Tooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Tooth Loss: The failure to retain teeth as a result of disease or injury.Tooth Germ: The collective tissues from which an entire tooth is formed, including the DENTAL SAC; ENAMEL ORGAN; and DENTAL PAPILLA. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth, Deciduous: The teeth of the first dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.Tooth Crown: The upper part of the tooth, which joins the lower part of the tooth (TOOTH ROOT) at the cervix (TOOTH CERVIX) at a line called the cementoenamel junction. The entire surface of the crown is covered with enamel which is thicker at the extremity and becomes progressively thinner toward the cervix. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p216)Tooth Root: The part of a tooth from the neck to the apex, embedded in the alveolar process and covered with cementum. A root may be single or divided into several branches, usually identified by their relative position, e.g., lingual root or buccal root. Single-rooted teeth include mandibular first and second premolars and the maxillary second premolar teeth. The maxillary first premolar has two roots in most cases. Maxillary molars have three roots. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p690)Tooth Eruption: The emergence of a tooth from within its follicle in the ALVEOLAR PROCESS of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE into the ORAL CAVITY. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Tooth, Supernumerary: An extra tooth, erupted or unerupted, resembling or unlike the other teeth in the group to which it belongs. Its presence may cause malposition of adjacent teeth or prevent their eruption.Tooth Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the teeth.Tooth Wear: Loss of the tooth substance by chemical or mechanical processesTooth Extraction: The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Tooth, Nonvital: A tooth from which the dental pulp has been removed or is necrotic. (Boucher, Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Molar: The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)Tooth, Impacted: A tooth that is prevented from erupting by a physical barrier, usually other teeth. Impaction may also result from orientation of the tooth in an other than vertical position in the periodontal structures.Tooth Discoloration: Any change in the hue, color, or translucency of a tooth due to any cause. Restorative filling materials, drugs (both topical and systemic), pulpal necrosis, or hemorrhage may be responsible. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p253)Tooth, Unerupted: A normal developing tooth which has not yet perforated the oral mucosa or one that fails to erupt in the normal sequence or time interval expected for the type of tooth in a given gender, age, or population group.Incisor: Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)Odontogenesis: The process of TOOTH formation. It is divided into several stages including: the dental lamina stage, the bud stage, the cap stage, and the bell stage. Odontogenesis includes the production of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS), dentin (DENTINOGENESIS), and dental cementum (CEMENTOGENESIS).Tooth Cervix: The constricted part of the tooth at the junction of the crown and root or roots. It is often referred to as the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), the line at which the cementum covering the root of a tooth and the enamel of the tooth meet. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p530, p433)Dental Enamel: A hard thin translucent layer of calcified substance which envelops and protects the dentin of the crown of the tooth. It is the hardest substance in the body and is almost entirely composed of calcium salts. Under the microscope, it is composed of thin rods (enamel prisms) held together by cementing substance, and surrounded by an enamel sheath. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)Tooth Exfoliation: Physiologic loss of the primary dentition. (Zwemer, Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Tooth Avulsion: Partial or complete displacement of a tooth from its alveolar support. It is commonly the result of trauma. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p312)Fused Teeth: Two teeth united during development by the union of their tooth germs; the teeth may be joined by the enamel of their crowns, by their root dentin, or by both.Cuspid: The third tooth to the left and to the right of the midline of either jaw, situated between the second INCISOR and the premolar teeth (BICUSPID). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p817)Tooth DiseasesTooth Calcification: The process whereby calcium salts are deposited in the dental enamel. The process is normal in the development of bones and teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p43)Bicuspid: One of the eight permanent teeth, two on either side in each jaw, between the canines (CUSPID) and the molars (MOLAR), serving for grinding and crushing food. The upper have two cusps (bicuspid) but the lower have one to three. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p822)Tooth Ankylosis: Solid fixation of a tooth resulting from fusion of the cementum and alveolar bone, with obliteration of the periodontal ligament. It is uncommon in the deciduous dentition and very rare in permanent teeth. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dental Pulp: A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth Erosion: Progressive loss of the hard substance of a tooth by chemical processes that do not involve bacterial action. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p296)Tooth Socket: A hollow part of the alveolar process of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE where each tooth fits and is attached via the periodontal ligament.Tooth Replantation: Reinsertion of a tooth into the alveolus from which it was removed or otherwise lost.Maxilla: One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.Dentin: The hard portion of the tooth surrounding the pulp, covered by enamel on the crown and cementum on the root, which is harder and denser than bone but softer than enamel, and is thus readily abraded when left unprotected. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth Resorption: Resorption of calcified dental tissue, involving demineralization due to reversal of the cation exchange and lacunar resorption by osteoclasts. There are two types: external (as a result of tooth pathology) and internal (apparently initiated by a peculiar inflammatory hyperplasia of the pulp). (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p676)Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Dentition: The teeth collectively in the dental arch. Dentition ordinarily refers to the natural teeth in position in their alveoli. Dentition referring to the deciduous teeth is DENTITION, PRIMARY; to the permanent teeth, DENTITION, PERMANENT. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Root Canal Therapy: A treatment modality in endodontics concerned with the therapy of diseases of the dental pulp. For preparatory procedures, ROOT CANAL PREPARATION is available.Odontometry: Measurement of tooth characteristics.Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Tooth Demineralization: A tooth's loss of minerals, such as calcium in hydroxyapatite from the tooth matrix, caused by acidic exposure. An example of the occurrence of demineralization is in the formation of dental caries.Dentition, Permanent: The 32 teeth of adulthood that either replace or are added to the complement of deciduous teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Dental Restoration, Permanent: A restoration designed to remain in service for not less than 20 to 30 years, usually made of gold casting, cohesive gold, or amalgam. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Anodontia: Congenital absence of the teeth; it may involve all (total anodontia) or only some of the teeth (partial anodontia, hypodontia), and both the deciduous and the permanent dentition, or only teeth of the permanent dentition. (Dorland, 27th ed)Tooth Preparation, Prosthodontic: The selected form given to a natural tooth when it is reduced by instrumentation to receive a prosthesis (e.g., artificial crown or a retainer for a fixed or removable prosthesis). The selection of the form is guided by clinical circumstances and physical properties of the materials that make up the prosthesis. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239)Periodontal Ligament: The fibrous CONNECTIVE TISSUE surrounding the TOOTH ROOT, separating it from and attaching it to the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS).Alveolar Process: The thickest and spongiest part of the maxilla and mandible hollowed out into deep cavities for the teeth.Age Determination by Teeth: A means of identifying the age of an animal or human through tooth examination.Dental Cementum: The bonelike rigid connective tissue covering the root of a tooth from the cementoenamel junction to the apex and lining the apex of the root canal, also assisting in tooth support by serving as attachment structures for the periodontal ligament. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)OdontoblastsAmeloblasts: Cylindrical epithelial cells in the innermost layer of the ENAMEL ORGAN. Their functions include contribution to the development of the dentinoenamel junction by the deposition of a layer of the matrix, thus producing the foundation for the prisms (the structural units of the DENTAL ENAMEL), and production of the matrix for the enamel prisms and interprismatic substance. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dental Pulp Cavity: The space in a tooth bounded by the dentin and containing the dental pulp. The portion of the cavity within the crown of the tooth is the pulp chamber; the portion within the root is the pulp canal or root canal.Dental Pulp Necrosis: Death of pulp tissue with or without bacterial invasion. When the necrosis is due to ischemia with superimposed bacterial infection, it is referred to as pulp gangrene. When the necrosis is non-bacterial in origin, it is called pulp mummification.Tooth Remineralization: Therapeutic technique for replacement of minerals in partially decalcified teeth.Dental Models: Presentation devices used for patient education and technique training in dentistry.Radiography, Panoramic: Extraoral body-section radiography depicting an entire maxilla, or both maxilla and mandible, on a single film.Periapical Periodontitis: Inflammation of the PERIAPICAL TISSUE. It includes general, unspecified, or acute nonsuppurative inflammation. Chronic nonsuppurative inflammation is PERIAPICAL GRANULOMA. Suppurative inflammation is PERIAPICAL ABSCESS.Dental Stress Analysis: The description and measurement of the various factors that produce physical stress upon dental restorations, prostheses, or appliances, materials associated with them, or the natural oral structures.Paleodontology: The study of the teeth of early forms of life through fossil remains.Dental Cavity Preparation: An operation in which carious material is removed from teeth and biomechanically correct forms are established in the teeth to receive and retain restorations. A constant requirement is provision for prevention of failure of the restoration through recurrence of decay or inadequate resistance to applied stresses. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239-40)Jaw, Edentulous, Partially: Absence of teeth from a portion of the mandible and/or maxilla.Composite Resins: Synthetic resins, containing an inert filler, that are widely used in dentistry.Dental Enamel Proteins: The proteins that are part of the dental enamel matrix.Dental Enamel Hypoplasia: An acquired or hereditary condition due to deficiency in the formation of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS). It is usually characterized by defective, thin, or malformed DENTAL ENAMEL. Risk factors for enamel hypoplasia include gene mutations, nutritional deficiencies, diseases, and environmental factors.Diastema: An abnormal opening or fissure between two adjacent teeth.Dental Occlusion: The relationship of all the components of the masticatory system in normal function. It has special reference to the position and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth for the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p556, p472)Enamel Organ: Epithelial cells surrounding the dental papilla and differentiated into three layers: the inner enamel epithelium, consisting of ameloblasts which eventually form the enamel, and the enamel pulp and external enamel epithelium, both of which atrophy and disappear before and upon eruption of the tooth, respectively.Oral Hygiene: The practice of personal hygiene of the mouth. It includes the maintenance of oral cleanliness, tissue tone, and general preservation of oral health.Dental Bonding: An adhesion procedure for orthodontic attachments, such as plastic DENTAL CROWNS. This process usually includes the application of an adhesive material (DENTAL CEMENTS) and letting it harden in-place by light or chemical curing.Molar, Third: The aftermost permanent tooth on each side in the maxilla and mandible.Post and Core Technique: Use of a metal casting, usually with a post in the pulp or root canal, designed to support and retain an artificial crown.Pulpectomy: Dental procedure in which the entire pulp chamber is removed from the crown and roots of a tooth.Mouth, Edentulous: Total lack of teeth through disease or extraction.Dental Materials: Materials used in the production of dental bases, restorations, impressions, prostheses, etc.Periodontium: The structures surrounding and supporting the tooth. Periodontium includes the gum (GINGIVA), the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS), the DENTAL CEMENTUM, and the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT.Dental Papilla: Mesodermal tissue enclosed in the invaginated portion of the epithelial enamel organ and giving rise to the dentin and pulp.Periodontal Diseases: Pathological processes involving the PERIODONTIUM including the gum (GINGIVA), the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS), the DENTAL CEMENTUM, and the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT.DMF Index: "Decayed, missing and filled teeth," a routinely used statistical concept in dentistry.Dental Restoration Failure: Inability or inadequacy of a dental restoration or prosthesis to perform as expected.Root Canal Filling Materials: Materials placed inside a root canal for the purpose of obturating or sealing it. The materials may be gutta-percha, silver cones, paste mixtures, or other substances. (Dorland, 28th ed, p631 & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p187)Resin Cements: Dental cements composed either of polymethyl methacrylate or dimethacrylate, produced by mixing an acrylic monomer liquid with acrylic polymers and mineral fillers. The cement is insoluble in water and is thus resistant to fluids in the mouth, but is also irritating to the dental pulp. It is used chiefly as a luting agent for fabricated and temporary restorations. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p159)Mesial Movement of Teeth: Migration of the teeth toward the midline or forward in the DENTAL ARCH. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Denture Design: The plan, delineation, and location of actual structural elements of dentures. The design can relate to retainers, stress-breakers, occlusal rests, flanges, framework, lingual or palatal bars, reciprocal arms, etc.Root Canal Preparation: Preparatory activities in ROOT CANAL THERAPY by partial or complete extirpation of diseased pulp, cleaning and sterilization of the empty canal, enlarging and shaping the canal to receive the sealing material. The cavity may be prepared by mechanical, sonic, chemical, or other means. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p1700)Denture, Partial, Removable: A partial denture designed and constructed to be removed readily from the mouth.Dental Prosthesis: An artificial replacement for one or more natural teeth or part of a tooth, or associated structures, ranging from a portion of a tooth to a complete denture. The dental prosthesis is used for cosmetic or functional reasons, or both. DENTURES and specific types of dentures are also available. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p244 & Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p643)Dental Leakage: The seepage of fluids, debris, and micro-organisms between the walls of a prepared dental cavity and the restoration.Root Canal Obturation: Phase of endodontic treatment in which a root canal system that has been cleaned is filled through use of special materials and techniques in order to prevent reinfection.Pulpitis: Inflammation of the DENTAL PULP, usually due to bacterial infection in dental caries, tooth fracture, or other conditions causing exposure of the pulp to bacterial invasion. Chemical irritants, thermal factors, hyperemic changes, and other factors may also cause pulpitis.Mastication: The act and process of chewing and grinding food in the mouth.Dental Cements: Substances used to bond COMPOSITE RESINS to DENTAL ENAMEL and DENTIN. These bonding or luting agents are used in restorative dentistry, ROOT CANAL THERAPY; PROSTHODONTICS; and ORTHODONTICS.Orthodontic Appliances: Devices used for influencing tooth position. Orthodontic appliances may be classified as fixed or removable, active or retaining, and intraoral or extraoral. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p19)MSX1 Transcription Factor: A homeodomain protein that interacts with TATA-BOX BINDING PROTEIN. It represses GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of target GENES and plays a critical role in ODONTOGENESIS.Dental Plaque: A film that attaches to teeth, often causing DENTAL CARIES and GINGIVITIS. It is composed of MUCINS, secreted from salivary glands, and microorganisms.Forensic Dentistry: The application of dental knowledge to questions of law.Dental Sac: Dense fibrous layer formed from mesodermal tissue that surrounds the epithelial enamel organ. The cells eventually migrate to the external surface of the newly formed root dentin and give rise to the cementoblasts that deposit cementum on the developing root, fibroblasts of the developing periodontal ligament, and osteoblasts of the developing alveolar bone.Radiography, Bitewing: Technique involving the passage of X-rays through oral structures to create a film record while a central tab or wing of dental X-ray film is being held between upper and lower teeth.Periapical Diseases: Diseases of the PERIAPICAL TISSUE surrounding the root of the tooth, which is distinguished from DENTAL PULP DISEASES inside the TOOTH ROOT.Malocclusion: Such malposition and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth as to interfere with the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)Amelogenin: A major dental enamel-forming protein found in mammals. In humans the protein is encoded by GENES found on both the X CHROMOSOME and the Y CHROMOSOME.PAX9 Transcription Factor: A paired box transcription factor that is involved in ODONTOGENESIS.Dental Arch: The curve formed by the row of TEETH in their normal position in the JAW. The inferior dental arch is formed by the mandibular teeth, and the superior dental arch by the maxillary teeth.Denture, Partial, Fixed: A partial denture attached to prepared natural teeth, roots, or implants by cementation.Jaw: Bony structure of the mouth that holds the teeth. It consists of the MANDIBLE and the MAXILLA.Dental Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of dental prostheses in general or a specific dental prosthesis. It does not include DENTURE DESIGN. The framework usually consists of metal.Periodontal Index: A numerical rating scale for classifying the periodontal status of a person or population with a single figure which takes into consideration prevalence as well as severity of the condition. It is based upon probe measurement of periodontal pockets and on gingival tissue status.Photography, Dental: Photographic techniques used in ORTHODONTICS; DENTAL ESTHETICS; and patient education.Dentin SensitivityDental Amalgam: An alloy used in restorative dentistry that contains mercury, silver, tin, copper, and possibly zinc.Orthodontic Brackets: Small metal or ceramic attachments used to fasten an arch wire. These attachments are soldered or welded to an orthodontic band or cemented directly onto the teeth. Bowles brackets, edgewise brackets, multiphase brackets, ribbon arch brackets, twin-wire brackets, and universal brackets are all types of orthodontic brackets.Glass Ionomer Cements: A polymer obtained by reacting polyacrylic acid with a special anion-leachable glass (alumino-silicate). The resulting cement is more durable and tougher than others in that the materials comprising the polymer backbone do not leach out.Gingivitis: Inflammation of gum tissue (GINGIVA) without loss of connective tissue.Calcium Hydroxide: A white powder prepared from lime that has many medical and industrial uses. It is in many dental formulations, especially for root canal filling.Esthetics, Dental: Skills, techniques, standards, and principles used to improve the art and symmetry of the teeth and face to improve the appearance as well as the function of the teeth, mouth, and face. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p108)Inlays: Restorations of metal, porcelain, or plastic made to fit a cavity preparation, then cemented into the tooth. Onlays are restorations which fit into cavity preparations and overlay the occlusal surface of a tooth or teeth. Onlays are retained by frictional or mechanical factors.Acid Etching, Dental: Preparation of TOOTH surfaces and DENTAL MATERIALS with etching agents, usually phosphoric acid, to roughen the surface to increase adhesion or osteointegration.Periodontal Splints: Fixed or removable devices that join teeth together. They are used to repair teeth that are mobile as a result of PERIODONTITIS.Gutta-Percha: Coagulated exudate isolated from several species of the tropical tree Palaquium (Sapotaceae). It is the trans-isomer of natural rubber and is used as a filling and impression material in dentistry and orthopedics and as an insulator in electronics. It has also been used as a rubber substitute.Cariostatic Agents: Substances that inhibit or arrest DENTAL CARIES formation. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Periapical Tissue: Tissue surrounding the apex of a tooth, including the apical portion of the periodontal membrane and alveolar bone.Pit and Fissure Sealants: Agents used to occlude dental enamel pits and fissures in the prevention of dental caries.Dentin-Bonding Agents: Cements that act through infiltration and polymerization within the dentinal matrix and are used for dental restoration. They can be adhesive resins themselves, adhesion-promoting monomers, or polymerization initiators that act in concert with other agents to form a dentin-bonding system.Dentinogenesis: The formation of dentin. Dentin first appears in the layer between the ameloblasts and odontoblasts and becomes calcified immediately. Formation progresses from the tip of the papilla over its slope to form a calcified cap becoming thicker by the apposition of new layers pulpward. A layer of uncalcified dentin intervenes between the calcified tissue and the odontoblast and its processes. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Orthodontics, Corrective: The phase of orthodontics concerned with the correction of malocclusion with proper appliances and prevention of its sequelae (Jablonski's Illus. Dictionary of Dentistry).Orthodontic Extrusion: Orthodontic movement in the coronal direction achieved by outward tension on the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT. It does not include the operative procedure that CROWN LENGTHENING involves.Dental Alloys: A mixture of metallic elements or compounds with other metallic or metalloid elements in varying proportions for use in restorative or prosthetic dentistry.Endodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the maintenance of the dental pulp in a state of health and the treatment of the pulp cavity (pulp chamber and pulp canal).Orthodontic Appliance Design: The planning, calculation, and creation of an apparatus for the purpose of correcting the placement or straightening of teeth.Periodontal Pocket: An abnormal extension of a gingival sulcus accompanied by the apical migration of the epithelial attachment and bone resorption.Pulpotomy: Dental procedure in which part of the pulp chamber is removed from the crown of a tooth.Dental Porcelain: A type of porcelain used in dental restorations, either jacket crowns or inlays, artificial teeth, or metal-ceramic crowns. It is essentially a mixture of particles of feldspar and quartz, the feldspar melting first and providing a glass matrix for the quartz. Dental porcelain is produced by mixing ceramic powder (a mixture of quartz, kaolin, pigments, opacifiers, a suitable flux, and other substances) with distilled water. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Bruxism: A disorder characterized by grinding and clenching of the teeth.Alveolar Bone Loss: Resorption or wasting of the tooth-supporting bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS) in the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE.Radiography, Dental, Digital: A rapid, low-dose, digital imaging system using a small intraoral sensor instead of radiographic film, an intensifying screen, and a charge-coupled device. It presents the possibility of reduced patient exposure and minimal distortion, although resolution and latitude are inferior to standard dental radiography. A receiver is placed in the mouth, routing signals to a computer which images the signals on a screen or in print. It includes digitizing from x-ray film or any other detector. (From MEDLINE abstracts; personal communication from Dr. Charles Berthold, NIDR)Denture, Partial, Fixed, Resin-Bonded: A commonly used prosthesis that results in a strong, permanent restoration. It consists of an electrolytically etched cast-metal retainer that is cemented (bonded), using resins, to adjacent teeth whose enamel was previously acid-treated (acid-etched). This type of bridgework is sometimes referred to as a Maryland bridge.Silicates: The generic term for salts derived from silica or the silicic acids. They contain silicon, oxygen, and one or more metals, and may contain hydrogen. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th Ed)Radiography, Dental: Radiographic techniques used in dentistry.Acrylic ResinsFossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Dental Restoration, Temporary: A prosthesis or restoration placed for a limited period, from several days to several months, which is designed to seal the tooth and maintain its position until a permanent restoration (DENTAL RESTORATION, PERMANENT) will replace it. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.Dental Abutments: Natural teeth or teeth roots used as anchorage for a fixed or removable denture or other prosthesis (such as an implant) serving the same purpose.Epoxy Resins: Polymeric resins derived from OXIRANES and characterized by strength and thermosetting properties. Epoxy resins are often used as dental materials.Dental Marginal Adaptation: The degree of approximation or fit of filling material or dental prosthetic to the tooth surface. A close marginal adaptation and seal at the interface is important for successful dental restorations.Fluorosis, Dental: A chronic endemic form of hypoplasia of the dental enamel caused by drinking water with a high fluorine content during the time of tooth formation, and characterized by defective calcification that gives a white chalky appearance to the enamel, which gradually undergoes brown discoloration. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)Dentures: An appliance used as an artificial or prosthetic replacement for missing teeth and adjacent tissues. It does not include CROWNS; DENTAL ABUTMENTS; nor TOOTH, ARTIFICIAL.Phosphoric Acids: Inorganic derivatives of phosphoric acid (H3PO4). Note that organic derivatives of phosphoric acids are listed under ORGANOPHOSPHATES.Dentin, Secondary: Dentin formed by normal pulp after completion of root end formation.Toothpastes: Dentifrices that are formulated into a paste form. They typically contain abrasives, HUMECTANTS; DETERGENTS; FLAVORING AGENTS; and CARIOSTATIC AGENTS.Sodium Hypochlorite: It is used as an oxidizing and bleaching agent and as a disinfectant. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Calcium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain calcium as an integral part of the molecule.Periodontitis: Inflammation and loss of connective tissues supporting or surrounding the teeth. This may involve any part of the PERIODONTIUM. Periodontitis is currently classified by disease progression (CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS; AGGRESSIVE PERIODONTITIS) instead of age of onset. (From 1999 International Workshop for a Classification of Periodontal Diseases and Conditions, American Academy of Periodontology)Dental Fistula: An abnormal passage in the oral cavity on the gingiva.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Bisphenol A-Glycidyl Methacrylate: The reaction product of bisphenol A and glycidyl methacrylate that undergoes polymerization when exposed to ultraviolet light or mixed with a catalyst. It is used as a bond implant material and as the resin component of dental sealants and composite restorative materials.Dinosaurs: General name for two extinct orders of reptiles from the Mesozoic era: Saurischia and Ornithischia.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Dental Instruments: Hand-held tools or implements especially used by dental professionals for the performance of clinical tasks.Dental Care: The total of dental diagnostic, preventive, and restorative services provided to meet the needs of a patient (from Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982).Dental Caries Activity Tests: Diagnostic tests conducted in order to measure the increment of active DENTAL CARIES over a period of time.Periodontal Attachment Loss: Loss or destruction of periodontal tissue caused by periodontitis or other destructive periodontal diseases or by injury during instrumentation. Attachment refers to the periodontal ligament which attaches to the alveolar bone. It has been hypothesized that treatment of the underlying periodontal disease and the seeding of periodontal ligament cells enable the creating of new attachment.Fluorides, Topical: Fluorides, usually in pastes or gels, used for topical application to reduce the incidence of DENTAL CARIES.Stainless Steel: Stainless steel. A steel containing Ni, Cr, or both. It does not tarnish on exposure and is used in corrosive environments. (Grant & Hack's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Amelogenesis Imperfecta: A clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary conditions characterized by malformed DENTAL ENAMEL, usually involving DENTAL ENAMEL HYPOPLASIA and/or TOOTH HYPOMINERALIZATION.Orthodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the prevention and correction of dental and oral anomalies (malocclusion).Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Dental Pulp Exposure: The result of pathological changes in the hard tissue of a tooth caused by carious lesions, mechanical factors, or trauma, which render the pulp susceptible to bacterial invasion from the external environment.Apexification: Endodontic procedure performed to induce TOOTH APEX barrier development. ROOT CANAL FILLING MATERIALS are used to repair open apex or DENTAL PULP NECROSIS in an immature tooth. CALCIUM HYDROXIDE and mineral trioxide aggregate are commonly used as the filling materials.Odontoma: A mixed tumor of odontogenic origin, in which both the epithelial and mesenchymal cells exhibit complete differentiation, resulting in the formation of tooth structures. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)Dentifrices: Any preparations used for cleansing teeth; they usually contain an abrasive, detergent, binder and flavoring agent and may exist in the form of liquid, paste or powder; may also contain medicaments and caries preventives.Dental Implants: Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.Dental Restoration Wear: Occlusal wear of the surfaces of restorations and surface wear of dentures.Zinc Oxide-Eugenol Cement: Used as a dental cement this is mainly zinc oxide (with strengtheners and accelerators) and eugenol. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p50)Dental Enamel Permeability: The property of dental enamel to permit passage of light, heat, gases, liquids, metabolites, mineral ions and other substances. It does not include the penetration of the dental enamel by microorganisms.Shear Strength: The internal resistance of a material to moving some parts of it parallel to a fixed plane, in contrast to stretching (TENSILE STRENGTH) or compression (COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH). Ionic crystals are brittle because, when subjected to shear, ions of the same charge are brought next to each other, which causes repulsion.X-Ray Microtomography: X-RAY COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY with resolution in the micrometer range.Dental Enamel Solubility: The susceptibility of the DENTAL ENAMEL to dissolution.Dental Pulp Capping: Application of a protective agent to an exposed pulp (direct capping) or the remaining thin layer of dentin over a nearly exposed pulp (indirect capping) in order to allow the pulp to recover and maintain its normal vitality and function.Dental Pulp Test: Investigations conducted on the physical health of teeth involving use of a tool that transmits hot or cold electric currents on a tooth's surface that can determine problems with that tooth based on reactions to the currents.Dental Prosthesis, Implant-Supported: A prosthesis that gains its support, stability, and retention from a substructure that is implanted under the soft tissues of the basal seat of the device and is in contact with bone. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Edar Receptor: A ectodysplasin receptor subtype that is specific for ECTODYSPLASIN A1. It signals via the specific signaling adaptor EDAR-ASSOCIATED DEATH DOMAIN PROTEIN. Loss of function of the edar receptor is associated with AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE ANHIDROTIC ECTODERMAL DYSPLASIA and ECTODERMAL DYSPLASIA 3, ANHIDROTIC.Fluorides: Inorganic salts of hydrofluoric acid, HF, in which the fluorine atom is in the -1 oxidation state. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed) Sodium and stannous salts are commonly used in dentifrices.Mesoderm: The middle germ layer of an embryo derived from three paired mesenchymal aggregates along the neural tube.Dental Caries Susceptibility: The predisposition to tooth decay (DENTAL CARIES).Streptococcus mutans: A polysaccharide-producing species of STREPTOCOCCUS isolated from human dental plaque.Denture, Complete: A denture replacing all natural teeth and associated structures in both the maxilla and mandible.Dentition, Mixed: The complement of teeth in the jaws after the eruption of some of the permanent teeth but before all the deciduous teeth are absent. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Methacrylates: Acrylic acids or acrylates which are substituted in the C-2 position with a methyl group.Apicoectomy: Excision of the apical portion of a tooth through an opening made in the overlying labial, buccal, or palatal alveolar bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)Gingival Crevicular Fluid: A fluid occurring in minute amounts in the gingival crevice, believed by some authorities to be an inflammatory exudate and by others to cleanse material from the crevice, containing sticky plasma proteins which improve adhesions of the epithelial attachment, have antimicrobial properties, and exert antibody activity. (From Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)Receptors, Ectodysplasin: Members of the TNF receptor family that are specific for ECTODYSPLASIN. At least two subtypes of the ectodysplasin receptor exist, each being specific for a ectodysplasin isoform. Signaling through ectodysplasin receptors plays an essential role in the normal ectodermal development. Genetic defects that result in loss of ectodysplasin receptor function results ECTODERMAL DYSPLASIA.Hardness: The mechanical property of material that determines its resistance to force. HARDNESS TESTS measure this property.Periapical Abscess: Acute or chronic inflammation of tissues surrounding the apical portion of a tooth, associated with the collection of pus, resulting from infection following pulp infection through a carious lesion or as a result of an injury causing pulp necrosis. (Dorland, 27th ed)Prosthesis Coloring: Coloring, shading, or tinting of prosthetic components, devices, and materials.Gingival DiseasesFluoridation: Practice of adding fluoride to water for the purpose of preventing tooth decay and cavities.Dental Pulp Diseases: Endodontic diseases of the DENTAL PULP inside the tooth, which is distinguished from PERIAPICAL DISEASES of the tissue surrounding the root.Saliva: The clear, viscous fluid secreted by the SALIVARY GLANDS and mucous glands of the mouth. It contains MUCINS, water, organic salts, and ptylin.Gingival Hemorrhage: The flowing of blood from the marginal gingival area, particularly the sulcus, seen in such conditions as GINGIVITIS, marginal PERIODONTITIS, injury, and ASCORBIC ACID DEFICIENCY.Forensic Anthropology: Scientific study of human skeletal remains with the express purpose of identification. This includes establishing individual identity, trauma analysis, facial reconstruction, photographic superimposition, determination of time interval since death, and crime-scene recovery. Forensic anthropologists do not certify cause of death but provide data to assist in determination of probable cause. This is a branch of the field of physical anthropology and qualified individuals are certified by the American Board of Forensic Anthropology. (From Am J Forensic Med Pathol 1992 Jun;13(2):146)
The eyes and teeth are small. They have dorsal and pectoral fin spines; P. fasciatum also has an additional, smaller, dorsal ... They typically inhabit major rivers where they prefer the main channels and tend to stay at maximum depth, but some species can ... After gonadal maturation, females tend to grow faster than males. They have a large, depressed head with an expandable mouth. ...
This is a result of the virus's killing the cells responsible for manufacturing the tooth enamel. These affected teeth tend to ... A first round of acute fever tends to begin around three to eight days after infection, which is often accompanied by a low ... Puppies, especially, will have damage to the enamel of teeth that are not completely formed or those that have not yet grown ... Dogs that have been infected with distemper tend to suffer a progressive deterioration of mental abilities and motor skills. ...
Oral microorganisms tend to adhere to teeth. The oral microbiome possesses its own characteristic microorganisms found there. ... Resident microbes of the mouth adhere to the teeth and gums. "[T]here may be important interactions between the saliva ...
They tend not to live within dense drift ice. In the summer months they live in the open ocean or on nearby shores. Spotted ... Like harbor seals, spotted seals have 34 teeth. Spotted seals are inhabitants of arctic or sub-arctic waters, often in the ...
Unlike human teeth, which are composed mostly of enamel on the portion of the tooth outside of the gum, whale teeth have ... Overall, they tend to be dwarfed by other cetaceans. Almost all species have female-biased sexual dimorphism, with the females ... spade-shaped teeth distinct from the conical teeth of dolphins. Porpoises, and other cetaceans, belong to the clade ... Odontocetes possess teeth with cementum cells overlying dentine cells. ...
... tends to occur on permanent teeth only. They are vary rare in (deciduous) baby teeth. In most cases the involved ... The digital images would show a tooth with talon cusp as if it were "double teeth". When looking at a radiograph some features ... Generally talon cusps on lower teeth require no treatment, but talon cusps on upper teeth may interfere with the bite mechanics ... This occurs during the morphological differentiation stage of tooth development. During the developmental stages of tooth ...
... they tend to fracture commonly. In order to prevent minor unwanted tooth movement, the fixed retainer must be passive. A fixed ... It also benefits from being robust and rigid, easy to construct and allows prosthetic tooth/teeth to be added onto. The main ... that hold teeth in position after surgery or any method of realigning teeth. Once a phase of orthodontic treatment has been ... do not allow the upper and lower teeth to touch because plastic covers the chewing surfaces of the teeth. Some orthodontists ...
Feliforms tend to have shorter rostrums than caniforms, fewer teeth, and more specialized carnassials. Feliforms tend to be ... These dental differences resemble the difference between Caniforms (with more teeth) and Feliforms (with fewer teeth) but this ... Feliforms also tend to be more digitigrade (walking on toes). In contrast, most caniforms are terrestrial, have non-retractile ... Caniforms tend more toward omnivorous and opportunity-based feeders. Many feliforms have retractile (retractable) or semi- ...
The lower teeth are similar, but tend to be more slender and finely serrated. The five pairs of gill slits are short. The ... There are 25-26 upper and 23-25 lower tooth rows. The upper teeth have a single, narrow, oblique cusp with strongly serrated ... The dermal denticles are small and overlapping, each with three horizontal ridges leading to marginal teeth. This species is ...
These resilient plants tend to prefer flat, rocky places but it is not uncommon to see them hanging on vertical cliff faces. A ... The leaf margins are armed with harmless, little white teeth. The Rubble Aloe is extremely variable-looking, depending on its ... Instead of growing upright, they tend to sprawl along the ground and over rocks. While most of the plant lies along the ground ...
The spacers stay between the teeth for one to two weeks and move the teeth apart slowly until they are far apart enough so that ... These are often worn longer than rubber bands, and tend to be more painful. These are not used as often as the rubber bands. ... They can be used when a patient's teeth are too close together. Although they are sometimes very painful, they are usually only ... Depending on the placement of the patient's teeth, spacers may not hurt when first applied, then start to hurt after some time ...
Males with teeth tend to have larger gonads than those without. The coloration is a uniform pale white with a pinkish hue ... and there are upper and lower pharyngeal tooth plates bearing 9-11 and 7-9 teeth respectively. The eyes are small and covered ... The external teeth of male S. nattereri are now thought to be used in combat for territory or mates; scars and scratches have ... The maximum known length is 25 cm (10 in), with males tending to be larger than females. The diet of S. nattereri consists of ...
These teeth tended to be transversely broader than Diademodon as well. A bony secondary palate and precise postcanine tooth ... The tunnels tend to tightly curve as they progress deeper, with chambers branching off at right angles to the main tunnel. A ... Trirachodon (Greek: "three ridge tooth") is an extinct genus of tritylodontoid cynodonts. Fossils have been found from the ... It had noticeably less molariform teeth than its closely related contemporary Diademodon. ...
Saltwater fish tend to lose water because of osmosis. Their kidneys return water to the body. The reverse happens in freshwater ... The scales of fish originate from the mesoderm (skin); they may be similar in structure to teeth. Fish typically have quite ... fish: they tend to gain water osmotically. Their kidneys produce dilute urine for excretion. Some fish have specially adapted ...
No axial thrust is created by the tooth loads. Spur gears are excellent at moderate speeds but tend to be noisy at high speeds ... Full-depth teeth Teeth in which the working depth equals 2.000 divided by the normal diametral pitch. Stub teeth Teeth in which ... Equal addendum teeth Teeth in which two engaging gears have equal addendums. Long and short-addendum teeth Teeth in which the ... It is used to determine tooth thickness. Modified addendum teeth Teeth of engaging gears, one or both of which have non- ...
A burrowing species, they tend to display more solitary conduct than humans. A Heechee bed is a cocoon, stuffed with soft bits ... Heechee are omnivorous and use a fibrous plant to clean their teeth. There are two Heechee languages: the language of Do and ...
There is an inner and outer row of teeth in their mouths. The teeth of the bottom row tend to be larger than those on top. They ... Hoplunnis macrura tends to live in deeper waters in subtropical environments. These congers are non-burrowing organisms, nor do ... They have overhanging jaws with which teeth of different sizes are visible when the mouth is closed. ...
Each lobe is edged with teeth. Leaves occurring higher on the stem are smaller with narrower lobes. It tends to flower during ...
Shark teeth are probably the state's most common fossil. During the early Paleozoic era Texas was covered by a sea that would ... They tend to be the most common fossil in the Hueco Mountain sites. Contemporary bryozoan and gastropod fossils were preserved ... Fossils include mostly teeth, vertebrae, and scales, although sometimes well preserved skeletons are found in the Austin Chalk ... Plant fossils from the latter two localities tended to be poorly preserved. Very early reptile fossils are also known from the ...
The tooth can also be unroofed to allow drainage and help relieve pressure.[citation needed] A root treated tooth may be eased ... But the fourth canal, often called a "mesio-buccal 2", tends to be very difficult to see and often requires special instruments ... Sometimes a tooth root may be perforated while the root canal is being treated, making it difficult to fill the tooth. The ... With the removal of nerves and blood supply from the tooth, it is best that the tooth be restored with a crown to seal the root ...
There is an apical tooth on the mandibles but the cheeks normally lack a spine. As well as being smaller than the females they ... Northern populations of A. scotica tend to be more extensively dark-haired than the southern populations. The smaller males ... females are facultative communal nesters with a group of them sharing a common entrance to a burrow in which each female tends ...
Having no teeth, it swallows food whole in a series of gulps. It does not recognise its prey as such but will try to consume ... The common toad tends to be sexually dimorphic with the females being browner and the males greyer. The underside is a dirty ... There are no teeth. The bulbous, protruding eyes have yellow or copper coloured irises and horizontal slit-shaped pupils. Just ... It has exceptionally large paratoid glands and its colour tends to be blotched rather than uniform. It is now considered to be ...
Compared with equally sized wolves, dogs tend to have 20% smaller skulls and 30% smaller brains. The teeth of gray wolves are ... The paws of a dog are half the size of those of a wolf, and their tails tend to curl upwards, another trait not found in wolves ... Competition would favor the wolf as it is known to kill dogs, however wolves tend to live in pairs or in small packs in areas ... In the 1950s and 1960s, dogs were kept outside more often than they tend to be today (using the expression "in the doghouse" to ...
Their jaws and teeth are strong enough to crack any kind of nuts. Babirusas lack the rostral bone in their nose, which is a ... Babirusas tend to occupy tropical rainforests, river banks and various natural ponds rich in water plants. They are omnivorous ...
At this point, the larvae usually have long forward-facing pointy teeth. As the larvae grow larger, the teeth will be replaced ... Their laterally compressed bodies tend to become more rounded in this stage. The head also thickens, the olfactory organ ... The leptocephalus stage of the larvae begins after the nutrients from the yolk have been absorbed and the eyes and teeth are ... Leptocephali are also characterized by their fang-like teeth that are present until metamorphosis, when they are lost. ...
... triangular carnassial teeth meant for grinding food. Hypercarnivores, however, have conical teeth and sharp carnassials meant ... That means that obese individuals did not tend to eat more while having meals; rather, the amount of snacks they ate between ... "How Do Birds Eat If They Have No Teeth? , Blog , eNature". wild.enature.com. Archived from the original on 14 April 2016. ... Young babies eat pureed baby foods because they have few teeth and immature digestive systems. Between 8 and 12 months of age, ...
... teeth tend to be darker. Baby teeth (deciduous teeth) are generally whiter than the adult teeth that follow, again due to ... Dentin forms the bulk of the tooth substance, and contributes most to the overall tooth color. At the core of the tooth is soft ... Tooth discoloration (also termed tooth staining) is abnormal tooth color, hue or translucency. External discoloration is ... This becomes apparent when the adult tooth erupts into the mouth. Teeth die mainly as a result of extensive tooth decay, ...
Biology: Lets talk a little bit about bones in general, actually bones and teeth. A lot of people think teeth are bones, and ... Males tend to be a little more robust or rugged, so we look above the eye orbits for brow ridges, and there is a bump on the ... Were now, by looking at teeth, able to determine where someone might have lived for a certain period of time, by looking at ... We would look at growth, and we would look at the joints, knees, shoulders, the back, the ribs and, certainly, the teeth. Those ...
... white fillings for front teeth. , Advantages and disadvantages as compared to porcelain restorations. , How long can dental ... As a result, it will tend to retain more food debris and plaque (Jacobson 2008). However, in the case where effective oral home ... The idea is that dental composite is placed on the sides of the teeth that lie to each side. By making each tooth just a little ... It mimics the color and appearance of tooth enamel well. *Its able to adhere directly to a tooths surface (even a smooth flat ...
Good oral hygiene is the to healthy teeth during old age. Correct brushing techniques and regular dental check-ups can help ... Tooth decay - As the age increases, the gums tend to recede. The roots of the teeth get exposed and become susceptible to ... Loose Teeth. Looseness of teeth is caused by a disease of the periodontium and includes the tissues surrounding the teeth. ... Dental Attrition - Dental attrition is a kind of tooth wear due to tooth-to-tooth contact. It is a normal part of aging and ...
Tending to Teeth Problems. Cavities occur when the bacteria begins to eat away at your tooth enamel. Frequent brushing, ... Rather that extracting the tooth entirely, the tooth is emptied and left in place for cosmetic reasons. These teeth problems ... Stained teeth is widespread problem that is easily avoided and treatable. If you drink an excess of coffee or tea, chances are ... Teeth problems are a very common obstacle among Americans. Even though we are taught at an early age how important brushing is ...
"Teeth tend to survive well. Some for tens of thousands of years," she says. ... Did ancient teeth decay?. Is tooth decay just a modern affliction? Read the answer and have your say. ... Sometimes when skeletons are unearthed that have been in the ground for say 2000 years and they have some teeth, the teeth ... Ancient Egyptian texts refer to gum disease and dental procedures such as tooth extraction and fixation of the teeth and jaws ...
Conventional Western dentistry tends to decapitate you, says Dr. David Villarreal, a biological dentist who practices in ... Cleaning and routine checkups tend to be covered.. As with any practitioner, be wary of a dentist who makes outlandish claims ... The numbers are growing for a few reasons, including acknowledgment that the teeth and gums should be considered vital to the ... Holistic dentists fill cavities, clean teeth and make bridges and implants. But they also are rooted in the concept that when ...
These Bony Growths Appear To Have A Genetic Link, But Environmental Situations Tend To Make Them Larger. Bruxism (tooth ... These Bony Growths Appear To Have A Genetic Link, But Environmental Situations Tend To Make Them Larger. Bruxism (tooth ... These Bony Growths Appear To Have A Genetic Link, But Environmental Situations Tend To Make Them Larger. Bruxism (tooth ... Bruxism, These, Bony, Growths, Appear, To, Have, A, Genetic, Link,, But, Environmental, , Situations, Tend, To, Make, Them, ...
... which is why root canal teeth can harbor such chronic infection. ... which is why root canal teeth can harbor such chronic infection ... A Root Canal Tooth Is Dead, and Necrotic Tissue Tends to Cause Problems. A root canal tooth is no longer alive. Its dead ... The teeth on either side of the missing tooth are prepared for caps or crowns, and the missing tooth is attached to those two ... A tooth is more like a sponge than a solid structure. "If you had a solid tooth structure that was like steel or a metal, you ...
University of Nebraska-Lincoln sociologist Philip Schwadel found that people actually tend to become more... ... CNN People tend to become less religious as they become more educated, right? Not necessarily, according to a new study. After ... How about Santa Claus, do you believe in Santa Claus?; the Tooth Fairy?;easter bunny? ... People tend to become less religious as they become more educated, right? Not necessarily, according to a new study. ...
You can also start by taking care of your teeth at home. ... Act like a grownup and tend to your teeth ... Put Your $ Where Your Mouth Is Act like a grownup and tend to your teeth ... GLO Teeth Whitening Pen. Whitening at the dentists office costs a pretty penny, but the Plus White Speed Whitening System ($ ... They even have a little pointed claw at the end for those moments when something is really stuck in your teeth-very handy for a ...
If you play with it a lot, it will start to stratch the enamel off your teeth, but even then, to actually damage your teeth a ... it will rub against your teeth because it has to be long to allow for swelling. However, after you put the right size stud or ... Do tongue rings wear enamel off teeth?. Yes. They also tend to chip and crack them. ... The singular form for the noun teeth is tooth.The singular possessive form is tooths.Example: The tooths chip can be repaired ...
Tooth loss can be as a result of various causes like trauma, gum disease and dental decay. Once you have undergone tooth... ... The importance of our teeth are better understood when we start losing them one by one. ... They work independent of the neighboring teeth just as a natural tooth works independent of the rest of the teeth. ... Artificial teeth are attached to the gums to replace your missing teeth.[1] X Trustworthy Source National Health Service (UK) ...
... teeth tend to be darker in shade.[5] This can be attributed to secondary dentin formation and thinning of enamel due to tooth ... Tooth wear and ageing: Tooth wear is a progressive loss of enamel and dentine due to tooth erosion, abrasion and attrition. As ... The process of tooth whitening lightens the colour of a tooth.[1] Tooth whitening can be achieved by either changing the ... "Tooth Whitening". 8 Dec 2014.. *^ a b "Public Attitudes to Tooth Whitening Regulations (Presentation)" (PDF). General Dental ...
... teeth tend to be darker in shade.[5] This can be attributed to secondary dentin formation and thinning of enamel due to tooth ... "Teeth Whitening". WebMD. Retrieved 2020-03-03.. *^ a b Greenwall, Linda (2017-04-11), "Tooth Sensitivity Associated with Tooth ... Tooth whitening or tooth bleaching is the process of lightning the color of human teeth.[1] Whitening is often desirable when ... Tooth wear and ageing: Tooth wear is a progressive loss of enamel and dentine due to tooth erosion, abrasion and attrition. As ...
Living without teeth can feel like a no-win situation. If a person chooses not to wear dentures, then they face a ... Furthermore, toothless individuals tend to suffer from poor self-esteem. Without the support provided by the teeth, a persons ... research indicates that people without teeth generally do not live as long as people with either natural or artificial teeth. ... Living without teeth can feel like a no-win situation. If a person chooses not to wear dentures, then they face a reduced ...
Some of the more bizarre items tend to raise eyebrows; but think - if. you were going to set up in the beekeeping business, you ... Does the BSI have a sweet tooth? Standards. are the distilled wisdom of generations of researchers, designers, manufacturers. ... other things: acrylic resin teeth; aluminium pudding basins; babies dummies;. bees; beehives; cheese-pressing moulds; ...
These teeth tend to fall out when children are around 6 or 7 years old. Discover other facts about childrens teeth by viewing ...
Usually used for mastication, the teeth of different vertebrate species are sometimes specialized. The teeth of snakes, for ... The teeth are hard, white structures found in the mouth. ... Herbivores tend to have specialized cheek teeth with… ... In tooth: Tooth form and function. …after birth, and the primary dentition is complete by age 2 1/2; shedding begins about age ... The primary teeth are shed when their roots are resorbed as the permanent teeth push toward the mouth cavity in the course of… ...
If you are missing teeth, dental implants might be an attractive option for maintaining your oral health and improving the ... How to Know What to Expect when Getting a Tooth Implant. ... Talk with your insurance provider. Because implants tend to be ... Maintain new teeth. Once you have your new teeth, it is important to clean and care for them like you would your normal teeth. ... This may include x-rays of your mouth and models made of your teeth and mouth. After evaluating your teeth, your dentist will ...
Dentition - Cutting of teeth, see teething. Deplumation - Tumor of the eyelids which causes hair loss. Diary fever - A fever ... In the last century it was seen in delicate, ill-fed, ill-tended children between the ages of two and five. The disease was the ... The latter could be relieved by lancing over the protruding tooth. Often teething was reported as a cause of death in infants. ... Cancer - A malignant and invasive growth or tumor (especially tissue that covers a surface or lines a cavity), tending to recur ...
Teeth are the same, if we have teeth that are out of alignment they tend to wear faster than teeth that are properly aligned. ... The enamel outside the tooth is hard yet the inside of the tooth, the dentin, is softer. Once the outside surface of the tooth ... taken out). During this time we can alter and adjust tooth shape and position so that the teeth are comfortable, the teeth work ... When teeth crowd they tend to retain more food and bacteria. Thats the same bacteria that often causes bad breath and gum ...
They also tend to look similar:. *Shorter than average, with stocky build ... Thick lips, widely spaced teeth, and large tongue. *Short, flat nose with wide nostrils ...
A dentist works on a patients teeth iStockPhoto (CBS News) While oral care has improved for many people in the United States, ... "We have tended not to see oral health as a part of overall health and wellbeing," Dr. David Satcher, a former Surgeon General, ... We have a lot of people now who still have their natural teeth after the age of 55. But theres still a lot of room to improve ... Ex-Surgeon General: "We have tended not to see oral health as a part of overall health". * ...
I would tend to think if some of the bigger corporations did have angel investors with covert purposes and working covertly for ... There is a rule against speeding and he applied the teeth of that rule to you. But, if you are not speeding and get a ticket, ... What tends to be transferred, however, is rarely - if ever - what is seen, but rather, based upon shared definitions for which ... Inequitable partings tend to be conclusive for most types of groups. However, one type specifically involved with intel or law ...
  • Tobacco: Tar in smoke from tobacco products (and also smokeless tobacco products) tends to form a yellow-brown-black stain around the necks of the teeth above the gumline. (wikipedia.org)
  • Foods, such as vegetables, that are rich with carotenoids or xanthonoids can stain teeth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chlorhexidine (antiseptic mouthwash) binds to tannins, meaning that prolonged use in persons who consume coffee, tea or red wine is associated with extrinsic staining (i.e., removable staining) of teeth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Calculus: Neglected plaque eventually calcifies, and leads to formation of a hard deposit on the teeth, especially around the gumline. (wikipedia.org)
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