Mansonelliasis: Infection with nematodes of the genus MANSONELLA. Symptoms include pruritus, headache, and articular swelling.Mansonella: A genus of parasitic nematodes whose organisms are distributed in Central and South America. Characteristics include a smooth cuticle and an enlarged anterior end.Crowdsourcing: Social media model for enabling public involvement and recruitment in participation. Use of social media to collect feedback and recruit volunteer subjects.Microscopy: The use of instrumentation and techniques for visualizing material and details that cannot be seen by the unaided eye. It is usually done by enlarging images, transmitted by light or electron beams, with optical or magnetic lenses that magnify the entire image field. With scanning microscopy, images are generated by collecting output from the specimen in a point-by-point fashion, on a magnified scale, as it is scanned by a narrow beam of light or electrons, a laser, a conductive probe, or a topographical probe.Plasmodium: A genus of protozoa that comprise the malaria parasites of mammals. Four species infect humans (although occasional infections with primate malarias may occur). These are PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; PLASMODIUM OVALE, and PLASMODIUM VIVAX. Species causing infection in vertebrates other than man include: PLASMODIUM BERGHEI; PLASMODIUM CHABAUDI; P. vinckei, and PLASMODIUM YOELII in rodents; P. brasilianum, PLASMODIUM CYNOMOLGI; and PLASMODIUM KNOWLESI in monkeys; and PLASMODIUM GALLINACEUM in chickens.Parasitemia: The presence of parasites (especially malarial parasites) in the blood. (Dorland, 27th ed)Blood: The body fluid that circulates in the vascular system (BLOOD VESSELS). Whole blood includes PLASMA and BLOOD CELLS.Malaria, Falciparum: Malaria caused by PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM. This is the severest form of malaria and is associated with the highest levels of parasites in the blood. This disease is characterized by irregularly recurring febrile paroxysms that in extreme cases occur with acute cerebral, renal, or gastrointestinal manifestations.Malaria: A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.Plasmodium falciparum: A species of protozoa that is the causal agent of falciparum malaria (MALARIA, FALCIPARUM). It is most prevalent in the tropics and subtropics.Parasitology: The study of parasites and PARASITIC DISEASES.Filariasis: Infections with nematodes of the superfamily FILARIOIDEA. The presence of living worms in the body is mainly asymptomatic but the death of adult worms leads to granulomatous inflammation and permanent fibrosis. Organisms of the genus Elaeophora infect wild elk and domestic sheep causing ischemic necrosis of the brain, blindness, and dermatosis of the face.Azure Stains: PHENOTHIAZINES with an amino group at the 3-position that are green crystals or powder. They are used as biological stains.Wuchereria bancrofti: A white threadlike worm which causes elephantiasis, lymphangitis, and chyluria by interfering with the lymphatic circulation. The microfilaria are found in the circulating blood and are carried by mosquitoes.Malaria, Vivax: Malaria caused by PLASMODIUM VIVAX. This form of malaria is less severe than MALARIA, FALCIPARUM, but there is a higher probability for relapses to occur. Febrile paroxysms often occur every other day.Plasmodium vivax: A protozoan parasite that causes vivax malaria (MALARIA, VIVAX). This species is found almost everywhere malaria is endemic and is the only one that has a range extending into the temperate regions.DNA, Protozoan: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of protozoa.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Antimalarials: Agents used in the treatment of malaria. They are usually classified on the basis of their action against plasmodia at different stages in their life cycle in the human. (From AMA, Drug Evaluations Annual, 1992, p1585)Reagent Kits, Diagnostic: Commercially prepared reagent sets, with accessory devices, containing all of the major components and literature necessary to perform one or more designated diagnostic tests or procedures. They may be for laboratory or personal use.BrazilLoop of Henle: The U-shaped portion of the renal tubule in the KIDNEY MEDULLA, consisting of a descending limb and an ascending limb. It is situated between the PROXIMAL KIDNEY TUBULE and the DISTAL KIDNEY TUBULE.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Solute Carrier Family 12, Member 1: Na-K-Cl transporter in the ASCENDING LIMB OF LOOP OF HENLE. It mediates active reabsorption of sodium chloride and is inhibited by LOOP DIURETICS such as FUROSEMIDE; and BUMETANIDE. Mutations in the gene encoding SLC12A1 are associated with a BARTTER SYNDROME.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Kidney Medulla: The internal portion of the kidney, consisting of striated conical masses, the renal pyramids, whose bases are adjacent to the cortex and whose apices form prominent papillae projecting into the lumen of the minor calyces.Myosins: A diverse superfamily of proteins that function as translocating proteins. They share the common characteristics of being able to bind ACTINS and hydrolyze MgATP. Myosins generally consist of heavy chains which are involved in locomotion, and light chains which are involved in regulation. Within the structure of myosin heavy chain are three domains: the head, the neck and the tail. The head region of the heavy chain contains the actin binding domain and MgATPase domain which provides energy for locomotion. The neck region is involved in binding the light-chains. The tail region provides the anchoring point that maintains the position of the heavy chain. The superfamily of myosins is organized into structural classes based upon the type and arrangement of the subunits they contain.Myofibrils: The long cylindrical contractile organelles of STRIATED MUSCLE cells composed of ACTIN FILAMENTS; MYOSIN filaments; and other proteins organized in arrays of repeating units called SARCOMERES .Nephrons: The functional units of the kidney, consisting of the glomerulus and the attached tubule.Uromodulin: A glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol (GPI) - anchored membrane protein found on the thick ascending limb of the LOOP OF HENLE. The cleaved form of the protein is found abundantly in URINE.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Actin Cytoskeleton: Fibers composed of MICROFILAMENT PROTEINS, which are predominately ACTIN. They are the smallest of the cytoskeletal filaments.Kidney Tubules, Distal: The portion of renal tubule that begins from the enlarged segment of the ascending limb of the LOOP OF HENLE. It reenters the KIDNEY CORTEX and forms the convoluted segments of the distal tubule.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Kidney Tubules: Long convoluted tubules in the nephrons. They collect filtrate from blood passing through the KIDNEY GLOMERULUS and process this filtrate into URINE. Each renal tubule consists of a BOWMAN CAPSULE; PROXIMAL KIDNEY TUBULE; LOOP OF HENLE; DISTAL KIDNEY TUBULE; and KIDNEY COLLECTING DUCT leading to the central cavity of the kidney (KIDNEY PELVIS) that connects to the URETER.Muscles: Contractile tissue that produces movement in animals.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Sodium Chloride: A ubiquitous sodium salt that is commonly used to season food.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Connectin: A giant elastic protein of molecular mass ranging from 2,993 kDa (cardiac), 3,300 kDa (psoas), to 3,700 kDa (soleus) having a kinase domain. The amino- terminal is involved in a Z line binding, and the carboxy-terminal region is bound to the myosin filament with an overlap between the counter-connectin filaments at the M line.Absorption: The physical or physiological processes by which substances, tissue, cells, etc. take up or take in other substances or energy.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Staining and Labeling: The marking of biological material with a dye or other reagent for the purpose of identifying and quantitating components of tissues, cells or their extracts.Furosemide: A benzoic-sulfonamide-furan. It is a diuretic with fast onset and short duration that is used for EDEMA and chronic RENAL INSUFFICIENCY.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Cytoskeleton: The network of filaments, tubules, and interconnecting filamentous bridges which give shape, structure, and organization to the cytoplasm.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Kidney Tubules, Collecting: Straight tubes commencing in the radiate part of the kidney cortex where they receive the curved ends of the distal convoluted tubules. In the medulla the collecting tubules of each pyramid converge to join a central tube (duct of Bellini) which opens on the summit of the papilla.Muscle Proteins: The protein constituents of muscle, the major ones being ACTINS and MYOSINS. More than a dozen accessory proteins exist including TROPONIN; TROPOMYOSIN; and DYSTROPHIN.Kidney Cortex: The outer zone of the KIDNEY, beneath the capsule, consisting of KIDNEY GLOMERULUS; KIDNEY TUBULES, DISTAL; and KIDNEY TUBULES, PROXIMAL.Microtomy: The technique of using a microtome to cut thin or ultrathin sections of tissues embedded in a supporting substance. The microtome is an instrument that hold a steel, glass or diamond knife in clamps at an angle to the blocks of prepared tissues, which it cuts in sections of equal thickness.Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Actins: Filamentous proteins that are the main constituent of the thin filaments of muscle fibers. The filaments (known also as filamentous or F-actin) can be dissociated into their globular subunits; each subunit is composed of a single polypeptide 375 amino acids long. This is known as globular or G-actin. In conjunction with MYOSINS, actin is responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscle.Horseshoe Crabs: An arthropod subclass (Xiphosura) comprising the North American (Limulus) and Asiatic (Tachypleus) genera of horseshoe crabs.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Hemorrhagic Disorders: Spontaneous or near spontaneous bleeding caused by a defect in clotting mechanisms (BLOOD COAGULATION DISORDERS) or another abnormality causing a structural flaw in the blood vessels (HEMOSTATIC DISORDERS).Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.Chlorides: Inorganic compounds derived from hydrochloric acid that contain the Cl- ion.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.X-Ray Diffraction: The scattering of x-rays by matter, especially crystals, with accompanying variation in intensity due to interference effects. Analysis of the crystal structure of materials is performed by passing x-rays through them and registering the diffraction image of the rays (CRYSTALLOGRAPHY, X-RAY). (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Tropomyosin: A protein found in the thin filaments of muscle fibers. It inhibits contraction of the muscle unless its position is modified by TROPONIN.Osmolar Concentration: The concentration of osmotically active particles in solution expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per liter of solution. Osmolality is expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per kilogram of solvent.Mucoproteins: Conjugated proteins in which mucopolysaccharides are combined with proteins. The mucopolysaccharide moiety is the predominant group with the protein making up only a small percentage of the total weight.Microscopy, Fluorescence: Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Bartter Syndrome: A group of disorders caused by defective salt reabsorption in the ascending LOOP OF HENLE. It is characterized by severe salt-wasting, HYPOKALEMIA; HYPERCALCIURIA; metabolic ALKALOSIS, and hyper-reninemic HYPERALDOSTERONISM without HYPERTENSION. There are several subtypes including ones due to mutations in the renal specific SODIUM-POTASSIUM-CHLORIDE SYMPORTERS.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Microscopy, Interference: The science and application of a double-beam transmission interference microscope in which the illuminating light beam is split into two paths. One beam passes through the specimen while the other beam reflects off a reference mirror before joining and interfering with the other. The observed optical path difference between the two beams can be measured and used to discriminate minute differences in thickness and refraction of non-stained transparent specimens, such as living cells in culture.Microscopy, Confocal: A light microscopic technique in which only a small spot is illuminated and observed at a time. An image is constructed through point-by-point scanning of the field in this manner. Light sources may be conventional or laser, and fluorescence or transmitted observations are possible.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Microscopy, Electron, Transmission: Electron microscopy in which the ELECTRONS or their reaction products that pass down through the specimen are imaged below the plane of the specimen.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Sodium: A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Elasticity: Resistance and recovery from distortion of shape.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Sodium-Hydrogen Antiporter: A plasma membrane exchange glycoprotein transporter that functions in intracellular pH regulation, cell volume regulation, and cellular response to many different hormones and mitogens.Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Histological Techniques: Methods of preparing tissue for examination and study of the origin, structure, function, or pathology.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Scattering, Radiation: The diversion of RADIATION (thermal, electromagnetic, or nuclear) from its original path as a result of interactions or collisions with atoms, molecules, or larger particles in the atmosphere or other media. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Microscopy, Electron, Scanning Transmission: A type of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY in which the object is examined directly by an extremely narrow electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point and using the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen to create the image. It should not be confused with SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Histocytochemistry: Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.Scintillation Counting: Detection and counting of scintillations produced in a fluorescent material by ionizing radiation.Flight, Animal: The use of wings or wing-like appendages to remain aloft and move through the air.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Bicarbonates: Inorganic salts that contain the -HCO3 radical. They are an important factor in determining the pH of the blood and the concentration of bicarbonate ions is regulated by the kidney. Levels in the blood are an index of the alkali reserve or buffering capacity.Polymers: Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).Collagen: A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Kidney Concentrating Ability: The ability of the kidney to excrete in the urine high concentrations of solutes from the blood plasma.Claudins: A large family of transmembrane proteins found in TIGHT JUNCTIONS. They take part in the formation of paracellular barriers and pores that regulate paracellular permeability.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Optics and Photonics: A specialized field of physics and engineering involved in studying the behavior and properties of light and the technology of analyzing, generating, transmitting, and manipulating ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION in the visible, infrared, and ultraviolet range.Protein Structure, Secondary: The level of protein structure in which regular hydrogen-bond interactions within contiguous stretches of polypeptide chain give rise to alpha helices, beta strands (which align to form beta sheets) or other types of coils. This is the first folding level of protein conformation.JapanModels, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Microscopy, Phase-Contrast: A form of interference microscopy in which variations of the refracting index in the object are converted into variations of intensity in the image. This is achieved by the action of a phase plate.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Personality: Behavior-response patterns that characterize the individual.Circular Dichroism: A change from planar to elliptic polarization when an initially plane-polarized light wave traverses an optically active medium. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Melanoma: A malignant neoplasm derived from cells that are capable of forming melanin, which may occur in the skin of any part of the body, in the eye, or, rarely, in the mucous membranes of the genitalia, anus, oral cavity, or other sites. It occurs mostly in adults and may originate de novo or from a pigmented nevus or malignant lentigo. Melanomas frequently metastasize widely, and the regional lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and brain are likely to be involved. The incidence of malignant skin melanomas is rising rapidly in all parts of the world. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 4th ed, p2445)Mytilus edulis: A species of mussel in the genus MYTILUS, family MYTILIDAE, class BIVALVIA, known as the common mussel. It has a bluish-black shell and is highly edible.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Nephrocalcinosis: A condition characterized by calcification of the renal tissue itself. It is usually seen in distal RENAL TUBULAR ACIDOSIS with calcium deposition in the DISTAL KIDNEY TUBULES and the surrounding interstitium. Nephrocalcinosis causes RENAL INSUFFICIENCY.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Arginine Vasopressin: The predominant form of mammalian antidiuretic hormone. It is a nonapeptide containing an ARGININE at residue 8 and two disulfide-linked cysteines at residues of 1 and 6. Arg-vasopressin is used to treat DIABETES INSIPIDUS or to improve vasomotor tone and BLOOD PRESSURE.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Muscle, Striated: One of two types of muscle in the body, characterized by the array of bands observed under microscope. Striated muscles can be divided into two subtypes: the CARDIAC MUSCLE and the SKELETAL MUSCLE.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Gold Colloid: A suspension of metallic gold particles.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Freeze Substitution: A modification of the freeze-drying method in which the ice within the frozen tissue is replaced by alcohol or other solvent at a very low temperature.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Deamino Arginine Vasopressin: A synthetic analog of the pituitary hormone, ARGININE VASOPRESSIN. Its action is mediated by the VASOPRESSIN receptor V2. It has prolonged antidiuretic activity, but little pressor effects. It also modulates levels of circulating FACTOR VIII and VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR.Fluorescent Dyes: Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Hardness: The mechanical property of material that determines its resistance to force. HARDNESS TESTS measure this property.Models, Structural: A representation, generally small in scale, to show the structure, construction, or appearance of something. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Biophysical Phenomena: The physical characteristics and processes of biological systems.Aggression: Behavior which may be manifested by destructive and attacking action which is verbal or physical, by covert attitudes of hostility or by obstructionism.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Chickens: Common name for the species Gallus gallus, the domestic fowl, in the family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. It is descended from the red jungle fowl of SOUTHEAST ASIA.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Biophysics: The study of PHYSICAL PHENOMENA and PHYSICAL PROCESSES as applied to living things.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Light: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Statistics as Topic: The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.Rats, Brattleboro: A mutant strain of Rattus norvegicus used in research on renal function and hypertension and as a disease model for diabetes insipidus.Membranes, Artificial: Artificially produced membranes, such as semipermeable membranes used in artificial kidney dialysis (RENAL DIALYSIS), monomolecular and bimolecular membranes used as models to simulate biological CELL MEMBRANES. These membranes are also used in the process of GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION.Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase: An enzyme that catalyzes the active transport system of sodium and potassium ions across the cell wall. Sodium and potassium ions are closely coupled with membrane ATPase which undergoes phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, thereby providing energy for transport of these ions against concentration gradients.Fourier Analysis: Analysis based on the mathematical function first formulated by Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier in 1807. The function, known as the Fourier transform, describes the sinusoidal pattern of any fluctuating pattern in the physical world in terms of its amplitude and its phase. It has broad applications in biomedicine, e.g., analysis of the x-ray crystallography data pivotal in identifying the double helical nature of DNA and in analysis of other molecules, including viruses, and the modified back-projection algorithm universally used in computerized tomography imaging, etc. (From Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Adenosine Triphosphate: An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.Potassium: An element in the alkali group of metals with an atomic symbol K, atomic number 19, and atomic weight 39.10. It is the chief cation in the intracellular fluid of muscle and other cells. Potassium ion is a strong electrolyte that plays a significant role in the regulation of fluid volume and maintenance of the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.Inclusion Bodies: A generic term for any circumscribed mass of foreign (e.g., lead or viruses) or metabolically inactive materials (e.g., ceroid or MALLORY BODIES), within the cytoplasm or nucleus of a cell. Inclusion bodies are in cells infected with certain filtrable viruses, observed especially in nerve, epithelial, or endothelial cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Cytoplasm: The part of a cell that contains the CYTOSOL and small structures excluding the CELL NUCLEUS; MITOCHONDRIA; and large VACUOLES. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Cell Wall: The outermost layer of a cell in most PLANTS; BACTERIA; FUNGI; and ALGAE. The cell wall is usually a rigid structure that lies external to the CELL MEMBRANE, and provides a protective barrier against physical or chemical agents.Receptors, Calcium-Sensing: A class of G-protein-coupled receptors that react to varying extracellular CALCIUM levels. Calcium-sensing receptors in the PARATHYROID GLANDS play an important role in the maintenance of calcium HOMEOSTASIS by regulating the release of PARATHYROID HORMONE. They differ from INTRACELLULAR CALCIUM-SENSING PROTEINS which sense intracellular calcium levels.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Color: The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.Tin Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain tin as an integral part of the molecule.Lasers: An optical source that emits photons in a coherent beam. Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (LASER) is brought about using devices that transform light of varying frequencies into a single intense, nearly nondivergent beam of monochromatic radiation. Lasers operate in the infrared, visible, ultraviolet, or X-ray regions of the spectrum.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Muscle, Smooth: Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Solubility: The ability of a substance to be dissolved, i.e. to form a solution with another substance. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Actomyosin: A protein complex of actin and MYOSINS occurring in muscle. It is the essential contractile substance of muscle.Microscopy, Atomic Force: A type of scanning probe microscopy in which a probe systematically rides across the surface of a sample being scanned in a raster pattern. The vertical position is recorded as a spring attached to the probe rises and falls in response to peaks and valleys on the surface. These deflections produce a topographic map of the sample.Magnesium: A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Mg, atomic number 12, and atomic weight 24.31. It is important for the activity of many enzymes, especially those involved in OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Thermodynamics: A rigorously mathematical analysis of energy relationships (heat, work, temperature, and equilibrium). It describes systems whose states are determined by thermal parameters, such as temperature, in addition to mechanical and electromagnetic parameters. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed)Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)
In Juli the same year a Northern American tour followed with Thick As Blood. Normally the band should have played Europe during ... Between January 20-31, 2012 the band toured Europe during the Persistence Tour alongside Biohazard and Suicidal Tendencies. ... The band is known for their aggressive sound which can be compared with First Blood and Blood Stands Still. 2006: This Means ... Lionheart announce tour with Thick As Blood, Dead Icons Karol Kaminski: Idioteq.com: LIONHEART POSTPONE THEIR EUROPEAN TOUR ( ...
... s are red and thick and may be itchy or painful. They do not extend beyond the boundary of the original wound ... They often contain nerves and blood vessels. They generally develop after thermal or traumatic injury that involves the deep ... Some people have an inherited tendency to this type of scarring, for example, those with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, classic type. ...
Thick As Blood, Sworn In, incendiary, Gideon, Bracewar, Remembering Never, Trapped Under Ice, Welcome The Tide, Skylar, Dark ... Suicidal Tendencies April 17, 2014 All That Remains, Bleeding Through, Broken Hope, Cop Problem, Darkest hour, Emmure, Enabler ... Acula, The Crimson Armada, Legacy, Counterparts, Legion, An Early Ending, Capitals April 15, 2011 Biohazard, Blood For Blood, ... Thick As Blood, Black Pyramid, Nachtmystium (cancelled), Donnybrook, XTheWarX, Grave Maker, Valient Thorr, After The Burial, ...
The restriction in blood supply usually results in significant reduction of fibroids and improvement of heavy bleeding tendency ... It is not effective for patients with very thick uterine lining or uterine fibroids. Levonorgestrel intrauterine devices are ... This has been suggested to be due to the disruption of blood supply to the ovaries after a hysterectomy or due to missing ... Length of surgery and amount of blood lost during surgery were significantly reduced during supracervical hysterectomy compared ...
Angiomyxoma is a myxoid tumor involving the blood vessels. It can affect the vulva and other parts of the pelvis. The ... it has a tendency to recur after surgical excision so it is termed as aggressive. The recurrence can be as close as six months ... thin-to-thick wall vessels of different sizes Myxoid, hypocellular background Bland cytological appearance of spindle cells ...
A further feature differentiating the yeast forms of H. duboisii and H. capsulatum is the tendency of buds of the former ... duboisii are oval in shape with thick cell walls composed of galactomannan intermixed with β-(1,4)-glucan. Cells of H. duboisii ... laboratory methods involving mycelial-to-yeast conversion on Brain-heart infusion medium supplemented with sheep blood and ... which is consistent with the tendency of the former to form mainly localized cutaneous and subcutaneous infections. ...
Patients with retinal tears may experience floaters if red blood cells are released from leaky blood vessels, and those with ... Eye floaters are suspended in the vitreous humour, the thick fluid or gel that fills the eye.[5] The vitreous humour, or ... Despite the name "floaters", many of these specks have a tendency to sink toward the bottom of the eyeball, in whichever way ... Although the blood vessels of the eye also obstruct light, they are invisible under normal circumstances because they are fixed ...
The hemolytic effect has been the result of surfactin having the ability to lyse red blood cells that is enough to warrant ... Its non-specificity also has bearing on its tendency to not produce resistant strains of bacteria. Consequently, this efficient ... whereas the Gram-positive bacteria lack the outer membrane and carry a thicker peptidoglycan layer as well as a phospholipids ... mode of cell destruction is indiscriminate, and attacks red blood cells with deadly efficiency. Surfactin, true to its ...
In his past, he made a living drinking young women's blood. Thanks to Mina, he represses his evil tendencies. Vlad has many ... Tara Strong (originally Ashley Johnson) - Wilhelmina "Mina" Harper: A 7-year-old girl with thick long red hair in a ponytail ...
Large hepatic adenomas have a tendency to rupture and bleed massively inside the abdomen. If not treated, there is a 30% risk ... The hepatocytes are on a regular reticulin scaffold and less or equal to three cell thick. The histologic diagnosis of hepatic ... Cells resemble normal hepatocytes and are traversed by blood vessels but lack portal tracts or central veins. Micrograph of ...
The mandible's blood supply is primarily via the inferior alveolar artery, and secondarily via the periosteum. Compromise of ... The cortical plates are thick and there is a medullary cavity. The sites of the mandible most commonly affected by OM are ( ... Other risk factors can be any familial hypercoagulation tendency, including for example, Factor V (Five) Leiden heterozygosity ... This is thought to be related to the differences in blood supply between the mandible and the maxilla. The maxilla has a better ...
The encoded protein has a greater tendency to allow potassium to flow into a cell rather than out of a cell (hence the term " ... It plays an important role in potassium recycling in the thick ascending limb (TAL) and potassium secretion in the cortical ... and low blood pressure. ROMK channels are inhibited by magnesium in the nephron's normal physiologic state. In states of ... "Rare independent mutations in renal salt handling genes contribute to blood pressure variation". Nature Genetics. 40 (5): 592- ...
Bartter's syndrome consists of low levels of potassium in the blood, alkalosis, normal to low blood pressures, and elevated ... Bartter syndrome is a rare inherited defect in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle. It is characterized by low ... Like infants with the neonatal subtype, patients with classic Bartter syndrome also have polyuria, polydipsia, and a tendency ... Proper function of all of these transporters is necessary for normal ion reabsorption along the thick ascending limb, and loss ...
... the thick-set body, and a tendency to be anti-intellectual and destructive. According to this theory, the product of this ... and his veins are so full of Gothic blood that even at the present day noble inhabitants of Morocco can trace their descent ...
This indicated a structural adaptation of the blood vessels to a state with smaller lumen diameter but thicker wall (what now ... His opinion was that individuals with a tendency to react more strongly with this response tend to develop higher blood ... The structural adaptation of blood vessels to elevated blood pressure. Folkow and coworkers studied the blood flow in the ... Even though the kidney is important for blood pressure control, he viewed it as subordinate to the brain. The function of the ...
... and having a wall one endothelial cell thick. They are the smallest blood vessels in the body: they convey blood between the ... to counteract the increased tendency for high pressure to increase blood flow.[citation needed] ... Blood sampling[edit]. Capillary blood sampling can be used to test for, for example, blood glucose (such as in blood glucose ... These types of blood vessels allow red and white blood cells (7.5 µm - 25 µm diameter) and various serum proteins to pass, ...
In the process he discovers that gold, known to the hrossa as "sun's blood", is plentiful on Malacandra, and thus is able to ... Weston - A thick-set physicist, savage, arrogant and greedy, who considers himself ultra-civilized. He mocks "classics and ... 18). Malacandra's hnau are "unfallen": free of the tendency to evil and sin that plagues humans. Ransom describes the emotional ... They are miners who especially like to dig up "sun's blood" (gold) and other useful and beautiful minerals. They are the only ...
Mycert stated that "the crib is at most barbarous and unscientific because there is already a tendency to determine the blood ... The Utica Crib was an ordinary bed with a thick mattress on the bottom, slats on the sides, and a hinged top that could be ...
... long thick arrow) plus increased signal in the overlying soft tissues indicating edema (short thick arrow). There is also ... More rarely, they may be associated with nervous system disorders, blood disorders or certain types of cancer.[citation needed ... Osteoarthritis shares certain clinical features with psoriatic arthritis such as its tendency to affect multiple distal joints ... A negative test result for rheumatoid factor, a blood factor associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis symptoms in the ...
Blood testing is also used to look for abnormal levels of alphafetoprotein or hormones. The results of all three factors may ... In pregnancies affected by Down syndrome there is a tendency for the levels of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) to be ... Natural fetal loss after positive diagnosis at 12 weeks is about 30%. Other common chromosomal defects that cause a thicker ... In 2011, Sequenom announced the launch of MaterniT21, a non-invasive blood test with a high level of accuracy in detecting Down ...
... "drugs to get blood pressure under control, drive cholesterol levels down and prevent blood clotting". Some cardiologists ... In addition, there is a strong tendency for clots to form at the site where the stent damages the arterial wall. Since ... One of the drawbacks of vascular stents is the potential for restenosis via the development of a thick smooth muscle tissue ... A coronary stent is a tube-shaped device placed in the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart, to keep the arteries ...
Their coat is shiny with thick skin. Horse breeding was first mentioned in documents in the Brandenburg March in the 15th ... A comprehensive blood rejuvenation has taken place since 1990, through the newly founded breeders' association. Since then, ... and is known for being energetic with little tendency to nervousness. The typical height is 16.1 hands. They have medium size ...
Examples of early crossover thrash bands are D.R.I. and Suicidal Tendencies. The New York hardcore band Killing Time is ... "A Taste for Blood Official Biography". Abridged Pause Recordings. October 26, 2013. Retrieved November 13, 2017. Ramirez, ... Jason Anderson of AllMusic noted the album's "raw lyrics and thick guitar grooves". Sheer Terror used obvious heavy metal ... "a thick, metallic guitar crunch to the by then standard manic, angst-ridden, and ragged neo-punk sound of the mid- to late-'80s ...
Other faults include a thick throat latch, a thick neck, a low neck set, ewe neck, some downhill horses (particularly with no ... In spite of this exclusion, many full blooded, registered Appaloosas still perform a natural ambling gait often referred to as ... the gene pool within the ApHC is rather slim and very few breeders strive to perpetuate this tendency. The Walkaloosa Horse ... thick, coarse or overly muscular appearance, insufficient muscling to the loin, or any crookedness of the back. Tiger Horse ( ...
It has been noted that parasitism by haematozoa is higher in colonial birds and it has been suggested that blood parasites ... For example, the thick-billed parrot is another bird that nests and roosts communally; individuals of neighboring roosts has ... but there is some doubt about whether it balances out against the tendency for conspicuous breeding colonies to attract ... "Gergarious Nesting Behavior of Thick-Billed Parrots (Rhynochopsitta pachyrhyncha) in Aspen Stands". Wilson Journal of ...
They found that as these chills increase, many changes in cerebral blood flow are seen in brain regions such as the amygdala, ... Differences were found in lateralization tendencies as language tasks favoured the left hemisphere, but the majority of ... Amusic brains have been found in fMRI studies to have less white matter and thicker cortex than controls in the right inferior ... Blood, A. J.; Zatorre, R. J. (2001). "Intensely pleasurable responses to music correlate with activity in brain regions ...
Although does Biancas prediction mean she wants Phèdre to embrace her lypiphera/anguissette tendencies? Or is this Biancas ... Blood is Thicker Than Water: Kushiels Chosen, Part 2. Theresa DeLucci and Natalie Zutter Wed Mar 4, 2015 11:00am 6 comments 1 ... Elua, all the blood in this part! Obviously Kushiels Dart set blood as a motif with Phèdres scarlet-flecked eye, the various ... "blood-shot darkness" of the thetalos. Blood is sustaining, but lose too much of it and youre dead. Its a delicate balance to ...
Mice with a greater tendency to form blood clots have larger plaques in their vessels, but they are more stable. Thus, there is ... Why thick blood protects from a heart attack Heidelberg researchers explain a clinical paradox in Circulation; animal model ... "Thick" blood can cause heart attack and stroke, but also prevent them. Scientists at Heidelberg University Hospital have ... The researchers examined mice with elevated blood fat levels and a genetic defect that leads to an increase in blood clotting. ...
The researchers also found ways to exploit the particles other natural tendencies. Since the particles tend to congregate ... found that effective delivery of the chemotherapy drug docetaxel could prevent artery walls from growing back too thick after ... Nanoparticles Disguised As Blood Cells Could Destroy Diseases. They slip past the immune system to deliver a powerful punch of ... Now a team of California-based researchers has figured out a way to disguise the particles to look like parts of blood cells, ...
... your body has to stop the bleeding by forming a blood clot. One of the first steps in forming a blood clot involves small blood ... Although these activated platelets are not necessarily "thicker," they have a tendency to form clumps. ... your body has to stop the bleeding by forming a blood clot. One of the first steps in forming a blood clot involves small blood ... Do Iron Supplements Thicken Blood Platelets?. Written by Adam Cloe; Updated December 27, 2018 Do Iron Supplements Thicken Blood ...
... tendency to clot) disorders, and other conditions that may not be apparent until looked for. When told one has "thick blood," ... Question: My boss recently had blood drawn for surgery and was told he had "thick blood". Can you offer any information on this ... "thick blood." Some doctors use this term to explain why they are placing their patients on medicines to "thin" their blood. ... Our blood flow (often mistakenly referred to as blood thickness) may be affected by local problems with blood vessels as well ...
Red blood cells (RBCs) in the presence of plasma proteins or other macromolecules have a tendency to form aggregates. Light- ... Angular-resolved measurements of light intensity scattered by an RBC suspension from a 200-μm thick optical glass cuvette ... Cristian V. L. Pop, Cristian V. L. Pop, Silvia Neamtu, Silvia Neamtu, } "Aggregation of red blood cells in suspension: study by ... Aggregation of red blood cells in suspension: study by light-scattering technique at small angles. ...
No, Im not sick: My blood glucose (BGs) have been high since yesterday, and its all my doing. I woke up yesterday (Sunday) ... But, when I do make chili, I have a tendency to make it very thick and to use it as a dip with taco chips. ... Protocol for people who use an insulin pump is to take an injection of insulin if blood glucose is high after a couple of ... Home , Blog , Jan Chait , Got Those Low-down, Fatty-Food-Eatin, No-Carb-Countin, High-Blood-Glucose Blues ...
... guidance and support for readers interested in applying the principles of The Blood Type Diet as outlined by The New York Times ... The protective effect of alcohol, in moderation and according to diet, for the particular dangers of having thicker blood is ... and least tendency for platelet aggregation. Because of this, Non-secretors (especially the type As) tend to be at the highest ... thickest blood viscosity, and the most probability to have high platelet aggregation. On the other end on the continuum will be ...
Here are some of the key symptoms that you might have if you have high blood sugar. ... We always associate high blood sugar with those who have diabetes. However, this need not necessarily be the case. ... When you have high blood sugar, it can make your blood thicker. This may make you feel numbness in certain organs as the blood ... This is also likely to cause a greater tendency to bladder and yeast infections. ...
... drugs decreased the viscosity of blood, but studies found[4] that they act by reducing the tendency of the blood to clot ... If the blood gets thicker, the result is an increase in arterial pressure. Certain medical conditions can change the viscosity ... Blood pressure (strictly speaking: vascular pressure) refers to the force exerted by circulating blood on the walls of blood ... Volume of fluid or blood volume, the amount of blood that is present in the body. The more blood present in the body, the ...
From the earliest ages the blood has been held to be one of the most important constituents of the body, for it was natural, ... and consequently have a tendency to fall to the bottom of the vessel when blood is removed from the body. This disposition to ... The red corpuscles are pale-yellow circular discs, each resembling a coin, with edges thicker than the central part, and they ... The Blood. From the earliest ages the blood has been held to be one of the most important constituents of the body, for it was ...
We have been developing extracorporeal blood Aβ-removal systems as a method for enhancing Aβ clearance from the brain. We ... Removal of Abeta Oligomers from the Blood: A Potential Therapeutic System for Alzheimers Disease Yuta Saito,1- 3 Miwa Sakata,3 ... reported previously that medical adsorbents and hemodialyzers removed Aβ monomers from peripheral blood, which was associated ... B-E) Time course of the concentration changes of Aβ oligomers (black solid thick line with square marks, pmol/L), Aβ1-40 (blue ...
... Diagnostics A sphygmomanometer, a device used for measuring arterial pressure. MeSH ... For information about high blood pressure, see Hypertension. ... If the blood gets thicker, the result is an increase in ... drugs decreased the viscosity of blood, but instead studies found[16] that they act by reducing the tendency of the blood to ... blood pressure - blood .pressure n [U] the force with which blood travels through your body ▪ high blood pressure check/take sb ...
As are commonly plagued by poor circulation caused by thick blood.. Mucus is our bodys way of removing irritants. It is ... Blood Type A. Unlike Os, those with blood type A (the second most common blood type) usually know from experience which foods ... These blood changes are related largely to blood type. So for some blood types, red meat is needful, and others should be ... I found out I am blood type B. I cant believe how spot on your description of their tendencies are! It explains a lot and Im ...
... guidance and support for readers interested in applying the principles of The Blood Type Diet as outlined by The New York Times ... especially the "chameleonlike quality" and "enigma". also, "tendency to feel angry and alienated from others", and "the ... through thick and thin, but i never felt like i belonged. i could never figure out where i fit in amongst groups of people. i ... I dont like to generalize within blood type either, but I do seem to find some similarities. My mother in law and Step Dad are ...
... wherein blood flow is in the direction of transition from larger to smaller diameter. A method for revascularizing a coronary ... and inserting the first end through the myocardium into a heart chamber so that the implant directs blood flow into the ... To counteract this tendency, the conduit 10, 10′ is equipped with a reservoir 24, 24′ which stores this pressurized blood ... In essence, the CPR 24, 24′ serves a function similar to the elastic connective tissue of the thick-walled aorta. The necessary ...
Lower Risk of Blood Clots and Cancer. The use of ginger may diminish the risk of blood clots forming and increase bleeding time ... It has a tendency to round out some flavors while accenting others. Ginger is now commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine ... Ginger is a perennial tropical plant with a thick tuberous rhizome. The fleshy rhizomes of ginger are harvested when the plant ... Its anti-tumor properties and ability to reduce the risk of blood clot formation makes it a useful herb for lowering the risk ...
Both of them involve endometrium growth due to which there has a tendency to formulate thick blood clots during periods. ... How to manage period blood clots? In case you are having occasional, small blood clots, then the matter is not a big deal, and ... Are large blood clots during period normal?. You must have noticed that throughout your menstruation cycle, blood color varies ... Moreover, large blood clots mean excessive blood loss, which if not treated in time, may lead towards anemia that causes pale ...
Hypertrophic scars are red and thick and may be itchy or painful. They do not extend beyond the boundary of the original wound ... They often contain nerves and blood vessels. They generally develop after thermal or traumatic injury that involves the deep ... Some people have an inherited tendency to this type of scarring, for example, those with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, classic type. ...
... of thick film preparation. Standardized blood droplets from 26 previously examined EDTA whole blood specimens (22 positive and ... Thick films contain 10 to 20 times more blood than thin films, correspondingly providing increased sensitivity for malaria ... The SCM is an inexpensive, rapid, and simple method that improves the adherence of thick blood films to standard glass slides ... A potential complication of thick film preparations is sloughing of the blood droplet from the slide during staining or rinsing ...
The parasympathetic branch ("rest and digest") causes pupil contraction, lowering of heart rate, lowering of blood sugar, ... Thick musculature. Symptoms - Bowel Movements (Very) frequent stools or normal stool frequency. ...
Cold Blooded: Existing with the chill in the grave racing through their blood, Banshees are hardly touched by mundane cold. A ... Thick Hide. You have resistance to your Natural Weapon Affinity damage type from nonmagical weapon attacks.. [h=3]Brute Subrace ... Hard and driven by nature, they are natural pragmatists, and their tendency towards dark origins gives them both a natural ... Strength Through Blood. In the muls form, one can see the best traits of both human and dwarf come together. A mul combines ...
I have a tendency to check it as my was open once and could not figure out why it smelled till i felt it and it as open. I have ... Then it put pressure on the pouch, and squeezed out the thick output. I was very careful about closing it, and it was on the ... Feb 2011 -- proctocolectomy with permanent ileolostomy; abscess, blood clot. Still healing, still glad for the surgery ... Feb 2011 -- proctocolectomy with permanent ileolostomy; abscess, blood clot. Still healing, still glad for the surgery ...
Angiomyxoma is a myxoid tumor involving the blood vessels. It can affect the vulva and other parts of the pelvis. The ... it has a tendency to recur after surgical excision so it is termed as aggressive. The recurrence can be as close as six months ... thin-to-thick wall vessels of different sizes Myxoid, hypocellular background Bland cytological appearance of spindle cells ...
A very thick and raised scar is called a keloid.. *Lichenification. Rough, thick epidermis with exaggerated skin lines. This is ... Small, dilated blood vessels that appear close to the surface of the skin. Telangiectasia is often a symptom of such diseases ... A tendency toward developing moles, freckles, or birthmarks may be inherited. Infection of the skin itself by bacteria, viruses ... A very thick and raised scar is called a keloid.. *Lichenification. Rough, thick epidermis with exaggerated skin lines. This is ...
  • Diogenes syndrome (DS) is characterized by self-neglect and social withdrawal with abnormal collecting pattern, tendency to hoard excessively (syllogomania), and refusal of help, wich may be precipitated by stressful event [ 1 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Other individuals have syndromes such as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) or autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome (AD-HIES) that include a tendency to develop candidiasis along with other signs and symptoms affecting various organs and systems of the body. (medlineplus.gov)
  • When signs and symptoms are present, they're the result of the thick blood that occurs with PV. (cdc.gov)
  • 19 . The method of claim 18 , wherein the blood flow path is at a site in the coronary vessel positioned between an obstruction in the coronary vessel and tissue of the heart to be supplied with blood by the coronary vessel. (google.ca)
  • The build-up of scar tissue can interfere with the flow of blood to your liver and stop it from functioning properly. (britishlivertrust.org.uk)
  • sending other cytokines and white blood cells that fight foreign invaders and promote tissue repair. (medlineplus.gov)
  • myxoid tumors Angiomyofibroblastoma Although it is a benign tumour and does not 'invade' the neighbouring tissue, it has a tendency to recur after surgical excision so it is termed as aggressive. (wikipedia.org)
  • Confirmatory testing varies depending on the initial screen and can include fatty acid oxidation probe tests on skin samples, enzyme uptake testing of skin or muscle tissue samples, enzyme assays of blood samples, DNA testing, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and tandem mass spectrometry. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • It is the area of the gas exchange between the blood and tissue spaces. (healthhype.com)
  • Red blood cells are made in your bone marrow-a sponge-like tissue inside the bones. (cdc.gov)
  • Tendency to tissue degeneration, septic conditions, abscesses that do not mature. (wellnesscenter.net)
  • Since the particles tend to congregate around damaged blood vessels, the researchers found that effective delivery of the chemotherapy drug docetaxel could prevent artery walls from growing back too thick after surgery. (popsci.com)
  • This may make you feel numbness in certain organs as the blood is not flowing easily into them. (internationaldrugmart.com)
  • During the Master Cleanse, as the body begins its job of healing the different organs in the body, you will notice that your white moss or fur carpet will get thicker. (curezone.com)
  • As a whole the tongue reflects the condition of the digestive system and the organs associated with blood, nutrient assimilation, and excretion. (curezone.com)
  • A TCM herbalist or acupuncturist will always prescribe ma huang in combination with other herbs to help counteract possible side effects such as nervousness, sleeplessness, heart palpitations, high blood pressure, and directing energy away from the digestive organs. (healthy.net)
  • Slowed blood flow prevents your organs from getting enough oxygen, which can cause serious problems, such as angina (an-JI-nuh or AN-juh-nuh) and heart failure . (cdc.gov)
  • Some blood "thinners" (such as aspirin, Plavix) actually delay or inhibit platelet function prolonging the time to form a platelet plug while others affect the coagulation time and delay the coagulation process causing prolonged bleeding (such as heparin and coumadin). (newsmax.com)
  • In essence what this means is that an A Non-secretor will be at the far end of the spectrum with the slowest bleeding times, thickest blood viscosity, and the most probability to have high platelet aggregation. (dadamo.com)
  • On the other end on the continuum will be O Secretors, who will have the longest bleeding time, thinnest blood, and least tendency for platelet aggregation. (dadamo.com)
  • A vital tip that helps reduce blood sugar levels naturally involves weight loss, especially among overweight or obese patients. (amazonaws.com)
  • The researchers examined mice with elevated blood fat levels and a genetic defect that leads to an increase in blood clotting. (eurekalert.org)
  • There seems to be some genetic link, based on the fact that the tendency to develop JA sometimes runs in a particular family and based on the fact that certain genetic markers are more frequently found in patients with JA and other related diseases. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The first step was to take a blood sample for future genetic analysis. (mcsweeneys.net)
  • The basic diagnostic process involves a medical examination, imaging of the lymph vessels and nodes, imaging of the soft tissues, measuring the changes in electric conductance, measurement of the volume of edema, genetic tests, and imaging of the blood vessels. (medindia.net)
  • To evaluate this condition, first check the complete blood count for abnormalities that may affect blood flow (such as excessive numbers of red blood cells as in polycythemia, or abnormalities of red blood cell form or structure). (newsmax.com)
  • Our blood flow (often mistakenly referred to as blood thickness) may be affected by local problems with blood vessels as well as abnormalities of blood components. (newsmax.com)
  • Sometimes the appearance of slow flow on blood draw has nothing to do with blood problems, and may be related to a local circulatory disorder or simply related to the size needle used to sample your blood. (newsmax.com)
  • [ 1 ] The mean BP, due to pumping by the heart and resistance to flow in blood vessels, decreases as the circulating blood moves away from the heart through arteries . (academic.ru)
  • A method for revascularizing a coronary vessel with a conduit through the heart wall having a diameter transition in the myocardial leg, wherein blood flow is in the direction of transition from larger to smaller diameter. (google.ca)
  • A method for revascularizing a coronary vessel using an implant with a myocardial leg having a maximum cross-sectional area proximate a first end, and inserting the first end through the myocardium into a heart chamber so that the implant directs blood flow into the coronary vessel. (google.ca)
  • placing a conduit in a heart wall between a heart chamber and the coronary vessel so that a blood flow path directly between the heart chamber and a posterior of the coronary vessel remains open during both systole and diastole. (google.ca)
  • To evaluate the influence of central corneal thickness (CCT) on intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements made with the Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT), Tono-Pen XL, ocular blood flow tonograph (OBF), and Canon TX-10 non-contact tonometer (NCT). (bmj.com)
  • 4- 6 The GAT, Tono-Pen, ocular blood flow tonograph (OBF), and non-contact tonometer (NCT) all use an applanation principle. (bmj.com)
  • Teens who lose 80 ml, or just under 3 ounces, of blood in the menstrual flow each month have a high risk of becoming anemic. (livestrong.com)
  • Therefore, it demands more oxygen and more blood flow. (nebraska.tv)
  • This allows it to control the blood flow to different areas of the body and withstand the high pressure of blood leaving the heart. (healthhype.com)
  • When blood just starts to flow in the artery, the turbulent flow creates a whooshing or pounding (first Korotkoff sound). (codagu.com)
  • This fluid can flow along with your chi and reside in any region of the body obstructing blood and chi flow. (acupuncture-healthcare.com)
  • They may also see thick, dark, velvety skin under the arms, between the legs, between fingers and toes, or on elbows and knees. (kidshealth.org)
  • It is measured on the inside of an elbow at the brachial artery , which is the upper arm's major blood vessel that carries blood away from the heart. (academic.ru)
  • femoral artery was opened sixteen ounces of blood came sided otorrhcea developed recently, which has resulted Chirurgicum of Scultetus, of which work this larger one is the nitrofurantoin mims singapore occurrence. (microtas10.org)
  • The Blood Type diet is NOT a diet based on an eating philosophy or theory, such as: Paleo, organic veggies only, raw foods only, no/low fats, sugars are bad, carbs are bad, no red meat, etc., but rather on actual measurements of the change of blood quality after the ingestion of specific foods. (health-parameters.com)
  • Avocado: This fruit contains the healthy fats which raise insulin sensitivity and is thus lower blood sugar. (amazonaws.com)
  • This condition occurs when stress or other factors cause vasoconstriction of blood vessels in the area, which stop the body from burning fats and stores them instead. (joyfulbelly.com)
  • The major organ system traditionally attributed to Jupiter is the liver, with its ability to cleanse our blood, process fats, and continually regenerate and detoxify. (astrology.com)
  • Iron is a mineral that is needed to make two different compounds in your body: myoglobin, which is found in muscle cells, and hemoglobin, which allows red blood cells to transport oxygen. (sfgate.com)
  • Anoxia - lack of oxygen in blood or tissues. (lsu.edu)
  • Red blood cells carry oxygen to all parts of your body. (cdc.gov)
  • High blood cortisol induces a diabetes-like state. (equisearch.com)
  • If you are suffering from diabetes or pre-diabetes and are looking for a change, then Blood Sugar Guardian may be the program for you. (amazonaws.com)
  • Blood Sugar Guardian is a program that teaches you how to permanently eliminate diabetes in a safe, natural, and effective manner. (amazonaws.com)
  • As a result, the Blood Sugar Diet does not constrain you, but frees you from the debilitating, harmful, and ineffective foods that cause your diabetes to stay in your body. (amazonaws.com)
  • There are a few common foods that help to lower blood sugar level if anyone is suffering from diabetes. (amazonaws.com)
  • Cinnamon, people who have diabetes, is commonly used to reduce blood sugar and cholesterol level in blood. (amazonaws.com)
  • Nuts are high in good kind of fat which helps the body cells to be more sensitive to the production of insulin and this effectively lower the blood sugar of the people with diabetes. (amazonaws.com)
  • Iron deficiency can cause low levels of red blood cells, also known as iron-deficiency anemia. (sfgate.com)
  • Like white and red blood cells, they are produced in the bone marrow and evolve from much larger cells called megakaryocytes. (sfgate.com)
  • Now a team of California-based researchers has figured out a way to disguise the particles to look like parts of blood cells, according to an article published today in Nature . (popsci.com)
  • Red blood cells (RBCs) in the presence of plasma proteins or other macromolecules have a tendency to form aggregates. (spiedigitallibrary.org)
  • Cristian V. L. Pop , Cristian V. L. Pop, Silvia Neamtu , Silvia Neamtu, } "Aggregation of red blood cells in suspension: study by light-scattering technique at small angles," Journal of Biomedical Optics 13(4), 041308 (1 July 2008). (spiedigitallibrary.org)
  • damage to your liver or some defect affecting the liver so that it cannot deal with bilirubin, a by-product of the breakdown of old red blood cells. (britishlivertrust.org.uk)
  • The membrane becomes invaded by white blood cells, which produce a variety of destructive chemicals. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The lymph nodes contain the infection-fighting cells called the white blood cells or lymphocytes, which filter the harmful substances and expel them out of the body. (medindia.net)
  • Polycythemia vera (POL-e-si-THEE-me-ah VAY-rah or VE-rah), or PV, is a rare blood disease in which your body makes too many red blood cells. (cdc.gov)
  • If you have PV, your bone marrow makes too many red blood cells. (cdc.gov)
  • This gene makes a protein that helps the body produce blood cells. (cdc.gov)
  • From the earliest ages the blood has been held to be one of the most important constituents of the body, for it was natural, when death was seen to follow alike in animals and in man the infliction of a small wound (providing it opened a large vessel ), to believe that as the blood drained away, the life itself was leaving the body. (chestofbooks.com)
  • The number of the corpuscles in the body of a horse is inconceivably great, but they may be counted in small quantities of blood which have been diluted with water , and it has been ascertained that there are no less than five or six millions in a cube 1/25 inch on the side, which would be represented by a very small drop. (chestofbooks.com)
  • It may appear as a thick jelly that your body expels during menstruation. (caretolife.com)
  • The cup collects all blood that your body releases naturally. (caretolife.com)
  • Blood vessels are the specially designed tubes that carry blood throughout the body. (healthhype.com)
  • This translates in the body as Mercury being connected to the digestion and nervous system functions, while Jupiter is connected to blood cleansing and the distribution of nutrients. (astrology.com)