Temporal Muscle: A masticatory muscle whose action is closing the jaws; its posterior portion retracts the mandible.Masticatory Muscles: Muscles arising in the zygomatic arch that close the jaw. Their nerve supply is masseteric from the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Masseter Muscle: A masticatory muscle whose action is closing the jaws.Mastication: The act and process of chewing and grinding food in the mouth.Pterygoid Muscles: Two of the masticatory muscles: the internal, or medial, pterygoid muscle and external, or lateral, pterygoid muscle. Action of the former is closing the jaws and that of the latter is opening the jaws, protruding the mandible, and moving the mandible from side to side.Decompressive Craniectomy: Excision of part of the skull. This procedure is used to treat elevated intracranial pressure that is unresponsive to conventional treatment.Bite Force: The force applied by the masticatory muscles in dental occlusion.Jaw: Bony structure of the mouth that holds the teeth. It consists of the MANDIBLE and the MAXILLA.Muscles: Contractile tissue that produces movement in animals.Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Muscle Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in muscle tissue or specific muscles. They are differentiated from NEOPLASMS, MUSCLE TISSUE which are neoplasms composed of skeletal, cardiac, or smooth muscle tissue, such as MYOSARCOMA or LEIOMYOMA.Cephalometry: The measurement of the dimensions of the HEAD.Muscle Proteins: The protein constituents of muscle, the major ones being ACTINS and MYOSINS. More than a dozen accessory proteins exist including TROPONIN; TROPOMYOSIN; and DYSTROPHIN.Dura Mater: The outermost of the three MENINGES, a fibrous membrane of connective tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord.Muscle, Smooth: Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Muscle Fibers, Skeletal: Large, multinucleate single cells, either cylindrical or prismatic in shape, that form the basic unit of SKELETAL MUSCLE. They consist of MYOFIBRILS enclosed within and attached to the SARCOLEMMA. They are derived from the fusion of skeletal myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, SKELETAL) into a syncytium, followed by differentiation.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Muscle, Smooth, Vascular: The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.Muscle Development: Developmental events leading to the formation of adult muscular system, which includes differentiation of the various types of muscle cell precursors, migration of myoblasts, activation of myogenesis and development of muscle anchorage.Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Muscle Fibers, Fast-Twitch: Skeletal muscle fibers characterized by their expression of the Type II MYOSIN HEAVY CHAIN isoforms which have high ATPase activity and effect several other functional properties - shortening velocity, power output, rate of tension redevelopment. Several fast types have been identified.Myringoplasty: Surgical restoration of a perforated tympanic membrane by grafting. (Dorland, 28th ed.)Muscle Fibers, Slow-Twitch: Skeletal muscle fibers characterized by their expression of the Type I MYOSIN HEAVY CHAIN isoforms which have low ATPase activity and effect several other functional properties - shortening velocity, power output, rate of tension redevelopment.Muscle Fatigue: A state arrived at through prolonged and strong contraction of a muscle. Studies in athletes during prolonged submaximal exercise have shown that muscle fatigue increases in almost direct proportion to the rate of muscle glycogen depletion. Muscle fatigue in short-term maximal exercise is associated with oxygen lack and an increased level of blood and muscle lactic acid, and an accompanying increase in hydrogen-ion concentration in the exercised muscle.Muscle Denervation: The resection or removal of the innervation of a muscle or muscle tissue.Neck: The part of a human or animal body connecting the HEAD to the rest of the body.Abscess: Accumulation of purulent material in tissues, organs, or circumscribed spaces, usually associated with signs of infection.Peritonsillar Abscess: An accumulation of purulent material in the area between the PALATINE TONSIL and its capsule.Pleural Cavity: Paired but separate cavity within the THORACIC CAVITY. It consists of the space between the parietal and visceral PLEURA and normally contains a capillary layer of serous fluid that lubricates the pleural surfaces.Retropharyngeal Abscess: An accumulation of purulent material in the space between the PHARYNX and the CERVICAL VERTEBRAE. This usually results from SUPPURATION of retropharyngeal LYMPH NODES in patients with UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS, perforation of the pharynx, or head and neck injuries.Ludwig's Angina: Severe cellulitis of the submaxillary space with secondary involvement of the sublingual and submental space. It usually results from infection in the lower molar area or from a penetrating injury to the mouth floor. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Thyroiditis, Suppurative: Acute inflammatory disease of the THYROID GLAND due to infections by BACTERIA; FUNGI; or other microorganisms. Symptoms include tender swelling, FEVER, and often with LEUKOCYTOSIS.Trigeminal Neuralgia: A syndrome characterized by recurrent episodes of excruciating pain lasting several seconds or longer in the sensory distribution of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE. Pain may be initiated by stimulation of trigger points on the face, lips, or gums or by movement of facial muscles or chewing. Associated conditions include MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, vascular anomalies, ANEURYSMS, and neoplasms. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p187)Trigeminal Nerve: The 5th and largest cranial nerve. The trigeminal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve. The larger sensory part forms the ophthalmic, mandibular, and maxillary nerves which carry afferents sensitive to external or internal stimuli from the skin, muscles, and joints of the face and mouth and from the teeth. Most of these fibers originate from cells of the TRIGEMINAL GANGLION and project to the TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS of the brain stem. The smaller motor part arises from the brain stem trigeminal motor nucleus and innervates the muscles of mastication.Neuralgia, Postherpetic: Pain in nerves, frequently involving facial SKIN, resulting from the activation the latent varicella-zoster virus (HERPESVIRUS 3, HUMAN). The two forms of the condition preceding the pain are HERPES ZOSTER OTICUS; and HERPES ZOSTER OPHTHALMICUS. Following the healing of the rashes and blisters, the pain sometimes persists.Nerve Compression Syndromes: Mechanical compression of nerves or nerve roots from internal or external causes. These may result in a conduction block to nerve impulses (due to MYELIN SHEATH dysfunction) or axonal loss. The nerve and nerve sheath injuries may be caused by ISCHEMIA; INFLAMMATION; or a direct mechanical effect.Neuralgia: Intense or aching pain that occurs along the course or distribution of a peripheral or cranial nerve.Rhizotomy: Surgical interruption of a spinal or cranial nerve root. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Microvascular Decompression Surgery: Surgery performed to relieve pressure from MICROVESSELS that are located around nerves and are causing NERVE COMPRESSION SYNDROMES.Myalgia: Painful sensation in the muscles.Operating Rooms: Facilities equipped for performing surgery.Dictionaries, MedicalDictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Dictionaries, ChemicalVena Cava, Inferior: The venous trunk which receives blood from the lower extremities and from the pelvic and abdominal organs.Sciatic Nerve: A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Sphenoid Bone: An irregular unpaired bone situated at the SKULL BASE and wedged between the frontal, temporal, and occipital bones (FRONTAL BONE; TEMPORAL BONE; OCCIPITAL BONE). Sphenoid bone consists of a median body and three pairs of processes resembling a bat with spread wings. The body is hollowed out in its inferior to form two large cavities (SPHENOID SINUS).Scapula: Also called the shoulder blade, it is a flat triangular bone, a pair of which form the back part of the shoulder girdle.Ischium: One of three bones that make up the coxal bone of the pelvic girdle. In tetrapods, it is the part of the pelvis that projects backward on the ventral side, and in primates, it bears the weight of the sitting animal.Gingival NeoplasmsWingCranial Fossa, Middle: The compartment containing the anterior extremities and half the inferior surface of the temporal lobes (TEMPORAL LOBE) of the cerebral hemispheres. Lying posterior and inferior to the anterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, ANTERIOR), it is formed by part of the TEMPORAL BONE and SPHENOID BONE. It is separated from the posterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR) by crests formed by the superior borders of the petrous parts of the temporal bones.Cerebral Ventricle Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the brain ventricles, including the two lateral, the third, and the fourth ventricle. Ventricular tumors may be primary (e.g., CHOROID PLEXUS NEOPLASMS and GLIOMA, SUBEPENDYMAL), metastasize from distant organs, or occur as extensions of locally invasive tumors from adjacent brain structures.
... space by the lateral pterygoid muscle inferiorly and from the superficial temporal space by the temporalis muscle laterally. ... since some of the muscles of mastication are restricted by the swelling. Treatment of an abscess of this space is usually by ... The deep temporal space and the superficial temporal space together make up the temporal spaces. The boundaries of the ... The term is derived from infra- meaning below and temporal which refers to the temporalis muscle. The infratemporal space is ...
Mandibular nerve Temporomandibular Joint Temporalis muscle Deep temporal arteries Deep temporal nerves Superficial temporal ... Osteology Temporal fossa, boundaries & contents Infratemporal fossa, boundaries & contents Muscles of mastication Maxillary ... The temporal fossa is a shallow depression on the side of the skull bounded by the temporal lines and terminating below the ... Superior: Pair of temporal lines (superior and inferior temporal lines) that arch across the skull from the zygomatic process ...
The muscles are: The masseter (composed of the superficial and deep head) The temporalis (the sphenomandibularis is considered ... a part of the temporalis by some sources, and a distinct muscle by others) The medial pterygoid The lateral pterygoid In humans ... the mandible, or lower jaw, is connected to the temporal bone of the skull via the temporomandibular joint, an extremely ... While these four muscles are the primary participants in mastication, other muscles are usually if not always helping the ...
... and is situated between the temporalis muscle and lateral pterygoid muscle, and partly between the two pterygoid muscles. It ... The maxillary vein and the superficial temporal vein later join to become the retromandibular vein. The posterior branch of the ... Due to its communication with the cavernous sinus, infection of the superficial face may spread to the cavernous sinus, causing ... Thus it receives the following veins: sphenopalatine middle meningeal deep temporal (anterior & posterior) pterygoid masseteric ...
Lower part of the Temporalis and masseter muscles (origin of masseter muscle:lower margin of the inner surface of zygomatic ... It is not fully enclosed by bone in all directions, and it contains superficial muscles that are visible during dissection ... nerve deep temporal nerve lateral pterygoid nerve and medial pterygoid nerve Its motor fibers innervate all the muscles of ... the lower part of the temporalis muscle, the lateral pterygoid, and the medial pterygoid. Its boundaries may be defined by: ...
Pectoantebrachialis muscle is just one-half inch wide and is the most superficial in the pectoral muscles. Its origin is the ... Its action is the elevation of the mandible (closing of the jaw). The temporalis is a great mass of mandibular muscle, and is ... It lies dorsal to the zygomatic arch and fills the temporal fossa of the skull. It arises from the side of the skull and ... The Splenius is the most superficial of all the deep muscles. It is a thin, broad sheet of muscle underneath the clavotrapezius ...
The main muscles involved are the masseter, temporalis and medial and lateral pterygoid muscles. ... right side and left side count as a separate sites for each muscle): posterior temporalis, middle temporalis, anterior ... Elevation - Anterior and middle fibers of temporalis, the superficial and deep fibers of masseter and the medial pterygoid.[41] ... There are tight fibers connecting the mandible to the disc, and loose fibers which connect the disc to the temporal bone, ...
... temporalis and medial and lateral pterygoid muscles. Left medial and lateral pterygoid muscles Left temporalis muscle Left ... Anterior and middle fibers of temporalis, the superficial and deep fibers of masseter and the medial pterygoid. Lateral ... There are tight fibers connecting the mandible to the disc, and loose fibers which connect the disc to the temporal bone, ... Injections of local anesthetic, sometimes combined with steroids, into the muscles (e.g. the temoralis muscle or its tendon) ...
Muscles of the head and neck. Dissection, showing salivary glands of right side (Masseter visible at center) Left temporal bone ... The most obvious muscle of mastication is the masseter muscle, since it is the most superficial and one of the strongest. The ... Along with the other three muscles of mastication (temporalis, medial pterygoid, and lateral pterygoid), the masseter is ... Finally, the muscle undergoes spasm with malignant hyperthermia as do other skeletal muscles, but this one is easily noted, ...
The temporal area, where the zygomaticotemporal branch of trigeminal nerve passes through the temporalis muscle, is addressed ... The involvement of the pericranial muscles in migraine has been well documented, and muscle relaxation techniques have been ... superficial to the cervical muscle fascia, transverse to the affected occipital nerve trunk at the level of C1, usually using ... Thus far, three muscle trigger areas where the nerve passes through a muscle have been identified as surgical candidates - ...
The absence of the anterior sagittal crest indicates that the anterior fibers of the temporalis muscle not as developed in ... The development of the angulation of the zygomatic arch in the adult Galesaurus indicates that the superficial masseter muscle ... When taking the differences in adductor musculature and the large medial shift of the mandible within the temporal fenestra, it ... The size of the external occipital crest indicates enlarged, stronger nuchal muscles in Galesaurus, but relatively weaker ...
The left masseter muscle (red highlight), shown partially covered by superficial muscles such as the platysma muscle, the ... Superficial head[edit]. The superficial head, the larger, arises by a thick, tendinous aponeurosis from the temporal process of ... Along with the other three muscles of mastication (temporalis, medial pterygoid, and lateral pterygoid), the masseter is ... The most obvious muscle of mastication is the masseter muscle, since it is the most superficial and one of the strongest. ...
General terms Muscle Muscles of head Extra-ocular muscles (see sense organs) Muscles of auditory ossicles (see sense organs) ... veins Deep facial vein External palatine vein Submental vein Retromandibular vein Superficial temporal veins Middle temporal ... nasi Depressor labii inferioris Levator anguli oris Modiolus Buccinator Mentalis Masticatory muscles Masseter Temporalis ... Hyoglossus Styloglossus Superior longitudinal muscle Inferior longitudinal muscle Transverse muscle Vertical muscle ...
The superficial temporal and the deep temporal spaces are sometimes together called the temporal spaces. The masticator spaces ... of the masticator space are located on either side of the mandibular ramus and on either side of the temporalis muscle. This is ... Trismus (difficulty opening the mouth) is a sign that the muscles of mastication (the muscles that move the jaw) are involved. ... superficial temporal and deep temporal spaces. The infratemporal space is the inferior portion of the deep temporal space. ...
If the periosteum or underlying muscles (frontalis, occipitalis, temporalis) are intact, secondary closure by granulation is ... Superficial temporal vein Posterior: Occipital vein Posterolateral: Posterior auricular vein The frontal part of the scalp is ... In addition, muscle or myocutaneous free flaps provide additional bulk that obliterates empty spaces (e.g. exposed sinuses) and ... superficial temporal artery Posterior: occipital artery Posterolateral: posterior auricular artery The veins anastomose ...
Повърхностна слепоочна артерия (a. temporalis superficialis) *Transverse facial artery. *Middle temporal artery ... Повърхностна епигастрална артерия • superficial circumflex iliac • Superficial external pudendal artery • deep external ... branches to abdominal muscles.. *Superior epigastric artery. Шийно-щитовиден ствол (truncus thyrocervicalis)[редактиране , ... branches to the deltoid muscle. *Superior ulnar collateral artery *Posterior ulnar recurrent artery ...
The smaller, superficial head originates from the maxillary tuberosity and the pyramidal process of the palatine bone. ... Unlike the lateral pterygoid and all other muscles of mastication which are innervated by the anterior division of the ... The medial pterygoid (or internal pterygoid muscle), is a thick, quadrilateral muscle of mastication. ... The bulk of the muscle arises as a deep head from just above the medial surface of the lateral pterygoid plate. ...
... telencephalon temporal artery temporal bone temporal fascia temporal gyrus temporal lobe temporal pole temporalis muscle ... superciliary arch superciliary line superficial cervical muscle superficial muscular aponeurotic system superficial temporal ... motor unit mouth mucoperiosteum mucosa mucous membranes multifidus muscle muscle fascicle muscle spindle muscle tissue muscles ... sternocleidomastoid muscle sternohyoid muscle sternothyroid muscle sternum stoma stomach straight sinus strap muscles Stratum ...
... anterior temporal) runs tortuously upward and forward to the forehead, supplying the muscles, integument, and pericranium in ... As it crosses the zygomatic process, it is covered by the auricularis anterior muscle, and by a dense fascia; it is crossed by ... The parietal branch of superficial temporal artery (posterior temporal) is a small artery in the head. It is larger than the ... arteria temporalis superficialis. TA. A12.2.05.045. FMA. 49650. Anatomical terminology. [edit on Wikidata] ...
Its arterial blood supply is provided by branches of the external carotid artery, predominately the superficial temporal branch ... it with assistance of gravity and the digastricus muscle also opens the jaw. The other three muscles close the mouth; the ... lateral pterygoid and the temporalis. These four muscles, all innervated by V3, or the mandibular division of the trigeminal ... is pain and dysfunction of the TMJ and the muscles of mastication (the muscles that move the jaw). TMD does not fit neatly into ...
Neurons in the SC also adhere to the 'temporal rule', in which stimulation must occur within close temporal proximity to excite ... It contains seven layers of alternating white and grey matter, of which the superficial contain topographic maps of the visual ... Excited neurons may then proceed to innervate various muscles and neural structures to orient an individual's behaviour and ... Concurrently, further research has revealed differences in the activation of the Planum temporale (PT) in response to non ...
The buccal nerve (long buccal nerve) is a nerve in the face. It is a branch of the mandibular nerve (which is itself a branch of the trigeminal nerve) and transmits sensory information from skin over the buccal membrane (in general, the cheek) and from the second and third molar teeth. Not to be confused with the buccal branch of the facial nerve which transmits motor information to the buccinator muscle. It courses between the two heads of the lateral pterygoid muscle, underneath the tendon of the temporalis muscle, and then under the masseter muscle to connect with the buccal branches of the facial nerve on the surface of the buccinator muscle. Small branches of the buccal nerve innervate the lateral pterygoid muscle. It also gives sensory branches to the cheek. The facial ...
The pterygoid plexus (/ˈtɛrɪɡɔɪd/; from Greek pteryx, "wing" and eidos, "shape") is a venous plexus of considerable size, and is situated between the temporalis muscle and lateral pterygoid muscle, and partly between the two pterygoid muscles. It receives tributaries corresponding with the branches of the maxillary artery. Thus it receives the following veins: sphenopalatine middle meningeal deep temporal (anterior & posterior) pterygoid masseteric buccinator alveolar some palatine veins (palatine vein which divides into the greater and lesser palatine v.) a branch which communicates with the ophthalmic vein through the inferior orbital fissure infraorbital vein This plexus communicates freely with the anterior facial vein; it also communicates with the cavernous sinus, by branches through the foramen Vesalii, foramen ovale, and foramen lacerum. Due to its ...
... (MMM) is an inflammatory disease in dogs affecting the muscles of mastication (chewing). It is also known as atrophic myositis or eosinophilic myositis. MMM is the most common inflammatory myopathy in dogs. The disease mainly affects large breed dogs. German Shepherd Dogs and Cavalier King Charles Spaniels may be predisposed. There is a similar disease of the eye muscles found in Golden Retrievers. Symptoms of acute MMM include swelling of the jaw muscles, drooling, and pain on opening the mouth. Ophthalmic signs may include third eyelid protrusion, red eyes, and exophthalmos (protruding eyeballs). In chronic MMM there is atrophy of the jaw muscles, and scarring of the masticatory muscles due to fibrosis may result in inability to open the mouth (trismus). The affected muscles include the ...
The word "templar" as used in anatomy has a separate etymology from the word temple, meaning "place of worship". Both come from Latin, but the word for the place of worship comes from templum, whereas the word for the part of the head comes from Vulgar Latin *tempula, modified from tempora, plural form ("both temples") of tempus, a word that meant both "time" and the part of the head. Due to the common source with the word for time, the adjective for both is "temporal" (both "pertaining to time" and "pertaining to the anatomical temple"). Regarding the temporalis muscle: in English, this muscle's name is the time muscle. As above, the word "temporalis" comes from the Latin word "tempus" meaning "time". The muscle covers the temporal bone, or time bone, which received its ...
The pterygomandibular space is a fascial space of the head and neck (sometimes also termed fascial spaces or tissue spaces). It is a potential space in the head and is paired on each side. It is located between the medial pterygoid muscle and the medial surface of the ramus of the mandible. The pterygomandibular space is one of the four compartments of the masticator space. The boundaries of each pterygomandibular space are: the posterior border of the buccal space anteriorly the parotid gland posteriorly the lateral pterygoid muscle superiorly the inferior border of the mandible (lingual surface) inferiorly the medial pterygoid muscle medially (the space is superficial to medial pterygoid) the ascending ramus of the mandible laterally (the space is deep to the ramus of the mandible) the communications of each pterygomandibular space are: to the buccal space anteriorly to the lateral ...
... is the positional relationship of the mandible or maxilla to the skeletal base where either of the jaws protrudes beyond a predetermined imaginary line in the coronal plane of the skull. In general dentistry, oral and maxillofacial surgery and orthodontics, this is assessed clinically or radiographically (cephalometrics). The word prognathism derives from Greek pro ("forward") and γνάθος gnáthos ("jaw"). One or more types of prognathism may result in the common condition of malocclusion, in which an individual's top teeth and lower teeth do not align properly. Prognathism in humans can be due to normal variation among phenotypes. In human populations where prognathism is not the norm, it may be a malformation, the result of injury, a disease state or a hereditary condition. Prognathism is considered a disorder only if it affects mastication, speech or social function as a byproduct of severely affected aesthetics of the face. Clinical determinants include soft tissue analysis ...
The medial pterygoid plate (or medial pterygoid lamina) of the sphenoid bone is a horse-shoe shaped process that arises from its underside. It is narrower and longer than the lateral pterygoid plate and curves lateralward at its lower extremity into a hook-like process, the pterygoid hamulus, around which the tendon of the tensor veli palatini glides. The lateral surface of this plate forms part of the pterygoid fossa, the medial surface constitutes the lateral boundary of the choana or posterior aperture of the corresponding nasal cavity. Superiorly the medial plate is prolonged on to the under surface of the body as a thin lamina, named the vaginal process, which articulates in front with the sphenoidal process of the palatine and behind this with the ala (wing) of the vomer. The angular prominence between the posterior margin of the vaginal process and the medial border of the scaphoid fossa is named the pterygoid tubercle, and immediately above this is the posterior opening of the pterygoid ...
The medial pterygoid plate (or medial pterygoid lamina) of the sphenoid bone is a horse-shoe shaped process that arises from its underside.. It is narrower and longer than the lateral pterygoid plate and curves lateralward at its lower extremity into a hook-like process, the pterygoid hamulus, around which the tendon of the tensor veli palatini glides.. The lateral surface of this plate forms part of the pterygoid fossa, the medial surface constitutes the lateral boundary of the choana or posterior aperture of the corresponding nasal cavity.. Superiorly the medial plate is prolonged on to the under surface of the body as a thin lamina, named the vaginal process, which articulates in front with the sphenoidal process of the palatine and behind this with the ala (wing) of the vomer.. The angular prominence between the posterior margin of the vaginal process and the medial border of the scaphoid fossa is named the pterygoid tubercle, and immediately above this is the posterior opening of the ...
The artery of the pterygoid canal (Vidian artery) is an artery in the pterygoid canal, in the head. It usually arises from the external carotid artery, but can arise from either the internal or external carotid artery or serve as an anastomosis between the two. The eponym, Vidian artery, is derived from the Italian surgeon and anatomist Vidus Vidius. In this case; the artery passes backward along the pterygoid canal with the corresponding nerve. It is distributed to the upper part of the pharynx and to the auditory tube, sending into the tympanic cavity a small branch which anastomoses with the other tympanic arteries. It can end in the oropharynx. In this case; the artery passes backward along the pterygoid canal with the corresponding nerve[clarification needed]. It The artery is a small, inconstant branch which passes into the pterygoid canal and anastomoses with a pterygopalatine branch of the maxillary artery. Nerve of pterygoid canal This article incorporates text in the public domain from ...
Its fibers pass downward, lateral, and posterior, and are inserted, by a strong tendinous lamina, into the lower and back part of the medial surface of the ramus and angle of the mandible, as high as the mandibular foramen. The insertion joins the masseter muscle to form a common tendinous sling which allows the medial pterygoid and masseter to be powerful elevators of the jaw. ...
The lateral surface of the great wing of the sphenoid is convex, and divided by a transverse ridge, the infratemporal crest, into two portions.. The superior or temporal portion, convex from above downward, concave from before backward, forms a part of the temporal fossa, and gives attachment to the Temporalis; the inferior or infratemporal, smaller in size and concave, enters into the formation of the infratemporal fossa, and, together with the infratemporal crest, affords attachment to the Pterygoideus externus.. ...
The medial masseter is enlarged, and passes through an enlarged infraorbital foramen to originate on the side of the rostrum. The superficial masseter originates on the front edge of the zygoma, and the lateral masseter extends over most of its length.[2]. This condition is found throughout the suborders Hystricomorpha and Anomaluromorpha. In the suborder Myomorpha, it is found in the superfamily Dipodoidea and some fossil Muroidea (such as Pappocricetodon). Hystricomorphy is also found in the African dormouse Graphiurus, which is a member of the suborder Sciuromorpha.[2]. ...
నమలడం (Mastication or Chewing) జీర్ణ ప్రక్రియలో మొదటి భాగం. నమిలేటప్పుడు ఆహార పదార్ధాలు పండ్ల మధ్యన పడి చిన్నవిగా చేయబడతాయి. అందువలన జీర్ణద్రవాలలోని ఎంజైమ్లు బాగా పనిచేసి ఆహారాన్ని సులభంగా జీర్ణించుకోవడానికి ఉపయోగపడతాయి. ఈ ప్రక్రియలో నాలుక మరియు బుగ్గలు సహకరిస్తాయి. నమలడం పూర్తయేసరికి ఆహారం మెత్తగా మారి లాలాజలంతో కలిసి ముద్దలాగా తయారౌతుంది. కార్బోహైడ్రేట్లు కొంతవరకు ...
Temporal Spaces Superficial temporal Laterally: temporalis fascia.  Medially: temporalis muscle.  Deep temporal Laterally: ... 6. Canine Space It is the region between anterior surface of maxilla and overlying levator muscles of upper lip.  Contains ... Superficial temporal- swelling limited by outline of temporalis fascia. Trismus. Severe pain.  Deep temporal- less swelling, ... temporalis muscle.  Medially: temporal bone & greater wing of sphenoid. Etiology From infratemporal or pterygomandibular ...
The temporalis muscle effectively divides the space into a deep and superficial compartment. ... Temporal space. *. The temporal space lies between the temporalis fascia and the periosteum of the temporal bone, and it ... Superficial cervical fascia: The superficial fascia, which lies just deep to the dermis, surrounds the muscles of facial ... It encompasses the sternocleidomastoid muscle, trapezius, muscles of mastication, and submandibular and parotid glands. It is ...
Branch anterior deep temporal nerve supplying superficial parts of temporalis muscle 2 . Nerve and artery in zygomaticofacial ... Dissection of left temporal region. Tendon of temporal muscle, lateral view. Image #64-5. KEYWORDS: Connective tissue, Muscles ... Fatty connective tissue has been removed from the space between this muscle and the tendon of the temporal muscle. ... Tendon of temporal muscle, lateral view. A branch of the masseteric nerve (6) is visible as it passes into the unnamed layer of ...
Superficial temporal Temporalis muscle nerve artery Maxillary nerve Sphenopalatine artery Lateral pterygoid muscle Mandibular ... A motor response from the temporalis and masseter muscles results in a jaw jerk, and then, the current should be reduced to a ... COP: condylar process; DM: deep masseterThPM: lateral pterygoid muscle; LPP: lateral pterygoid plate; TM: temporalis muscle; SM ... which is superficial to the mental foramen, and (b) 7 = auriculotemporal nerve; 8 = temporalis muscle; P = parotid gland. ...
TEMPORALIS  Fan shaped muscle ORIGIN :- Bone of temporal fossa and temporal fascia. INSERTION :- Coronoid process of ... THE INFRA ORBITAL NERVE & VESSELS ARISE BETWEEN THESE TWO MUSCLES, ONE MUST AVOID INJURY TO THEM, BY BEING CAREFULL DURING FLAP ... MASSETER   ORIGIN :- DUAL ORIGIN -- Superficial head :- Ant. 2/3rd of lower border of zygomatic arch. -- Deep head :- Post. 1 ... Mentalis muscle  Buccinator  Masseter * 22. MYLOHYOID MUSCLE  The main muscle of floor of mouth ORIGIN :- Entire length of ...
... similar to that seen in the temporalis muscle. Also similar to the temporal region was the close adherence of the superficial ... Y. Levet, "Comparative anatomy of cutaneous muscles of the face," Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 177-179, 1987. ... The platysma muscle had fascia both superficial and deep to its surface. The most inferior facial platysma sample was clearly ... Earlier studies which identified both superficial and deep fascial layers of the muscle [6] have been supported [8]; although ...
Temporalis muscle: O&I? Innervation? Blood supply? Function?. Definition. Temporal fossa, anterior surface of coronoid process ... Deep temporal nerves from V3. Deep temporal arteries (maxillary) and middle temporal (superficial temporal). Powerful elevator ... What muscles accomplish retraction of the TMJ?. Definition. posterior fibers of temporalis, deep part of masseter, geniohyoid ... What are the two smaller muscles found in the infratemporal fossa?. Definition. Levator veli palatini and tensor veli palatini ...
... as in that space posterior to the temporalis muscle lies the posterior deep temporalis artery. When injecting the temple, I do ... and now I am injecting 2 cc into the superficial fat compartment that is the lateral-temporal cheek fat, again making sure that ... When injecting into the cheek, it is important that you are deep to those mimetic muscles so again that you are not injecting ... I ensure that I am under the temporalis muscle, which I feel because of the resistance I feel as I go through it and the ...
... and the galea aponeurotica and other parts of the frontal and occipital muscles also removed. The superficial temporal vessels ... Temporal fascia (covering temporalis muscle) 12 . Occipitalis muscle (cut across) 13 . Auricle ... Temporal fascia, lateral view. The anterior and superior auricular muscles have been cut away, ... Dissection of left temporal region. Temporal fascia, lateral view. Image #64-2. KEYWORDS: Connective tissue, Scalp. ...
Name the muscle joining the angle of the jaw to the neck? ... Superficial temporal vein. Maxillary vein 34 What is the nerve ... Name the three muscles adjoining the parotid gland? Temporalis. Sternocleidomastoid. Master 31 ... What is the function of the inner muscle fibres in orbicularis oculi? ... What is the function of the outer muscle fibres in orbicularis oculi? ...
The temporal fossa contains the following structures:. Temporalis muscle. The strongest of the chewing muscles is the ... Both parts anastomose with the superficial temporal artery and supply the temporal muscle. The posterior maxillary artery ... The lateral pterygoid muscle is the only jaw opener of all chewing muscles. With the masseter muscle, it forms a muscle loop, ... temporalis muscle. The temporalis is a skeletal muscle that originates from the temporal surface at the lateral aspect of the ...
Pio Modi outlines what soreness in the different muscles indicate. ... Confused about what different muscle soreness is telling you? Dr. ... So temporalis, often, these muscles are sore when theres an occlusal muscle disorder. Many patients of ours have temporal ... We move to the masseters, superficial and deep.. Soreness there can indicate displacement of the same side condyle from Centric ...
What structures does the superficial temporal artery supply with blood?. parotid gland, temporalis muscle and frontal & ... posterior scalp, suprahyoid muscles, sternocleidomastoid muscle and meninges. What artery is the most superior branch of the ... What structure does the deep temporal supply with blood?. temporalis muscle. What structures does the pterygoid branches supply ... Terminal: superficial temporal and maxillary. What is the order of the branches of the external carotid from the heart to the ...
... that innervates the temporalis muscle. Synonym: deep temporal nerve ... Synonym: greater superficial petrosal nerve; major superficial petrosal nerve. greater superficial petrosal nerve. Greater ... and vertical muscles) and three of the extrinsic muscles of the tongue (the styloglossus, hyoglossus, and genioglossus muscles ... superficial fibular nerve. Superficial peroneal nerve.. superficial peroneal nerve. One of the two major branches of the common ...
There are four muscles - the masseter, temporalis, medial pterygoid and lateral pterygoid. ... The muscles of mastication are a group of muscles associated with movements of the jaw. ... Only the superficial head is visible. Temporalis. The temporalis muscle originates from the temporal fossa - a shallow ... The medial pterygoid muscle has a quadrangular shape, with two heads; deep and superficial. It is located inferiorly to the ...
The anterior flap is elevated superficial to temporalis and sternomastoid muscles. The external canal is transected at the bony ... The cut zygomatic arch was retracted and the temporalis muscle was divided at the temporal fossa. This exposes the greater wing ... Fig.2 Skin flap was raised superficial to temporalis and sternomastoid muscles. Anteriorly based myoperiosteal flap was raised ... Ca EAC (T4) Subtotal Temporal Bobe Resection. Ca Ear (T4) Total Temporal Bone Resection. Rhabdomyosarcoma of Ear - 2 yrs Old. ...
Branches of frontal superficial temporal supplies face, temporalis muscle, to low levels of tnf and il-7, while myeloid den- ... He neck connects 4. Surface anatomy 7. Spinal cord questions 3. Vertebral column muscles of the hand. Following the ... Aua guidelines detection of incidence has been introduced with a towel or tissue the nebuliser unit and rotate major muscle ... pectoralis minor m. Radial n. Ulnar n. Figure 5.6 gluteal muscles. Patients with urethral obliteration may need to perfect ...
temporalis muscle. This muscle is attached to the mandible and, together with the masseter muscle, is one of the muscles you ... Just behind the superficial temporal artery are two other structures. One is a hole in the temporal bone. This hole is the ... These drawings show some muscles in and around the skull. The upper drawing shows a large muscle coveting the temporal bone. ... One muscle that helps you chew is the temporalis muscle. Its located on both sides of your skull.. Pictured at bottom is an ...
... of temporal bone,?? Tendon(s), of temporalis muscle,¦Ƭ ڤ?? Tongue, apex of, artery and vein of,?? Tongue, dorsum of,???? Tongue ... temporal, deep, ¦Ƭư̮ Artery (arteries), temporal, middle,??¦Ƭư̮ Artery (arteries), temporal, superficial,??¦Ƭư̮ Artery ( ... Muscle(s), tensor veli palatini, ??ĥ Nasopharynx,ɡ Ƭ Nasopharynx, mucosa of,ɡ ?Ƭ??? ?? Nasopharynx, muscles in,ɡ ?Ƭ?ζ Nerve(s ... Muscle(s), masseter,?? Muscle(s), pterygoid, lateral, ¦???? Muscle(s), pterygoid, medial,??¦???? Muscle(s), temporalis,¦Ƭ
The superficial drainage follows the arteries above; the superficial temporal, occipital, posterior auricular, supraorbital and ... This is a large plexus of veins situated between the temporalis and lateral pterygoid muscles, and drains into the maxillary ... The pull of the occipitofrontalis muscle prevents the closure of the bleeding vessel and surrounding skin. ... The superficial drainage follows the arteries above; the superficial temporal, occipital, posterior auricular, supraorbital and ...
Temporalis (Temporal Muscle) - Want more power? The master muscle is not as powerful as the temporal muscle; a broad, fan ... Masticatory Muscles: 4 Muscles of Mastication Meet the masseter. The masseter muscle is powerful. Shaped in a quadrangular ... fashion it can be split into two parts; deep and superficial. ... Medial Pterygoid- Can be called a "wing" muscle. This muscle ... Whats unique about this muscle? It is the only one of the 4 muscles that can open the jaw. Bilateral activation causes ...
Sedlmayr, J. C.; Kirsch, C. F. & Wisco, J. J. The human temporalis muscle: superficial, deep, and zygomatic parts comprise one ... muscles. This study showed three distinct anatomical portions in the middle of the temporalis muscle, which corresponds to its ... Fig 1. Temporal region of the skull in lateral view (A), anterior (B) and medial (C). In A, note the temporal muscle (MT) ... KEY WORDS: Sphenomandibular muscle; Dissection; Deep bundle of the temporal muscle.. RESUMEN: El músculo denominado como ...
... that innervates the temporalis muscle. SYN: SEE: deep temporal nerve. 2. Any of the branches of the facial nerve (CN VII) that ... longus and braves muscles.. SYN: SEE: superficial fibular nerve ... deep temporal, and buccal nerves, which innervate the muscles ... and vertical muscles) and three of the extrinsic muscles of the tongue (the styloglossus, hyoglossus, and genioglossus muscles ... It becomes superficial near the wrist and passes into the hand above (superficial to) the flexor retinaculum. ...
This is an article covering the anatomy of the superficial nerves of the face and scalp. Learn all about those important ... the nerve progresses in the space between the temporal bone and the temporalis muscle. It goes on to pierce the temporal fascia ... The most superficial branches of this nerve run beneath the skin and on the surface of the superficial muscles of the face. ... Superficial Nerves of the Face and Scalp. The superficial nerves of the face and scalp are derived from three primary nerves:. ...
Separating the skin flap directly from the muscle and skull, and then turning over the skin and temporalis muscle at the same ... Many efforts have been made to protect the superficial temporal artery and the facial nerve in standard pterional approach. But ... only a small part of the temporalis muscles is cut, which may reduce the possibility of patients with temporalis atrophy or ... Then, pulled down the musculocutaneous flap and cut a small part of the anterior temporalis muscle. A hole was made near the ...
  • A key point, though, is to not have tunnel vision because soreness of these muscles may also indicate cervical misalignments, and you may have to refer to a physical therapist. (thedawsonacademy.com)
  • Doctors will tell you that anatomy is the study of the bones, muscles, blood vessels, and organs of living creatures. (scribd.com)
  • This bundle presented two portions, a meaty upper portion and a tendinous lower portion, which continues with the tendinous part of the superficial bundle present on the internal surface of the coronoid process. (conicyt.cl)
  • Here we document the 3-dimensional morphology of the cranial musculoskeletal anatomy in the Australian Laughing Kookaburra Dacelo novaeguineae , with a focus upon the geometry and attachments of the jaw muscles in this species. (peerj.com)