation in the early embryo. Here, we show that the forced expression of Pem from the mouse Pgk-1 promoter in ES cells blocks the in vitro and in vivo differentiation of the cells. In particular, embryoid bodies produced from these Pgk-Pem ES cells do not differentiate into primitive endoderm or embryonic ectoderm, which are prominent features of early embryoid bodies from normal ES cells. This Pgk-Pem phenotype is also different from the null phenotype, as embryoid bodies derived from ES cells in which endogenous Pem gene expression has been blocked show a pattern of differentiation similar to that of normal ES cells. When the Pgk-Pem ES cells were introduced into subcutaneous sites of nude mice, only undifferentiated EC-like cells were found in the teratomas derived from the injected cells. The Pem-dependent block of ES cell differentiation appears to be cell autonomous; Pgk-Pem ES cells did not differentiate when mixed with normal, differentiating ES cells. A block to ES cell differentiation, resulting from the forced expression of Pem, can also be produced by the forced expression of the nonhomeodomain region of Pem. These studies are consistent with a role for Pem in regulating the transition between undifferentiated and differentiated cells of the early mouse embryo.  (+info)

Characterization of the model for experimental testicular teratoma in 129/SvJ-mice. (8/1513)

An animal model of experimental testicular teratoma has been established to study how a teratoma affects the host testis and how the host testis reacts against the teratoma. 129/SvJ-mice were used as experimental animals. To induce the experimental testicular teratoma, male gonadal ridges from 12-day-old 129/SvJ-mouse fetuses were grafted into the testes of adult mice for 1-12 weeks. The developing tumour was analysed by light and electron microscopy and by immunocytochemical localization of transcription factors SOX9 and c-kit, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and type IV collagen. Testicular teratoma was observed in 36 out of 124 testes with implanted fetal gonadal ridges (frequency 29%). One spontaneous testicular teratoma was observed in this material from 70 male mice (1.5%). One week after implantation intracordal clusters of cells were seen in embryonic testicular cords of the graft as the first sign of testicular teratomas. Four weeks after implantation the embryonic testicular cords had totally disappeared from grafts with teratomas, and the tumour tissue had enlarged the testis and invaded the interstitium of the host testis. It consisted of solitary pieces of immature cartilage as well as of glial cells and of primitive neuroepithelium. Six to eight weeks after implantation the tumour tissue had expanded so that the enlarged testis could be detected by macroscopic enlargement of the scrotum. The testicular tissue of the host had practically disappeared, and only solitary disrupted seminiferous tubules of the host were seen surrounding the teratoma. Neuroepithelial structures of some teratomas cultured for 8 weeks had cells with a granular nucleus as a sign of obvious apoptosis. Eleven to 12 weeks after implantation the growth of the teratoma had stopped, and the histology corresponded to that of a mature cystic teratoma. GFAP, SOX9 and type IV collagen were strongly positive in some parts of the tumours cultured for 4 and 8 weeks, while only occasional c-kit-positive areas were observed in tumours cultured for 8 weeks. As conclusions: (1) the metastasizing capacity of the experimental testicular teratoma is very low during 12 weeks, but the behaviour of the tumour in the testicular tissue of the graft is invasive; (2) the growth of experimental testicular teratomas cease 6-8 weeks after implantation of the fetal gonadal ridges with the obvious apoptosis of the immature tissue components; (3) the model of experimental testicular teratoma in the mouse is suitable for studying how the teratoma affects the host testis and how the host testis reacts to teratoma.  (+info)

A teratoma is a type of germ cell tumor, which is a broad category of tumors that originate from the reproductive cells. A teratoma contains developed tissues from all three embryonic germ layers: ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. This means that a teratoma can contain various types of tissue such as hair, teeth, bone, and even more complex organs like eyes, thyroid, or neural tissue.

Teratomas are usually benign (non-cancerous), but they can sometimes be malignant (cancerous) and can spread to other parts of the body. They can occur anywhere in the body, but they're most commonly found in the ovaries and testicles. When found in these areas, they are typically removed surgically.

Teratomas can also occur in other locations such as the sacrum, coccyx (tailbone), mediastinum (the area between the lungs), and pineal gland (a small gland in the brain). These types of teratomas can be more complex to treat due to their location and potential to cause damage to nearby structures.

Testicular neoplasms are abnormal growths or tumors in the testicle that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They are a type of genitourinary cancer, which affects the reproductive and urinary systems. Testicular neoplasms can occur in men of any age but are most commonly found in young adults between the ages of 15 and 40.

Testicular neoplasms can be classified into two main categories: germ cell tumors and non-germ cell tumors. Germ cell tumors, which arise from the cells that give rise to sperm, are further divided into seminomas and non-seminomas. Seminomas are typically slow-growing and have a good prognosis, while non-seminomas tend to grow more quickly and can spread to other parts of the body.

Non-germ cell tumors are less common than germ cell tumors and include Leydig cell tumors, Sertoli cell tumors, and lymphomas. These tumors can have a variety of clinical behaviors, ranging from benign to malignant.

Testicular neoplasms often present as a painless mass or swelling in the testicle. Other symptoms may include a feeling of heaviness or discomfort in the scrotum, a dull ache in the lower abdomen or groin, and breast enlargement (gynecomastia).

Diagnosis typically involves a physical examination, imaging studies such as ultrasound or CT scan, and blood tests to detect tumor markers. Treatment options depend on the type and stage of the neoplasm but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these modalities. Regular self-examinations of the testicles are recommended for early detection and improved outcomes.

The sacrococcygeal region is the lower part of the back where the spine ends, specifically referring to the area where the sacrum (a triangular bone at the base of the spine formed by the fusion of several vertebrae) meets the coccyx (also known as the tailbone). This region is located at the very bottom of the spine and is susceptible to injury or trauma due to its position and role in supporting the body's weight. It is also a common site for birth defects, particularly in newborns.

A dermoid cyst is a type of benign (non-cancerous) growth that typically develops during embryonic development. It is a congenital condition, which means it is present at birth, although it may not become apparent until later in life. Dermoid cysts are most commonly found in the skin or the ovaries of women, but they can also occur in other areas of the body, such as the spine or the brain.

Dermoid cysts form when cells that are destined to develop into skin and its associated structures, such as hair follicles and sweat glands, become trapped during fetal development. These cells continue to grow and multiply, forming a sac-like structure that contains various types of tissue, including skin, fat, hair, and sometimes even teeth or bone.

Dermoid cysts are usually slow-growing and may not cause any symptoms unless they become infected or rupture. In some cases, they may cause pain or discomfort if they press on nearby structures. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the cyst to prevent complications and alleviate symptoms.

Mediastinal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors located in the mediastinum, which is the central compartment of the thoracic cavity that lies between the lungs and contains various vital structures such as the heart, esophagus, trachea, blood vessels, lymph nodes, and nerves. Mediastinal neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous), and they can arise from any of the tissues or organs within the mediastinum.

Benign mediastinal neoplasms may include thymomas, lipomas, neurofibromas, or teratomas, among others. These tumors are typically slow-growing and rarely spread to other parts of the body. However, they can still cause symptoms or complications by compressing adjacent structures within the mediastinum, such as the airways, blood vessels, or nerves.

Malignant mediastinal neoplasms are cancerous tumors that can invade and destroy surrounding tissues and may spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body. Common types of malignant mediastinal neoplasms include thymic carcinomas, lymphomas, germ cell tumors, and neuroendocrine tumors. These tumors often require aggressive treatment, such as surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, to control their growth and spread.

It is important to note that mediastinal neoplasms can present with various symptoms depending on their location, size, and type. Some patients may be asymptomatic, while others may experience cough, chest pain, difficulty breathing, hoarseness, or swallowing difficulties. A thorough diagnostic workup, including imaging studies and biopsies, is necessary to confirm the diagnosis and determine the best course of treatment for mediastinal neoplasms.

Neoplasms, germ cell and embryonal are types of tumors that originate from the abnormal growth of cells. Here's a brief medical definition for each:

1. Neoplasms: Neoplasms refer to abnormal tissue growths or masses, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They result from uncontrolled cell division and may invade surrounding tissues or spread to other parts of the body through a process called metastasis.
2. Germ Cell Tumors: These are rare tumors that develop from the germ cells, which give rise to sperm and eggs in the reproductive organs (ovaries and testes). They can be benign or malignant and may occur in both children and adults. Germ cell tumors can also arise outside of the reproductive organs, a condition known as extragonadal germ cell tumors.
3. Embryonal Tumors: These are a type of malignant neoplasm that primarily affects infants and young children. They develop from embryonic cells, which are immature cells present during fetal development. Embryonal tumors can occur in various organs, including the brain (medulloblastomas), nervous system (primitive neuroectodermal tumors or PNETs), and other areas like the kidneys and liver.

It is essential to note that these conditions require professional medical evaluation and treatment by healthcare professionals with expertise in oncology and related fields.

Dysgerminoma is a type of germ cell tumor that develops in the ovaries. It is a malignant (cancerous) tumor that primarily affects girls and women of reproductive age, although it can occur at any age. Dysgerminomas are composed of large, round, or polygonal cells with clear cytoplasm and distinct cell borders, arranged in nests or sheets. They may also contain lymphoid aggregates and may produce hormones such as estrogen or testosterone.

Dysgerminomas are usually unilateral (affecting one ovary), but they can be bilateral (affecting both ovaries) in about 10-15% of cases. They tend to grow and spread rapidly, so early detection and treatment are crucial for a favorable prognosis.

The standard treatment for dysgerminoma is surgical removal of the affected ovary or ovaries, followed by chemotherapy with agents such as bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP). With appropriate treatment, the five-year survival rate for patients with dysgerminoma is high, ranging from 80% to 95%.

Ovarian neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the ovary, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can originate from various cell types within the ovary, including epithelial cells, germ cells, and stromal cells. Ovarian neoplasms are often classified based on their cell type of origin, histological features, and potential for invasive or metastatic behavior.

Epithelial ovarian neoplasms are the most common type and can be further categorized into several subtypes, such as serous, mucinous, endometrioid, clear cell, and Brenner tumors. Some of these epithelial tumors have a higher risk of becoming malignant and spreading to other parts of the body.

Germ cell ovarian neoplasms arise from the cells that give rise to eggs (oocytes) and can include teratomas, dysgerminomas, yolk sac tumors, and embryonal carcinomas. Stromal ovarian neoplasms develop from the connective tissue cells supporting the ovary and can include granulosa cell tumors, thecomas, and fibromas.

It is essential to diagnose and treat ovarian neoplasms promptly, as some malignant forms can be aggressive and potentially life-threatening if not managed appropriately. Regular gynecological exams, imaging studies, and tumor marker tests are often used for early detection and monitoring of ovarian neoplasms. Treatment options may include surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy, depending on the type, stage, and patient's overall health condition.

Retroperitoneal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the retroperitoneal space. This is the area located behind the peritoneum, which is the membrane that lines the abdominal cavity and covers the abdominal organs. The retroperitoneal space contains several vital structures such as the kidneys, adrenal glands, pancreas, aorta, and lymphatic vessels.

Retroperitoneal neoplasms can be benign or malignant (cancerous). Malignant retroperitoneal neoplasms are often aggressive and can invade surrounding tissues and organs, leading to various complications. Common types of retroperitoneal neoplasms include lymphomas, sarcomas, and metastatic tumors from other primary sites. Symptoms may vary depending on the size and location of the tumor but can include abdominal or back pain, weight loss, and swelling in the legs. Diagnosis typically involves imaging studies such as CT scans or MRI, followed by a biopsy to determine the type and grade of the tumor. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Embryonic stem cells are a type of pluripotent stem cell that are derived from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst, which is a very early-stage embryo. These cells have the ability to differentiate into any cell type in the body, making them a promising area of research for regenerative medicine and the study of human development and disease. Embryonic stem cells are typically obtained from surplus embryos created during in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures, with the consent of the donors. The use of embryonic stem cells is a controversial issue due to ethical concerns surrounding the destruction of human embryos.

A germinoma is a type of tumor that develops in the brain or the spine, primarily in the pituitary gland or pineal gland. It is a rare form of primary central nervous system (CNS) cancer and is classified as a type of germ cell tumor. These tumors arise from cells that normally develop into sperm or eggs, which can migrate to unusual locations during embryonic development.

Germinomas are highly sensitive to radiation therapy and chemotherapy, making them generally treatable and curable with appropriate medical intervention. Symptoms of a germinoma may include headaches, nausea, vomiting, visual disturbances, hormonal imbalances, and neurological deficits, depending on the location and size of the tumor. Diagnosis typically involves imaging studies like MRI or CT scans, followed by a biopsy to confirm the presence of malignant cells.

I could not find a medical definition for "Severe Teratoid Abnormalities" as it is not a widely recognized or established medical term. However, the term "teratoid" is used in medical contexts to describe abnormal growths or tumors that contain a mixture of tissue types, such as skin, muscle, bone, and nerve cells. A severe teratoid abnormality would likely refer to a particularly serious or extreme case of such a condition.

If you are looking for information on a specific medical condition or issue, I would be happy to help you try to find more accurate and relevant information. Can you please provide me with more context or details?

Isochromosomes are abnormal chromosomes that contain identical arms on both sides, instead of having one arm longer than the other. This occurs due to an error in cell division where the centromere, the region where the chromatids (the two copies of chromosome) are attached, is duplicated and then separated improperly. As a result, each new chromosome has two identical arms.

Isochromosomes can lead to genetic disorders because they can disrupt the balance of genes on the chromosome. For example, if an isochromosome forms for chromosome 18 (i(18)), there will be three copies of the genes on one arm and only one copy on the other arm, leading to an overexpression of some genes and a loss of expression of others. This can cause developmental abnormalities and intellectual disabilities.

Isochromosomes are often associated with certain types of cancer, as well as genetic disorders such as Turner syndrome and Klinefelter syndrome.

Mesonephroma is a very rare type of kidney tumor that originates from the mesonephric duct remnants, which are the embryonic precursors of the male reproductive system. This tumor typically affects older adults and is more common in men than women.

Mesonephromas are usually slow-growing and asymptomatic, making them difficult to detect at an early stage. When symptoms do occur, they may include flank pain, hematuria (blood in the urine), a palpable abdominal mass, and weight loss.

On imaging studies such as CT or MRI scans, mesonephromas typically appear as well-circumscribed masses within the kidney. The diagnosis is usually confirmed through a biopsy or surgical excision of the tumor.

Mesonephromas are composed of tubular structures lined with cuboidal to low columnar epithelial cells, often with clear cytoplasm. They may also contain areas of necrosis and hemorrhage. The treatment of mesonephroma typically involves surgical excision, and the prognosis is generally favorable, with a low risk of recurrence or metastasis. However, long-term follow-up is recommended due to the rarity and limited data on this type of tumor.

Struma ovarii is a rare type of ovarian tumor, which is composed predominantly of thyroid tissue and accounts for less than 1% of all ovarian neoplasms. It is classified as a specialized form of monodermal teratoma (a type of germ cell tumor). Despite being composed mainly of thyroid tissue, struma ovarii may produce and release thyroid hormones, leading to symptoms associated with hyperthyroidism in some cases.

Struma ovarii can be asymptomatic or present with various symptoms such as abdominal pain, distension, or menstrual irregularities. In rare instances, it might undergo malignant transformation into a thyroid-like carcinoma known as strumal carcinoid or thyroid carcinoma of the ovary. The definitive diagnosis is usually established through histopathological examination following surgical resection.

The coccyx, also known as the tailbone, is the small triangular bone at the bottom of the spine in humans and other primates. It is formed by the fusion of several small vertebrae and serves to attach muscles and ligaments in the pelvic region. The coccyx can be a source of pain and discomfort if it is injured or becomes inflamed.

Pluripotent stem cells are a type of undifferentiated stem cell that have the ability to differentiate into any cell type of the three germ layers (endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm) of a developing embryo. These cells can give rise to all the cell types that make up the human body, with the exception of those that form the extra-embryonic tissues such as the placenta.

Pluripotent stem cells are characterized by their ability to self-renew, which means they can divide and produce more pluripotent stem cells, and differentiate, which means they can give rise to specialized cell types with specific functions. Pluripotent stem cells can be derived from embryos at the blastocyst stage of development or generated in the lab through a process called induced pluripotency, where adult cells are reprogrammed to have the properties of embryonic stem cells.

Pluripotent stem cells hold great promise for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering because they can be used to generate large numbers of specific cell types that can potentially replace or repair damaged or diseased tissues in the body. However, their use is still a subject of ethical debate due to concerns about the source of embryonic stem cells and the potential risks associated with their use in clinical applications.

An ovarian cyst is a sac or pouch filled with fluid that forms on the ovary. Ovarian cysts are quite common in women during their childbearing years, and they often cause no symptoms. In most cases, ovarian cysts disappear without treatment over a few months. However, larger or persistent cysts may require medical intervention, including surgical removal.

There are various types of ovarian cysts, such as functional cysts (follicular and corpus luteum cysts), which develop during the menstrual cycle due to hormonal changes, and non-functional cysts (dermoid cysts, endometriomas, and cystadenomas), which can form due to different causes.

While many ovarian cysts are benign, some may have malignant potential or indicate an underlying medical condition like polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Regular gynecological check-ups, including pelvic examinations and ultrasounds, can help detect and monitor ovarian cysts.

Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) are a type of pluripotent stem cells that are generated from somatic cells, such as skin or blood cells, through the introduction of specific genes encoding transcription factors. These reprogrammed cells exhibit similar characteristics to embryonic stem cells, including the ability to differentiate into any cell type of the three germ layers (endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm). The discovery and development of iPSCs have opened up new possibilities in regenerative medicine, drug testing and development, and disease modeling, while avoiding ethical concerns associated with embryonic stem cells.

The retroperitoneal space refers to the area within the abdominal cavity that is located behind (retro) the peritoneum, which is the smooth serous membrane that lines the inner wall of the abdomen and covers the abdominal organs. This space is divided into several compartments and contains vital structures such as the kidneys, adrenal glands, pancreas, duodenum, aorta, and vena cava.

The retroperitoneal space can be further categorized into two regions:

1. The posterior pararenal space, which is lateral to the psoas muscle and contains fat tissue.
2. The perirenal space, which surrounds the kidneys and adrenal glands and is filled with fatty connective tissue.

Disorders or conditions affecting the retroperitoneal space may include infections, tumors, hematomas, or inflammation, which can lead to various symptoms depending on the specific structures involved. Imaging techniques such as CT scans or MRI are commonly used to diagnose and assess retroperitoneal pathologies.

Cell differentiation is the process by which a less specialized cell, or stem cell, becomes a more specialized cell type with specific functions and structures. This process involves changes in gene expression, which are regulated by various intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factors. Differentiation results in the development of distinct cell types that make up tissues and organs in multicellular organisms. It is a crucial aspect of embryonic development, tissue repair, and maintenance of homeostasis in the body.

Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a protein produced by the yolk sac and the liver during fetal development. In adults, AFP is normally present in very low levels in the blood. However, abnormal production of AFP can occur in certain medical conditions, such as:

* Liver cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)
* Germ cell tumors, including non-seminomatous testicular cancer and ovarian cancer
* Hepatitis or liver inflammation
* Certain types of benign liver disease, such as cirrhosis or hepatic adenomas

Elevated levels of AFP in the blood can be detected through a simple blood test. This test is often used as a tumor marker to help diagnose and monitor certain types of cancer, particularly HCC. However, it's important to note that an elevated AFP level alone is not enough to diagnose cancer, and further testing is usually needed to confirm the diagnosis. Additionally, some non-cancerous conditions can also cause elevated AFP levels, so it's important to interpret the test results in the context of the individual's medical history and other diagnostic tests.

An Endodermal Sinus Tumor (EST) is a type of germ cell tumor, which is a rare cancer that occurs most frequently in the ovaries or testicles but can also occur in other parts of the body. EST is also known as a yolk sac tumor because it resembles the yolk sac of an embryo.

ESTs are highly aggressive and fast-growing tumors that typically affect children and young adults, with a peak incidence in the first decade of life. These tumors can produce various proteins and substances, such as alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), which can be used as markers for diagnosis and monitoring treatment response.

The symptoms of EST depend on the location of the tumor but may include abdominal pain or swelling, constipation, nausea, vomiting, and irregular menstrual periods in females. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the tumor, followed by chemotherapy to kill any remaining cancer cells. The prognosis for EST depends on several factors, including the stage of the disease at diagnosis, the patient's age, and the response to treatment.

Multiple primary neoplasms refer to the occurrence of more than one primary malignant tumor in an individual, where each tumor is unrelated to the other and originates from separate cells or organs. This differs from metastatic cancer, where a single malignancy spreads to multiple sites in the body. Multiple primary neoplasms can be synchronous (occurring at the same time) or metachronous (occurring at different times). The risk of developing multiple primary neoplasms increases with age and is associated with certain genetic predispositions, environmental factors, and lifestyle choices such as smoking and alcohol consumption.

Octamer Transcription Factor-3 (OTF-3 or Oct3) is a specific protein that belongs to the class of POU domain transcription factors. These proteins play crucial roles in the regulation of gene expression during cell growth, development, and differentiation. The "POU" name refers to the presence of two conserved domains - a POU-specific domain and a POU homeodomain - that recognize and bind to specific DNA sequences called octamer motifs, which are involved in controlling the transcription of target genes.

Oct3, encoded by the Pou2f1 gene, is widely expressed in various tissues, including lymphoid cells, neurons, and embryonic stem cells. It has been shown to regulate the expression of several genes that are essential for cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation. Dysregulation of Oct3 has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancers and neurological disorders.

In summary, Octamer Transcription Factor-3 (Oct3) is a POU domain transcription factor that binds to octamer motifs in DNA and regulates the expression of target genes involved in cell growth, development, and differentiation.

SOXB1 transcription factors are a subgroup of the SOX (SRY-related HMG box) family of transcription factors, which are characterized by a conserved high mobility group (HMG) box DNA-binding domain. The SOXB1 subfamily includes SOX1, SOX2, and SOX3, which play crucial roles during embryonic development and in the maintenance of stem cells. They regulate gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences and interacting with other transcription factors and cofactors. SOXB1 proteins have been implicated in various biological processes, such as neurogenesis, eye development, and sex determination. Dysregulation of SOXB1 transcription factors has been associated with several human diseases, including cancer.

Choriocarcinoma is a rapidly growing and invasive type of gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD), which are abnormal growths that develop in the tissues that are supposed to become the placenta during pregnancy. It occurs when a malignant tumor develops from trophoblast cells, which are normally found in the developing embryo and help to form the placenta.

Choriocarcinoma can occur after any type of pregnancy, including normal pregnancies, molar pregnancies (a rare mass that forms inside the uterus after conception), or ectopic pregnancies (when a fertilized egg implants outside the uterus). It is characterized by the presence of both trophoblastic and cancerous cells, which can produce human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) hormone.

Choriocarcinoma can spread quickly to other parts of the body, such as the lungs, liver, brain, or vagina, through the bloodstream. It is important to diagnose and treat choriocarcinoma early to prevent serious complications and improve the chances of a successful treatment outcome. Treatment typically involves surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy.

Paraneoplastic syndromes of the nervous system are a group of rare disorders that occur in some individuals with cancer. These syndromes are caused by an immune system response to the cancer tumor, which can lead to the damage or destruction of nerve cells. The immune system produces antibodies and/or activated immune cells that attack the neural tissue, leading to neurological symptoms.

Paraneoplastic syndromes can affect any part of the nervous system, including the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves, and muscles. Symptoms vary depending on the specific syndrome and the location of the affected nerve tissue. Some common neurological symptoms include muscle weakness, numbness or tingling, seizures, memory loss, confusion, difficulty speaking or swallowing, visual disturbances, and coordination problems.

Paraneoplastic syndromes are often associated with specific types of cancer, such as small cell lung cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and lymphoma. Diagnosis can be challenging because the symptoms may precede the discovery of the underlying cancer. A combination of clinical evaluation, imaging studies, laboratory tests, and sometimes a brain biopsy may be necessary to confirm the diagnosis.

Treatment typically involves addressing the underlying cancer with surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy. Immunosuppressive therapies may also be used to manage the immune response that is causing the neurological symptoms. While treatment can help alleviate symptoms and improve quality of life, paraneoplastic syndromes are often difficult to cure completely.

Spinal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors found within the spinal column, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These tumors can originate in the spine itself, called primary spinal neoplasms, or they can spread to the spine from other parts of the body, known as secondary or metastatic spinal neoplasms. Spinal neoplasms can cause various symptoms, such as back pain, neurological deficits, and even paralysis, depending on their location and size. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial to prevent or minimize long-term complications and improve the patient's prognosis.

X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging method that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional (tomographic) images (virtual "slices") of the body. These cross-sectional images can then be used to display detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body.

The term "computed tomography" is used instead of "CT scan" or "CAT scan" because the machines take a series of X-ray measurements from different angles around the body and then use a computer to process these data to create detailed images of internal structures within the body.

CT scanning is a noninvasive, painless medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. CT imaging provides detailed information about many types of tissue including lung, bone, soft tissue and blood vessels. CT examinations can be performed on every part of the body for a variety of reasons including diagnosis, surgical planning, and monitoring of therapeutic responses.

In computed tomography (CT), an X-ray source and detector rotate around the patient, measuring the X-ray attenuation at many different angles. A computer uses this data to construct a cross-sectional image by the process of reconstruction. This technique is called "tomography". The term "computed" refers to the use of a computer to reconstruct the images.

CT has become an important tool in medical imaging and diagnosis, allowing radiologists and other physicians to view detailed internal images of the body. It can help identify many different medical conditions including cancer, heart disease, lung nodules, liver tumors, and internal injuries from trauma. CT is also commonly used for guiding biopsies and other minimally invasive procedures.

In summary, X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging technique that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional images of the body. It provides detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body, allowing physicians to diagnose and treat medical conditions.

Conjoined twins, also known as Siamese twins, are a rare type of monozygotic (identical) twins who are born physically connected to each other. They develop from a single fertilized egg that fails to fully separate, resulting in various degrees of fusion between their bodies. The point of connection and the extent of sharing body parts can vary greatly between sets of conjoined twins. Some may be connected at the chest, abdomen, or hips, while others may share vital organs such as the heart or brain. Treatment options depend on the type of conjunction and whether separation is possible without causing harm to either twin. Conjoined twins occur in about 1 in every 200,000 live births.

Seminoma is a type of germ cell tumor that develops in the testicle. It is a malignant tumor, meaning it can spread to other parts of the body if left untreated. Seminomas are typically slow-growing and tend to remain localized to the testicle for a longer period compared to other types of testicular cancer. They usually occur in men between the ages of 25 and 45 but can develop at any age.

Seminomas can be classified into two main subtypes: classical seminoma and spermatocytic seminoma. Classical seminoma is more common and typically responds well to treatment, while spermatocytic seminoma is rarer and tends to have a better prognosis with a lower risk of spreading.

Seminomas are usually treated with surgery to remove the affected testicle (orchiectomy), followed by radiation therapy or chemotherapy to kill any remaining cancer cells. The prognosis for seminoma is generally good, especially when caught and treated early. Regular self-examinations of the testicles can help detect any lumps or abnormalities that may indicate the presence of a seminoma or other type of testicular cancer.

Embryonal carcinoma is a rare and aggressive type of cancer that arises from primitive germ cells. It typically occurs in the gonads (ovaries or testicles), but can also occur in other areas of the body such as the mediastinum, retroperitoneum, or sacrococcygeal region.

Embryonal carcinoma is called "embryonal" because the cancerous cells resemble those found in an embryo during early stages of development. These cells are capable of differentiating into various cell types, which can lead to a mix of cell types within the tumor.

Embryonal carcinoma is a highly malignant tumor that tends to grow and spread quickly. It can metastasize to other parts of the body, including the lungs, liver, brain, and bones. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the tumor, followed by chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy to kill any remaining cancer cells.

Prognosis for embryonal carcinoma depends on several factors, including the stage of the disease at diagnosis, the location of the tumor, and the patient's overall health. In general, this type of cancer has a poor prognosis, with a high risk of recurrence even after treatment.

humpath pathology images #2657 (Teratomas), #4541 (Mature teratoma), #5350 (Immature teratoma) cystic teratoma at eMedicine ( ... Cystic teratomas usually are grade 0 and, conversely, grade 0 teratomas usually are cystic. Grades 0, 1, and 2 pure teratomas ... Mature teratomas include dermoid cysts and are generally benign. Immature teratomas may be cancerous. Most ovarian teratomas ... The most diagnosed fetal teratomas are sacrococcygeal teratoma (Altman types I, II, and III) and cervical (neck) teratoma. ...
An immature teratoma is a teratoma that contains anaplastic immature elements, and is often synonymous with malignant teratoma ... An immature teratoma is thus a very rare tumor, representing 1% of all teratomas, 1% of all ovarian cancers, and 35.6% of ... Ovarian immature teratomas have been classified as among the least mutated of all solid cancers. Immature teratomas originate ... Immature teratomas composed of embryonic endodermal derivatives are rare. Often a mature cystic teratoma is misdiagnosed as its ...
... (SCT) is a type of tumor known as a teratoma that develops at the base of the coccyx (tailbone) and is ... Like other teratomas, an SCT can grow very large. Unlike other teratomas, an SCT sometimes grows larger than the rest of the ... Like all teratomas, a sacrococcygeal teratoma has the potential to be malignant, and the standard of care requires long-term ... Complications of the mass effect of a teratoma in general are addressed on the teratoma page. Complications of the mass effect ...
... is a rare complication of teratoma that can occur when an immature ovarian germ cell teratoma is ...
... is a rare teratoma of the oropharynx. Epignathus is a form of oropharyngeal teratoma that arises from the palate and ... Teratomas develop in the head and neck region with a live birth (fetus shows signs of life after leaving mother's womb) ... Teratomas, which are generally benign tumors, originate from stem cells, with the oropharynx (epignathus) region being the ... The occurrence of epignathus, a teratoma of the oropharynx, is extremely rare, with a live birth incidence found to be 1:35,000 ...
Presacral teratoma usually is considered to be a variant of sacrococcygeal teratoma. However, the presacral teratoma that is ... Gopal M, Turnpenny PD, Spicer R (June 2007). "Hereditary sacrococcygeal teratoma--not the same as its sporadic counterpart!". ... Ashcraft KW; Holder TM (October 1974). "Hereditary presacral teratoma". J. Pediatr. Surg. 9 (5): 691-7. doi:10.1016/0022-3468( ... Other potential presacral masses include presacral teratoma and enteric cyst. ...
Lee, Yong Ho; Kim, Sung Gun; Choi, Sung Hyuk; Kim, In Sun; Kim, Sun Haeng (2003). "Ovarian Mature Cystic Teratoma Containing ... Abbott, TM; Hermann, WJ; Scully, RE (1984). "Ovarian fetiform teratoma (homunculus) in a 9-year-old girl". Int J Gynecol Pathol ... Kuno, N; Kadomatsu, K; Nakamura, M; Miwa-Fukuchi, T; Hirabayashi, N; Ishizuka, T (2004). "Mature ovarian cystic teratoma with a ... Weiss, JR; Burgess, JB; Kaplan, KJ (2006). "Fetiform teratoma (homunculus)". Arch Pathol Lab Med. 130 (10): 1552-1556. doi: ...
"Terry the Teratoma". Lucy, the Daughter of the Devil. Season 1. Episode 5. 2007-09-30. Adult Swim. "Lucy, Daughter Of The Devil ...
Teratoma, and Choristoma". Encyclopedia of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. pp. 1179-1183. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-23499-6_ ...
Heterotopia or monodermal teratoma? Am J Surg Pathol 14(4):390-394. Pueblitz-Peredo S, Luévano-Flores E, Rincòn-Taracena R, ...
A large minority of patients with a mediastinal teratoma (including dermoid cyst) will cough up hair. For a differential ... Teratoma and cyst. Many signs and symptoms of a mediastinal tumor do not distinguish between these two principal classes of ... germ cell tumors including teratoma, thyroid tissue, and parathyroid lesions. Masses in this area are more likely to be ...
ISBN 978-0-323-29639-7. "Choristoma" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary Lee KH, Roland PS (2013). "Heterotopias, Teratoma, and ...
... is an occasional complication of sacrococcygeal teratoma. Seventh-century Byzantine physician Paulus Aegineta ... Bhat NA, Mathur M, Bhatnagar V (2003). "Sacrococcygeal teratoma with anorectal malformation". Indian Journal of ...
Teratoma of the thyroid gland. Black grain mycetoma due to Madurella mycetomi: a case report from the East Central State of ... Suseelan, AV; Gupta, IM; Viswanathan, V; Udekwu, FA (1976). "Teratoma of the thyroid gland". International Surgery. 62 (11-12 ...
Solid malignant teratoma of the ovary. Green GH. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1960 May;79:999-1001. Placenta praevia. A review of 242 ...
Zaki, S. A.; Dadge, D; Shanbag, P; Choudhury, R (2009). "Mature cystic teratoma: Unusual presentation as dysphagia". The Indian ...
Sacrococcygeal teratoma with nephroblastoma was reported by Ward and Dehner and by Trebbi et al. Cases of primary lumbosacral ... and by Govender et al.,. It is therefore of primary importance the distinction of MDHSR from sacrococcygeal teratoma and from ... Brain Pathol 8:817-818 Ward SP, Dehner LP (1974) Sacrococcygeal teratoma with nephroblastoma (Wilms tumor). A variant of ... An extrarenal Wilms tumor arising from a sacrococcygeal teratoma. Clin Pediatr 13:1009-1023 Abrahams JM, Powel BR, Duhaime A-C ...
"NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms - Mature Teratoma". National Cancer Institute. 2011-02-02. Tang QL, Jiang XF, Yuan XP, Liu Y, ...
... teratoma-initiating embryonic-like carcinoma cells during differentiation. The survival of these teratoma-initiating cells is ... Teratoma formation by pluripotent stem cells may be caused by low activity of PTEN enzyme, reported to promote the survival of ... The formed teratoma is cut out and used for the isolation of the necessary differentiated human cells by means of monoclonal ... Teratomas". Science-Business EXchange. 6 (7): 158. doi:10.1038/scibx.2013.158. Lee MO, Moon SH, Jeong HC, Yi JY, Lee TH, Shim ...
... and sacrococcygeal teratoma with a large component inside the fetus. Large masses of the neck (such as cervical teratoma) also ... A 1992 case report of a baby with a sacrococcygeal teratoma (SCT) reported that the SCT had obstructed the outlet of the ... Goto M, Makino Y, Tamura R, Ikeda S, Kawarabayashi T (2000). "Sacrococcygeal teratoma with hydrops fetalis and bilateral ... "Congenital bladder rupture and urine ascites secondary to a sacrococcygeal teratoma". Pediatric Radiology. 22 (7): 509-11. doi: ...
The most common tumor here is sacrococcygeal teratoma. Others are retrorectal hamartoma (tailgut cyst), schwannoma, ...
Teratoma Parasitic twin Conjoined twins Notes Campbell 19. Buckle 371. From a description by Mary Douglas, qtd. in Cockburn 78 ...
Teratoma formation: iPSCs injected into immunodeficient mice spontaneously formed teratomas after nine weeks. Teratomas are ... Much the same as ESC, iPSCs readily form teratoma when injected into immunodeficient mice. Teratoma formation is considered a ... found teratomas, which indicated that the cells were tolerated by the immune system. In 2013, Araki et al. attempted to ... Teratoma formation is a landmark test for pluripotency. Embryoid body: hESCs in culture spontaneously form ball-like embryo- ...
"Congenital teratoma of the orbit: a rare tumor". J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 52 (2): 128. doi:10.3928/01913913-20150313-12 ...
A number of tumors are known to involve the coccyx; of these, the most common is sacrococcygeal teratoma. Both coccydynia and ...
Teratomas can be divided into two types: mature teratoma (benign) and immature teratoma (malignant). Immature teratomas contain ... Immature teratomas are characterized with a diameter of 14-25 cm, encapsulated mass, cystic areas, and occasional appearance of ... Wang Y, Yang JX, Yu M, Cao DY, Shen K (2018). "Malignant mixed ovarian germ cell tumor composed of immature teratoma, yolk sac ... Wang Y, Yang JX, Yu M, Cao DY, Shen K (2018). "Malignant mixed ovarian germ cell tumor composed of immature teratoma, yolk sac ...
Hydronephrosis Sacrococcygeal teratoma Spina bifida Vesicoureteral reflux Breen, Micheál; Phelps, Andrew; Estrada, Carlos; Chow ...
Mauer, K.; Waye, J. D.; Lewis, B. S.; Szporn, A. H. (2008). "The Hairy Polyp: A Benign Teratoma of the Colon". Endoscopy. 21 (3 ...
... are benign teratomas. Ovarian teratomas may be associated with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. Despite their name, GCTs occur ... Among these, a common form is teratoma with endodermal sinus tumor. Teratocarcinoma refers to a germ cell tumor that is a ... This kind of mixed germ cell tumor may be known simply as a teratoma with elements of embryonal carcinoma or choriocarcinoma, ... Harding MJ, Paul J, Gillis CR, Kaye SB (April 1993). "Management of malignant teratoma: does referral to a specialist unit ...
... these women often have ovarian teratomas. A Japanese review found ten reported during pregnancy and five after delivery. ...
humpath pathology images #2657 (Teratomas), #4541 (Mature teratoma), #5350 (Immature teratoma) cystic teratoma at eMedicine ( ... Cystic teratomas usually are grade 0 and, conversely, grade 0 teratomas usually are cystic. Grades 0, 1, and 2 pure teratomas ... Mature teratomas include dermoid cysts and are generally benign. Immature teratomas may be cancerous. Most ovarian teratomas ... The most diagnosed fetal teratomas are sacrococcygeal teratoma (Altman types I, II, and III) and cervical (neck) teratoma. ...
A malignant teratoma is a type of cancer consisting of cysts that contain one or more of the three primary embryonic germ ... A malignant teratoma is a type of cancer consisting of cysts that contain one or more of the three primary embryonic germ ... Because malignant teratomas have usually spread by the time of diagnosis, systemic chemotherapy is needed. The prognosis for ... people with malignant teratomas is based on the size of the tumor, its location and the age of the patient. ...
Inconsistent nomenclature often confuses discussions of various subtypes of teratomas. ... Teratomas are germ cell tumors commonly composed of multiple cell types derived from one or more of the 3 germ layers. ... Testicular teratomas may occur at any age but are more common in infants and children. In adults, pure testicular teratomas are ... Testicular teratomas most often present as a painless scrotal mass, except in the case of torsion. Mediastinal teratomas are ...
Grade 1 immature teratoma. A grade 1 immature teratoma is made up mostly of non-cancerous tissue, and only a few cancerous ... If careful staging has determined that a grade 1 immature teratoma is limited to one or both ovaries, surgery to remove the ... Women with benign (non-cancerous) germ cell tumors such as mature teratomas (dermoid cysts) are cured by removing the part of ...
Teratoma. Facts About Teratoma. A teratoma is a congenital (present at birth) tumor. This tumor contains three layers of tissue ... Most teratomas are benign, but some can be malignant. Benign teratomas grow aggressively, but do not spread; whereas malignant ... Teratoma Challenges. Teratomas, even ones deemed benign, do come with a increased chance of reoccurrence of malignant tumors. ... Teratoma Prognosis. Although often benign, any teratoma have the potential to be malignant. Therefore adequate follow up ...
We report a case of extramammary Pagets disease in ovarian mature cystic teratoma. The patient was a 70-year-old Japanese ... Extramammary Pagets disease arising in mature cystic teratoma of the ovary Am J Surg Pathol. 1991 Oct;15(10):1002-6. doi: ... We report a case of extramammary Pagets disease in ovarian mature cystic teratoma. The patient was a 70-year-old Japanese ... This is the first reported case, to our knowledge, of extramammary Pagets disease arising in mature cystic teratoma of the ...
Congenital Cervical Teratoma (Case Report) Fatogoma Issa Koné, Amal Hajjij, Naouma Cissé, Siaka Soumaoro, Abdoul Wahabhaidara, ... Extrapineal mature teratoma of the posterior fossa in a child (Articles) Mónica Rivero-Garvía, Javier Márquez-Rivas, Eloy Rivas ... Mature Teratoma Revealed by an Encysted Pleural Effusion (Articles) Houda Gharsalli, Monia Attia, Sarra Zairi, Imen Sahnoun, ... Intraorbital Mature Teratoma in Infant (Articles) Oumar Diallo, Abdoulaye Hima Maiga, Bekety Katanga Anthony, Mahamadou Dama, ...
Testicular Teratoma in an Infant Read More about Scrotal Swelling, Benign Testicular Tumour on Pediatric Oncall ... 4) Pure testicular teratomas in prepubertal boys have not been reported to metastasize, whereas testicular teratomas in adults ... Testicular Teratoma in an Infant. P C Das1, K Shreedhara Avabratha2, Kirana Pailoor3.. 1Department of Pediatric surgery, Fr ... Testicular Teratoma in an Infant 01/09/2014 00:00:00 P C Das, K Shreedhara Avabratha, Kirana Pailoor 11/01/2012 00:00:00 https ...
Case 2: Mature ovarian cystic teratomaCase 2: Mature ovarian cystic teratoma ... Ovarian teratoma. Last revised by Rania Adel Anan on 18 Feb 2021 ... immature ovarian teratoma. * specialized teratoma of the ovary ... Ovarian teratomas are the most common group of ovarian germ cell tumors. ... Ovarian teratoma. Reference article, Radiopaedia.org (Accessed on 03 Dec 2023) https://doi.org/10.53347/rID-15359 ...
Sacrococcygeal teratoma is a usually noncancerous tumor that develops on or near a babys tailbone, sometimes growing outside ... Sacrococcygeal teratoma (SCT) is an unusual tumor, occurring in about 1 in 40,000 live births. The tumor is located at the base ... Because all sacrococcygeal teratomas must be surgically removed after birth, arrangements should be made for the infant to be ... The severity of a sacrococcygeal teratoma is directly related to the size of the tumor and the amount of blood flow to it. Both ...
Learn about diagnosis and specialist referrals for Sacrococcygeal teratoma. ...
Teratoma is often a gut-wrenching emotive force beyond its deathly force and heft. At the same time, Inertia on Teratoma is ... Teratoma by Inertia. Want More Metal? Subscribe To Our Daily Newsletter. Enter your information below to get a daily update ... All in all, Teratoma covers so much ground and has as many beautiful and uplifting parts as it does downright nasty and eye- ... My mind cant take how insane Inertia - Teratoma is. I ran behind on jamming it, but Im rarely this blown away by new music. I ...
CD133-enriched Xeno-Free human embryonic-derived neural stem cells expand rapidly in culture and do not form teratomas in ...
... resulting in growing-teratoma-syndrome and need for further surgery. She now remains well in uneventful clinical follow-up. We ... Immature teratomas (IT) are rare and recurrences uncommon. A 12-year-old female with grade 3 (high-grade) ovarian IT underwent ... Growing teratoma syndrome. , Gynecologic oncology. , Immature teratoma. , Ovarian. , Pediatric oncology. , Surgery. , ... Immature teratomas (IT) are rare and recurrences uncommon. A 12-year-old female with grade 3 (high-grade) ovarian IT underwent ...
686 Teratomas are unusual forms of cancer because they are composed of tissues such as tooth and bone not ... ... are being compared to the tissues of the teratomas, meaning that the tissues of the teratomas are similar to tooth and bone. It ... are being compared to the tissues of the teratomas, meaning that the tissues of the teratomas are similar to tooth and bone. It ... Re: Teratomas are unusual forms of cancer because they are composed of tis [#permalink] 25 Nov 2017, 16:58 ...
IntroductionMature cystic teratoma (MCT) of the ovary, as a synonym for the ovarian dermoid cyst, is a benign germ cell tumor. ...
Ancient Origins articles related to teratoma in the sections of history, archaeology, human origins, unexplained, artifacts, ... A new study has highlighted the oldest documented instance of a teratoma discovered within the 3,000-year-old burial chamber of ...
Dive into the research topics of Testicular teratoma presenting as a transilluminating scrotal mass. Together they form a ...
Investigation of patients with atypical or severe hyperandrogenaemia including androgen-secreting ovarian teratoma.. Michael ... presenting with features atypical of PCOS and include only the ninth case report of an androgen-secreting ovarian teratoma. ...
A teratoma is a type of tumor that can contain tissues derived from multiple germ cell layers, such as hair, teeth, bone, and ... The term "teratoma" comes from the Greek words "teras" meaning monster, and "onkoma" meaning swelling or tumor, refecting the ... Teratomas are considered to be rare and can be either benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). ...
Mature intracranial teratoma with meningocele in a lamb. Other Titles: Teratoma intracraniano benigno com meningocele em um ... Mature intracranial teratoma with meningocele in a lamb. Ciência Rural, Santa Maria, v. 50, n. 12, e20200248, 2020. DOI: https ... This study described the pathological aspects of a mature intracranial teratoma with meningocele in a one-day-old lamb. The ... To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of intracranial teratoma with meningocele in animals. ...
Recenze: Teratoma - In The Inside...Reborn The Flesh (2017). Že IMMORTAL SOULS PRODUCTION vydávají ten nejlepší světový rambajz ... Další pestrobarevnou piraňou v jejich sítích jsou katalánští a v Barceloně dlící TERATOMA. Kapela spatřila světl… ...
Sacrococcygeal teratoma?. Our RARE Concierge Services Guides are available to assist you by providing information, resources ...
Dive into the research topics of Survival of a profoundly hydropic fetus with a sacrococcygeal teratoma delivered at 27 weeks ... Survival of a profoundly hydropic fetus with a sacrococcygeal teratoma delivered at 27 weeks of gestation for maternal mirror ...
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p>The teratoma, a specialized neoplasm, is not commonly found in the bovine and it does not appear to be of any economic ... The teratoma, a specialized neoplasm, is not commonly found in the bovine and it does not appear to be of any economic ...
What is cystic teratoma of the ovary?. Cystic Teratoma is a type of tumor that can arise on sperm cells. A cystic teratoma is a ... Teratomas are generally described as either mature or immature. *Symptoms of a teratoma. Teratomas may have no symptoms at ... Ovarian teratoma. Most ovarian teratomas are mature. The mature ovarian teratoma is also known as a dermoid cyst. ... What causes dermoid teratoma?. What Causes Teratoma? Teratomas happen when complications arise during your cells ...
Teratomas. A teratoma is a tumor that can contain different types of benign tissue. There are two forms of teratoma that a ... Mature teratomas can contain tissue such as bone, hair, or teeth.. Immature teratomas are a rarer form of teratoma. Immature ... An immature teratoma can have cells that appear to be embryonic or fetal. These tissues can include respiratory passages, ... Mature teratomas usually develop in females of reproductive age. Reproductive age for females is generally from teenage years ...
... It is a benign or malignant tumor belonging to a group of germ ... These teratomas are often seen in combination with mature teratomas. In around 26% cases there is also a mature teratoma in the ... What is ovarian teratoma?. Ovarian teratoma is a benign or malignant tumor belonging to a group of germ cell tumors. It ... Struma ovarii - teratoma that is composed of thyroid tissue. This type of teratoma is usually benign, but in some cases it can ...
  • Mature teratomas include dermoid cysts and are generally benign. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mature teratomas generally are benign, with 0.17-2% of mature cystic teratomas becoming malignant. (wikipedia.org)
  • Teratomas range from benign, well-differentiated (mature) cystic lesions to those that are solid and malignant (immature). (medscape.com)
  • Women with benign (non-cancerous) germ cell tumors such as mature teratomas (dermoid cysts) are cured by removing the part of the ovary that has the tumor (ovarian cystectomy) or by removing the entire ovary. (cancer.org)
  • Most teratomas are benign, but some can be malignant. (rainbowkids.com)
  • Teratomas, even ones deemed benign, do come with a increased chance of reoccurrence of malignant tumors. (rainbowkids.com)
  • Although often benign, any teratoma have the potential to be malignant. (rainbowkids.com)
  • Histopathological examination of the swelling was reported as benign teratoma of the testis (Fig.1). (pediatriconcall.com)
  • Teratomas are considered to be rare and can be either benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). (mdura.xyz)
  • Teratomas in newborns are generally benign and don't spread. (motelmexicolabali.com)
  • Ovarian teratoma is a benign or malignant tumor belonging to a group of germ cell tumors. (motelmexicolabali.com)
  • A teratoma is a tumor that can contain different types of benign tissue. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A teratoma is a benign tumor composed of tissue not normally found at a particular location of the body. (altogenlabs.com)
  • In most cases, ovarian teratomas are benign lesions with a cystic structure. (medicalwholesome.com)
  • The most common ovarian teratoma is mature teratoma (Latin teratoma maturum), it takes the form of a benign lesion with a cystic structure and its size is up to 10 centimeters. (medicalwholesome.com)
  • Despite the ominous name, however, ovarian teratomas are usually benign, and arise from totipotent stem cells which are capable of developing into any type of body cell. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Mature teratoma is a benign germ cell tumor commonly found in young women. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Mature teratoma is a benign germ cell tumor of the ovary, commonly found in reproductive women, which is composed of mature tissues from two or three germ layers. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Teratomata typically form in the tailbone (where it is known as a sacrococcygeal teratoma), ovary, or testicle. (wikipedia.org)
  • A struma ovarii (also known as goitre of the ovary or ovarian goiter) is a rare form of mature teratoma that contains mostly thyroid tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mature cystic teratoma of the ovary exhibiting multiple tissue types. (medscape.com)
  • Mature cystic teratoma of the ovary with hair, sebaceous material, and thyroid tissue. (medscape.com)
  • [ 3 ] Mature cystic teratomas of the ovary are often discovered as incidental findings on physical examination, during radiographic studies, or during abdominal surgery performed for other indications. (medscape.com)
  • The gross appearance of the resected ovary was typical for mature cystic teratoma. (nih.gov)
  • This is the first reported case, to our knowledge, of extramammary Paget's disease arising in mature cystic teratoma of the ovary. (nih.gov)
  • What is cystic teratoma of the ovary? (motelmexicolabali.com)
  • In around 26% cases there is also a mature teratoma in the same ovary, and in around 10% on the opposite side [3] . (cancerwall.com)
  • Ovarian teratoma belongs to the group of germinal neoplasms of the ovary, which means that it develops from primary germ cells (so-called gonocytes) and then differentiates into fetal tissues of varying degrees of advancement and maturity. (medicalwholesome.com)
  • Immature teratoma of the ovary may require unilateral removal of the ovary, and in postmenopausal women, total hysterectomy with appendages. (medicalwholesome.com)
  • The specimen shown here (right) is a dermoid cyst, or cystic teratoma, which has formed inside an ovary. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • [ 3 ] Sacrococcygeal teratomas are more likely to recur than those in the ovary or other sites. (medscape.com)
  • Herein, we report a 24-year-old female with neurocytoma in a mature teratoma of the right ovary. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Based on these findings, the woman was diagnosed with neurocytoma arising from mature ovary teratoma, with microscopic foci of immature cartilage tissues. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The final pathology report showed a mature teratoma of the left ovary featuring dermoid cyst, respiratory anlaga, and struma ovarii. (cdc.gov)
  • A dermoid cyst is a mature cystic teratoma containing hair (sometimes very abundant) and other structures characteristic of normal skin and other tissues derived from the ectoderm. (wikipedia.org)
  • The teratoma is a more developed dermoid cyst (a noncancerous lump present at birth). (motelmexicolabali.com)
  • The mature ovarian teratoma is also known as a dermoid cyst. (motelmexicolabali.com)
  • Dermoid cyst (cystic teratoma) with fully developed tooth and hair. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Pathologically, there are four types of teratomas: dermoid cyst, teratoid cyst, true teratoma, and an epignathus as described by Arnold in 1870 [22]. (fortunejournals.com)
  • This article focuses on mature cystic teratomas, commonly referred to as dermoid cysts. (medscape.com)
  • Malignant transformation occurs in 1-3% of mature cystic teratomas (MCTs), usually in postmenopausal women. (medscape.com)
  • Cystic teratomas occur most commonly in the ovaries and testes, but they can rarely be found in the anterior mediastinum, sacrococcygeal region, or neck. (medscape.com)
  • [ 6 , 8 ] Additional support came from Linder and associates' studies of mature cystic teratomas of the ovaries. (medscape.com)
  • There are no specific laboratory studies for mature cystic teratomas. (cancerwall.com)
  • Mature cystic teratomas can be surgically removed and they don't require any other treatment [5] . (cancerwall.com)
  • Mature cystic teratomas (MCTs) (commonly called 'dermoid cysts') are cystic tumors composed of well-differentiated tissue derived from at least two of the three germ cell layers (ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm). (indexindex.com)
  • Cysts within mature teratomas may have partially-developed organ systems: reports include cases of partial cranial bones, long bones and a rudimentary, beating heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • A malignant teratoma is a type of cancer consisting of cysts that contain one or more of the three primary embryonic germ layers: ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Diagnosis and management of teratoma and epidermoid cysts. (pediatriconcall.com)
  • Teratoid cysts are composed of all three germ layers but are poorly differentiated, while true teratomas consist of three well-differentiated germlayers. (fortunejournals.com)
  • Teratomas , sometimes referred to as dermoid cysts, are a unique type of tumor that contain germ cells that can grow into brain or nervous tissue, glands, fat, and even skin, teeth and hair. (hormonesmatter.com)
  • Somatic-type tumors arising from dermoid cysts are very rare, while tumors of CNS arising from mature teratoma are even rarer. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Testicular and immature ovarian teratomas are also frequently treated with chemotherapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because malignant teratomas have usually spread by the time of diagnosis, systemic chemotherapy is needed. (medlineplus.gov)
  • the first was treated with surgery but the second was metastatic and managed with chemotherapy, resulting in growing-teratoma-syndrome and need for further surgery. (cam.ac.uk)
  • The German MAKEI trials suggest that the recurrence rate for immature teratomas can be decreased to 9.5% with chemotherapy. (medscape.com)
  • The term is most often applied to teratoma on the skull sutures and in the ovaries of females. (wikipedia.org)
  • A cystic teratoma is a type of tumor that arises from egg or sperm cells, in the ovaries or testicles. (motelmexicolabali.com)
  • A teratoma is a type of tumor that can contain tissues derived from multiple germ cell layers, such as hair, teeth, bone, and muscle. (mdura.xyz)
  • A testicular teratoma may present as a painless lump. (wikipedia.org)
  • Testicular teratomas most often present as a painless scrotal mass, except in the case of torsion. (medscape.com)
  • Because of these common findings and the fact that teratomas form in the embryonic stage, there is a myth that these tumors are an embryo themselves or a twin, but that is false. (rainbowkids.com)
  • CD133-enriched Xeno-Free human embryonic-derived neural stem cells expand rapidly in culture and do not form teratomas in immunodeficient mice. (ca.gov)
  • An immature teratoma can have cells that appear to be embryonic or fetal. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Teratoma formation is characterized by accelerated growth and a mixture of all three embryonic germ cell layers when xenografted into immunodeficient mice (read more about Altogen Labs xenograft services). (altogenlabs.com)
  • A teratoma is created via the injection of a customer's embryonic stem (ES) cells or induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. (altogenlabs.com)
  • By definition, teratomas include components derived from all three embryonic layers: ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm. (medscape.com)
  • Additionally, teratomas may be monodermal and highly specialized. (medscape.com)
  • Another type of ovarian teratoma is monodermal teratoma. (cancerwall.com)
  • A teratoma is a tumor made up of several different types of tissue, such as hair, muscle, teeth, or bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • A mature teratoma often contains several different types of tissue such as skin, muscle, and bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term "teratoma" comes from the Greek words "teras" meaning monster, and "onkoma" meaning swelling or tumor, refecting the tumor's diverse and often bizarre tissue components. (mdura.xyz)
  • A teratoma is a congenital (present prior to birth) tumor formed by different types of tissue. (motelmexicolabali.com)
  • Teratomas can contain undeveloped tissue or a number of different kinds of mature tissue, including fat, hair, teeth, gland and muscle. (motelmexicolabali.com)
  • Mature teratomas can contain tissue such as bone, hair, or teeth. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • In mature ovarian teratoma, there are various cell structures, such as masses of sebum with tangled hair, and sometimes bulges with growing teeth, or deformed cartilage or bone tissue. (medicalwholesome.com)
  • Immature teratoma is the malignant counterpart of the mature teratoma and contains immature tissues which typically show primitive or embryonal neuroectodermal histopathology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Teratomas are unusual forms of cancer because they are composed of tissues such as tooth and bone not normally found in the organ in which the tumor appears. (gmatclub.com)
  • The diagnosis of mature teratoma was based on microscopic features, where well-differentiated tissues representative of the three germ layers were observed. (ufla.br)
  • Teratomas are a germ cell tumors composed of two or more tissues which originate from ectoderm, endoderm or mesoderm. (medscape.com)
  • The finding of a malignant teratoma increase this chance even more. (rainbowkids.com)
  • Immature teratomas may be cancerous. (wikipedia.org)
  • Immature teratomas (IT) are rare and recurrences uncommon. (cam.ac.uk)
  • Immature teratomas are a rarer form of teratoma. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Immature teratomas usually occur in females under 18 years old. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Immature teratomas are also made of at least two germ cell layers. (cancerwall.com)
  • Immature teratomas are around 14-25 cm large, solid or with cystic component. (cancerwall.com)
  • Close histologic evaluation of immature teratomas reveals a good correlation between the degree of immaturity and the presence of microscopic foci of frankly malignant elements. (medscape.com)
  • Charoenkwan et al found overexpression of p53 in the more aggressive immature teratomas at all sites. (medscape.com)
  • The mean follow-up time was 101.4 months (30-146 months), with 2 recurrences of high-grade immature teratomas at 11 and 30 months following the surgery. (turkarchpediatr.org)
  • In adults, testicular teratomas are generally cancerous. (wikipedia.org)
  • Testicular teratomas represent almost half of testicular cancers. (wikipedia.org)
  • 4) Pure testicular teratomas in prepubertal boys have not been reported to metastasize, whereas testicular teratomas in adults are associated with clinical metastasis in 60% cases. (pediatriconcall.com)
  • This study described the pathological aspects of a mature intracranial teratoma with meningocele in a one-day-old lamb. (ufla.br)
  • To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of intracranial teratoma with meningocele in animals. (ufla.br)
  • A case of Klinefelter syndrome with retroperitoneal teratoma. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Dive into the research topics of 'A case of Klinefelter syndrome with retroperitoneal teratoma. (elsevierpure.com)
  • [ 2 ] Sacrococcygeal teratomas may be diagnosed antenatally during routine ultrasounds, fetal anomaly scans, or when the mother presents with clinical symptoms such as size greater than dates or polyhydramnios. (medscape.com)
  • Sacrococcygeal teratomas are generally not cancerous, and most babies do well with surgical treatment after birth. (ucsfbenioffchildrens.org)
  • Because all sacrococcygeal teratomas must be surgically removed after birth, arrangements should be made for the infant to be born in a specialized hospital with pediatric surgery expertise. (ucsfbenioffchildrens.org)
  • Sacrococcygeal teratomas are rare tumors associated with frequent postoperative dysfunctions. (turkarchpediatr.org)
  • Recurrences may also be seen, particularly in immature, high-grade forms of sacrococcygeal teratomas. (turkarchpediatr.org)
  • Sacrococcygeal teratoma is an extragonadal germ cell tumor that develops during fetal and neonatal periods and is associated with significant perinatal morbidity and even mortality. (turkarchpediatr.org)
  • A teratoma is a congenital (present at birth) tumor. (rainbowkids.com)
  • Even though all teratomas are congenital, some are not discovered until later in life. (rainbowkids.com)
  • We report a case of congenital orbital teratoma. (unibe.edu.do)
  • Clinical, imaging and laboratory features were consistent with congenital orbital teratoma. (unibe.edu.do)
  • Although rare, sacrococcygeal teratoma is the most common congenital tumor . (bvsalud.org)
  • Every year, about 100 children undergo surgery with reconstruction of the rectum, pelvic floor and genitals due to malformations of the gastrointestinal tract such as anal atresia, Hirschsprung's disease, esophageal atresia, or urogenital malformations such as hypospadias, and congenital pelvic tumors such as sacrococcygeal teratoma. (lu.se)
  • thus, the presence of some degree of organization, a high degree of cellular differentiation, and cystic structure differentiates dermoids from teratomas. (medscape.com)
  • Teratomas happen when complications arise during your cells' differentiation process. (motelmexicolabali.com)
  • Teratomas are generally described as either mature or immature. (motelmexicolabali.com)
  • Teratomas may be classified as mature or immature on the basis of the presence of immature neuroectodermal elements within the tumor. (medscape.com)
  • Challenges also arise if the teratoma is located in a inaccessible location or one that causes pressure to be placed on a vital organ or the nervous system. (rainbowkids.com)
  • Cystic Teratoma is a type of tumor that can arise on sperm cells. (motelmexicolabali.com)
  • It has been discovered that teratomas arise from a single germ cell after its first division. (cancerwall.com)
  • Mutter suggested that these genes or the cells have only the maternal imprint because many teratomas arise from a parthenogenetically activated egg. (medscape.com)
  • The most diagnosed fetal teratomas are sacrococcygeal teratoma (Altman types I, II, and III) and cervical (neck) teratoma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because these teratomas project from the fetal body into the surrounding amniotic fluid, they can be seen during routine prenatal ultrasound exams. (wikipedia.org)
  • Testicular mixed embryonal carcinoma and teratoma is a type of mixed germ cell cancer that arises from the testis. (withoutaribbon.org)
  • There is no known cause, but it is thought that certain genetic and hereditary mutations, as well as exposure to certain environmental factors, can cause the development of testicular mixed embryonal carcinoma and teratoma. (withoutaribbon.org)
  • What Support can we Give for Testicular Mixed Embryonal carcinoma and Teratoma? (withoutaribbon.org)
  • Testicular Mixed Embryonal carcinoma and Teratoma is rare cancer, meaning it is not as well-known as other forms of cancer. (withoutaribbon.org)
  • If you suffer from rare cancer such as Testicular Mixed Embryonal carcinoma and Teratoma, we can help and support you through your journey thanks to the generous donations we receive. (withoutaribbon.org)
  • This presentation reports an unusual case of a large cervical teratoma in a newborn who presented with acute respiratory distress. (lml.com.ly)
  • Teratomas are germ cell tumors commonly composed of multiple cell types derived from one or more of the 3 germ layers. (medscape.com)
  • Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of mature cystic teratoma. (unibe.edu.do)
  • Pelvic ultrasound suggested pelvic abscess but after laparotomy and histological analysis of a bulky uterus removed a diagnosis of mature uterine teratoma was confirmed. (medscape.com)
  • Interpretation: Left ovarian cystic mature teratoma and right corpus luteal cyst. (radiologycases.my)
  • What are the signs and symptoms of ovarian teratomas? (motelmexicolabali.com)
  • Symptoms of a teratoma. (motelmexicolabali.com)
  • Teratomas may have no symptoms at first. (motelmexicolabali.com)
  • If the teratoma is bigger in size, it can cause some unspecific symptoms like abdominal discomfort or pain. (cancerwall.com)
  • Due to the possible torsion of the cyst stalk, symptoms of ovarian teratoma may occur in the form of: acute abdominal pain, abdominal muscle tension, chills and increased body temperature, nausea and vomiting. (medicalwholesome.com)
  • Although it is rare, uterine teratoma should be considered in differential diagnosis to any patient with uterine mass even without typical radiological findings. (medscape.com)
  • Towards the end of November 2018, the group put out a new full-length, Teratoma. (metalinjection.net)
  • Il s'agissait d'une étude rétrospective descriptive d'une durée de 2 ans 3 mois allant du 1er janvier 2018 au 31 Mars 2020 portant sur 80 dossiers de malades porteurs d'hémopathies malignes et prise en charge dans le centre. (bvsalud.org)
  • Thus, testicular teratoma should be considered in any child with painless inguino-scrotal swelling. (pediatriconcall.com)
  • The study included data from all sacrococcygeal teratoma cases diagnosed from 2011 to 2020. (turkarchpediatr.org)
  • The prognosis for people with malignant teratomas is based on the size of the tumor, its location and the age of the patient. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The severity of a sacrococcygeal teratoma is directly related to the size of the tumor and the amount of blood flow to it. (ucsfbenioffchildrens.org)
  • Teratomas (from Greek teras, meaning "monster," and - oma, a suffix denoting a tumor or neoplasm) and other germ cell tumors are relatively common solid neoplasms in children. (medscape.com)
  • Treatment of coccyx, testicular, and ovarian teratomas is generally by surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Experience with testis-sparing surgery for testicular teratoma. (pediatriconcall.com)
  • Ovarian teratoma can be detected quite accidentally during non-related surgery. (medicalwholesome.com)
  • This study aimed to determine the clinicopathologic characteristics, the clinical outcomes, and postoperative complications of sacrococcygeal teratoma cases in the low-volume pediatric surgery service in a developing country. (turkarchpediatr.org)
  • Although teratomas can develop in almost any part of the body - including the brain, neck, bladder, and the testes in men - being confronted with a toothy tumour in the female reproductive organs brought to mind mythic archetypes of the sexually devouring and deadly woman. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Ovarian teratomas in prepubertal females are uncommon, but familial ones are exceedingly rare. (motelmexicolabali.com)
  • The teratoma, a specialized neoplasm, is not commonly found in the bovine and it does not appear to be of any economic importance. (iastate.edu)
  • Although they might be present at any age, most commonly this type of teratoma is seen in young woman (around 30 years of age). (cancerwall.com)