A masticatory muscle whose action is closing the jaws; its posterior portion retracts the mandible.
Muscles arising in the zygomatic arch that close the jaw. Their nerve supply is masseteric from the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
A masticatory muscle whose action is closing the jaws.
The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.
The measurement of the dimensions of the HEAD.
Contractile tissue that produces movement in animals.
The protein constituents of muscle, the major ones being ACTINS and MYOSINS. More than a dozen accessory proteins exist including TROPONIN; TROPOMYOSIN; and DYSTROPHIN.
Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.
Large, multinucleate single cells, either cylindrical or prismatic in shape, that form the basic unit of SKELETAL MUSCLE. They consist of MYOFIBRILS enclosed within and attached to the SARCOLEMMA. They are derived from the fusion of skeletal myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, SKELETAL) into a syncytium, followed by differentiation.
The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.

Regional differences in fibre type composition in the human temporalis muscle. (1/103)

Anatomical and electromyographic studies point to regional differences in function in the human temporalis muscle. During chewing and biting the anterior portions of the muscle are in general more intensively activated and they are capable of producing larger forces than the posterior portions. It was hypothetised that this heterogeneity in function is reflected in the fibre type composition of the muscle. The composition and surface area of different fibre types in various anteroposterior portions of the temporalis muscle were investigated in 7 cadavers employing immunohistochemistry with a panel of monoclonal antibodies against different isoforms of myosin heavy chain. Pure slow muscle fibres, type I, differed strongly in number across the muscle. In the most posterior portion of the muscle there were 24% type I fibres, in the intermediate portion 57%, and in the most anterior portion 46%. The mean fibre cross-sectional area (m-fcsa) of type I fibres was 1849 microm2, which did not differ significantly across the muscle. The proportion of pure fast muscle fibres, type IIA and IIX, remained more or less constant throughout the muscle at 13% and 11% respectively; their m-fcsa was 1309 microm2 and 1206 microm2, respectively, which did not differ significantly throughout the muscle. Pure type IIB fibres were not found. The relative proportion of hybrid fibres was 31% and did not differ significantly among the muscle portions. Fibre types I + IIA and cardiac alpha + I + IIA were the most abundant hybrid fibre types. In addition, 5% of the type I fibres had an additional myosin isoform which has only recently been described by means of electrophoresis and was named Ia. In the present study they were denoted as hybrid type I + Ia muscle fibres. It is concluded that intramuscular differences in type I fibre distribution are in accordance with regional differences in muscle function.  (+info)

Neuroimaging of a wooden foreign body retained for 5 months in the temporalis muscle following penetrating trauma with a chopstick--case report. (2/103)

A 48-year-old female was stabbed by her husband with a chopstick made of wood in the left temporal region during a quarrel. She suffered laceration of the left temporal scalp. At initial examination, she concealed the assault with a chopstick. Radiography showed no abnormality, so the wound was sutured. One month after the injury, a painless subcutaneous mass appeared in the left temporal region which grew rapidly for 3 months. She was then admitted to our department. Computed tomography (CT) on admission showed a hyperdense area at the center of the mass. This area was hypointense on both T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. Temporalis muscle tumor with accompanying central necrosis, old hematoma, and inflammatory granuloma was considered. The mass was totally resected for cosmetic purposes and was found to be wooden foreign body granuloma. High density on CT and hypointensity on both T1- and T2-weighted MR images are characteristic of a chronically retained wooden foreign body in the living body and are useful for detecting wooden foreign bodies in the chronic granulomatous phase.  (+info)

Elevated abeta42 in skeletal muscle of Alzheimer disease patients suggests peripheral alterations of AbetaPP metabolism. (3/103)

The levels of amyloid-beta40 (Abeta40) and Abeta42 peptides were quantified in temporalis muscles and brain of neuropathologically diagnosed Alzheimer disease (AD) and of nondemented individuals. This was achieved by using a novel analytical approach consisting of a combination of fast-performance liquid chromatographic (FPLC) size exclusion chromatography developed under denaturing conditions and europium immunoassay on the 4.0- to 4.5-kd fractions. In the temporalis muscles of the AD and nondemented control groups, the average values for Abeta42 were 15.7 ng/g and 10.2 ng/g (P = 0.010), and for Abeta40 they were 37.8 ng/g and 29.8 ng/g (P = 0.067), respectively. Multiple regression analyses of the AD and control combined populations indicated that 1) muscle Abeta40 and muscle Abeta42 levels were correlated with each other (P < 0.001), 2) muscle Abeta40 levels were positively correlated with age (P = 0. 036), and 3) muscle Abeta42 levels were positively correlated with Braak stage (P = 0.042). Other forms of the Abeta peptide were discovered by mass spectrometry, revealing the presence of Abeta starting at residues 1, 6, 7, 9, 10, and 11 and ending at residues 40, 42, 44, 45, and 46. It is possible that in AD the skeletal muscle may contribute to the elevated plasma pool of Abeta and thus indirectly to the amyloid deposits of the brain parenchyma and cerebral blood vessels. The increased levels of Abeta in the temporalis muscles of AD patients suggest that alterations in AbetaPP and Abeta metabolism may be manifested in peripheral tissues.  (+info)

EMG activities of two heads of the human lateral pterygoid muscle in relation to mandibular condyle movement and biting force. (4/103)

Electromyographic (EMG) activities of the superior (SUP) and inferior heads (INF) of the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPT) were recorded in humans during voluntary stepwise changes in biting force and jaw position that were adopted to exclude the effects of acceleration and velocity of jaw movements on the muscle activity. The SUP behaved like a jaw-closing muscle and showed characteristic activity in relation to the biting force. It showed a considerable amount of background activity (5-32% of the maximum) even in the intercuspal position without teeth clenching and reached a nearly maximum activity at relatively lower biting-force levels than the jaw-closing muscles during increment of the biting force. Stretch reflexes were found in the SUP, the function of which could be to stabilize the condyle against the biting force that pulls the condyle posteriorly. This notion was verified by examining the biomechanics on the temporomandibular joint. The complex movements of the mandibular condyle in a sagittal plane were decomposed into displacement in the anteroposterior direction (Ac) and angle of rotation (RAc) around a kinesiological specific point on the condyle. In relation to Ac, each head of the LPT showed quite a similar behavior to each other in all types of jaw movements across all subjects. Working ranges of the muscle activities were almost constant (Ac <3 mm for the SUP and Ac >3 mm for the INF). The amount of EMG activity of the SUP changed in inverse proportion to Ac showing a hyperbola-like relation, whereas that of the INF changed rather linearly. The EMG amplitude of the SUP showed a quasilinear inverse relation with RAc in the hinge movement during which the condyle rotated with no movement in the anteroposterior direction. This finding suggests that the SUP controls the angular relationship between the articular disk and the condyle. On the other hand, the position of the disk in relation to the maxilla, not to the condyle, is controlled indirectly by the INF because the disk is attached to the condyle by tendinous ligaments.  (+info)

Positional relationships between the masticatory muscles and their innervating nerves with special reference to the lateral pterygoid and the midmedial and discotemporal muscle bundles of temporalis. (5/103)

For an accurate assessment of jaw movement, it is crucial to understand the comprehensive formation of the masticatory muscles with special reference to the relationship to the disc of the temporomandibular joint. Detailed dissection was performed on 26 head halves of 14 Japanese cadavers in order to obtain precise anatomical information of the positional relationships between the masticatory muscles and the branches of the mandibular nerve. After complete removal of the bony elements, the midmedial muscle bundle in all specimens and the discotemporal muscle bundle in 6 specimens, derivatives of the temporalis, which insert into the disc were observed. On the anterior area of the articular capsule and the disc of the temporomandibular joint, the upper head of the lateral pterygoid, the midmedial muscle bundle of temporalis and the discotemporal bundle of temporalis were attached mediolaterally, and in 3 specimens the posterosuperior margin of the zygomaticomandibularis was attached to the anterolateral area of the disc. It is suggested that these muscles and muscle bundles contribute to various mandibular movements. Although various patterns of the positional relationships between the muscles and muscle bundles and the their innervating nerves are observed in the present study, relative positional relationships of the muscles and muscle bundles and of nerves of the mandibular nerve are consistent. A possible scheme of the developmental formation of the masticatory muscles based on the findings of the positional relationships between the muscles and the nerves is presented.  (+info)

Influence on myoelectric discharges of anteroposterior displacement of the mandibular position near the tapping point. (6/103)

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence that the anteroposterior mandibular displacement near the tapping point exerts on the myoelectric activity of masseter and temporal muscles at a specific occluding force and to clarify the possibility of judging the mandibular position by measuring the amount of myoelectric discharge. Eight dentulous subjects were selected for the study. Surface electrodes were placed over the anterior, middle and posterior regions of the masseter muscle and over the anterior, middle and posterior bundles of the temporal muscle. Independently of the measurement region, the changes in the masseter and temporal muscle myoelectric activity which accompanied the anteroposterior mandibular displacement, were low. Moreover, when the mandible was displaced anteroposteriorly, the total amount of the myoelectrical discharge from all the recorded places, as well as the amounts of myoelectrical discharge over the middle part of the masseter muscle and the anterior bundle of the temporal muscle reached their lowest values in those mandibular positions which included the tapping point in less than half of the subjects. Therefore, this study indicates that the possibility of judging anteroposterior mandibular displacement by masseter and temporal muscle electromyography is quite low.  (+info)

Excitability of the human trigeminal motoneuronal pool and interactions with other brainstem reflex pathways. (7/103)

We studied the properties of motoneurones and Ia-motoneuronal connections in the human trigeminal system, and their functional interactions with other brainstem reflex pathways mediated by non-muscular (Abeta) afferents. With surface EMG recordings we tested the recovery cycles of the heteronymous H-reflex in the temporalis muscle and the homonymous silent period in the masseter muscle both elicited by stimulation of the masseteric nerve at the infratemporal fossa in nine healthy subjects. In four subjects single motor-unit responses were recorded from the temporalis muscle. In six subjects we also tested the effect of the stimulus to the mental nerve on the temporalis H-reflex and, conversely, the effect of Ia input (stimulus to the masseteric nerve) on the R1 component of the blink reflex in the orbicularis oculi muscle. The recovery cycle of the H-reflex showed a suppression peaking at the 5-20 ms interval; conversely the time course of the masseteric silent period was facilitated at comparable intervals. The inhibition of the test H-reflex was inversely related to the level of background voluntary contraction. Single motor units were unable to fire consistently in response to the test stimulus at intervals shorter than 50 ms. Mental nerve stimulation strongly depressed the H-reflex. The time course of this inhibition coincided with the EMG inhibition elicited by mental nerve stimulation during voluntary contraction. The trigeminal Ia input facilitated the R1 component of the blink reflex when the supraorbital test stimulation preceded the masseteric conditioning stimulation by 2 ms. We conclude that the time course of the recovery cycle of the heteronymous H-reflex in the temporalis muscle reflects the after-hyperpolarization potential (AHP) of trigeminal motoneurones, and that the Ia trigeminal input is integrated with other brainstem reflexes.  (+info)

The course of the buccal nerve: relationships with the temporalis muscle during the prenatal period. (8/103)

The aim of this study was to describe the course of the buccal nerve and its relationships with the temporalis muscle during the prenatal period. Serial sections of 90 human fetal specimens ranging from 9 to 17 wk development were studied by light microscopy. Each fetal specimen was studied on both right and left sides, making a total of 180 cases for study. A 3-D reconstruction of the region analysed in one of the specimens was made. In 89 cases the buccal nerve was located medial to the temporalis muscle; in 73 cases it penetrated the muscle; in 15 cases it lay in a canal formed by the muscle fibres and was covered by fascia, and finally, in 3 cases it was a branch of the inferior alveolar nerve. The study has revealed that in a large number of cases the buccal nerve maintains an intimate association with the temporalis muscle.  (+info)

The temporalis muscle is a fan-shaped muscle located in the lateral aspect of the head, in the temporal fossa region. It belongs to the group of muscles known as muscles of mastication, responsible for chewing movements. The temporalis muscle has its origin at the temporal fossa and inserts into the coronoid process and ramus of the mandible. Its main function is to retract the mandible and assist in closing the jaw.

Masticatory muscles are a group of skeletal muscles responsible for the mastication (chewing) process in humans and other animals. They include:

1. Masseter muscle: This is the primary muscle for chewing and is located on the sides of the face, running from the lower jawbone (mandible) to the cheekbone (zygomatic arch). It helps close the mouth and elevate the mandible during chewing.

2. Temporalis muscle: This muscle is situated in the temporal region of the skull, covering the temple area. It assists in closing the jaw, retracting the mandible, and moving it sideways during chewing.

3. Medial pterygoid muscle: Located deep within the cheek, near the angle of the lower jaw, this muscle helps move the mandible forward and grind food during chewing. It also contributes to closing the mouth.

4. Lateral pterygoid muscle: Found inside the ramus (the vertical part) of the mandible, this muscle has two heads - superior and inferior. The superior head helps open the mouth by pulling the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) downwards, while the inferior head assists in moving the mandible sideways during chewing.

These muscles work together to enable efficient chewing and food breakdown, preparing it for swallowing and digestion.

The masseter muscle is a strong chewing muscle in the jaw. It is a broad, thick, quadrilateral muscle that extends from the zygomatic arch (cheekbone) to the lower jaw (mandible). The masseter muscle has two distinct parts: the superficial part and the deep part.

The superficial part of the masseter muscle originates from the lower border of the zygomatic process of the maxilla and the anterior two-thirds of the inferior border of the zygomatic arch. The fibers of this part run almost vertically downward to insert on the lateral surface of the ramus of the mandible and the coronoid process.

The deep part of the masseter muscle originates from the deep surface of the zygomatic arch and inserts on the medial surface of the ramus of the mandible, blending with the temporalis tendon.

The primary function of the masseter muscle is to elevate the mandible, helping to close the mouth and clench the teeth together during mastication (chewing). It also plays a role in stabilizing the jaw during biting and speaking. The masseter muscle is one of the most powerful muscles in the human body relative to its size.

The mandible, also known as the lower jaw, is the largest and strongest bone in the human face. It forms the lower portion of the oral cavity and plays a crucial role in various functions such as mastication (chewing), speaking, and swallowing. The mandible is a U-shaped bone that consists of a horizontal part called the body and two vertical parts called rami.

The mandible articulates with the skull at the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) located in front of each ear, allowing for movements like opening and closing the mouth, protrusion, retraction, and side-to-side movement. The mandible contains the lower teeth sockets called alveolar processes, which hold the lower teeth in place.

In medical terminology, the term "mandible" refers specifically to this bone and its associated structures.

Cephalometry is a medical term that refers to the measurement and analysis of the skull, particularly the head face relations. It is commonly used in orthodontics and maxillofacial surgery to assess and plan treatment for abnormalities related to the teeth, jaws, and facial structures. The process typically involves taking X-ray images called cephalograms, which provide a lateral view of the head, and then using various landmarks and reference lines to make measurements and evaluate skeletal and dental relationships. This information can help clinicians diagnose problems, plan treatment, and assess treatment outcomes.

A muscle is a soft tissue in our body that contracts to produce force and motion. It is composed mainly of specialized cells called muscle fibers, which are bound together by connective tissue. There are three types of muscles: skeletal (voluntary), smooth (involuntary), and cardiac. Skeletal muscles attach to bones and help in movement, while smooth muscles are found within the walls of organs and blood vessels, helping with functions like digestion and circulation. Cardiac muscle is the specific type that makes up the heart, allowing it to pump blood throughout the body.

Muscle proteins are a type of protein that are found in muscle tissue and are responsible for providing structure, strength, and functionality to muscles. The two major types of muscle proteins are:

1. Contractile proteins: These include actin and myosin, which are responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscles. They work together to cause muscle movement by sliding along each other and shortening the muscle fibers.
2. Structural proteins: These include titin, nebulin, and desmin, which provide structural support and stability to muscle fibers. Titin is the largest protein in the human body and acts as a molecular spring that helps maintain the integrity of the sarcomere (the basic unit of muscle contraction). Nebulin helps regulate the length of the sarcomere, while desmin forms a network of filaments that connects adjacent muscle fibers together.

Overall, muscle proteins play a critical role in maintaining muscle health and function, and their dysregulation can lead to various muscle-related disorders such as muscular dystrophy, myopathies, and sarcopenia.

Smooth muscle, also known as involuntary muscle, is a type of muscle that is controlled by the autonomic nervous system and functions without conscious effort. These muscles are found in the walls of hollow organs such as the stomach, intestines, bladder, and blood vessels, as well as in the eyes, skin, and other areas of the body.

Smooth muscle fibers are shorter and narrower than skeletal muscle fibers and do not have striations or sarcomeres, which give skeletal muscle its striped appearance. Smooth muscle is controlled by the autonomic nervous system through the release of neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine and norepinephrine, which bind to receptors on the smooth muscle cells and cause them to contract or relax.

Smooth muscle plays an important role in many physiological processes, including digestion, circulation, respiration, and elimination. It can also contribute to various medical conditions, such as hypertension, gastrointestinal disorders, and genitourinary dysfunction, when it becomes overactive or underactive.

Skeletal muscle, also known as striated or voluntary muscle, is a type of muscle that is attached to bones by tendons or aponeuroses and functions to produce movements and support the posture of the body. It is composed of long, multinucleated fibers that are arranged in parallel bundles and are characterized by alternating light and dark bands, giving them a striped appearance under a microscope. Skeletal muscle is under voluntary control, meaning that it is consciously activated through signals from the nervous system. It is responsible for activities such as walking, running, jumping, and lifting objects.

Skeletal muscle fibers, also known as striated muscle fibers, are the type of muscle cells that make up skeletal muscles, which are responsible for voluntary movements of the body. These muscle fibers are long, cylindrical, and multinucleated, meaning they contain multiple nuclei. They are surrounded by a connective tissue layer called the endomysium, and many fibers are bundled together into fascicles, which are then surrounded by another layer of connective tissue called the perimysium.

Skeletal muscle fibers are composed of myofibrils, which are long, thread-like structures that run the length of the fiber. Myofibrils contain repeating units called sarcomeres, which are responsible for the striated appearance of skeletal muscle fibers. Sarcomeres are composed of thick and thin filaments, which slide past each other during muscle contraction to shorten the sarcomere and generate force.

Skeletal muscle fibers can be further classified into two main types based on their contractile properties: slow-twitch (type I) and fast-twitch (type II). Slow-twitch fibers have a high endurance capacity and are used for sustained, low-intensity activities such as maintaining posture. Fast-twitch fibers, on the other hand, have a higher contractile speed and force generation capacity but fatigue more quickly and are used for powerful, explosive movements.

A smooth muscle within the vascular system refers to the involuntary, innervated muscle that is found in the walls of blood vessels. These muscles are responsible for controlling the diameter of the blood vessels, which in turn regulates blood flow and blood pressure. They are called "smooth" muscles because their individual muscle cells do not have the striations, or cross-striped patterns, that are observed in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. Smooth muscle in the vascular system is controlled by the autonomic nervous system and by hormones, and can contract or relax slowly over a period of time.

The deep temporal arteries supply the temporalis muscle. The deep temporal arteries may be affected by giant cell arteritis. ... They anastomose with the middle temporal artery, among other vessels. They supply the temporalis muscle. The deep temporal ... They ascend between the temporalis muscle and the pericranium. The deep temporal arteries anastomose with the middle temporal ... The deep temporal arteries are two arteries of the head. They ascend between the temporalis muscle and the pericranium. ...
This provides attachment to the temporal muscle. Teeth sit in the upper part of the body of the mandible. The frontmost part of ... the inferior muscle of the tongue) attaches; the geniohyoid muscle attaches to the lower mental spine. Above the mental spine, ... where the mylohyoid muscle attaches; a small part of the superior pharyngeal constrictor muscle attaches to the posterior ridge ... and the medial pterygoid muscle medially; the stylomandibular ligament is attached to the angle between these muscles. The ...
The deep temporal nerves provide motor innervation to the temporalis muscle. The deep temporal nerves also have articular ... Number There are usually two deep temporal nerves - the anterior deep temporal nerve and posterior deep temporal nerve. ... They ascend to the temporal fossa[citation needed] and enter the deep surface of the temporalis muscle. ... The deep temporal nerves are typically two nerves (one anterior and one posterior) which arise from the mandibular nerve (CN V3 ...
Part of the temporal muscle's tendon inserts into it. https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/retromolar+fossa The ...
Temporal bone Temporal fenestrae Temporal muscle Temporomandibular joint Göksu, N; Kemaloğlu, YK; Köybaşioğlu, A; Ileri, F; ... Kwong, Y; Yu, D; Shah, J (August 2012). "Fracture mimics on temporal bone CT: a guide for the radiologist". AJR. American ... Koerner's septum is an anatomic boundary in the temporal bone formed by the petrosquamous suture between the petrous and ... 2004 Apr.}} Wikimedia Commons has media related to Temporal bone. "Anatomy diagram: 34256.000-1". Roche Lexicon - illustrated ...
Its outer surface is smooth and convex; it affords attachment to the temporal muscle, and forms part of the temporal fossa; on ... The squamous part of temporal bone, or temporal squama, forms the front and upper part of the temporal bone, and is scale-like ... it serves for the attachment of the temporal fascia, and limits the origin of the temporalis muscle. The boundary between the ... The superior border is long, thin, and sharp, and serves for the attachment of the temporal fascia; the inferior, short, thick ...
Teeth - Temple - Temporal arteries, deep - Temporal artery, middle - Temporal artery, superficial - Temporal muscle - Tendon - ... Oblique muscle of auricle - The oblique muscle of auricle (oblique auricular muscle or Tod muscle) is an intrinsic muscle of ... "Muscles within muscles: Coordination of 19 muscle segments within three shoulder muscles during isometric motor tasks". J ... Serratus anterior muscle - Serratus posterior inferior muscle - Serratus posterior superior muscle - Skeletal muscle - Skin - ...
The temporal muscle covers this area and is used during mastication. Cladists classify land vertebrates based on the presence ... The temple is a latch where four skull bones fuse: the frontal, parietal, temporal, and sphenoid. It is located on the side of ... The brain has a lobe called the temporal lobe. The word "temple" as used in anatomy has a separate etymology from the other ... Due to its shared spelling (but not shared source) with the word for time, the adjective for both is "temporal" (both " ...
Eswaran, H.; Preissl, H.; Murphy, P.; Wilson, J.D.; Lowery, C.L. (2005). "Spatial-Temporal Analysis of Uterine Smooth Muscle ... Filler, Aaron G; Maravilla, Kenneth R; Tsuruda, Jay S (2004-08-01). "MR neurography and muscle MR imaging for image diagnosis ... Magnetomyography (MMG) is a technique for mapping muscle activity by recording magnetic fields produced by electrical currents ... Garcia, Marco Antonio Cavalcanti; Baffa, Oswaldo (2015). "Magnetic fields from skeletal muscles: a valuable physiological ...
This likely meant a more forward attachment of the temporal muscles. The nuchal and sagittal crests were also proportionally ... with the temporal fossa being shorter, resulting in the distance between the orbits and occiput being shorter. ...
... interacts with myostatin and regulates temporal progression of muscle regeneration through modulation of myostatin ... "Nfix Regulates Temporal Progression of Muscle Regeneration through Modulation of Myostatin Expression". Cell Reports. 14 (9): ... Nfix also inhibits the slow-twitch muscle phenotype. GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000008441 - Ensembl, May 2017 GRCm38: ... "Enhanced exercise and regenerative capacity in a mouse model that violates size constraints of oxidative muscle fibres , eLife ...
... excluding the inferior oblique muscle. The lateral rectus muscle inserts into the temporal side of the eyeball. This insertion ... The lateral rectus muscle is a muscle on the lateral side of the eye in the orbit. It is one of six extraocular muscles that ... Lateral rectus muscle Dissection showing origins of right ocular muscles, and nerves entering by the superior orbital fissure. ... The insertion of the lateral rectus muscle is around 8 mm from the insertion of the inferior rectus muscle, around 7 mm from ...
Temporal summation is a potent mechanism for generation of referred muscle pain. Central hyperexcitability is important for the ... 1999). "Ketamine reduces muscle pain, temporal summation, and referred pain in fibromyalgia patients". Pain. 85 (3): 483-491. ... Local pain in the prostate can radiate referred pain to the abdomen, lower back, and calf muscles. Kidney stones can cause ... For example, stimulated local pain in the anterior tibial muscle causes referred pain in the ventral portion of the ankle; ...
Associated temporal muscle release in the region of these nerves may also be indicated. Because these nerves are very small and ... The greater occipital nerve travels through several muscle layers (including the trapezius muscle and splenius capitis muscle) ... These nerves are released from these muscles so they may lie free of pressure from these muscle structures. Small blood vessels ... or muscle tissue. The supra-orbital and supra-trochlear nerves travel through the corrugator supercilii muscle which enables ...
... its fibers merging with those of the frontalis muscle. The procerus muscle is supplied by the temporal branch of the facial ... The procerus muscle (or pyramidalis nasi) is a small pyramidal slip of muscle deep to the superior orbital nerve, artery and ... The procerus muscle arises by tendinous fibers from the fascia covering the lower part of the nasal bone and upper part of the ... The procerus muscle helps to pull that part of the skin between the eyebrows downwards, which assists in flaring the nostrils. ...
Tyler's accepted reconstruction of Sangiran 31 shows a double temporal ridge. The temporal muscles extend to the top of the ... The specimen was unusual for having a double temporal ridge (sagittal crest), which almost meets at the top of the cranium, and ... It had the same double sagittal crest or double temporal ridge with a cranial capacity of around 800-1000cc. Since its ...
The temporal muscles, sagittal, and nuchal crests are weaker compared to other tenrec species. In addition, the lowland ... Cutaneous muscles underneath the quills were confirmed and are known as quill vibrator disc; they are around 16.8 mm long and ... These cutaneous muscles were the apparatus that contribute the vibration of the quills and production of sound for ...
The superior auricular muscle is supplied by the temporal branch of the facial nerve (VII). Auricula in context. Superior ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Auricularis superior muscles. Anterior auricular muscle Posterior auricular muscle This ... The superior auricular muscle is a muscle above the auricle of the outer ear. It originates from the epicranial aponeurosis, ... The superior auricular muscle originates from the epicranial aponeurosis. Its fibres converge to be inserted by a thin, ...
Under the temporal lesions the skeletal muscle is almost in direct continuity with the epidermis. There are at least four types ...
The lateral slips of the temporal muscles are thicker and stronger in Asian black bears. In contrast to polar bears, Asian ... Comparative morphology of the muscles of mastication in the giant panda and the Asiatic black bear. Annals of Anatomy. ... and the weight ratio of the two pterygoid muscles is also much smaller in Asian black bears. ...
... below them it forms part of the temporal fossa, and affords attachment to the temporal muscle. At the back part and close to ... and the latter indicates the upper limit of the muscular origin of the temporal muscle. Above these lines the bone is covered ... The point of meeting of this angle with the occipital and the mastoid part of the temporal is named the asterion. The parietal ... Crossing the middle of the bone in an arched direction are two curved lines, the superior and inferior temporal lines; the ...
The skulls of bears are massive, providing anchorage for the powerful masseter and temporal jaw muscles. The canine teeth are ... If they have stored enough body fat, their muscles remain in good condition, and their protein maintenance requirements are met ...
Features of the skull and mandible suggest that Phiomicetus had large temporal muscles in the jaw; combined with tooth wear ...
The temporal lines on the braincase, which anchor muscles, are located lower in P. germainepetterae. Like in aardvarks, the ...
Compared to Neanderthals and modern humans, the area the temporal muscle would have covered is rather flat. The brow ridges ... The mastoid part of the temporal bone at the base of the skull notably juts out. The occipital condyles (which connect the ... The squamous part of the temporal bone is triangular like that of Peking Man, and the infratemporal crest is quite sharp.: 240- ... The base of the temporal bone is consistent with Java Man and Peking Man rather than Neanderthals and modern humans. Unlike ...
This is partly due to the greater development of the temporal muscles, which required longer temporal pits. Georges Cuvier ...
Initial facial changes usually involve the area of the face covered by the temporal or buccinator muscles. The disease ... or latissimus dorsi muscle to the face. Severe deformities may require additional procedures, such as pedicled temporal fascia ... characterized by rapid spasms of a muscle group that subsequently spread to adjacent muscles) and occur on the side ... Other ocular abnormalities include ophthalmoplegia (paralysis of one or more of the extraocular muscles) and other types of ...
But, A. Boisei's skull was robust and had large temporals muscles that helped crush nuts and hard plants. It's important to ... The development of the robusticity comes from the anterior part of the temporals muscles. As a result of this massiveness size ... of temporals muscles KNM-ER 406 shows presents of shallow orbits. This species is suggested to be male and his features are the ... The big chewing muscles attached to the sagittal crest are traits of this adaptation. Following a three-month expedition funded ...
The anterior auricular muscle is the smallest of the three auricular muscles. The superficial temporal artery, a branch of the ... The anterior auricular muscle is supplied is supplied by the temporal branch of the facial nerve (VII). It may also receive ... The anterior auricular muscle, the smallest of the three auricular muscles, is thin and fan-shaped, and its fibers are pale and ... Superior auricular muscle Posterior auricular muscle Auricula in context. This article incorporates text in the public domain ...
With progression, the illness involves the pectoral girdle and trunk muscles and finally the masseters and temporal muscles. ... The initial symptoms are muscle spasms in the legs and alopecia (hair loss). The spasms are painful and progressive, and their ... The spasms usually spare the facial muscles. Severe spasms can interfere with respiration and speech. During an attack-free ... characterized by painful muscle spasms, alopecia, diarrhea, endocrinopathy with amenorrhoea, and secondary skeletal ...
An oral rehabilitation robot for massaging the masseter and temporal muscles: A preliminary report. Oral Radiology. 2009 Jun;25 ... An oral rehabilitation robot for massaging the masseter and temporal muscles : A preliminary report. In: Oral Radiology. 2009 ... Dive into the research topics of An oral rehabilitation robot for massaging the masseter and temporal muscles: A preliminary ... An oral rehabilitation robot for massaging the masseter and temporal muscles: A preliminary report. / Ariji, Yoshiko; Katsumata ...
Electromyographic analysis of the masseter and temporal muscles in oralized deaf individuals.. Regalo, S C H; Vitti, M; ... This study aimed to assess, by means of computerized bilateral electromyography (EMG), masseter and temporal muscles of 12 ... The analysis made use of Variance Analysis (ANOVA). Significant differences (p < 0.01) for both muscles were found among the ... The stomatognathic system muscles play important roles in functions such as mastication, deglutition, and phonation. ...
Temporal and proximal muscle wasting. * Peripheral edema. See Clinical Presentation for more detail. ...
The deep temporal arteries supply the temporalis muscle. The deep temporal arteries may be affected by giant cell arteritis. ... They anastomose with the middle temporal artery, among other vessels. They supply the temporalis muscle. The deep temporal ... They ascend between the temporalis muscle and the pericranium. The deep temporal arteries anastomose with the middle temporal ... The deep temporal arteries are two arteries of the head. They ascend between the temporalis muscle and the pericranium. ...
Temporal Muscle * Teratoma Explore _. Co-Authors (13) People in Profiles who have published with this person. ...
A 2015 RCT comprised of 70 patients was conducted to examine the effect of blocking trigger points in the temporal muscles of ... Injection of trigger points in the temporal muscles of patients with miofascial syndrome. Arq Neuropsiquiatr. 2015;73(10):861- ... Muscle group - a group of muscles that are contiguous and that share a common function, e.g., flexion, stabilization or ... Muscles that are widely separated anatomically and have different functions may be separate muscle groups. ...
Laxity of the TMJ ligaments → hypotonus of the temporal and masseter muscles → dropping of the jaw. ...
dr said its irritation of the temporal muscle how long will this last? does this usually cause headaches?. ... An inexpensive 2-piece mouthguard worn at night may change the muscle dynamics enough to stop spasms.. Created for people with ...
Temporal changes of muscle injury. Semin Musculoskelet Radiol 2010;14:176-93.doi:10.1055/s-0030-1253159 pmid:http://www.ncbi. ... B) Muscle contusion: long-axis extended field of view image of an acute quadriceps contusion. Muscle fibre disruption of the VI ... British athletics muscle injury classification: a new grading system. Br J Sports Med 2014;48:1347-51.doi:10.1136/bjsports-2013 ... Mr imaging of muscle trauma: anatomy, biomechanics, pathophysiology, and imaging appearance. Radiographics 2018;38:124-48.doi: ...
Temporal muscle recruitment pattern varied between muscles based on their function. Heavier lifting weight evenly increased the ... lifting pace affected the temporal recruitment pattern in most of muscles. The faster lifting pace increased the muscle ... Musculoskeletal-system; Biomechanics; Body-mechanics; Body-regions; Extremities; Manual-lifting; Kinesiology; Muscles; Muscle- ... The purpose of this study was to compare the effect on the trunk and upper extremity muscle recruitment when controlling the ...
We identified 14 major jaw muscles: 6 in the temporal group (M. adductor mandibulae and M. pseudotemporalis), 7 in the ... The head of a deceased specimen was CT scanned, and an accurate 3D representation of the skull and jaw muscles was generated ... provide a summary of the nomenclature used throughout the avian jaw muscle literature. The approach presented here provides ... with a focus upon the geometry and attachments of the jaw muscles in this species. ...
Signs and symptoms reflect frontal and temporal lobe dysfunction with lower motor neuron-type weakness, muscle atrophy, and ... It is characterized by pyramidal cell loss in the frontal and temporal lobes and degeneration of motor neurons in the ... 23] This contrasted with frontotemporal dementia, in which glucose hypometabolism is seen in the frontal lobes and temporal ... MND signs include bulbar weakness with dysarthria and dysphagia, limb weakness, muscle wasting and fasciculations, and, of ...
The motor component supplies the masseter, temporal, and lateral pterygoid muscles.. The posterior trunk radiates from the ... The mandibular nerve sends a branch to the mylohyoid muscle and the anterior belly of the digastric muscle and then enters the ... The second branch is the first motor nerve, which supplies the medial pterygoid muscle. Inferior to that branch, the mandibular ... Gentle facial muscle massage can promote and encourage earlier regain and manifestation of sensation. ...
Temporal Muscle/surgery, Leprosy/surgery, Facial Nerve Diseases/surgery @font-face{font-family:Roboto;font-style:normal;font- ... Leprosy/diagnosis, Peripheral Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis, Skin Tests/methods, Muscle Strength ... a transferência de músculo temporal (Gillies). Vídeo sem áudio. See more details ...
15 Savabi O, Nejatidanesh F, Khosravi S. Effect of occlusal splints on the EMG activities of masseter and temporal muscles ... 16 Scopel V, da Costa GS Alves, Urias D. An EMG study of masseter and anterior temporalis muscles in extra-articular myogenous ... 3 Ferrario VF et al Immediate effect of a stabilization splint on masticatory muscle activity in TMD patients. J Oral Rehab ... 17 Türp JC, Komine F, Hugger A. Efficacy of stabilization splint therapy for the management of patients with masticatory muscle ...
The lipid raft localization of Kv7.1/Kv7.5 heteromers provides efficient spatial and temporal regulation of smooth muscle ... Functional assembly of Kv7.1/Kv7.5 channels with emerging properties on vascular muscle physiology.. Oliveras A, Roura-Ferrer M ... Functional assembly of Kv7.1/Kv7.5 channels with emerging properties on vascular muscle physiology.. Arteriosclerosis, ... Title: Functional assembly of Kv7.1/Kv7.5 channels with emerging properties on vascular muscle physiology. ...
describe the anatomy of the vertebral column, neck, skull, scalp and face, parotid and temporal regions, facial muscles and ...
Muscle volume and PDFF were measured, segmentation masks were divided into proximal, middle and distal muscle section. Results ... Our results indicate that psoas muscle PDFF and fat volume could serve as MRI-determined biomarkers for early risk ... Relative maximum change of erector spinae muscle showed a significant regional variation. Correlation testing with age as a ... Conclusion: In erector spinae muscles, a regional variation of fat distribution at baseline and relative maximum change of ...
At the end of May 2020, a 29-year-old woman had temporal lobe headache, neck stiffness, muscle weakness, and her temperature ...
The parotid lymph nodes drain the nasal planum, skin, and subcutis of the frontal and temporal regions and many of the muscles ... The mandibular nodes drain the nose, lips, superficial muscles of the head, and parts of the tongue, oral cavity, and pharynx. ...
It was found that a subset of trigeminal afferent fibers which innervate the masseter and temporal muscles expressed α, α and α ... may sensitize masticatory muscle nociceptors to increase pain and desensitize muscle proprioceptors to alter muscle tone, ... This study aimed to test whether neck muscle activity can be induced in rats by noxious stimulation of the frontal dura or ... To rule out the possibility that local ischemia was responsible for the observed effect of phenylephrine on masticatory muscle ...
There are several symptoms associated with Temporal Arteritis, to include muscle pain, pain when chewing, fever, stiffness, and ... Temporal Arteritis:. Temporal Arteritis, also referred to as, Giant Cell Arteritis, or, Cranial Arteritis, involves an ... Muscle weakness in one side of the body, and accumulation of lactic acid in the blood are additional symptoms. The child may ... Other symptoms of Temporal Arteritis include weight loss, anemia, shaking, fatigue, sweats, and vision loss.. Disseminated ...
3 The fascia of the temporal muscle was incised and a pocket was created within the muscle to incorporate the VORP of the ... The fascia of the temporalis muscle was closed over the VORP in an interrupted pattern with PDS 3-0 to hold the implant in ...
There is a substantial relationship between TMD and hyperactivity of the temporal muscle, and the physiotherapeutic treatment ( ... Muscle hyperactivity can be of significant characteristic in subjects with Temporomandibular Disorders, which can be associated ... Abekura H, Kotani H, Tokuyama H, Hamada T. Effects of oclusal splints on the asymmetry of masticatory muscle activity during ... The study of the electromyographic signals of the masticatory activity in the isotonic contractions of the muscles in study was ...
Background There is an emerging role for the radiological evaluation of the psoas muscle as a marker of sarcopenia, and as a ... Some studies have indicated that morphometric analysis of temporal muscle thickness [19-21] or zygomatic thickness [19] may be ... It is defined as "muscle failure" characterized by loss of muscle strength, quality and quantity [1]. A variety of physical ... Survival prediction using temporal muscle thickness measurements on cranial magnetic resonance images in patients with newly ...
... less temporal muscle manipulation, less brain parenchyma retraction) from the skin to the aneurysm than standard approaches. ...
Synapsids are amniotes with a single temporal fenestra in the skull (an opening for the attachment of jaw muscles). The only ...
It is superficial to sternomastoid muscle, superficial temporal artery, deep lobe of the left parotid gland and the mastoid ... It is deep to part of the superficial lobe of the left parotid gland and platysma muscle. ...
Then, the brain surface was covered, using the temporal muscle and frontal pericranium. As a result, the right temporal lobe ... The temporal muscle and frontal pericranium were dissected as the vascularized flaps for the indirect bypass. To perform large ... T2-weighted MRI revealed two de novo microbleeds in the right deep temporal lobe adjacent to the temporal horn and the right ... weighted MRI taken 6 months later demonstrated two de novo microbleeds in the right deep temporal lobe adjacent to the temporal ...
  • Sometimes in malocclusion , bad bite the muscle forces that work the tooth sideways stimulates bone around the root to build up and become stronger. (1stdentist.com)
  • These joints are located between the lower jaw and the temporal bone. (healthline.com)
  • Background A plethora of age-related changes contribute to hollowing of the temples, as bone remodeling, atrophy of the temporalis muscle, thinning of the skin, and deflation of the subcutaneous and deep temporal fat create the appearance of a skeletonized face. (uni-muenchen.de)
  • With age, there is bone resorption, particularly in the temporal bone, which is responsible for hollow temples. (looketmedecine.fr)
  • To make the opening and closing of the jaw easy and smooth, there is a small, soft disc placed between the condyle and the temporal bone. (riveroaksdental.ca)
  • Temporomandibular joint or TMJ, is the joint that links the lower jaw (mandible) with the temporal bone of our skull. (healthhearty.com)
  • The name Temporomandibular is derived from the combination of the names of two bones that make this joint i.e., the temporal bone of the skull and lower jawbone called the mandible. (healthhearty.com)
  • At the end of May 2020, a 29-year-old woman had temporal lobe headache, neck stiffness, muscle weakness, and her temperature increased to 38.5°C. Her condition did not improve for 3-4 days, and on May 29, she was admitted to an emergency care facility. (cdc.gov)
  • I should have stated, my subjects have large temporal lobe muscles, and I think I'll need to do 2dwarper on skullstriped EPIs, which is why I was asking when in the preprocessing stages I can use 2dwarper. (nih.gov)
  • Facial muscle action as connected with orthodontic treatment. (nih.gov)
  • Typically, people have a severe and often throbbing headache, pain in the scalp when they brush their hair, and pain in facial muscles when they chew. (msdmanuals.com)
  • In addition, previous studies have established a relationship between facial skeletonization, temporal hollowing, and postmenopausal sarcopenia. (uni-muenchen.de)
  • In particular, the facial artery is found which originates from the neck and then travels along a path that passes under the platysma , under the depressor angulis oris, then under the large zygomatic muscle . (looketmedecine.fr)
  • Temporomandibular joint disorders occur when there is a problem with the facial muscles and the jaw. (riveroaksdental.ca)
  • Polymyalgia Rheumatica Polymyalgia rheumatica involves inflammation of the lining of joints, causing severe pain and stiffness in the muscles of the neck, back, shoulders, and hips. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Symptoms include stiffness in the abdomen, trouble swallowing, and painful muscle contractions in the jaw and neck. (healthline.com)
  • You may feel pain in your shoulders, neck, and jaw muscles. (riveroaksdental.ca)
  • If home remedies such as gently massaging your jaw and neck muscles, avoiding stress, chewing gum, and over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are not effective, you should see your dentist. (riveroaksdental.ca)
  • 8. [Skeletal muscle T-cell lymphoma following hemophagocytic syndrome]. (nih.gov)
  • For example, at the orbicular level, by contracting, the muscles exert mechanical forces on the fatty tissues which are both pushed upwards, leading to the appearance of bags on the lower eyelids, but also pushed downwards with the appearance of what is called the valley of tears. (looketmedecine.fr)
  • It has several muscles and connective tissues to help in the smooth movement of the joint. (healthhearty.com)
  • Your organs, tissues, muscles, and joints work best when your body is properly aligned. (alignburleson.com)
  • Muscles and tissues that become too tight may pull on joints and vertebrae or press on nerves. (alignburleson.com)
  • Treatments like massage and soft tissue mobilization loosen tight muscles and tissues. (alignburleson.com)
  • Whether the tissues tightened due to a subluxation, poor posture, injury or stress, muscle tension can cause pain, headaches and fatigue. (alignburleson.com)
  • Conclusion Temporal soft-tissue filler injections are safe and provide long-lasting aesthetic improvement both in pre- and postmenopausal women. (uni-muenchen.de)
  • Muscles also atrophy with age but are also responsible for a change in the distribution of fat. (looketmedecine.fr)
  • Strength training trains the body to make those big anaerobic muscle fibres, giving you the body-builder look, but cardio builds endurance muscles without hypertrophy. (stackexchange.com)
  • tissue but includes many elastic and muscle fibres. (co.ma)
  • I had surgery on 1/16/09 for removal of a blue nevus from my temporal muscle and the pathology came back stage III melanoma. (cancer.org)
  • Typically affected are the temporal arteries, which run through the temples and provide blood to part of the scalp, the jaw muscles, and the optic nerves. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Some people can exert over 900 pounds of compressive force with their jaw muscles so you can imagine how much damage such force can do when you close into a single tooth and then work it from side to side. (1stdentist.com)
  • The TMJ is the joint that connects the jaw to the temporal bones of the skull (located just below your temple and in front of your ear). (riveroaksdental.ca)
  • In a locked jaw, the muscles become stiff and stay permanently in a state of contraction. (healthhearty.com)
  • People with chronic musculoskeletal (muscle, joint, ligament, tendon) pain tend to experience pain first before becoming fatigued, according to a study published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorder in 2022. (alignburleson.com)
  • This pain is known as myofascial pain and involves discomfort or pain in all the muscles that control your jaw's function. (riveroaksdental.ca)
  • Unlike typical paradigms, however, we also find patterns of early (sensorimotor) activity with distinct temporal dynamics predicts agency over muscle movements, suggesting that the "neural correlates of agency" may depend on the level of abstraction (i.e., direct sensorimotor feedback versus downstream consequences) most relevant to a given agency judgment. (nih.gov)
  • The problem can be compounded if teeth interfere with functional muscle patterns, the jaw muscles will attempt to "erase" the part of the tooth that interferes by grinding against it all the more. (1stdentist.com)
  • I feel out of breath (the sign of an oxygen deficit) after a sprint that doesn't tire out my muscles: if I were on the bike instead, I'd be able to keep up that level of activity for hours. (stackexchange.com)
  • Symptoms and results of a physical examination suggest the diagnosis, but biopsy of the temporal artery is done to confirm it. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Drawing on methods from human-computer interaction and adaptive experimentation, we use human-in-the-loop Bayesian optimization to tune the timing of electrical muscle stimulation so as to robustly elicit a SoA over electrically actuated muscle movements in male and female human subjects. (nih.gov)
  • It is important to educate the workers about the effect of lifting pace and weight on the biomechanical load to control the mechanical load on the muscles and spine. (cdc.gov)
  • Though uncommon, infections can permanently damage muscles or nerves, which can lead to repeated bouts of lockjaw. (healthline.com)
  • The excessive muscle activity often results in pain in the muscle itself. (1stdentist.com)
  • TMD causes pain in the jaw joint and surrounding muscles. (healthline.com)
  • The labia generate the sound, dorsal muscles time the sound production, and ventral muscles control the sound frequency. (nih.gov)
  • When an object is rapidly approaching these signals from your eye control your muscles directly using the TectoSpinal tract to avoid the object and preserve your life. (thehighestofthemountains.com)
  • All of the jaw muscles can become sore including the temporal muscles that are the source of many so-called tension headaches. (1stdentist.com)
  • The treatment may also ease muscle tension and decrease inflammation, a condition that can play a role in a range of health problems, including chronic fatigue, asthma, diabetes, high blood pressure and depression. (alignburleson.com)
  • The muscles that move the jaw are very powerful and can do major damage to the teeth when the biting surfaces don't fit together properly. (1stdentist.com)
  • As we all know, cardio and strength training have completely different effects on your muscles, and your body's response to them. (stackexchange.com)
  • The projectile perforated the skin of the right temporal region directly in front of the line of the growth of the hair, making a pea-sized blackened opening. (nih.gov)
  • Few reports of intramuscular lipoma in the temporal region are seen in the literature. (bvsalud.org)
  • A patient with an intramuscular lipoma located in the temporal region is presented along with the mentioned treatment. (bvsalud.org)
  • Some excessive muscle activity may be caused by emotional stress. (1stdentist.com)
  • EMG activity was recorded from the gastrocnemius and rectus femoris muscles during the falls. (nfshost.com)
  • He will determine the source and cause of your discomfort, and devise a customized treatment solution that will work for you to help with muscle twitch in face. (doctortmj.com)
  • Expiratory respiratory muscles set the basic temporal structure of the song, and the rate of expiratory pulses during song is five-fold higher in pressure than under non-song conditions (Suthers RA and Zollinger SA. (nih.gov)
  • Typically, the jaw muscles hurt and become tired soon after people begin chewing. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The purpose of this study was to compare the effect on the trunk and upper extremity muscle recruitment when controlling the lifting pace and the lifting weight. (cdc.gov)
  • Kinematics of upper extremity and the box and electromyography of trunk and upper extremity muscles were collected. (cdc.gov)
  • The effect of load weight vs. pace on muscle recruitment during lifting. (cdc.gov)
  • What effect does restricted oxygen in cardio have on muscle damage & repair? (stackexchange.com)
  • The development of nano-reservoir arrays coupled to optical detection of neuronal function will significantly improve our understanding of neural network behavior by providing a carefully controlled platform on which to study the effect of spatial and temporal neurotransmitter delivery to neurons. (stanford.edu)
  • Our muscles are the primary means through which we affect the external world, and the sense of agency (SoA) over the action through those muscles is fundamental to our self-awareness. (nih.gov)
  • Temporal muscle recruitment pattern varied between muscles based on their function. (cdc.gov)
  • Networks of neurons, the cells responsible for communicating within the brain and activating muscle function, can store information, such as a memory. (stanford.edu)
  • In some cases, you may be able to relieve tight jaw muscles using targeted exercises and stretches. (healthline.com)
  • Unfortunately, it only takes a slightly misaligned vertebra or a tight muscle or tendon to cause imbalances that can be subtle or very noticeable. (alignburleson.com)
  • However, the variability of T(c) for each of the muscles was larger in the vision occluded condition. (nfshost.com)
  • When vision is occluded, muscle activation is hypothesized to start relative to onset of the fall. (nfshost.com)