Surgical procedure by which a tendon is incised at its insertion and placed at an anatomical site distant from the original insertion. The tendon remains attached at the point of origin and takes over the function of a muscle inactivated by trauma or disease.
Fibrous bands or cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE at the ends of SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS that serve to attach the MUSCLES to bones and other structures.
Injuries to the fibrous cords of connective tissue which attach muscles to bones or other structures.
A fibrous cord that connects the muscles in the back of the calf to the HEEL BONE.
Surgical division of a tendon for relief of a deformity that is caused by congenital or acquired shortening of a muscle (Stedman, 27th ed). Tenotomy is performed in order to lengthen a muscle that has developed improperly, or become shortened and is resistant to stretching.
General or unspecified injuries involving the foot.
Diseases of the cervical (and first thoracic) roots, nerve trunks, cords, and peripheral nerve components of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS. Clinical manifestations include regional pain, PARESTHESIA; MUSCLE WEAKNESS, and decreased sensation (HYPESTHESIA) in the upper extremity. These disorders may be associated with trauma (including BIRTH INJURIES); THORACIC OUTLET SYNDROME; NEOPLASMS; NEURITIS; RADIOTHERAPY; and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1351-2)
A deformed foot in which the foot is plantarflexed, inverted and adducted.
Paralysis of an infant resulting from injury received at birth. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Implants used in arthroscopic surgery and other orthopedic procedures to attach soft tissue to bone. One end of a suture is tied to soft tissue and the other end to the implant. The anchors are made of a variety of materials including titanium, stainless steel, or absorbable polymers.
The region corresponding to the human WRIST in non-human ANIMALS.
The articulations between the various CARPAL BONES. This does not include the WRIST JOINT which consists of the articulations between the RADIUS; ULNA; and proximal CARPAL BONES.
Disease involving the median nerve, from its origin at the BRACHIAL PLEXUS to its termination in the hand. Clinical features include weakness of wrist and finger flexion, forearm pronation, thenar abduction, and loss of sensation over the lateral palm, first three fingers, and radial half of the ring finger. Common sites of injury include the elbow, where the nerve passes through the two heads of the pronator teres muscle (pronator syndrome) and in the carpal tunnel (CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME).
The musculotendinous sheath formed by the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, and teres minor muscles. These help stabilize the head of the HUMERUS in the glenoid fossa and allow for rotation of the SHOULDER JOINT about its longitudinal axis.
Plantar declination of the foot.
Forcible or traumatic tear or break of an organ or other soft part of the body.
The first digit on the radial side of the hand which in humans lies opposite the other four.
The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.
Disease involving the common PERONEAL NERVE or its branches, the deep and superficial peroneal nerves. Lesions of the deep peroneal nerve are associated with PARALYSIS of dorsiflexion of the ankle and toes and loss of sensation from the web space between the first and second toe. Lesions of the superficial peroneal nerve result in weakness or paralysis of the peroneal muscles (which evert the foot) and loss of sensation over the dorsal and lateral surface of the leg. Traumatic injury to the common peroneal nerve near the head of the FIBULA is a relatively common cause of this condition. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1995, Ch51, p31)
Dressings made of fiberglass, plastic, or bandage impregnated with plaster of paris used for immobilization of various parts of the body in cases of fractures, dislocations, and infected wounds. In comparison with plaster casts, casts made of fiberglass or plastic are lightweight, radiolucent, able to withstand moisture, and less rigid.
A general term most often used to describe severe or complete loss of muscle strength due to motor system disease from the level of the cerebral cortex to the muscle fiber. This term may also occasionally refer to a loss of sensory function. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p45)
The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.
The joint that is formed by the inferior articular and malleolar articular surfaces of the TIBIA; the malleolar articular surface of the FIBULA; and the medial malleolar, lateral malleolar, and superior surfaces of the TALUS.
The large network of nerve fibers which distributes the innervation of the upper extremity. The brachial plexus extends from the neck into the axilla. In humans, the nerves of the plexus usually originate from the lower cervical and the first thoracic spinal cord segments (C5-C8 and T1), but variations are not uncommon.
A band of fibrous tissue that attaches the apex of the PATELLA to the lower part of the tubercle of the TIBIA. The ligament is actually the caudal continuation of the common tendon of the QUADRICEPS FEMORIS. The patella is embedded in that tendon. As such, the patellar ligament can be thought of as connecting the quadriceps femoris tendon to the tibia, and therefore it is sometimes called the patellar tendon.
The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.
Clinical syndrome describing overuse tendon injuries characterized by a combination of PAIN, diffuse or localized swelling, and impaired performance. Distinguishing tendinosis from tendinitis is clinically difficult and can be made only after histopathological examination.
A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.
The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.
Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.
The introduction of functional (usually cloned) GENES into cells. A variety of techniques and naturally occurring processes are used for the gene transfer such as cell hybridization, LIPOSOMES or microcell-mediated gene transfer, ELECTROPORATION, chromosome-mediated gene transfer, TRANSFECTION, and GENETIC TRANSDUCTION. Gene transfer may result in genetically transformed cells and individual organisms.
A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
The transfer of mammalian embryos from an in vivo or in vitro environment to a suitable host to improve pregnancy or gestational outcome in human or animal. In human fertility treatment programs, preimplantation embryos ranging from the 4-cell stage to the blastocyst stage are transferred to the uterine cavity between 3-5 days after FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.
The naturally occurring transmission of genetic information between organisms, related or unrelated, circumventing parent-to-offspring transmission. Horizontal gene transfer may occur via a variety of naturally occurring processes such as GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; and TRANSFECTION. It may result in a change of the recipient organism's genetic composition (TRANSFORMATION, GENETIC).

Effects of aggressive early rehabilitation on the outcome of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with multi-strand semitendinosus tendon. (1/175)

To evaluate the effects of aggressive early rehabilitation on the clinical outcome of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using semitendinosus (and gracilis) tendon, 103 of 110 consecutive patients who underwent ACL reconstruction using multistrand semitendinosus tendon (ST) or the central one-third of patellar tendon with bony attachments (BTB) were analyzed prospectively. Subjectively, the Lysholm score was not different among the groups. The Lachman test indicated a trend of less negative grade in the ST men's group than that in the BTB men's group. On the patellofemoral grinding test, only women patients of both groups showed pain, with less positive crepitation in the ST group than in the BTB group. KT measurements at manual maximum showed more patients with more than 5 mm differences in the ST group than in the BTB group. The results of this study suggest that aggressive early rehabilitation after the ACL reconstruction using the semitendinosus (and gracilis) tendon has more risk of residual laxity than with the BTB.  (+info)

Function after correction of a clawed great toe by a modified Robert Jones transfer. (2/175)

We carried out a cross-sectional study in 51 patients (81 feet) with a clawed hallux in association with a cavus foot after a modified Robert Jones tendon transfer. The mean follow-up was 42 months (9 to 88). In all feet, concomitant procedures had been undertaken, such as extension osteotomy of the first metatarsal and transfer of the tendon of the peroneus longus to peroneus brevis, to correct the underlying foot deformity. All patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically. The overall rate of patient satisfaction was 86%. The deformity of the hallux was corrected in 80 feet. Catching of the big toe when walking barefoot, transfer lesions and metatarsalgia, hallux flexus, hallux limitus and asymptomatic nonunion of the interphalangeal joint were the most frequent complications. Hallux limitus was more likely when elevation of the first ray occurred (p = 0.012). Additional transfer of the tendon of peroneus longus to peroneus brevis was a significant risk factor for elevation of the first metatarsal (p < 0.0001). The deforming force of extensor hallucis longus is effectively eliminated by the Jones transfer, but the mechanics of the first metatarsophalangeal joint are altered. The muscle balance and stability of the entire first ray should be taken into consideration in the management of clawed hallux.  (+info)

Restoration of elbow flexion by modified Steindler flexorplasty. (3/175)

A modified Steindler flexorplasty was used to restore elbow flexion in 8 patients with post-traumatic flail elbow. In 5 patients there was associated loss of wrist and finger extension, which was treated by tendon transfer and in 2 patients an associated flail shoulder was treated by arthrodesis. The results were not compromised in patients whose flexor tendons had been transferred for wrist and finger extension. All patients had a stable and mobile elbow with marked improvement of upper limb function. Modified Steindler flexorplasty is a simple, effective and reliable procedure for the restoration of elbow flexion.  (+info)

The Ilizarov method in the management of relapsed club feet. (4/175)

We present the results of the management of 17 relapsed club feet in 12 children using the Ilizarov method with gradual distraction and realignment of the joint. Review at a mean of three years after surgery showed maintenance of correction with excellent or good results in 13 feet. Five mobile feet which had been treated by a split transfer of the tibialis anterior tendon two weeks after removal of the frame had an excellent result.  (+info)

Posterior psoas transfer and hip instability in lumbar myelomeningocele. (5/175)

Seventy-two posterior psoas transfer operations performed in forty-four children with lumbar myelomeningocele were reviewed one to eight years after operation in an attempt to assess its value. Muscle charting, an objective recording of the child's walking ability, and radiographic examination of the hips were done. Hip stability was improved: 49 per cent were stable at the time of psoas transfer and 94 per cent at review. Functional results depend mainly on the level of neurological activity present: 57 per cent of the children had an acceptable functional result. Usually, posterior psoas transfer should be done as soon after the age of nine months as the child's condition will allow. Over the age of two years it should be restricted to children with activity in the third and fourth segments of the lumbar cord.  (+info)

Selective release of the flexor origin with transfer of flexor carpi ulnaris in cerebral palsy. (6/175)

Transfer of flexor carpi ulnaris combined with selective release of the flexor pronator origin was undertaken in 35 patients with hemiplegic cerebral palsy for a pronation flexion deformity of the forearm, hand and wrist. The patients were divided into four groups depending on the severity of the deformity, the surgical procedure recommended, potential hand function and prognosis. The procedure reduces the power of wrist and finger flexion by release of the flexor pronator origin, and reinforces the strength of extension and supination of the wrist by transfer of flexor carpi ulnaris. After a mean follow-up of four years the appearance of the hand and forearm improved in all patients. None lost movement and all gained improved mobility of the forearm, wrist and hand. There was no overcorrection.  (+info)

Tendon transfers to improve grasp in patients with cervical spinal cord injury. (7/175)

Patients with cervical spinal cord injury can gain useful hand function from a good rehabilitation programme and non-operative hand care. Effective prehension can usually be achieved by proper positioning, exercises, and splinting but when grasp is poor, tendon transfers are very effective in furthering the goal of independence. These patients have been reviewed extensively and classified into groups according to remaining neurological function. Group I patients have weak elbow flexion and weak shoulder function or less. No tendon transfers were done. Group II patients have shoulder control, elbow flexion and weak wrist extensors. Some of these patients can be improved by transferring the brachioradialis to the radial wrist extensor. Group III patients have the above and good to normal brachioradialis and two radial wrist extensors. Transferring the brachioradialis to restore opposition and the extensor carpi radialis longus to the flexor digitorum profundi provides strong and effective prehension. Group IV patients have the above plus pronator teres and flexor carpi radialis which can be used for transfer. Opposition and finger flexion can be restored by a variety of transfers. In groups III and IV tendon transfers were done only when automatic grasp was poor or absent. If finger grasp was good and thumb function ineffective only opponens transfers were done in order to achieve key pinch. Group V patients have all muscles functioning but with varying degrees of intrinsic weakness. Opponens transfer is useful for these patients. Indications and contraindications to surgery are given. All the patients have improved function and strength following their tendon transfers. No patient has regretted having had surgery.  (+info)

Long-term results of tibialis posterior tendon transfer for drop-foot. (8/175)

Twelve patients with drop-foot secondary to sciatic or common peroneal nerve palsy treated with transfer of the tibialis posterior tendon were followed-up for a mean of 90 (24-300) months. In 10 patients the results were 'excellent' or 'good'. In 11 patients grade 4 or 5 power of dorsiflexion was achieved, although the torque, as measured with a Cybex II dynamometer, and generated by the transferred tendon, was only about 30% of the normal side. Seven patients were able to dorsiflex their foot to the neutral position and beyond. The results appeared to be better in men under 30 years of age with common peroneal palsies. A painful flatfoot acquired in adulthood does not appear to be a significant long-term complication despite the loss of a functioning tibialis posterior tendon.  (+info)

A tendon transfer is a surgical procedure where a healthy tendon is moved to rebalance or reinforce a muscle that has become weak or paralyzed due to injury, disease, or nerve damage. The transferred tendon attaches to the bone in a new position, allowing it to power a different movement or stabilize a joint. This procedure helps restore function and improve mobility in the affected area.

A tendon is the strong, flexible band of tissue that connects muscle to bone. It helps transfer the force produced by the muscle to allow various movements of our body parts. Tendons are made up of collagen fibers arranged in parallel bundles and have a poor blood supply, making them prone to injuries and slow to heal. Examples include the Achilles tendon, which connects the calf muscle to the heel bone, and the patellar tendon, which connects the kneecap to the shinbone.

Tendon injuries, also known as tendinopathies, refer to the damage or injury of tendons, which are strong bands of tissue that connect muscles to bones. Tendon injuries typically occur due to overuse or repetitive motion, causing micro-tears in the tendon fibers. The most common types of tendon injuries include tendinitis, which is inflammation of the tendon, and tendinosis, which is degeneration of the tendon's collagen.

Tendon injuries can cause pain, swelling, stiffness, and limited mobility in the affected area. The severity of the injury can vary from mild discomfort to severe pain that makes it difficult to move the affected joint. Treatment for tendon injuries may include rest, ice, compression, elevation (RICE) therapy, physical therapy, medication, or in some cases, surgery. Preventing tendon injuries involves warming up properly before exercise, using proper form and technique during physical activity, gradually increasing the intensity and duration of workouts, and taking regular breaks to rest and recover.

The Achilles tendon, also known as the calcaneal tendon, is a strong band of tissue that connects the calf muscles to the heel bone (calcaneus). It plays a crucial role in enabling activities such as walking, running, and jumping by facilitating the movement of the foot downward, which is called plantar flexion. Injuries to the Achilles tendon, such as tendinitis or ruptures, can be quite painful and impact mobility.

Tenotomy is a surgical procedure where a tight or contracted tendon is cut to help relieve tension, improve mobility, and treat various musculoskeletal conditions. Tendons are strong bands of tissue that connect muscles to bones. In some cases, tendons can become shortened, thickened, or stiff due to injury, disease, or overuse, leading to limited movement, pain, or deformity.

During a tenotomy, the surgeon locates the affected tendon and carefully incises it, allowing the attached muscle to lengthen gradually. This procedure can be performed on different tendons throughout the body, depending on the specific condition being addressed. Tenotomy is often used in conjunction with other treatments, such as physical therapy or casting, to ensure optimal recovery and functional improvement.

Common indications for tenotomy include:

1. Contractures in children with cerebral palsy or other neurological disorders
2. Shortening of the Achilles tendon (equinus deformity) in adults with foot drop or spasticity
3. Dupuytren's contracture, a thickening and shortening of the palmar fascia in the hand
4. Trigger finger, a condition where the flexor tendon in the finger becomes stuck due to nodule formation
5. Certain types of tendon injuries or tears that do not respond to non-surgical treatment.

Foot injuries refer to any damage or trauma caused to the various structures of the foot, including the bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, blood vessels, and nerves. These injuries can result from various causes such as accidents, sports activities, falls, or repetitive stress. Common types of foot injuries include fractures, sprains, strains, contusions, dislocations, and overuse injuries like plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis. Symptoms may vary depending on the type and severity of the injury but often include pain, swelling, bruising, difficulty walking, and reduced range of motion. Proper diagnosis and treatment are crucial to ensure optimal healing and prevent long-term complications.

Brachial plexus neuropathies refer to a group of conditions that affect the brachial plexus, which is a network of nerves that originates from the spinal cord in the neck and travels down the arm. These nerves are responsible for providing motor and sensory function to the shoulder, arm, and hand.

Brachial plexus neuropathies can occur due to various reasons, including trauma, compression, inflammation, or tumors. The condition can cause symptoms such as pain, numbness, weakness, or paralysis in the affected arm and hand.

The specific medical definition of brachial plexus neuropathies is:

"A group of conditions that affect the brachial plexus, characterized by damage to the nerves that results in motor and/or sensory impairment of the upper limb. The condition can be congenital or acquired, with causes including trauma, compression, inflammation, or tumors."

Clubfoot, also known as talipes equinovarus, is a congenital foot deformity where the foot is twisted inward and downward. The affected foot appears to be turned inward and downward, resembling a club or a bowling pin. This condition usually affects one foot but can occur in both feet as well.

The cause of clubfoot is not fully understood, but it is believed to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Clubfoot is often diagnosed at birth or during routine prenatal ultrasound exams. Treatment for clubfoot typically involves nonsurgical methods such as stretching, casting, and bracing to gradually correct the position of the foot over time. In some cases, surgery may be required to release tight tendons and realign the bones in the foot and ankle.

If left untreated, clubfoot can lead to significant mobility issues and difficulty walking or participating in activities. However, with early intervention and consistent treatment, most children with clubfoot are able to lead active and normal lives.

Obstetric paralysis is a specific type of paralysis that can occur as a result of complications during childbirth. It is also known as "birth paralysis" or "puerperal paralysis."

The condition is typically caused by nerve damage or trauma to the brachial plexus, which is a network of nerves that runs from the spinal cord in the neck and provides movement and sensation to the shoulders, arms, and hands. Obstetric paralysis can occur when the brachial plexus is stretched or compressed during childbirth, particularly in difficult deliveries where forceps or vacuum extraction may be used.

There are several types of obstetric paralysis, including:

* Erb's palsy: This type of obstetric paralysis affects the upper brachial plexus and can cause weakness or paralysis in the arm, particularly the shoulder and elbow.
* Klumpke's palsy: This type of obstetric paralysis affects the lower brachial plexus and can cause weakness or paralysis in the hand and forearm.
* Total brachial plexus injury: This is a rare but severe form of obstetric paralysis that involves injury to all of the nerves in the brachial plexus, resulting in complete paralysis of the arm.

The severity of obstetric paralysis can vary widely, from mild weakness to complete paralysis. In some cases, the condition may resolve on its own within a few months, while in other cases, surgery or physical therapy may be necessary to help restore function.

A suture anchor is a medical device used in surgical procedures, particularly in orthopedic and cardiovascular surgeries. It is typically made of biocompatible materials such as metal (titanium or absorbable steel) or polymer (absorbable or non-absorbable). The suture anchor serves to attach a suture to bone securely, providing a stable fixation point for soft tissue reattachment or repair.

Suture anchors come in various shapes and sizes, including screws, hooks, or buttons, designed to fit specific surgical needs. Surgeons insert the anchor into a predrilled hole in the bone, and then pass the suture through the eyelet or loop of the anchor. Once the anchor is securely in place, the surgeon can tie the suture to attach tendons, ligaments, or other soft tissues to the bone.

The use of suture anchors has revolutionized many surgical procedures by providing a more reliable and less invasive method for reattaching soft tissues to bones compared to traditional methods such as drill holes and staples.

The carpus is the region of the forelimb in animals that corresponds to the wrist in humans. It is located between the radius and ulna bones of the forearm and the metacarpal bones of the paw. The carpus is made up of several small bones called carpals, which provide flexibility and support for movement of the limb. The number and arrangement of these bones can vary among different animal species.

The carpal joints are a group of articulations in the wrist region of the human body. They consist of eight bones, which are arranged in two rows. The proximal row includes the scaphoid, lunate, triquetral, and pisiform bones, while the distal row includes the trapezium, trapezoid, capitate, and hamate bones.

The carpal joints can be further divided into several smaller joints, including:
1. The midcarpal joint: This joint is located between the proximal and distal rows of carpal bones and allows for flexion, extension, and circumduction movements of the wrist.
2. The radiocarpal joint: This joint is located between the distal end of the radius bone and the scaphoid and lunate bones in the proximal row. It allows for flexion, extension, radial deviation, and ulnar deviation movements of the wrist.
3. The intercarpal joints: These are the joints located between the individual carpal bones within each row. They allow for small gliding movements between the bones.

The carpal joints are surrounded by a fibrous capsule, ligaments, and muscles that provide stability and support to the wrist. The smooth articular cartilage covering the surfaces of the bones allows for smooth movement and reduces friction during articulation.

Median neuropathy, also known as Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, is a common entrapment neuropathy caused by compression of the median nerve at the wrist level. The median nerve provides sensation to the palm side of the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and half of the ring finger. It also innervates some of the muscles that control movement of the fingers and thumb.

In median neuropathy, the compression of the median nerve can cause symptoms such as numbness, tingling, and weakness in the affected hand and fingers. These symptoms may be worse at night or upon waking up in the morning, and can be exacerbated by activities that involve repetitive motion of the wrist, such as typing or using tools. If left untreated, median neuropathy can lead to permanent nerve damage and muscle wasting in the hand.

The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles and their tendons that attach to the shoulder blade (scapula) and help stabilize and move the shoulder joint. These muscles are the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis. The rotator cuff helps to keep the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) centered in the glenoid fossa (shoulder socket), providing stability during shoulder movements. It also allows for rotation and elevation of the arm. Rotator cuff injuries or conditions, such as tears or tendinitis, can cause pain and limit shoulder function.

Equinus deformity is a condition in which the ankle remains in a permanently plantarflexed position, meaning that the toes are pointing downward. This limitation in motion can occur in one or both feet and can be congenital (present at birth) or acquired. Acquired equinus deformity can result from conditions such as cerebral palsy, stroke, trauma, or prolonged immobilization. The limited range of motion in the ankle can cause difficulty walking, pain, and abnormalities in gait. Treatment options for equinus deformity may include physical therapy, bracing, orthotic devices, or surgery.

A rupture, in medical terms, refers to the breaking or tearing of an organ, tissue, or structure in the body. This can occur due to various reasons such as trauma, injury, increased pressure, or degeneration. A ruptured organ or structure can lead to serious complications, including internal bleeding, infection, and even death, if not treated promptly and appropriately. Examples of ruptures include a ruptured appendix, ruptured eardrum, or a ruptured disc in the spine.

In medical terms, the thumb is referred to as "pollex" and it's the first digit of the hand, located laterally to the index finger. It's opposable, meaning it can move opposite to the other fingers, allowing for powerful gripping and precise manipulation. The thumb contains two phalanges bones - the distal and proximal - and is connected to the hand by the carpometacarpal joint, which provides a wide range of motion.

Articular Range of Motion (AROM) is a term used in physiotherapy and orthopedics to describe the amount of movement available in a joint, measured in degrees of a circle. It refers to the range through which synovial joints can actively move without causing pain or injury. AROM is assessed by measuring the degree of motion achieved by active muscle contraction, as opposed to passive range of motion (PROM), where the movement is generated by an external force.

Assessment of AROM is important in evaluating a patient's functional ability and progress, planning treatment interventions, and determining return to normal activities or sports participation. It is also used to identify any restrictions in joint mobility that may be due to injury, disease, or surgery, and to monitor the effectiveness of rehabilitation programs.

Peroneal neuropathies refer to conditions that cause damage or dysfunction to the peroneal nerve, which is a branch of the sciatic nerve. The peroneal nerve runs down the back of the leg and wraps around the fibula bone (the smaller of the two bones in the lower leg) before dividing into two branches that innervate the muscles and skin on the front and side of the lower leg and foot.

Peroneal neuropathies can cause various symptoms, including weakness or paralysis of the ankle and toe muscles, numbness or tingling in the top of the foot and along the outside of the lower leg, and difficulty lifting the foot (known as "foot drop"). These conditions can result from trauma, compression, diabetes, or other underlying medical conditions. Treatment for peroneal neuropathies may include physical therapy, bracing, medications to manage pain, and in some cases, surgery.

Surgical casts are medical devices used to immobilize and protect injured body parts, typically fractured or broken bones, during the healing process. They are usually made of plaster or fiberglass materials that harden when wet and conform to the shape of the affected area once applied. The purpose of a surgical cast is to restrict movement and provide stability to the injured site, allowing for proper alignment and healing of the bones.

The casting process involves first aligning the broken bone fragments into their correct positions, often through manual manipulation or surgical intervention. Once aligned, the cast material is applied in layers, with each layer being allowed to dry before adding the next. This creates a rigid structure that encases and supports the injured area. The cast must be kept dry during the healing process to prevent it from becoming weakened or damaged.

Surgical casts come in various shapes and sizes depending on the location and severity of the injury. They may also include additional components such as padding, Velcro straps, or window openings to allow for regular monitoring of the skin and underlying tissue. In some cases, removable splints or functional braces may be used instead of traditional casts, providing similar support while allowing for limited movement and easier adjustments.

It is essential to follow proper care instructions when wearing a surgical cast, including elevating the injured limb, avoiding excessive weight-bearing, and monitoring for signs of complications such as swelling, numbness, or infection. Regular check-ups with a healthcare provider are necessary to ensure proper healing and adjust the cast if needed.

Paralysis is a loss of muscle function in part or all of your body. It can be localized, affecting only one specific area, or generalized, impacting multiple areas or even the entire body. Paralysis often occurs when something goes wrong with the way messages pass between your brain and muscles. In most cases, paralysis is caused by damage to the nervous system, especially the spinal cord. Other causes include stroke, trauma, infections, and various neurological disorders.

It's important to note that paralysis doesn't always mean a total loss of movement or feeling. Sometimes, it may just cause weakness or numbness in the affected area. The severity and extent of paralysis depend on the underlying cause and the location of the damage in the nervous system.

The shoulder joint, also known as the glenohumeral joint, is the most mobile joint in the human body. It is a ball and socket synovial joint that connects the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) to the glenoid cavity of the scapula (shoulder blade). The shoulder joint allows for a wide range of movements including flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, internal rotation, and external rotation. It is surrounded by a group of muscles and tendons known as the rotator cuff that provide stability and enable smooth movement of the joint.

The ankle joint, also known as the talocrural joint, is the articulation between the bones of the lower leg (tibia and fibula) and the talus bone in the foot. It is a synovial hinge joint that allows for dorsiflexion and plantarflexion movements, which are essential for walking, running, and jumping. The ankle joint is reinforced by strong ligaments on both sides to provide stability during these movements.

The brachial plexus is a network of nerves that originates from the spinal cord in the neck region and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the upper limb. It is formed by the ventral rami (branches) of the lower four cervical nerves (C5-C8) and the first thoracic nerve (T1). In some cases, contributions from C4 and T2 may also be included.

The brachial plexus nerves exit the intervertebral foramen, pass through the neck, and travel down the upper chest before branching out to form major peripheral nerves of the upper limb. These include the axillary, radial, musculocutaneous, median, and ulnar nerves, which further innervate specific muscles and sensory areas in the arm, forearm, and hand.

Damage to the brachial plexus can result in various neurological deficits, such as weakness or paralysis of the upper limb, numbness, or loss of sensation in the affected area, depending on the severity and location of the injury.

The patellar ligament, also known as the patellar tendon, is a strong band of tissue that connects the bottom part of the kneecap (patella) to the top part of the shinbone (tibia). This ligament plays a crucial role in enabling the extension and straightening of the leg during activities such as walking, running, and jumping. Injuries to the patellar ligament, such as tendonitis or tears, can cause pain and difficulty with mobility.

Biomechanics is the application of mechanical laws to living structures and systems, particularly in the field of medicine and healthcare. A biomechanical phenomenon refers to a observable event or occurrence that involves the interaction of biological tissues or systems with mechanical forces. These phenomena can be studied at various levels, from the molecular and cellular level to the tissue, organ, and whole-body level.

Examples of biomechanical phenomena include:

1. The way that bones and muscles work together to produce movement (known as joint kinematics).
2. The mechanical behavior of biological tissues such as bone, cartilage, tendons, and ligaments under various loads and stresses.
3. The response of cells and tissues to mechanical stimuli, such as the way that bone tissue adapts to changes in loading conditions (known as Wolff's law).
4. The biomechanics of injury and disease processes, such as the mechanisms of joint injury or the development of osteoarthritis.
5. The use of mechanical devices and interventions to treat medical conditions, such as orthopedic implants or assistive devices for mobility impairments.

Understanding biomechanical phenomena is essential for developing effective treatments and prevention strategies for a wide range of medical conditions, from musculoskeletal injuries to neurological disorders.

Tendinopathy is a general term referring to the degeneration or dysrepair of a tendon, which can result in pain and impaired function. It was previously referred to as tendinitis or tendinosis, but tendinopathy is now preferred because it describes various pathological conditions within the tendon, rather than a specific diagnosis.

Tendinopathy often develops due to overuse, repetitive strain, or age-related wear and tear. The condition typically involves collagen breakdown in the tendon, along with an increase in disorganized tenocytes (tendon cells) and vascular changes. This process can lead to thickening of the tendon, loss of elasticity, and the formation of calcium deposits or nodules.

Commonly affected tendons include the Achilles tendon, patellar tendon, rotator cuff tendons in the shoulder, and the extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon in the elbow (also known as tennis elbow). Treatment for tendinopathy often includes rest, physical therapy, exercise, pain management, and occasionally, surgical intervention.

"Recovery of function" is a term used in medical rehabilitation to describe the process in which an individual regains the ability to perform activities or tasks that were previously difficult or impossible due to injury, illness, or disability. This can involve both physical and cognitive functions. The goal of recovery of function is to help the person return to their prior level of independence and participation in daily activities, work, and social roles as much as possible.

Recovery of function may be achieved through various interventions such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language therapy, and other rehabilitation strategies. The specific approach used will depend on the individual's needs and the nature of their impairment. Recovery of function can occur spontaneously as the body heals, or it may require targeted interventions to help facilitate the process.

It is important to note that recovery of function does not always mean a full return to pre-injury or pre-illness levels of ability. Instead, it often refers to the person's ability to adapt and compensate for any remaining impairments, allowing them to achieve their maximum level of functional independence and quality of life.

In medical terms, a hand is the part of the human body that is attached to the forearm and consists of the carpus (wrist), metacarpus, and phalanges. It is made up of 27 bones, along with muscles, tendons, ligaments, and other soft tissues. The hand is a highly specialized organ that is capable of performing a wide range of complex movements and functions, including grasping, holding, manipulating objects, and communicating through gestures. It is also richly innervated with sensory receptors that provide information about touch, temperature, pain, and proprioception (the sense of the position and movement of body parts).

A surgical flap is a specialized type of surgical procedure where a section of living tissue (including skin, fat, muscle, and/or blood vessels) is lifted from its original site and moved to another location, while still maintaining a blood supply through its attached pedicle. This technique allows the surgeon to cover and reconstruct defects or wounds that cannot be closed easily with simple suturing or stapling.

Surgical flaps can be classified based on their vascularity, type of tissue involved, or method of transfer. The choice of using a specific type of surgical flap depends on the location and size of the defect, the patient's overall health, and the surgeon's expertise. Some common types of surgical flaps include:

1. Random-pattern flaps: These flaps are based on random blood vessels within the tissue and are typically used for smaller defects in areas with good vascularity, such as the face or scalp.
2. Axial pattern flaps: These flaps are designed based on a known major blood vessel and its branches, allowing them to cover larger defects or reach distant sites. Examples include the radial forearm flap and the anterolateral thigh flap.
3. Local flaps: These flaps involve tissue adjacent to the wound and can be further classified into advancement, rotation, transposition, and interpolation flaps based on their movement and orientation.
4. Distant flaps: These flaps are harvested from a distant site and then transferred to the defect after being tunneled beneath the skin or through a separate incision. Examples include the groin flap and the latissimus dorsi flap.
5. Free flaps: In these flaps, the tissue is completely detached from its original blood supply and then reattached at the new site using microvascular surgical techniques. This allows for greater flexibility in terms of reach and placement but requires specialized expertise and equipment.

Surgical flaps play a crucial role in reconstructive surgery, helping to restore form and function after trauma, tumor removal, or other conditions that result in tissue loss.

Gene transfer techniques, also known as gene therapy, refer to medical procedures where genetic material is introduced into an individual's cells or tissues to treat or prevent diseases. This can be achieved through various methods:

1. **Viral Vectors**: The most common method uses modified viruses, such as adenoviruses, retroviruses, or lentiviruses, to carry the therapeutic gene into the target cells. The virus infects the cell and inserts the new gene into the cell's DNA.

2. **Non-Viral Vectors**: These include methods like electroporation (using electric fields to create pores in the cell membrane), gene guns (shooting gold particles coated with DNA into cells), or liposomes (tiny fatty bubbles that can enclose DNA).

3. **Direct Injection**: In some cases, the therapeutic gene can be directly injected into a specific tissue or organ.

The goal of gene transfer techniques is to supplement or replace a faulty gene with a healthy one, thereby correcting the genetic disorder. However, these techniques are still largely experimental and have their own set of challenges, including potential immune responses, issues with accurate targeting, and risks of mutations or cancer development.

Skeletal muscle, also known as striated or voluntary muscle, is a type of muscle that is attached to bones by tendons or aponeuroses and functions to produce movements and support the posture of the body. It is composed of long, multinucleated fibers that are arranged in parallel bundles and are characterized by alternating light and dark bands, giving them a striped appearance under a microscope. Skeletal muscle is under voluntary control, meaning that it is consciously activated through signals from the nervous system. It is responsible for activities such as walking, running, jumping, and lifting objects.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

Embryo transfer is a medical procedure that involves the transfer of an embryo, which is typically created through in vitro fertilization (IVF), into the uterus of a woman with the aim of establishing a pregnancy. The embryo may be created using the intended parent's own sperm and eggs or those from donors. After fertilization and early cell division, the resulting embryo is transferred into the uterus of the recipient mother through a thin catheter that is inserted through the cervix. This procedure is typically performed under ultrasound guidance to ensure proper placement of the embryo. Embryo transfer is a key step in assisted reproductive technology (ART) and is often used as a treatment for infertility.

Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), also known as lateral gene transfer, is the movement of genetic material between organisms in a manner other than from parent to offspring (vertical gene transfer). In horizontal gene transfer, an organism can take up genetic material directly from its environment and incorporate it into its own genome. This process is common in bacteria and archaea, but has also been observed in eukaryotes including plants and animals.

Horizontal gene transfer can occur through several mechanisms, including:

1. Transformation: the uptake of free DNA from the environment by a cell.
2. Transduction: the transfer of genetic material between cells by a virus (bacteriophage).
3. Conjugation: the direct transfer of genetic material between two cells in physical contact, often facilitated by a conjugative plasmid or other mobile genetic element.

Horizontal gene transfer can play an important role in the evolution and adaptation of organisms, allowing them to acquire new traits and functions rapidly. It is also of concern in the context of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and antibiotic resistance, as it can facilitate the spread of genes that confer resistance or other undesirable traits.

... involves redistribution of muscle power, not recreation. Tendons are transferred at the distal attachment from ... Sammer, Douglas M.; Chung, Kevin C. (2009-05-29). "Tendon Transfers Part I: Principles of Transfer and Transfers for Radial ... These are examples of commonly performed tendon transfers. Many of the lower extremity tendon transfers were performed during ... In the beginning o twentieth century, tendon transfers were used to correct congenital talipes equina. Tendon transfers were ...
Select cases of foot drop can be surgically corrected with tendon transfer, in which the tibialis posterior muscle is ... Chiodo, Chris; Bluman, Eric M. (2011-10-21). Tendon transfers in the foot and ankle. Saunders. p. 421. ISBN 9781455709243. ... Another form of scapular fixation, although not commonly done in FSHD, is tendon transfer, which involves surgically ... Krishnamurthy, S; Ibrahim, M (January 2019). "Tendon Transfers in Foot Drop". Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery. 52 (1): 100- ...
Various other symptoms can occur which may be repaired through surgery and tendon transfers. Tendon transfers have been very ... In order to have optimal results the individual needs to follow the following principles of tendon transfer: normal tissue ... Many tendon transfers have been shown to restore opposition to the thumb and provide thumb and finger flexion. ... "Tendon transfer for median nerve palsy". Hand Clin. 4 (2): 155-65. doi:10.1016/S0749-0712(21)01134-3. PMID 3294241. Lad, ...
"Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath". American Journal of Orthopedics. 34 (3): 116-21. PMID 15828513. Dunker J, Larsson U, ... "Parallel DNA template preparation using a vacuum filtration sample transfer device". BioTechniques. 34 (4): 862-6, 868. doi: ...
Single-stage reconstruction of achilles tendon rupture with flexor hallucis longus tendon transfer and simultaneous free radial ... Of all the large tendon ruptures, 1 in 5 will be an Achilles tendon rupture. An Achilles tendon rupture is estimated to occur ... In complete ruptures, the tendon of another muscle is used and wrapped around the Achilles tendon. Commonly, the tendon of the ... the flexor hallucis longus tendon can be used. The flexor hallucis longus tendon of the big toe is transferred with free tissue ...
The Blasters also paid an undisclosed amount of transfer fee to sign Sotirio. On 19 July 2023, Kerala Blasters announced that ... He ruptured his achilles tendon, which required surgery. Sotirio has dual citizenship (French and Australian); both of his ... "Jets announce winger is off to Asia & officially confirm worst-kept transfer secret". 16 May 2023. "ISL - Kerala Blasters FC ...
... the distal component is transferred to the proximal component. The tendons of the distal component are preserved as the rest of ... As the tendons insert proximally, the elevation is performed proximally too to potentially rebalance the ulnar thumb. After the ... Tendon centralization is also often used for correction. Still, cases with osseous deformities may happen. To provide alignment ... Mostly one neurovascular bundle can be identified, with no tendons present in the extra digit. In case of a fully developed ...
In some cases, tendon transfers can improve function. Congenital deformities of the feet, hips and spine may require surgical ... Additionally, due to the lack of fetal movement, the tendons that connect the muscles to bone are not able to stretch to their ... connective tissue tendon and skeletal defects may contribute to the fetal akinesia and be the primary cause of amyoplasia. ...
Delandistrogene moxeparvovec - Systemic Gene Transfer with rAAVrh74.MHCK7.micro-dystrophin. Charvet B, Ruggiero F, Le Guellec D ... A review". Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal. 2 (2): 53-63. PMC 3666507. PMID 23738275. Dystrophin-Associated+Protein+ ...
Many different conditions can be treated by tendon transfer surgery. Tendon transfer surgery is necessary when a certain muscle ... Tendon transfer surgery can be used to attempt to replace that function. Common nerve injuries that are treated with tendon ... Tendon transfers have higher chance to treat nerve palsy, and such transfers include posterior, anterior, and anteroposterior ... Wagenaar, Frank-Christiaan B.M.; Louwerens, Jan Willem K. (2007). "Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer: Results of Fixation to the ...
The summer transfer window saw twelve players join the club, including experienced striker Kayode Odejayi while Ryan Lowe left ... "Hill Has Surgery On Injured Achilles Tendon". Tranmere Rovers F.C. 24 September 2014. Retrieved 23 November 2015. "Matt Gill ... "Transfer deadline day: Tranmere sign Donnelly and Brezovan". BBC Sport. 1 September 2014. Retrieved 21 April 2016. "Matt Hill ... "Five Transfer Listed". Tranmere Rovers F.C. 8 January 2015. Retrieved 23 November 2015. "Alan Rogers joins coaching staff". ...
He was supposed to succeed his countryman Keisuke Honda who had impressed and made a transfer to AC Milan half a year earlier. ... However, on 15 December 2013, Ōtsu badly injured his achilles tendon. After a long rehabilitation, Ōtsu became fit again and ... On 13 December 2014, it was announced that Otsu would leave VVV-Venlo in the winter transfer window. He had signed a deal with ...
Mourad Mestikawy; Francis G. Zeir (March-April 1971). "Tendon Transfers for Poliomyelitis of the Lower Limb in Guinean Children ...
He is transferred to Em City when solitary is evacuated and participates in the guide dog program. He teaches his dog to attack ... He later slashes Officer Brass's Achilles tendon, ending his basketball career. He is sent to solitary but refuses to confess ... Guenzel is transferred to Unit B and gang-raped by the Aryans. When Schillinger thinks Guenzel will tell the officers what has ... During a transfer to the hospital for a checkup, he attempts escape and is shot to death. Burr Redding (Anthony Chisholm, ...
... and value for tendon transfer in the tetraplegic". The Journal of Hand Surgery. 13 (1): 99-104. doi:10.1016/0363-5023(88)90210- ... It is attached to the distal styloid process of the radius by way of the brachioradialis tendon, and to the lateral ...
... and value for tendon transfer in the tetraplegic". The Journal of Hand Surgery. 13 (1): 99-104. doi:10.1016/0363-5023(88)90210- ... This is due to the passage of the inflamed extensor pollicis brevis tendon and abductor pollicis longus tendon around it. The ... The tendon of the brachioradialis attaches at its base. The radial collateral ligament of the wrist attaches at its apex. The ... lateral surface is marked by a flat groove for the tendons of the abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis. ...
... tendon transfers may be useful. The surgeon should be confident that the muscle to be transferred has enough power and is under ... The results of tendon transfers for patients with complete injuries are predictable. On the other hand, it is well known that ... muscles lacking normal excitation perform unreliably after surgical tendon transfers. Despite the unpredictable aspect in ... and transfers on level surfaces. Even in complete spinal cord injury, it is common for individuals to recover up to 1 level of ...
The tendon of flexor carpi ulnaris can be used for tendon transfer. Bones of left forearm. Posterior aspect. Bones of the left ... The most lateral one is the tendon of flexor carpi radialis muscle, and the middle one, not always present, is the tendon of ... On a person's distal forearm, just before the wrist, there are either two or three tendons. The tendon of the flexor carpi ... The tendon of flexor carpi ulnaris can be seen on the anterior surface of the distal forearm. ...
... can be done when tendon transfer is contraindicated or in cases of failed tendon transfers. The dorsal scapular nerve is at ... In the T3 transfer, rather than transferring the rhomboids to the scapular fossae, they are transferred to the scapular spine, ... Muscular dystrophy often contraindicates tendon transfer, because the muscles transferred are either dystrophic or capable of ... The triple tendon transfer (T3 transfer) was described by Elhassan et al. at the Mayo Clinic in 2015, and since 2010 no other ...
... pronator teres tendon can be rerouted, so called tendon transfer, to extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon to restore wrist ... "Tendon Transfers Part I: Principles of Transfer and Transfers for Radial Nerve Palsy". Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 123 ... Ligament of Struthers Lacertus fibrosus Proximal arch of the FDS Rare causes such as following tendon transfers for radial ... The muscle passes obliquely across the forearm, and ends in a flat tendon, which is inserted into a rough impression at the ...
He described surgeries of combining tenodeses and tendon transfers to restore hand function. He also advocated transferring the ... 1623-30 Tendon transfers as applied to tetraplegia; Marc Revol, et al., Hand clin 18 (2002) 423-439 Principles of tendon ... one pertaining to dressing and the other to transfer). After tendon transfers, the total mean score statistically increased ... Tendons transfers to improve grasp after injuries of the cervical spinal cord.Freehafer AA, Vonhaam E, Allen V., J Bone Joint ...
For scapular winging not amenable to nerve repair, tendon transfer is an option. Pectoralis major transfer can be done for ... When tendon transfer is not feasible, such as in the case of muscular dystrophy or multiple muscular deficits, remaining ... Surgical options include neurolysis (chordotomy) and intercostal nerve transfer if a nerve lesion is the cause of winging. ...
In the summer of 2012, Batuk was transferred to Anadolu Efes where he signed a two-year deal. In May 2014, he re-signed his ... In August 2014, he suffered an Achilles tendon injury during a pre-season game. He was expected to be 5-6 months off the court ...
"Changes in plantar pressure distribution after Achilles tendon augmentation with flexor hallucis longus transfer". Clinical ...
Gerber C and Krushell RJ, Isolated rupture of the tendon of the subscapularis muscle. Clinical features in 16 cases. J Bone ... RESORTHO Balgrist Campus Gerber C, Latissimus dorsi transfer for the treatment of irreparable tears of the rotator cuff.Clin ... such as the isolated rupture of the subscapularis tendon. As a result of his clinical experience, he developed clinical tests, ... he has also described novel surgical procedures such as the latissimus dorsi transfer for a pseudoparalytic shoulder and he has ...
cite book}}: ,first1= has generic name (help) "Tendon Transfers: History, Concepts, Timing of Tendon Transfer". 2017-05-02. {{ ... Tendon transfer (the origin remains the same but insertion is moved) Splinting Radial neuropathy is not necessarily permanent, ...
Thereafter he transferred to Tsugaru Junior High School. He participated again in the all-star game, losing to Osaka's Fujita ... He had torn his right achilles tendon and was diagnosed with a six-month recovery. In the 2017-18 season, he continued ... In July 2015, he transferred to Cyberdyne Tsukuba Robots. In 2016, he moved to Yokohama B-Corsairs. He was appointed captain of ...
Due to the high failure rate of capsulotomy and tendon transfer it is generally avoided. Osteotomy (cutting of bone) and ...
Tendons connect muscle to bone whereas ligaments connect bone to bone. Tendons and ligaments play an active role in maintain ... Most leg pain is transferred pain from our backs or hips. Foot injuries including plantar fasciitis is another source of pain ... Tendons connect muscle to bone whereas ligaments connect bone to bone. Tendons and ligaments play an active role in maintain ... Routine sessions of physiotherapy after the cast is removed can help return strength in limp muscles or tendons. Alternately, ...
Nervous system: collecting, transferring and processing information with brain, spinal cord, peripheral nervous system and ... Skeletal system: structural support and protection with bones, cartilage, ligaments and tendons. Endocrine system: ... Lymphatic system: structures involved in the transfer of lymph between tissues and the blood stream; includes the lymph and the ...
Tendon transfer involves redistribution of muscle power, not recreation. Tendons are transferred at the distal attachment from ... Sammer, Douglas M.; Chung, Kevin C. (2009-05-29). "Tendon Transfers Part I: Principles of Transfer and Transfers for Radial ... These are examples of commonly performed tendon transfers. Many of the lower extremity tendon transfers were performed during ... In the beginning o twentieth century, tendon transfers were used to correct congenital talipes equina. Tendon transfers were ...
Table 4. Tendon Transfers for a High Radial Nerve Palsy. *Table 5. Tendon Transfers for a Low Radial Nerve Palsy or Posterior ... encoded search term (Hand Tendon Transfers) and Hand Tendon Transfers What to Read Next on Medscape ... Determination of muscle-tendon unit properties during tendon transfer. J Hand Surg [Am]. 1979 Jul. 4(4):331-9. [QxMD MEDLINE ... Table 1. Recommended Transfers for a High Median Nerve Palsy. *Table 2. Tendon Transfers for an Anterior Interosseous Nerve ...
This media is available to ISAKOS 2021: Global Registrants and On Demand purchases only ...
Muscles Tendons. » Tendon Transfers for Radial Nerve Palsy: Finger Extension Deficit. Tendon Transfers for Radial Nerve Palsy: ... ulnar nerve compression from impingement of the transferred tendon;. - references:. - Tendon transfers for radial palsy. JH ... See: tendon excursion. - Discussion: - FCR to EDC transfer;. - this transfer is also well suited for finger extension;. - ... Categories Muscles Tendons Tags Hand, Muscles Tendons, Nerves, Wrist Tendon Injury, & Repair ...
What is tendon transfer surgery?. Tendon transfer surgery seeks to restore lost function of the hand due to conditions such as ... Who needs a tendon transfer surgery?. You may require a tendon transfer surgery to restore your lost function of muscles or ... Thus, the muscle attached to the transferred tendon is now a functional muscle. More than one tendon transfers may be required ... How does a tendon transfer work?. The hand has various muscles attached to the bone by tendons. A muscle may lose its functions ...
The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the clinical benefit of transfer of the flexor digitorum longus tendon regarding ... Results: Overall crude patient satisfaction after flexor digitorum longus tendon transfer was 86.7% (95% confidence interval, ... this comprehensive analysis provides supportive evidence of the clinical benefit of flexor digitorum longus tendon transfer. (J ... Transfer of the flexor digitorum longus tendon is one of the surgical techniques described to treat lesser toe deformities. A ...
The effectiveness of early mobilization after tendon transfers in the hand: A systematic review Journal Articles ... and tendon transfer integration were significantly superior with early mobilization compared with immobilization. However, in ... has become an increasing trend in postoperative rehabilitation after tendon transfer surgery in the hand. However, there are no ... and the patients preferences when selecting between early and late mobilization after tendon transfer. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 2a. ...
Jailed Maldives ex-president transferred to house … Connecticut enacts its most sweeping gun control … ... Aaron Rodgers faces a long, arduous but not impossible road to recovery from torn Achilles tendon by: ROB MAADDI, Associated ... The road to recovery for players coming off a torn Achilles tendon is long and arduous. If he decides to play, Rodgers would be ... KEVIN DURANT: The two-time NBA Finals MVP tore his Achilles tendon on June 13, 2019 playing for Golden State in Game 4 of the ...
The EIP to EPL transfer is certainly more common and relatively easier operation when starting to do tendon transfers but once ... Null hypothesis: Using Walant does not speed up brain retraining after tendon transfer. ...
Shoulder Tendon Transfers. Shoulder tendon transfers are surgical treatment options for a select cohort of patients that have ... Lower trapezius tendon transfer for massive irrepairable posterior superior rotator cuff tears. The lower trapezius has a ... Latissimus doris transfer for irrepairable subscapularis tear. The latissimus dorsi can be released and reattached through key ... An open incision is required in the axilla region to mobilise the tendon. ...
Temporalis Tendon Transfer (T3). The temporalis muscle and tendon are located in the face. The muscles purpose is to help with ... Muscles require nerves in order to function, and so muscle transfers such as the gracilis transfer require two separate ... Nerve Transfers. When a facial nerve is injured, there is a period of time during which it may be possible to restore lost ... Masseteric Muscle Transfer. The masseter muscle is one of many muscles that help people chew. One of the branches of the nerve ...
... it can be replaced with another tendon to restore muscle functionality, Visit Dr. Amit Mulay for Tendon transfer Pune. ... If you injure a tendon connecting one muscle, ... In a tendon transfer surgery, a non-working muscle and tendon ... Doctors may recommend a tendon transfer in cases where either extensive muscles or tendons have been lost due to the following ... It can be sewn into another bone or tendon. Sometimes, more than one transfer will need to be done at a time. The skin is ...
Table 4. Tendon Transfers for a High Radial Nerve Palsy. *Table 5. Tendon Transfers for a Low Radial Nerve Palsy or Posterior ... encoded search term (Hand Tendon Transfers) and Hand Tendon Transfers What to Read Next on Medscape ... Determination of muscle-tendon unit properties during tendon transfer. J Hand Surg [Am]. 1979 Jul. 4(4):331-9. [QxMD MEDLINE ... Table 1. Recommended Transfers for a High Median Nerve Palsy. *Table 2. Tendon Transfers for an Anterior Interosseous Nerve ...
What is a tendon transfer?. What is a tendon transfer?. Tendon Transfer. A tendon transfer is moving a tendon from its normal, ... Will my foot move normally after the tendon transfer?. It depends on which tendon transfer you have. Some tendon transfers act ... Tendon transfers involve the cutting of the tendon at or near its normal insertion, rerouting it through the soft tissues ... There are three requirements for tendon transfers to be successful:. *The muscle that the tendon is attached to has to be ...
CO offers tendon transfer surgery to replace the damaged tendon and restore the normal movement of the foot. ... What is a Tendon Transfer?. In a tendon transfer procedure, a healthy tendon is transferred to replace the damaged tendon and ... Tendon Transfer Procedure. Tendon transfer surgery is usually performed under general anesthesia. An incision is made along the ... Complications of Tendon Transfer. As with all surgeries, tendon transfer surgery may be associated with certain complications ...
Tendons have fewer blood vessels in them than muscles do, so they are prone to injury when overstrained. ... Tendons connect muscles to bones, allowing us to move. They are made out of connective tissue that has a lot of strong collagen ... Tendons then act as space-saving "connectors" that transfer the movement of the muscle to the bone. One end of the tendon is ... What are tendons and tendon sheaths? - InformedHealth.org. What are tendons and tendon sheaths? - InformedHealth.org. ...
Sons beef neck tendons; 100 % pure meat, crunchy and lean. ... Beef tendons do not contain bones or cartilage and they are a ... These dried beef neck tendons are a hard, lean chew for small to medium-sized dogs and provide your dog with lots of chewing ... These dried beef neck tendons are a hard, lean chew for small to medium-sized dogs and provide your dog with lots of chewing ... Phil & Sons Beef Neck Tendons dog snacks are a single ingredient, supplementary food for adult dogs. Feed as a snack or reward ...
Dr Jacob Kirsch offers lower trapezius tendon transfer in Dedham, Waltham and Boston, MA. ... Click here to learn physical therapy protocols to be followed after lower trapezius tendon transfer. ... Lower Trapezius Tendon Transfer to Greater Tuberosity. PHASE I: Protected ROM (8 weeks) ...
After tendon lengthening and tendon transfer, postoperative bracing may be needed, which should be discussed preoperatively. ... Varus deformities (if present) can be corrected with tibialis posterior tendon transfer, lengthening, or tenotomy. These ... can be corrected by heel-cord lengthening and tibialis posterior tendon transfer through the interosseous membrane onto the ... Efficient adenovirus-mediated transfer of a human minidystrophin gene to skeletal muscle of mdx mice. Nature. 1993 Feb 18. 361 ...
Tibialis anterior tendon transfer ... The Achilles tendon at the back of the foot is almost always ... Tendons are tissues that help attach muscles to bones. A clubfoot occurs when tight tendons and ligaments prevent the foot from ... Your childs surgeon may make the tendons around the foot longer or shorter. ... Repair of clubfoot; Posteromedial release; Achilles tendon release; Clubfoot release; Talipes equinovarus - repair; ...
Clean or repair the tendon. *Transfer a tendon to restore the arch ... Disorders of tendons and fascia and adolescent and adult pes planus. In: Azar FM, Beaty JH, eds. Campbells Operative ... Aging, injuries, or illness may harm the tendons and cause flat feet to develop in a person who has already formed arches. This ... Flat feet occur because the tissues holding the joints in the foot together (called tendons) are loose. ...
TREATMENT OF THE CHRONIC, PAINFUL METATARSAL CALLUS BY A TENDON TRANSFER. KIEHN, CLIFFORD L.; EARLE, A. SCOTT; DESPRFZ, JOHN D ... ALTERATIONS IN FINGER GROWTH FOLLOWING FLEXOR TENDON INJURIES. GAISFORD, JOHN C.; FLEEGLER, EARL J. ...
2022 3rd Seminar on tendon transfers and ligament reconstruction of the Foot and Ankle on fresh frozen Cadaveric Specimens ...
Tendon transfer. A tendon is taken from a healthy muscle and transferred to a damaged tendon in order to restore its connected ... In a tendon transfer procedure, a healthy tendon is connected to a damaged tendon to restore its function. ... such as a nerve graft or transfer) is not done within 12 months, a tendon transfer may be recommended as having a better chance ...
229 Results for Hand or Wrist Tendon Transfer near Ashburn, VA 20147 Sort: Recommended. Recommended Distance Rating: High to ...
Hand or Wrist Tendon Transfer. *Hand Tendon Repair. *Hip Arthroscopy. *Hip Dislocation ... Elbow surgeons perform proceduras including arthroscopy, replacement, resurfacing, or tendon repair to treat conditions ...
Ghoraishian M, Stone MA, Elhassan B, Abboud J, Namdari S. Techniques for lower trapezius tendon transfer for the management of ... He is considered the world expert in the evaluation and management of scapulothoracic disorders, and tendon transfers around ... In this video, Bassem Elhassan, MD, discusses his unique approach to treating shoulder conditions with tendon transfers. ... Muscle transfer technique brings pain relief to patients Dr. Bassem Elhassan, Co-Chief of the Shoulder Service, has created ...
4. Temporalis Tendon Transfer. With a temporalis tendon transfer, Dr. Azizzadeh makes an incision into a patients temporalis ... 2. Masseter to Facial Nerve Transfer. Dr. Azizzadeh may recommend a masseter to facial nerve transfer to patients who have been ... 1. Hypoglossal-Facial Nerve Transfer. A hypoglossal-facial nerve transfer involves attaching the hypoglossal (trigeminal) nerve ... He then attaches the temporalis tendon and bones to muscles in the corner of his patients mouth. This helps the patient ...
In this paper we present a case of reconstruction of Achilles tendon defect with peroneus brevis transfer reinforced with ... Reconstruction with peroneus brevis transfer, reinforced with medial gastrocnemius fascia and plantaris tendon, restore ... MRI showed a lump of 5 × 2,5 × 2 cm into Achilles tendon with invasion of the anterior fat tissue but no invasion of the ... Epithelioid sarcoma arising from the Achilles tendon is an extremely rare malignant tumour in an atypical site and may easily ...
  • Tendons and ligaments play an important role here, too: Tendons connect muscles to bones, allowing us to move, and ligaments help to hold things in place. (nih.gov)
  • Some tendons run through narrow tunnels made of bones and ligaments, and some are stretched over bumpy parts of bones, for instance in the wrist and foot. (nih.gov)
  • A clubfoot occurs when tight tendons and ligaments prevent the foot from stretching into the right position. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Some hereditary conditions cause loose tendons and ligaments. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Soft tissue sarcomas of the foot represent a specific reconstructive challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon because of their proximity to critical structures such as tendons, ligaments, bones and neurovascular structure. (springeropen.com)
  • Those realistic Super Bowl dreams turned into another nightmare for long-suffering Jets fans once it became clear Rodgers tore his left Achilles tendon. (wnct.com)
  • The road to recovery for players coming off a torn Achilles tendon is long and arduous. (wnct.com)
  • Typically, it takes players 9-12 months to recover from surgery for a torn Achilles tendon. (wnct.com)
  • Rodgers tore his Achilles tendon after injuring his calf in training camp. (wnct.com)
  • DeLuca said there's no correlation between calf injuries and Achilles tendon ruptures. (wnct.com)
  • There is low to very low evidence in the literature that previous muscle injury is a risk factor for Achilles tendon ruptures," DeLuca said. (wnct.com)
  • KOBE BRYANT: The Basketball Hall of Famer tore his Achilles tendon on April 12, 2013, had surgery the next day and returned to the court with the Los Angeles Lakers on Dec. 8, 2013, at age 35. (wnct.com)
  • KEVIN DURANT: The two-time NBA Finals MVP tore his Achilles tendon on June 13, 2019 playing for Golden State in Game 4 of the championship round. (wnct.com)
  • DOMINIQUE WILKINS: The Basketball Hall of Famer tore his Achilles tendon on Jan. 28, 1992. (wnct.com)
  • The Achilles tendon at the back of the foot is almost always cut or lengthened. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In this paper we present a case of reconstruction of Achilles tendon defect with peroneus brevis transfer reinforced with medial gastrocnemius fascia and plantaris tendon after excision of a local recurrence of epithelioid sarcoma. (springeropen.com)
  • Epithelioid sarcoma arising from the Achilles tendon is an extremely rare malignant tumour in an atypical site and may easily be confused with other soft tissue masses. (springeropen.com)
  • In this paper we present a technical case of reconstruction of Achilles tendon defect with peroneus brevis transfer reinforced with medial gastrocnemius fascia and plantaris tendon after excision of a rare case of local recurrence of epithelioid sarcoma as an effective reconstructive strategy to obtain satisfactory functional results even after a wide resection as required. (springeropen.com)
  • In April 2007 the patient underwent unplanned excision of the lump in the right Achilles' tendon. (springeropen.com)
  • Background There is limited information about Achilles tendon disorders in professional football. (bmj.com)
  • Aims To investigate the incidence, injury circumstances, lay-off times and reinjury rates of Achilles tendon disorders in male professional football. (bmj.com)
  • Results A total of 203 (2.5% of all injuries) Achilles tendon disorders were registered. (bmj.com)
  • The mean lay-off time for Achilles tendinopathies was 23±37 (median=10, Q 1 =4 and Q 3 =24) days, while a rupture of the Achilles tendon, on average, caused 161±65 (median=169, Q 1 =110 and Q 3 =189) days of absence. (bmj.com)
  • Conclusions Achilles tendon disorders account for 3.8% of the total lay-off time and are more common in older players. (bmj.com)
  • The elastic properties of the Achilles tendon are important for locomotion. (bmj.com)
  • 1-3 The tendon has a capacity to withstand loads up to 12.5 times the body weight, 4 but nevertheless many athletes sustain Achilles tendon disorders. (bmj.com)
  • 5-7 The cause of Achilles tendon disorder is unclear, 8 but it is suggested that the essential lesion of tendinopathy is a failed healing response. (bmj.com)
  • 9-12 Achilles tendinopathy often manifests with a gradual onset of pain during tendon load (especially 2-6 cm proximal to the tendon insertion), 13 morning stiffness and sometimes a localised swelling. (bmj.com)
  • In vivo, Achilles tendon strain is typically determined by measuring the tendon length change during muscle contractions relative to its slack length by tracking the myotendinous junction displacement relative to the tendon's insertion point using ultrasound 16 . (nature.com)
  • EAGAN, Minn. (AP) - Minnesota Vikings running back Cam Akers ruptured his left Achilles tendon in another blow to a banged-up offense, a season-ending injury confirmed Monday by coach Kevin O'Connell. (yahoo.com)
  • Akers tore his right Achilles tendon in an offseason workout before the 2021 season with the Rams and made a remarkably fast recovery to return in less than six months for the playoffs for the eventual Super Bowl champions. (yahoo.com)
  • The injury to Akers left the Vikings with their second torn Achilles tendon in as many weeks following the loss of quarterback Kirk Cousins . (yahoo.com)
  • On August 21, 1993, while incarcerated at the Coyote Ridge Corrections Center (CRCC) in Connell, Washington, Richard Yamamoto suffered a severe injury to his right Achilles tendon. (prisonlegalnews.org)
  • As a result, the torn Achilles tendon was allowed to atrophy to such a degree that Mr. Yamamoto suffered permanent, irreversible damage to his right foot, tendon, calf, and leg. (prisonlegalnews.org)
  • Tendon transfers provide a substitute which can be permanent or temporary, when muscle function is lost either due to nerve injuries or injuries to the muscle/tendon unit. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tendon transfers are also performed to correct the imbalanced muscle tone due to spasticity resulting from injuries to the central nervous system. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tendon transfers were extensively performed during World Wars I and II to patients with upper extremity injuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • More than one tendon transfers may be required to repair some injuries. (hdkino.org)
  • Aging, injuries, or illness may harm the tendons and cause flat feet to develop in a person who has already formed arches. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Management and functional outcomes of combined injuries of flexor tendons, nerves, and vessels at the wrist. (medscape.com)
  • The role of toe flexor-to-extensor transfer in correcting metatarsophalangeal joint instability of the second toe. (japmaonline.org)
  • In this region, the flexor hallucis longus tendon (FHL) crosses deep to the adjacent flexor digitorum longus tendon (FDL). (radsource.us)
  • The axial fat suppressed fast spin-echo proton density-weighted image through the midfoot showing fluid intensity signal around the flexor hallucis longus tendon (FHL). (radsource.us)
  • The affected sites are (1) the dorsal and volar aspects of the wrist, because the tendons are covered by synovium as they pass under the flexor and extensor retinaculum and under the wrist, and (2) the volar aspect of the digits, because the tendons are covered by synovium in the fibro-osseous canals in the finger. (medscape.com)
  • Tendon excursion, or distance a tendon travels upon movement, should be similar to that of the recipient to adequately restore the function. (wikipedia.org)
  • A single tendon should be used to restore a single function. (wikipedia.org)
  • Transfer of one tendon to restore multiple functions will compromise strength and movement. (wikipedia.org)
  • When muscle-tendon units remain functional in an extremity, consider sacrificing one function to restore another by transferring the working unit to a new location. (medscape.com)
  • Tendon transfer surgery seeks to restore lost function of the hand due to conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. (hdkino.org)
  • Tendon transfer from a functional site may be performed in such cases to restore the lost function. (hdkino.org)
  • When a facial nerve is injured, there is a period of time during which it may be possible to restore lost nerve function to (reinnervate) the muscles of the face by transferring another nerve to that area. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Tendons typically are transferred in order to restore more normal movement to a foot and ankle that has lost function. (orthopedicspecialistsofseattle.com)
  • Therefore, if you injure a tendon connecting one muscle, it can be replaced with another tendon to restore muscle functionality. (dramitmulay.com)
  • In a tendon transfer procedure, a healthy tendon is transferred to replace the damaged tendon and restore the normal movement of the foot. (sharpfootankle.com)
  • In a tendon transfer procedure, a healthy tendon is connected to a damaged tendon to restore its function. (spine-health.com)
  • A tendon is taken from a healthy muscle and transferred to a damaged tendon in order to restore its connected muscle's function. (spine-health.com)
  • Reconstruction with peroneus brevis transfer, reinforced with medial gastrocnemius fascia and plantaris tendon, restore appropriate structural continuity and resistance. (springeropen.com)
  • A nerve transfer is a procedure in which an expendable donor nerve (from another location in the patient's body) is rerouted and connected to the site of a damaged or de-innervated nerve stump to restore its function. (hss.edu)
  • Tendon transfers have been used in upper extremity reconstruction for well over a century. (medscape.com)
  • In the latter part of the century, microvascular techniques were developed that added free muscle transfers as a possible tool for paralysis reconstruction. (medscape.com)
  • While newer techniques of functional electrical stimulation and microvascular transfer have added new dimensions to reconstruction, tendon transfer remains a primary tool in upper extremity paralysis management. (medscape.com)
  • The patient underwent excision of the tumour and reconstruction of the tendinous defect with peroneus brevis transfer. (springeropen.com)
  • These surgeries include a range of primary nerve reconstruction procedures, which are optimally performed three to six months following the injury, as well as secondary reconstructive procedures, which include free muscle transplants, pedicle muscle transfers, tendon transfers, and fusions. (hss.edu)
  • Procedures involved in reconstruction may include one or more of the following: neurolysis/nerve release, nerve repair, nerve grafts and nerve transfers. (hss.edu)
  • In 10 participants, nerve transfers were uniquely combined with tendon transfers allowing different styles of reconstruction to be performed in each hand, and enabling participants to benefit from the innate strengths of both tendon and nerve transfers. (sciencedaily.com)
  • Rupture of the extensor pollicis longus (EPL) tendon is a common complication secondary to a distal radial fracture. (medscape.com)
  • Rheumatoid arthritis may be responsible for tendon rupture of any of the hand and wrist tendons, but it commonly leads to rupture of extensor tendons of the fingers or thumb. (medscape.com)
  • The arch of the foot collapses because of the stretching or rupture of the posterior tibial tendon (attaches the calf muscle to the bones on the inside of the foot), leading to pain and discomfort. (sharpfootankle.com)
  • Hypertrophic synovial tissue begins to invade and weaken the tendon, eventually leading to rupture. (medscape.com)
  • Tendon rupture may also be a result of attrition of the tendon from bony spicules and osteophytes. (medscape.com)
  • Additionally, nerve transfers can re-animate more than one muscle at a time, have a shorter period of immobilisation after surgery (10 days in a sling vs 6-12 weeks in a brace for a nerve transfer for elbow extension), and avoid the technical problems associated with of tendon transfer surgery including tendon tensioning during surgery and mechanical failure (stretch or rupture) after surgery. (sciencedaily.com)
  • What are tendons and tendon sheaths? (nih.gov)
  • What do tendon sheaths do? (nih.gov)
  • In these places, the tendons are often protected by layers of connective tissue known as tendon sheaths. (nih.gov)
  • Tendon sheaths are filled with a lubricating fluid, allowing the tendons to move smoothly and freely through them. (nih.gov)
  • The axial inversion recovery-weighted image obtained at the level of the pisotriquetral joint shows fluid intensity signal distending the tendon sheaths of the extensor pollicis longus (EPL), extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) and extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB). (radsource.us)
  • Muscles require nerves in order to function, and so muscle transfers such as the gracilis transfer require two separate surgeries. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • But this is the first prospective study to use standardised functional outcome measures and combinations of multiple nerve and tendon transfer surgeries. (sciencedaily.com)
  • OpenSim is used to simulate gait, tendon transfer surgeries, and sports movements. (cdc.gov)
  • There are two common reasons your foot and ankle orthopedic surgeon may recommend a tendon transfer in the foot and ankle. (orthopedicspecialistsofseattle.com)
  • Tendon transfers involve the cutting of the tendon at or near its normal insertion, rerouting it through the soft tissues either around or between the bones of the foot and ankle, and connecting it to another bone in the foot. (orthopedicspecialistsofseattle.com)
  • A tendon is a cord-like fibrous band that attaches a muscle to a bone to aid movement during muscle action. (hdkino.org)
  • The hand has various muscles attached to the bone by tendons. (hdkino.org)
  • When the transferred tendon is long enough, it can be passed through a tunnel drilled through the target bone and then sewn to itself. (orthopedicspecialistsofseattle.com)
  • The tendon also can be brought into a bone tunnel and fastened with a screw made of metal or an absorbable plastic. (orthopedicspecialistsofseattle.com)
  • An anchor with sutures attached to it also can be placed in the bone at the point the tendon is to be attached and the sutures used to sew the tendon to the anchor. (orthopedicspecialistsofseattle.com)
  • It can be sewn into another bone or tendon. (dramitmulay.com)
  • More than likely, after surgery, you will be given a cast or splint to protect your new tendon transfer until it is done healing and reconnecting to the bone. (dramitmulay.com)
  • Tendons then act as space-saving "connectors" that transfer the movement of the muscle to the bone. (nih.gov)
  • A healthy tendon is identified, cut at its normal insertion, rerouted through the soft tissues and bones, and then sutured to another bone in the foot. (sharpfootankle.com)
  • Understanding the three-dimensional ultrastructure morphology of tendon-to-bone interface may allow the development of effective therapeutic interventions for enhanced interface healing. (iucr.org)
  • Based on phase retrieval for PPC-SRµCT imaging, this technique is capable of visualizing the three-dimensional internal architecture of PPTI at a cellular high spatial resolution including bone and tendon, especially the chondrocytes lacuna at the fibrocartilage layer. (iucr.org)
  • Unfortunately, this unique tissue that forms at the tendon-to-bone interface is not regenerated during tendon-to-bone healing. (iucr.org)
  • In order to develop effective therapeutic interventions for enhanced interface healing, we firstly need to understand the morphology of the enthesis between tendon and bone at the natural physiological status. (iucr.org)
  • The procedure may include bone realignment, ligament or tendon release, tendon transfers, or foot fusions. (dukehealth.org)
  • Eight weeks after the donor's death, skin samples that had been treated in cryopreservative solution containing an antibiotic and unprocessed fat, muscle, tendon, and bone samples, all of which had been stored frozen at -70° Celsius at a tissue bank, were transferred to CDC. (cdc.gov)
  • West Nile Virus RNA was detected in samples from the spleen/lymph node, skin, and fat associated with the tibia bone, as well as 1 of 2 muscle specimens, 1 of 4 tendon specimens, and 1 of 2 bone marrow specimens. (cdc.gov)
  • We identified West Nile Virus RNA in spleen/lymph node homogenate, skin, fat, muscle, tendon, and bone marrow samples obtained postmortem from a donor associated with transmission of West Nile Virus through solid organ transplantation. (cdc.gov)
  • In operations such as nerve grafts, nerve transfers, and muscle transfers, specially trained surgeons, using customized precision instruments, work meticulously to reconnect and repair nerves. (hss.edu)
  • Both single and double free muscle transfer procedure were performed using extraplexal donor motor nerves. (medscape.com)
  • Tendon transfers may also be useful in restoring function in patients with spastic disorders due to cerebral palsy or stroke. (medscape.com)
  • Treatment of spastic varus/ equinovarus foot with split-tendon transfers in Cerebral Palsy: how does it affect the hindfoot motion? (researchgate.net)
  • Introduction The flexible spastic varus foot in cerebral palsy is commonly corrected by split-tendon transfer of tibialis anterior or tibialis posterior. (researchgate.net)
  • The newly transferred tendon is protected by a cast or splint until the tendon heals to its new position in one to two months. (hdkino.org)
  • When hand surgery evolved as a subspecialty, transfer techniques expanded. (medscape.com)
  • What Is Tendon Transfer Surgery? (hdkino.org)
  • Tendon transfer surgery is a type of hand surgery that is performed to improve the lost function of the hand. (hdkino.org)
  • In this surgery, a functioning tendon is shifted from its original attachment to another site in the hand for restoring the lost action. (hdkino.org)
  • A tendon transfer surgery may be performed to repair damage to both these groups of tendons. (hdkino.org)
  • Who needs a tendon transfer surgery? (hdkino.org)
  • A tendon transfer surgery restores the lost function by replacing non-working muscles and tendons with working ones. (hdkino.org)
  • During this surgery, the surgeon makes a surgical cut (incision) and harvests the tendon of an extra muscle that is moved from another place and stitches it to the tendon of the non-working muscle. (hdkino.org)
  • What are the risks of tendon transfer surgery? (hdkino.org)
  • INTRODUCTION: Over the past decade, early mobilization (initiated within a week) has become an increasing trend in postoperative rehabilitation after tendon transfer surgery in the hand. (mcmaster.ca)
  • Until the body of evidence increases, clinicians should consider the clinical context, their experience in optimizing patient outcomes after surgery, and the patient's preferences when selecting between early and late mobilization after tendon transfer. (mcmaster.ca)
  • Patients typically are non-weightbearing for six weeks after surgery to allow the transferred tendon to heal to its new attachment. (orthopedicspecialistsofseattle.com)
  • In a tendon transfer surgery, a non-working muscle and tendon replace a working muscle and tendon. (dramitmulay.com)
  • Tendon transfer surgery is usually performed under general anesthesia. (sharpfootankle.com)
  • You will be non-weight bearing for 6 weeks after surgery to allow the tendon to heal. (sharpfootankle.com)
  • The surgical treatments for RA of the hand and wrist include synovectomy, tenosynovectomy, tendon realignment, reconstructive surgery or arthroplasty, and arthrodesis. (medscape.com)
  • Nerve transfer surgery has enabled 13 young adults with complete paralysis to regain movement and function in their elbows and hands, according to the largest case series of this technique in people with tetraplegia (paralysis of both the upper and lower limbs). (sciencedaily.com)
  • The findings suggest that nerve transfers can achieve similar functional improvements to traditional tendon transfers, with the benefit of smaller incisions and shorter immobilisation times after surgery. (sciencedaily.com)
  • Nevertheless, four nerve transfers failed in three participants and the authors conclude that more research will be needed to determine which people are the best candidates to select for nerve transfer surgery to minimise the incidence of failure. (sciencedaily.com)
  • We believe that nerve transfer surgery offers an exciting new option, offering individuals with paralysis the possibility of regaining arm and hand functions to perform everyday tasks, and giving them greater independence and the ability to participate more easily in family and work life," says Dr Natasha van Zyl from Austin Health in Melbourne, Australia who led the research. (sciencedaily.com)
  • Traditionally, upper limb function has been reconstructed using tendon transfer surgery, during which muscles that still work, but are designed for another function, are surgically re-sited to do the work of muscles that are paralysed. (sciencedaily.com)
  • Previous single case reports and small retrospective studies have shown nerve transfer surgery to be feasible and safe in people with tetraplegia. (sciencedaily.com)
  • was placed on the injured list on 4/24, and underwent surgery on 4/26 at Rush Oak Brook Surgery Center to repair the torn tendon behind his right knee. (mlb.com)
  • Suffered a torn hamstring tendon while running to first base on 4/23 at Minnesota. (mlb.com)
  • The literature reports reduced total cost, total rehabilitation time, and demonstrates that early mobilization is a safe approach with no incidence of tendon ruptures or insertion pull out. (mcmaster.ca)
  • This develops when the posterior tibial tendon stretches and becomes nonfunctional or ruptures, which can cause the arch of the foot to drop. (orthopedicspecialistsofseattle.com)
  • citation needed] Preoperative evaluation of the patient is required to map out functional deficits, and determine which muscles are available for transfer. (wikipedia.org)
  • In other words, it must not result in functional deficit after transfer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, the muscle attached to the transferred tendon is now a functional muscle. (hdkino.org)
  • The muscle that the tendon is attached to has to be functional. (orthopedicspecialistsofseattle.com)
  • The transferred muscle is weaker than it was in its original functional position because of the transfer. (orthopedicspecialistsofseattle.com)
  • The soft tissue that will receive the tendon should be functional. (sharpfootankle.com)
  • The authors report the functional outcomes after functioning free muscle transfer (FFMT) for restoration of the upper-extremity movement after brachial plexus injury (BPI). (medscape.com)
  • Rheumatoid nodules can also develop within the tendons and within the subcutaneous tissue. (medscape.com)
  • Tendons are transferred at the distal attachment from lesser to more important functions so that the overall function is improved. (wikipedia.org)
  • Shoulder tendon transfers are surgical treatment options for a select cohort of patients that have large irreparable rotator cuff tears. (drandrewmcbride.com)
  • A tendon transfer is a surgical process in which the insertion of a tendon is moved, but the origin remains in the same location. (wikipedia.org)
  • In fact, Mr. Yamamoto did not receive surgical intervention until nearly a year later, after he was transferred to the Pine Lodge Pre-Release. (prisonlegalnews.org)
  • While only a small study, researchers say that nerve transfers are a major advance in the restoration of hand and arm function, and offer another safe, reliable surgical option for people living with tetraplegia. (sciencedaily.com)
  • Trivector gracilis free tissue transfer procedure for facial paralysis. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Cranial nerve transfer procedure for a benign facial schwannoma. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Biceps and shoulder musculature reinnervation involving both nerve grafting and transfer techniques has resulted in reliable restoration of elbow flexion and shoulder abduction when the procedure is undertaken within 6 to 9 months of injury. (medscape.com)
  • In the initial phase of rehabilitation, outcomes like range of motion, grip strength, pinch strength, total active motion of digits, deformity correction, and tendon transfer integration were significantly superior with early mobilization compared with immobilization. (mcmaster.ca)
  • The axial fat suppressed fast spin-echo T2-weighted image demonstrates peritendinous edema (arrow) around the abductor pollicis longus tendon (APL) and the myotendinous junction of the extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) of the first dorsal extensor compartment and around the extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) and extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) tendons of the second dorsal extensor compartment at their point of intersection over the lateral radius. (radsource.us)
  • Anatomically, the EPL tendon runs through the third extensor compartment and around the Lister tubercles. (medscape.com)
  • Beef tendons do not contain bones or cartilage and they are a tasty snack between meals for larger dogs. (zooplus.com)
  • Tendons are tissues that help attach muscles to bones. (medlineplus.gov)
  • MRI showed a lump of 5 × 2,5 × 2 cm into Achille's tendon with invasion of the anterior fat tissue but no invasion of the surrounding bones. (springeropen.com)
  • The joints that the tendon crosses need to be both mobile and stable. (orthopedicspecialistsofseattle.com)
  • Muscles and their tendons allow you to move your joints. (dramitmulay.com)
  • The joints through which the tendon will pass should be mobile and stable. (sharpfootankle.com)
  • Flat feet occur because the tissues holding the joints in the foot together (called tendons) are loose. (medlineplus.gov)
  • therefore, the tendons are affected by the same disease process as joints. (medscape.com)
  • Surgeons refer to various types of nerve transfers, based on the location of the donor nerve. (hss.edu)
  • Intraplexal nerve transfers are those that are done within the brachial plexus itself. (hss.edu)
  • Nerve transfers restored more natural movement and finer motor control in one hand, and tendon transfers restored more power and heavy lifting ability in the other hand. (sciencedaily.com)
  • What's more, we have shown that nerve transfers can be successfully combined with traditional tendon transfer techniques to maximise benefits. (sciencedaily.com)
  • When grasp and pinch was restored using nerve transfers in one hand and tendon transfers in the other, participants consistently reporting that they liked both hands for different reasons and would not choose to have two hands reconstructed in the same way. (sciencedaily.com)
  • In contrast, nerve transfers allow the direct reanimation of the paralysed muscle itself. (sciencedaily.com)
  • The middle part of the 20th century saw the development of transfers for multiple peripheral nerve paralyses, including median, ulnar, and radial nerve palsies. (medscape.com)
  • He is considered the world expert in the evaluation and management of scapulothoracic disorders, and tendon transfers around the shoulder and elbow. (massgeneral.org)
  • Restoring elbow extension improved their ability to propel their wheelchair and to transfer into bed or a car. (sciencedaily.com)
  • Nine patients underwent a double free muscle transfer for simultaneous restoration of elbow flexion and wrist extension (first muscle) and finger flexion (second muscle), combined with direct triceps neurotization. (medscape.com)
  • Transfer for combined elbow flexion and wrist extension compared with elbow flexion alone lowered the overall results for elbow flexion strength. (medscape.com)
  • Seventy-nine percent of the FFMTs for elbow flexion alone (single transfer) and 63% of similarly innervated muscles transferred for combined motion achieved at least Grade M4 elbow flexion strength. (medscape.com)
  • In addition to restoration of elbow flexion, this double free muscle transfer provides an opportunity for patients with complete brachial plexus avulsions to regain prehension. (medscape.com)
  • The lower trapezius has a similar line of pull to the posterior rotator muscles and can be transferred with the assistance of a bridging allograft to improve shoulder strength and function. (drandrewmcbride.com)
  • Functioning free muscle transfer is a viable reconstructive option for restoration of upper-extremity function in the setting of severe BPI. (medscape.com)
  • According to Joe Avento of the Johnson City Press Giplaye tore the patellar tendon in his knee , and the injury is a season-ending one. (nbcsports.com)
  • Cite this: Gracilis Free Muscle Transfer for Restoration of Function After Complete Brachial Plexus Avulsion - Medscape - May 01, 2004. (medscape.com)
  • Disorders of tendons and fascia and adolescent and adult pes planus. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Deep-seated tumours are typically larger and firmly attached to tendons and fascia. (springeropen.com)
  • Usually, deep tendon reflexes in affected limbs are increased, muscles are hypertonic, and voluntary movements are weak and poorly coordinated. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Deep tendon reflexes and plantar responses were absent. (bvsalud.org)
  • In vivo, the force-velocity relation (F-v-r) is typically derived from the torque-angular velocity relation (T-ω-r), which is subject to two factors that may influence resulting measurements: tendon compliance and preload prior to contraction. (nature.com)
  • Preload is typically applied to minimize the effects of the electromechanical delay, to guarantee maximal muscle activity and to reduce muscle-tendon unit (MTU) compliance. (nature.com)
  • A tunnel may be drilled to allow the tendon to pass through and then sewn on itself, fastened with a metal or plastic screw, or attached with anchor sutures. (sharpfootankle.com)
  • Forearm pain and swelling at the junction of the first and second dorsal extensor tendon compartments due to overuse was first described by Velpeau in 1841, and subsequently termed "intersection syndrome" by Dobyns et al. (radsource.us)
  • Many of the lower extremity tendon transfers were performed during the nineteenth century to improve ambulation in polio patients due to post-poliomyelitis paralysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Loss of hand function secondary to neuromuscular paralysis, tendon loss, or muscle loss can dramatically reduce a person's ability to perform normal activities of daily life. (medscape.com)
  • Hamstring tendonitis/tendinopathy is inflammation or degeneration of one of the hamstring tendons at the point where it attaches to the back of the knee. (sportsinjuryclinic.net)