Tendon Injuries: Injuries to the fibrous cords of connective tissue which attach muscles to bones or other structures.Tendons: Fibrous bands or cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE at the ends of SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS that serve to attach the MUSCLES to bones and other structures.Achilles Tendon: A fibrous cord that connects the muscles in the back of the calf to the HEEL BONE.Finger Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the fingers.Patellar Ligament: A band of fibrous tissue that attaches the apex of the PATELLA to the lower part of the tubercle of the TIBIA. The ligament is actually the caudal continuation of the common tendon of the QUADRICEPS FEMORIS. The patella is embedded in that tendon. As such, the patellar ligament can be thought of as connecting the quadriceps femoris tendon to the tibia, and therefore it is sometimes called the patellar tendon.Tendinopathy: Clinical syndrome describing overuse tendon injuries characterized by a combination of PAIN, diffuse or localized swelling, and impaired performance. Distinguishing tendinosis from tendinitis is clinically difficult and can be made only after histopathological examination.Rupture: Forcible or traumatic tear or break of an organ or other soft part of the body.Hand Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the hand.Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Tissue Adhesions: Pathological processes consisting of the union of the opposing surfaces of a wound.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Tendon Transfer: Surgical procedure by which a tendon is incised at its insertion and placed at an anatomical site distant from the original insertion. The tendon remains attached at the point of origin and takes over the function of a muscle inactivated by trauma or disease.Brain Injuries: Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.Spinal Cord Injuries: Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).Reperfusion Injury: Adverse functional, metabolic, or structural changes in ischemic tissues resulting from the restoration of blood flow to the tissue (REPERFUSION), including swelling; HEMORRHAGE; NECROSIS; and damage from FREE RADICALS. The most common instance is MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.Injury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.Heel: The back (or posterior) of the FOOT in PRIMATES, found behind the ANKLE and distal to the TOES.Thigh: The portion of the leg in humans and other animals found between the HIP and KNEE.Sprains and Strains: A collective term for muscle and ligament injuries without dislocation or fracture. A sprain is a joint injury in which some of the fibers of a supporting ligament are ruptured but the continuity of the ligament remains intact. A strain is an overstretching or overexertion of some part of the musculature.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Orthopedics: A surgical specialty which utilizes medical, surgical, and physical methods to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the skeletal system, its articulations, and associated structures.Textbooks as Topic: Books used in the study of a subject that contain a systematic presentation of the principles and vocabulary of a subject.North CarolinaArthroplasty, Replacement, Knee: Replacement of the knee joint.Arthroplasty, Replacement: Partial or total replacement of a joint.Athletes: Individuals who have developed skills, physical stamina and strength or participants in SPORTS or other physical activities.Pharmacists: Those persons legally qualified by education and training to engage in the practice of pharmacy.Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems: Systems developed for collecting reports from government agencies, manufacturers, hospitals, physicians, and other sources on adverse drug reactions.Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction: A condition characterized by a broad range of progressive disorders ranging from TENOSYNOVITIS to tendon rupture with or without hindfoot collapse to a fixed, rigid, FLATFOOT deformity. Pathologic changes can involve associated tendons, ligaments, joint structures of the ANKLE, hindfoot, and midfoot. Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is the most common cause of acquired flatfoot deformity in adults.Flatfoot: A condition in which one or more of the arches of the foot have flattened out.Tenosynovitis: Inflammation of the synovial lining of a tendon sheath. Causes include trauma, tendon stress, bacterial disease (gonorrhea, tuberculosis), rheumatic disease, and gout. Common sites are the hand, wrist, shoulder capsule, hip capsule, hamstring muscles, and Achilles tendon. The tendon sheaths become inflamed and painful, and accumulate fluid. Joint mobility is usually reduced.Baseball: A competitive nine-member team sport including softball.Finger Joint: The articulation between the head of one phalanx and the base of the one distal to it, in each finger.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Chronology as Topic: The temporal sequence of events that have occurred.Ankle Joint: The joint that is formed by the inferior articular and malleolar articular surfaces of the TIBIA; the malleolar articular surface of the FIBULA; and the medial malleolar, lateral malleolar, and superior surfaces of the TALUS.Talus: The second largest of the TARSAL BONES. It articulates with the TIBIA and FIBULA to form the ANKLE JOINT.Ankle FracturesAnkle Injuries: Harm or hurt to the ankle or ankle joint usually inflicted by an external source.Lacerations: Torn, ragged, mangled wounds.Pneumoconiosis: A diffuse parenchymal lung disease caused by inhalation of dust and by tissue reaction to their presence. These inorganic, organic, particulate, or vaporized matters usually are inhaled by workers in their occupational environment, leading to the various forms (ASBESTOSIS; BYSSINOSIS; and others). Similar air pollution can also have deleterious effects on the general population.Toes: Any one of five terminal digits of the vertebrate FOOT.Toe Joint: The articulation between the head of one phalanx and the base of the one distal to it, in each toe.Access to Information: Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.Catheter Ablation: Removal of tissue with electrical current delivered via electrodes positioned at the distal end of a catheter. Energy sources are commonly direct current (DC-shock) or alternating current at radiofrequencies (usually 750 kHz). The technique is used most often to ablate the AV junction and/or accessory pathways in order to interrupt AV conduction and produce AV block in the treatment of various tachyarrhythmias.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Saudi ArabiaFingers: Four or five slender jointed digits in humans and primates, attached to each HAND.

Late repair of simultaneous bilateral distal biceps brachii tendon avulsion with fascia lata graft. (1/627)

A 50 year old rock climber sustained a bilateral rupture of the distal biceps brachii tendons. He retained some flexion power in both arms but minimal supination, being weaker on the non-dominant right side. As the patient presented late, with retraction and shortening of the biceps muscle bellies, reconstruction was carried out using fascia lata grafts on both sides. Because of residual weakness on the left (dominant) side, three further surgical procedures had to be carried out to correct for elongation of the graft. A functionally satisfactory outcome, comparable with that on the right side, was eventually obtained. In summary, bilateral fascia lata grafts to bridge the gap between the retracted biceps bellies and the radial tuberosities were successful in restoring function and flexion power to the elbow. Despite being the stronger side, the dominant arm did not respond as well to the initial surgery. This may be due to overuse of this arm after the operation.  (+info)

Evaluation of chronic tears of the rotator cuff by ultrasound. A new index. (2/627)

The diagnosis of chronic lesions of the rotator cuff is challenging. We have developed a new index to improve the sonographic diagnosis of chronic tears of the cuff. In a pilot study, we examined 50 asymptomatic healthy volunteers by ultrasound to establish the diameter of the rotator cuff in relation to the tendon of the long head of biceps. Subsequently, the index was calculated in 64 patients who had had shoulder pain for more than three months caused by clinically diagnosed lesions of the rotator cuff. The compensatory hypertrophy of the biceps tendon was quantified sonographically in relation to the diameter of the cuff. Comparison with the contralateral shoulder revealed a significantly higher biceps rotator-cuff ratio (p < 0.05) for patients with torn rotator cuffs. A ratio greater than 0.8 was considered pathological (index positive); the mean ratio in the control group was 0.43. The sensitivity of a positive index was 97.8%, the specificity 63.2%, the positive predictive value 86.3%, and the negative predictive value 92.4% in comparison with surgical findings. Use of the index improves sensitivity in the diagnosis of chronic tears of the cuff by ultrasound.  (+info)

Safety of the limited open technique of bone-transfixing threaded-pin placement for external fixation of distal radial fractures: a cadaver study. (3/627)

OBJECTIVE: To examine the safety of threaded-pin placement for fixation of distal radial fractures using a limited open approach. DESIGN: A cadaver study. METHODS: Four-millimetre Schanz threaded pins were inserted into the radius and 3-mm screw pins into the second metacarpal of 20 cadaver arms. Each threaded pin was inserted in the dorsoradial oblique plane through a limited open, 5- to 10-mm longitudinal incision. Open exploration of the threaded-pin sites was then carried out. OUTCOME MEASURES: Injury to nerves, muscles and tendons and the proximity of these structures to the threaded pins. RESULTS: There were no injuries to the extensor tendons, superficial radial or lateral antebrachial nerves of the forearm, or to the soft tissues overlying the metacarpal. The lateral antebrachial nerve was the closest nerve to the radial pins and a branch of the superficial radial nerve was closest to the metacarpal pins. The superficial radial nerve was not close to the radial pins. CONCLUSION: Limited open threaded-pin fixation of distal radial fractures in the dorsolateral plane appears to be safe.  (+info)

Common extensor tendon rupture following corticosteroid injection for lateral tendinosis of the elbow. (4/627)

Corticosteroid injections are commonly administered to athletes to relieve symptoms of lateral elbow tendinosis. This report presents a case of almost total rupture of the common extensor origin in a 45 year old female squash player secondary to such a procedure.  (+info)

Contribution of lumbrical muscle activity to the paradoxical extension phenomenon induced by injuries to the finger flexor tendons. (5/627)

The "Extensor habitus" phenomenon occurs in finger flexor tendon injuries and consists of a paradoxical extension of the interphalangeal joints after an attempt to flex the finger. The mechanism of extension is considered to be a contraction of the flexor digitorum profundus that is then transmitted via the lumbrical muscle structure to the extensor expansion. Using electromyography, we recorded the lumbrical muscle activity during the paradoxical extension phenomenon to determine whether the lumbrical muscle contributed to this event. Two patterns of electromyographical activity of the lumbrical muscle were observed. Group I (6 fingers) displayed electrical activities in the lumbrical muscle during flexion tasks, while group II (12 fingers) did not. In group I, the lesions were mainly located in zone V, and the response to range of motion exercises was satisfactory. In group II, nearly all of the lesion were located in zone II, and half of the cases required additional surgical interventions. Group II appeared to exhibit the "Extensor habitus" phenomenon, while group I exhibited an "Extensor habitus-like phenomenon." To distinguish between these two phenomena, an electromyographical examination of the lumbrical muscle must be performed.  (+info)

Comparison of sonography and magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of partial tears of finger extensor tendons in rheumatoid arthritis. (6/627)

OBJECTIVE: Finger extensor tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may lead to partial and eventually to complete tendon tears. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic value of sonography (SG) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize partial tendon tears. METHODS: Twenty-one RA patients with finger extensor tenosynovitis for more than 12 months underwent SG, MRI and surgical inspection, the latter being the gold standard. RESULTS: For partial tears, sensitivity and specificity were 0.27 and 0.83 for MRI, and 0.33 and 0.89 for SG, respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 0.35 and 0.78 for MRI, and 0.50 and 0.80 for SG, respectively. Accuracy was 0.69 for MRI and 0.75 for SG. CONCLUSION: For visualization of partial finger extensor tendon tears in RA patients, SG performs slightly better than MRI, but both techniques are at present not sensitive enough to be used in daily practice.  (+info)

Brachial biceps tendon injuries in young female high-level tennis players. (7/627)

AIM: To evaluate brachial biceps tendon lesions in four young female tennis players who complained about anterior shoulder pain on their dominant side. METHODS: Medical and sport's activity history, palpation of the painful zone, Ghilchrist (palm-up) test, and brachial biceps contraction against resistance were performed. RESULTS: The two girls who suffered from mild tenderness in the bicipital groove and over the anterior aspect of the upper arm and the shoulder joint, had tendinitis of the long biceps head. The two girls who suffered from severe tenderness just under the groove, had a partial tear in the long head of the biceps. Ghilchrist test was positive in all girls. CONCLUSION: Tennis players can have shoulder pain without clear history of trauma. Pain occurred probably as a result of technical errors or use of inadequate equipment.  (+info)

Intracellular biogenesis of collagen fibrils in 'activated fibroblasts' of tendo Achillis. An ultrastructural study in the New Zealand rabbit. (8/627)

We have studied the formation of collagen fibrils in 'activated fibroblasts' of tendo Achillis of rabbits. The tendon was in the process of regeneration after experimental partial tenotomy. Samples were taken from the peri-incisional region and analysed by transmission electron microscopy. Ultrastructural examination showed the presence of a 'fine dense granular substance' inside the rough endoplasmic reticulum and procollagen filaments. These come together to form collagen fibrils in the dilated vacuoles of the rough endoplasmic reticulum. The possible intra- and extracellular origin of collagen fibrils is suggested. Within the cell biosynthesis of collagen fibrils take place with the formation of collagen substance which gives rise to procollagen filaments. These make contact in parallel apposition to produce striated 'spindle-shaped bodies' which elongate by the longitudinal attachment of more procollagen filaments and form intracellular nascent collagen fibrils.  (+info)

  • Two heads come off the shoulder and one tendon inserts onto the elbow," explains Bryan L. Reuss, M.D. , a double board-certified orthopaedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine at Orlando Orthopaedic Center . (orlandoortho.com)
  • Your doctor may still use the term tendinitis or epicondylitis to describe tendon injuries to the inner or outer elbow. (uncmedicalcenter.org)
  • The triceps tendons connect the triceps muscles to the shoulder blade and elbow in your arm. (suncoastshoulder-elbow.com)
  • High cholesterol update 2016: Recent stories and studies on cholesterol and the associated health complications, such as vision problems, tendon injuries, and heart health risk. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • Issues with compliance, the competing priorities of their school, sport and social lives and generally being more independent and less supervised by adults means that often a more conservative approach is taken to minimise complications post tendon repair. (bondijunctionhandtherapy.com.au)
  • Currently, horses with tendon injury are treated using their own mesenchymal stem cells, those which form muscular and connective tissues. (aht.org.uk)
  • Integra LifeSciences Holdings Corp. has received FDA clearance to market TenoGlide Tendon Protector Sheet in the US. (itnonline.com)
  • Obtaining a detailed medical report from a medical expert explaining the extent of your injuries, the rehabilitation program required and the potential future costs is therefore essential. (bishopslaw.co.uk)
  • This course goes into detail covering the anatomy, assessment and treatment techniques of tibialis anterior muscle and tendon injuries. (benjamininstitute.com)
Connecting the Dots Between Statins and Tendon Injuries | AACP
Connecting the Dots Between Statins and Tendon Injuries | AACP (aacp.org)
Tendon Injuries Could be Treated by Athletes' Own Blood
Tendon Injuries Could be Treated by Athletes' Own Blood (medindia.net)
Shoulder injuries Archives - Page 3 of 4 - Sports Injury Bulletin
Shoulder injuries Archives - Page 3 of 4 - Sports Injury Bulletin (sportsinjurybulletin.com)
What is a Peroneal Tendon Injury? | Family Foot & Ankle Specialists
What is a Peroneal Tendon Injury? | Family Foot & Ankle Specialists (stopfootpainfast.com)
Leg joint pain in pregnancy nhs, youtube flexor tendon repair nutrients
Leg joint pain in pregnancy nhs, youtube flexor tendon repair nutrients (s3.amazonaws.com)
Muscle and Tendon Injuries - Evaluation and Management | Gian Luigi Canata | Springer
Muscle and Tendon Injuries - Evaluation and Management | Gian Luigi Canata | Springer (springer.com)
Bicipital Tendon Injuries: Practice Essentials, Anatomy, Etiology
Bicipital Tendon Injuries: Practice Essentials, Anatomy, Etiology (emedicine.medscape.com)
Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Injection Therapy
Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Injection Therapy (news-medical.net)
Achilles Tendon Injuries | Johns Hopkins Medicine
Achilles Tendon Injuries | Johns Hopkins Medicine (hopkinsmedicine.org)
Preventing Tendon Injuries - Expert advice on horse care and horse riding
Preventing Tendon Injuries - Expert advice on horse care and horse riding (equisearch.com)
February 1986 - Volume 16 - Issue 2 : Annals of Plastic Surgery
February 1986 - Volume 16 - Issue 2 : Annals of Plastic Surgery (journals.lww.com)
Jun 1985 - Volume 67 - Issue 5 : JBJS
Jun 1985 - Volume 67 - Issue 5 : JBJS (journals.lww.com)
Tiger Woods - Achilles Tendon Injuries | Austin Foot And Ankle Specialists
Tiger Woods - Achilles Tendon Injuries | Austin Foot And Ankle Specialists (austinfootandankle.com)
Preventing Achilles Tendon Injuries | EmaxHealth
Preventing Achilles Tendon Injuries | EmaxHealth (emaxhealth.com)
Treatments for Elbow Pain From Weightlifting | Livestrong.com
Treatments for Elbow Pain From Weightlifting | Livestrong.com (livestrong.com)
Wheeless' Textbook of Orthopaedics
Wheeless' Textbook of Orthopaedics (wheelessonline.com)
Nelson F. SooHoo, MD : Orthopaedic Surgery, Foot and Ankle | Orthopaedic Surgery - Santa Monica, California
Nelson F. SooHoo, MD : Orthopaedic Surgery, Foot and Ankle | Orthopaedic Surgery - Santa Monica, California (uclahealth.org)
Achilles Tendon Injuries and Ruptures In Basketball, Article #5 | Indiana Podiatry Group
Achilles Tendon Injuries and Ruptures In Basketball, Article #5 | Indiana Podiatry Group (inpodiatrygroup.com)
OCD: Causes in Young Horses and Long-Term Impact - The Horse
OCD: Causes in Young Horses and Long-Term Impact - The Horse (thehorse.com)
Service Locations | Logan Regional Hospital
Service Locations | Logan Regional Hospital (intermountainhealthcare.org)
Shoulder Injuries Due to Over Stretching Arms | LIVESTRONG.COM
Shoulder Injuries Due to Over Stretching Arms | LIVESTRONG.COM (livestrong.com)
Howell Equine Handbook of Tendon and Ligament Injuries by Linda B Schultz | Waterstones
Howell Equine Handbook of Tendon and Ligament Injuries by Linda B Schultz | Waterstones (waterstones.com)
Musculoskeletal Medicine - Orthogate Press
Musculoskeletal Medicine - Orthogate Press (orthogate.org)
Treatments for Forearm Muscle and Tendon Injuries | Livestrong.com
Treatments for Forearm Muscle and Tendon Injuries | Livestrong.com (livestrong.com)
Knee injuries: Common injuries, treatment options, and prevention
Knee injuries: Common injuries, treatment options, and prevention (medicalnewstoday.com)
Philadelphia Eagles: DeMeco Ryans and Research on Achilles Tendon Injuries | Bleacher Report | Latest News, Videos and...
Philadelphia Eagles: DeMeco Ryans and Research on Achilles Tendon Injuries | Bleacher Report | Latest News, Videos and... (bleacherreport.com)
Scientists 1 Step Closer to Understand Tendon Injury
Scientists 1 Step Closer to Understand Tendon Injury (medindia.net)
Biceps curl - Wikipedia
Biceps curl - Wikipedia (en.wikipedia.org)
NIOSHTIC-2  Publications Search - 20036522 - Exposure-dependent increases in IL-1beta, substance P, CTGF, and tendinosis in...
NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search - 20036522 - Exposure-dependent increases in IL-1beta, substance P, CTGF, and tendinosis in... (cdc.gov)
Training Articles Archives - Page 19 of 20 - Nicros Nicros
Training Articles Archives - Page 19 of 20 - Nicros Nicros (nicros.com)
Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Stem Cell Reprogramming Decoded
Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Stem Cell Reprogramming Decoded (medindia.net)
Embryonic Stem Cells for Tendon Injuries in Horses Examined - BloodHorse
Embryonic Stem Cells for Tendon Injuries in Horses Examined - BloodHorse (bloodhorse.com)
Aging | Science 2.0
Aging | Science 2.0 (science20.com)
Occupational Therapy - Greensboro | Wake Forest Baptist Health
Occupational Therapy - Greensboro | Wake Forest Baptist Health (wakehealth.edu)
General Trauma Care and Related Aspects - Trauma Surgery II | Hans-Jörg Oestern | Springer
General Trauma Care and Related Aspects - Trauma Surgery II | Hans-Jörg Oestern | Springer (springer.com)