Dentin: The hard portion of the tooth surrounding the pulp, covered by enamel on the crown and cementum on the root, which is harder and denser than bone but softer than enamel, and is thus readily abraded when left unprotected. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth, Deciduous: The teeth of the first dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.Tooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Dentin Permeability: The property of dentin that permits passage of light, heat, cold, and chemical substances. It does not include penetration by microorganisms.Dentin Desensitizing Agents: Substances which reduce or eliminate dentinal sensitivity or the pain associated with a source of stimulus (such as touch, heat, or cold) at the orifice of exposed dentinal tubules causing the movement of tubular fluid that in turn stimulates tooth nerve receptors.Dentin SensitivityTooth Root: The part of a tooth from the neck to the apex, embedded in the alveolar process and covered with cementum. A root may be single or divided into several branches, usually identified by their relative position, e.g., lingual root or buccal root. Single-rooted teeth include mandibular first and second premolars and the maxillary second premolar teeth. The maxillary first premolar has two roots in most cases. Maxillary molars have three roots. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p690)Dentin-Bonding Agents: Cements that act through infiltration and polymerization within the dentinal matrix and are used for dental restoration. They can be adhesive resins themselves, adhesion-promoting monomers, or polymerization initiators that act in concert with other agents to form a dentin-bonding system.Tooth Crown: The upper part of the tooth, which joins the lower part of the tooth (TOOTH ROOT) at the cervix (TOOTH CERVIX) at a line called the cementoenamel junction. The entire surface of the crown is covered with enamel which is thicker at the extremity and becomes progressively thinner toward the cervix. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p216)Tooth Germ: The collective tissues from which an entire tooth is formed, including the DENTAL SAC; ENAMEL ORGAN; and DENTAL PAPILLA. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth Loss: The failure to retain teeth as a result of disease or injury.Dentin, Secondary: Dentin formed by normal pulp after completion of root end formation.Dental Bonding: An adhesion procedure for orthodontic attachments, such as plastic DENTAL CROWNS. This process usually includes the application of an adhesive material (DENTAL CEMENTS) and letting it harden in-place by light or chemical curing.Molar: The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)OdontoblastsTooth Eruption: The emergence of a tooth from within its follicle in the ALVEOLAR PROCESS of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE into the ORAL CAVITY. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Dental Enamel: A hard thin translucent layer of calcified substance which envelops and protects the dentin of the crown of the tooth. It is the hardest substance in the body and is almost entirely composed of calcium salts. Under the microscope, it is composed of thin rods (enamel prisms) held together by cementing substance, and surrounded by an enamel sheath. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)Resin Cements: Dental cements composed either of polymethyl methacrylate or dimethacrylate, produced by mixing an acrylic monomer liquid with acrylic polymers and mineral fillers. The cement is insoluble in water and is thus resistant to fluids in the mouth, but is also irritating to the dental pulp. It is used chiefly as a luting agent for fabricated and temporary restorations. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p159)Tooth Wear: Loss of the tooth substance by chemical or mechanical processesTooth Calcification: The process whereby calcium salts are deposited in the dental enamel. The process is normal in the development of bones and teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p43)Methacrylates: Acrylic acids or acrylates which are substituted in the C-2 position with a methyl group.Tooth Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the teeth.Dentin Dysplasia: An apparently hereditary disorder of dentin formation, marked by a normal appearance of coronal dentin associated with pulpal obliteration, faulty root formation, and a tendency for peripheral lesions without obvious cause. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Incisor: Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)Dental Pulp: A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Acid Etching, Dental: Preparation of TOOTH surfaces and DENTAL MATERIALS with etching agents, usually phosphoric acid, to roughen the surface to increase adhesion or osteointegration.Tooth, Supernumerary: An extra tooth, erupted or unerupted, resembling or unlike the other teeth in the group to which it belongs. Its presence may cause malposition of adjacent teeth or prevent their eruption.Tooth Demineralization: A tooth's loss of minerals, such as calcium in hydroxyapatite from the tooth matrix, caused by acidic exposure. An example of the occurrence of demineralization is in the formation of dental caries.Tooth Cervix: The constricted part of the tooth at the junction of the crown and root or roots. It is often referred to as the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), the line at which the cementum covering the root of a tooth and the enamel of the tooth meet. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p530, p433)Composite Resins: Synthetic resins, containing an inert filler, that are widely used in dentistry.Tooth, Nonvital: A tooth from which the dental pulp has been removed or is necrotic. (Boucher, Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Tooth Extraction: The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Dental Stress Analysis: The description and measurement of the various factors that produce physical stress upon dental restorations, prostheses, or appliances, materials associated with them, or the natural oral structures.Odontogenesis: The process of TOOTH formation. It is divided into several stages including: the dental lamina stage, the bud stage, the cap stage, and the bell stage. Odontogenesis includes the production of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS), dentin (DENTINOGENESIS), and dental cementum (CEMENTOGENESIS).Dentinogenesis: The formation of dentin. Dentin first appears in the layer between the ameloblasts and odontoblasts and becomes calcified immediately. Formation progresses from the tip of the papilla over its slope to form a calcified cap becoming thicker by the apposition of new layers pulpward. A layer of uncalcified dentin intervenes between the calcified tissue and the odontoblast and its processes. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Smear Layer: Adherent debris produced when cutting the enamel or dentin in cavity preparation. It is about 1 micron thick and its composition reflects the underlying dentin, although different quantities and qualities of smear layer can be produced by the various instrumentation techniques. Its function is presumed to be protective, as it lowers dentin permeability. However, it masks the underlying dentin and interferes with attempts to bond dental material to the dentin.Tooth Discoloration: Any change in the hue, color, or translucency of a tooth due to any cause. Restorative filling materials, drugs (both topical and systemic), pulpal necrosis, or hemorrhage may be responsible. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p253)Tensile Strength: The maximum stress a material subjected to a stretching load can withstand without tearing. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p2001)Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Phosphoric Acids: Inorganic derivatives of phosphoric acid (H3PO4). Note that organic derivatives of phosphoric acids are listed under ORGANOPHOSPHATES.Dental Cavity Preparation: An operation in which carious material is removed from teeth and biomechanically correct forms are established in the teeth to receive and retain restorations. A constant requirement is provision for prevention of failure of the restoration through recurrence of decay or inadequate resistance to applied stresses. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239-40)Dentin Solubility: The susceptibility of the DENTIN to dissolution.Tooth, Unerupted: A normal developing tooth which has not yet perforated the oral mucosa or one that fails to erupt in the normal sequence or time interval expected for the type of tooth in a given gender, age, or population group.Tooth Erosion: Progressive loss of the hard substance of a tooth by chemical processes that do not involve bacterial action. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p296)Tooth, Impacted: A tooth that is prevented from erupting by a physical barrier, usually other teeth. Impaction may also result from orientation of the tooth in an other than vertical position in the periodontal structures.Bisphenol A-Glycidyl Methacrylate: The reaction product of bisphenol A and glycidyl methacrylate that undergoes polymerization when exposed to ultraviolet light or mixed with a catalyst. It is used as a bond implant material and as the resin component of dental sealants and composite restorative materials.Dental Restoration, Permanent: A restoration designed to remain in service for not less than 20 to 30 years, usually made of gold casting, cohesive gold, or amalgam. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth Remineralization: Therapeutic technique for replacement of minerals in partially decalcified teeth.Dental Cements: Substances used to bond COMPOSITE RESINS to DENTAL ENAMEL and DENTIN. These bonding or luting agents are used in restorative dentistry, ROOT CANAL THERAPY; PROSTHODONTICS; and ORTHODONTICS.Dental Cavity Lining: An inner coating, as of varnish or other protective substance, to cover the dental cavity wall. It is usually a resinous film-forming agent dissolved in a volatile solvent, or a suspension of calcium hydroxide in a solution of a synthetic resin. The lining seals the dentinal tubules and protects the pulp before a restoration is inserted. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Tooth Exfoliation: Physiologic loss of the primary dentition. (Zwemer, Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Dental Pulp Cavity: The space in a tooth bounded by the dentin and containing the dental pulp. The portion of the cavity within the crown of the tooth is the pulp chamber; the portion within the root is the pulp canal or root canal.Dental Materials: Materials used in the production of dental bases, restorations, impressions, prostheses, etc.Dental Leakage: The seepage of fluids, debris, and micro-organisms between the walls of a prepared dental cavity and the restoration.Bicuspid: One of the eight permanent teeth, two on either side in each jaw, between the canines (CUSPID) and the molars (MOLAR), serving for grinding and crushing food. The upper have two cusps (bicuspid) but the lower have one to three. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p822)Cuspid: The third tooth to the left and to the right of the midline of either jaw, situated between the second INCISOR and the premolar teeth (BICUSPID). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p817)Dentinal Fluid: The lymph or fluid of dentin. It is a transudate of extracellular fluid, mainly cytoplasm of odontoblastic processes, from the dental pulp via the dentinal tubules. It is also called dental lymph. (From Stedman, 26th ed, p665)Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.Dental Marginal Adaptation: The degree of approximation or fit of filling material or dental prosthetic to the tooth surface. A close marginal adaptation and seal at the interface is important for successful dental restorations.Tooth Resorption: Resorption of calcified dental tissue, involving demineralization due to reversal of the cation exchange and lacunar resorption by osteoclasts. There are two types: external (as a result of tooth pathology) and internal (apparently initiated by a peculiar inflammatory hyperplasia of the pulp). (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p676)Hardness: The mechanical property of material that determines its resistance to force. HARDNESS TESTS measure this property.Dental Cementum: The bonelike rigid connective tissue covering the root of a tooth from the cementoenamel junction to the apex and lining the apex of the root canal, also assisting in tooth support by serving as attachment structures for the periodontal ligament. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth Avulsion: Partial or complete displacement of a tooth from its alveolar support. It is commonly the result of trauma. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p312)Molar, Third: The aftermost permanent tooth on each side in the maxilla and mandible.Fused Teeth: Two teeth united during development by the union of their tooth germs; the teeth may be joined by the enamel of their crowns, by their root dentin, or by both.Root Canal Therapy: A treatment modality in endodontics concerned with the therapy of diseases of the dental pulp. For preparatory procedures, ROOT CANAL PREPARATION is available.Adhesiveness: A property of the surface of an object that makes it stick to another surface.Tooth DiseasesAdhesives: Substances that cause the adherence of two surfaces. They include glues (properly collagen-derived adhesives), mucilages, sticky pastes, gums, resins, or latex.Dental Restoration Failure: Inability or inadequacy of a dental restoration or prosthesis to perform as expected.Dentition, Permanent: The 32 teeth of adulthood that either replace or are added to the complement of deciduous teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Shear Strength: The internal resistance of a material to moving some parts of it parallel to a fixed plane, in contrast to stretching (TENSILE STRENGTH) or compression (COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH). Ionic crystals are brittle because, when subjected to shear, ions of the same charge are brought next to each other, which causes repulsion.Maxilla: One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.Polymethacrylic Acids: Poly-2-methylpropenoic acids. Used in the manufacture of methacrylate resins and plastics in the form of pellets and granules, as absorbent for biological materials and as filters; also as biological membranes and as hydrogens. Synonyms: methylacrylate polymer; poly(methylacrylate); acrylic acid methyl ester polymer.Tooth Socket: A hollow part of the alveolar process of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE where each tooth fits and is attached via the periodontal ligament.Decalcification Technique: Removal of minerals from bones during bone examination.Ameloblasts: Cylindrical epithelial cells in the innermost layer of the ENAMEL ORGAN. Their functions include contribution to the development of the dentinoenamel junction by the deposition of a layer of the matrix, thus producing the foundation for the prisms (the structural units of the DENTAL ENAMEL), and production of the matrix for the enamel prisms and interprismatic substance. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Sialoglycoproteins: Glycoproteins which contain sialic acid as one of their carbohydrates. They are often found on or in the cell or tissue membranes and participate in a variety of biological activities.Tooth Ankylosis: Solid fixation of a tooth resulting from fusion of the cementum and alveolar bone, with obliteration of the periodontal ligament. It is uncommon in the deciduous dentition and very rare in permanent teeth. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Microradiography: Production of a radiographic image of a small or very thin object on fine-grained photographic film under conditions which permit subsequent microscopic examination or enlargement of the radiograph at linear magnifications of up to several hundred and with a resolution approaching the resolving power of the photographic emulsion (about 1000 lines per millimeter).Dental Pulp Exposure: The result of pathological changes in the hard tissue of a tooth caused by carious lesions, mechanical factors, or trauma, which render the pulp susceptible to bacterial invasion from the external environment.Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Tooth Attrition: The wearing away of a tooth as a result of tooth-to-tooth contact, as in mastication, occurring only on the occlusal, incisal, and proximal surfaces. It is chiefly associated with aging. It is differentiated from TOOTH ABRASION (the pathologic wearing away of the tooth substance by friction, as brushing, bruxism, clenching, and other mechanical causes) and from TOOTH EROSION (the loss of substance caused by chemical action without bacterial action). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p86)Sodium Hypochlorite: It is used as an oxidizing and bleaching agent and as a disinfectant. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Tooth Replantation: Reinsertion of a tooth into the alveolus from which it was removed or otherwise lost.Odontometry: Measurement of tooth characteristics.Toothpastes: Dentifrices that are formulated into a paste form. They typically contain abrasives, HUMECTANTS; DETERGENTS; FLAVORING AGENTS; and CARIOSTATIC AGENTS.Extracellular Matrix Proteins: Macromolecular organic compounds that contain carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and usually, sulfur. These macromolecules (proteins) form an intricate meshwork in which cells are embedded to construct tissues. Variations in the relative types of macromolecules and their organization determine the type of extracellular matrix, each adapted to the functional requirements of the tissue. The two main classes of macromolecules that form the extracellular matrix are: glycosaminoglycans, usually linked to proteins (proteoglycans), and fibrous proteins (e.g., COLLAGEN; ELASTIN; FIBRONECTINS; and LAMININ).Dentinogenesis Imperfecta: An autosomal dominant disorder of tooth development characterized by opalescent dentin resulting in discoloration of the teeth. The dentin develops poorly with low mineral content while the pulp canal is obliterated.Root Canal Preparation: Preparatory activities in ROOT CANAL THERAPY by partial or complete extirpation of diseased pulp, cleaning and sterilization of the empty canal, enlarging and shaping the canal to receive the sealing material. The cavity may be prepared by mechanical, sonic, chemical, or other means. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p1700)Periodontal Ligament: The fibrous CONNECTIVE TISSUE surrounding the TOOTH ROOT, separating it from and attaching it to the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS).Dentition: The teeth collectively in the dental arch. Dentition ordinarily refers to the natural teeth in position in their alveoli. Dentition referring to the deciduous teeth is DENTITION, PRIMARY; to the permanent teeth, DENTITION, PERMANENT. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Post and Core Technique: Use of a metal casting, usually with a post in the pulp or root canal, designed to support and retain an artificial crown.
1. Tooth 2. Enamel 3. Dentin 4. Dental pulp ::5. cameral pulp ::6. root pulp :7. Cementum :8. Crown ::9. Cusp ::10. Sulcus :11 ... In immature teeth the root is not fully formed leading to an open apex. This is also seen in some pathological teeth. ... In anatomy the apical foramen is the opening at the apex of the root of a tooth, through which the nerve and blood vessels that ... A tooth may have multiple small accessory canals in the root apex area forming an apical delta which can complicate the ...
Eohippus, with left forefoot (third metacarpal colored) and tooth (a enamel; b dentin; c cement) detailed ... Teeth[edit]. Further information: Horse teeth. Throughout the phylogenetic development, the teeth of the horse underwent ... The most dramatic change between Eohippus and Orohippus was in the teeth: the first of the premolar teeth were dwarfed, the ... Additionally, its teeth were strongly curved, unlike the very straight teeth of modern horses. Consequently, it is unlikely to ...
Odontoblasts (dentin-producing cells) of the teeth. Around the optic vesicle and the developing eye and contributes to many eye ... "In vitro odontoblast-like cell differentiation of cranial neural crest cells induced by fibroblast growth factor 8 and dentin ...
This occurs because the white enamel has eroded away to reveal the yellowish dentin. A change in shape of the teeth is also a ... Acid erosion begins initially in the enamel, causing it to become thin, and can progress into dentin, giving the tooth a dull ... Teeth will begin to appear with a broad rounded concavity, and the gaps between teeth will become larger. There can be evidence ... Even low sugar contained in fruit is bad for the teeth since it is the sugar/acid exposure time which erodes the teeth, not the ...
In the longitudinal section of a tooth. these lines appear near the dentin. They bend obliquely near the cervical region. They ... in dentin have increased organic content and show the variations in rhythm as the tooth enamel matrix calcifies follow an ... these lines can be seen on the labial surface or lip side of anterior or front teeth as horizontal lines on the tooth crown, ... Lines of Retzius (think age bands like tree growth rings) - Stria (A) artifacts in enamel (not found in dentin) created by ...
The teeth lack enamel, consisting only of two layers ever-growing dentin. Supernumerary teeth have occasionally been observed, ... They lack incisors and have a large reduction in number of teeth with only four to five sets remaining including canines. ... McAfee, Robert K.; Naples, Virginia L. (2012-01-01). "NOTICE ON THE OCCURRENCE OF SUPERNUMERARY TEETH IN THE TWO-TOED SLOTHS ... The species has relatively few teeth; it has four to five sets including canines and lacks incisors. ...
2002). "Investigation of osteocalcin, osteonectin, and dentin sialophosphoprotein in developing human teeth". Bone. 30 (2): 377 ... Dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein 1 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the DMP1 gene. Dentin matrix acidic ... which is critical for proper mineralization of bone and dentin, is present in diverse cells of bone and tooth tissues. The ... 2004). "Dentin matrix protein 1 is expressed in human lung cancer". J. Bone Miner. Res. 18 (8): 1506-12. doi:10.1359/jbmr. ...
However, the quantity of DNA available in dentin is affected by age and dental disease, whereas that in cementum is not. Tooth ... The dentinocemental junction (DCJ) is a relatively smooth area in the permanent tooth, and attachment of cementum to the dentin ... which sometimes extends onto the enamel of the tooth. The excessive buildup of cementum on the roots of a tooth is a ... given that cementum and dentin are of common embryological background, unlike that of enamel and dentin. ...
Used in some toothpastes for sensitive teeth.[37] Recently, the use of potassium nitrate in toothpastes for treating sensitive ... "Managing dentin hypersensitivity" (PDF). Journal of the American Dental Association. 137 (7): 990-8, quiz 1028-9. doi:10.14219 ... "Sensodyne Toothpaste for Sensitive Teeth". 2008-08-03. Archived from the original on August 7, 2007. Retrieved 2008-08-03.. ... teeth has increased.[38][39]. *Used historically to treat asthma.[40] Used in some toothpastes to relieve asthma symptoms.[41] ...
The dental papilla gives rise to the dentin and pulp of a tooth. The enamel organ, dental papilla, and dental follicle together ... Tooth development proceeds into three stages: the bud, cap and bell stage. these terms are descriptive of the morphology of the ... This is of importance because all the tissues of a tooth and its supporting structures form from these distinct cellular ... seen in histologic sections of a developing tooth. It lies below a cellular aggregation known as the enamel organ. The dental ...
There are three hard tissues that comprise human teeth: enamel, dentin and cementum. The majority of the tooth structure is ... is an extract of porcine fetal tooth material used to biomimetically stimulate the soft and hard tissues surrounding teeth to ... discovered that a very thin layer of enamel actually exists between the dentin and cementum on the roots of adult human teeth. ... formed from dentin, and the enamel serves as the superficial layer of the crown while the cementum serves to cover the root. In ...
The enamel is also resorbed or undermined to the point of tooth fracture. Resorbed cementum and dentin is replaced with bone- ... Feline Tooth Resorption (TR) is a syndrome in cats characterized by resorption of the tooth by odontoclasts, cells similar to ... Tooth restoration is not recommended because resorption of the tooth will continue underneath the restoration. Use of ... Treatment for TRs is limited to tooth extraction because the lesion is progressive. Amputation of the tooth crown without root ...
The dental canaliculi (sometimes called dentinal tubules) are the blood supply of a tooth. The number and size of the ... Dentin. ...
Dentin composes most of the root, which normally has pulp canals. The roots of teeth may be single in number (single-rooted ... Teeth can belong to one of two sets of teeth: primary ("baby") teeth or permanent teeth. Often, "deciduous" may be used in ... The tooth bud (sometimes called the tooth germ) is an aggregation of cells that eventually forms a tooth and is organized into ... For permanent teeth, the upper right teeth begin with the number, "1". The upper left teeth begin with the number, "2". The ...
Root dentin is considered different from dentin found in the crown of the tooth (known as coronal dentin) because of the ... mantle dentin, primary dentin, secondary dentin, and tertiary dentin. Odontoblasts differentiate from cells of the dental ... Thus a type of tertiary dentin forms in reaction to stimuli, such as attrition or dental caries. Odontoblasts Dentin Tooth ... Interglobular dentin is especially evident in coronal dentin, near the DEJ, and in certain dental anomalies, such as in dentin ...
Tooth enamel ranks 5 on Mohs hardness scale and has a Young's modulus of 83 GPa. Dentin, less mineralized and less brittle, 3-4 ... The hard tissues of humans are bone, tooth enamel, dentin, and cementum. The term is in contrast to soft tissue. Bone is a ... At the edges of teeth where there is no dentin underlying the enamel, the color sometimes has a slightly blue tone. Since ... Yellow in appearance, it greatly affects the color of a tooth due to the translucency of enamel. Dentin, which is less ...
1991) assessed the influence of a smear layer on the adhesion of sealer cements to dentin. A total of 120 teeth was tested, 40 ... In vitro the penetration of bacteria into tubules of intact dentin exposed by fracture was compared in pairs of teeth, one of ... Twenty dentin disks were cut from human extracted third molars. The dentin surface of the disks was etched with 6% citric acid ... The selected teeth were instrumented and randomly divided into 2 groups. In the first group (smear [+]), the teeth were ...
Instead they should only be used to test the vitality of teeth. The pulp of a tooth with irreversible pulpitis may not be left ... Once reparative dentin forms, odontoblasts associated with the dentin change, and the pulpal fibroblasts lose p75 expression, ... No statistics are known but it is possible to have a trouble-free tooth after irreversible pulpitis, albeit a dead tooth. The ... The pulp contains the blood vessels the nerves and connective tissue inside a tooth and provides the tooth's blood and ...
Each tooth is made up of a crown, which is above the gum line and covered in enamel, and roots that anchor the tooth to the ... Beneath the enamel, there are collagen fibres and inorganic hydroxyapatite which together form dentin. Hydroxyapatite is the ... it is not the only method that can be used to care for a dog's teeth. Daily dental dog chews and teeth brushing will scrape ... These compounds are able to work on the whole mouth including between teeth and all the way up to the gum line, and is not ...
... s had four functional molar teeth at a time, two in the upper jaw and two in the lower. About 23 cm (9.1 in) ... Wear-resistant, they were held together with cementum and dentin. A mammoth's molars were replaced five times over the animal's ... The crowns of the teeth became deeper in height and the skulls became taller to accommodate this. At the same time, the skulls ... The teeth had separated ridges of enamel, which were covered in "prisms" directed towards the chewing surface. ...
Human teeth are made of dentin and are covered by enamel in the areas that are exposed. Enamel, itself, is composed of ... Earlier Homo erectus species exhibited larger teeth than Homo sapiens do today, but the teeth are smaller than early Homo ... Orrorin had smaller teeth relative to body size and the enamel was thicker. The upper canines contain a mesial groove which ... The teeth of Ardipithecus ramidus in particular showed that the species was probably an omnivore. The upper canines are less ...
"Ebner's lines": short period incremental lines in the dentin and cementum of the tooth. "Ebner's reticulum": A network of ... Histologie der Zähne (in Julius Scheff's Handbuch der Zahnheilkunde, Wien 1890) - Histology of the teeth. Über den Bau der ...
No statistics are known but it is possible to have a trouble-free tooth after irreversible pulpitis, albeit a dead tooth. The ... Once reparative dentin forms, odontoblasts associated with the dentin change, and the pulpal fibroblasts lose p75 expression, ... The pulp contains the blood vessels the nerves and connective tissue inside a tooth and provides the tooth's blood and ... When it becomes painful and decayed the tooth may become known as a "hot tooth"[19] and local anasethtic may work as well.[19][ ...
For human teeth to have a healthy oral environment, enamel, dentin, cementum, and the periodontium must all develop during ... Teeth can belong to one of two sets of teeth: primary ("baby") teeth or permanent teeth. Often, "deciduous" may be used in ... For permanent teeth, the upper right teeth begin with the number, "1". The upper left teeth begin with the number, "2". The ... This is true only in permanent teeth. In deciduous teeth, the maxillary second molar is the last tooth in the mouth and does ...
Cementum covers the roots of teeth and serves to anchor gingival and periodontal fibers of the periodontal ligament by way of ... Once the root sheath disintegrates, the newly formed surface of root dentin comes into contact with the undifferentiated cells ... Because of the apposition of cementum over the dentin, the dentinocemental junction (DCJ) is formed. After the apposition of ... The cementoblasts then disperse to cover the root dentin area and undergo cementogenesis, laying down cementoid. During the ...
Killer whale teeth show two slight peripheral indentations and may also display a faint rosette pattern in the dentin cross- ... The cross-sections of the teeth are rounded or oval. A characteristic feature is that the dentin forms in layers that alternate ... Their teeth are second in hardness to hippopotamus ivory. Sperm whale teeth may grow up to 20 cm (8 inches) in length while the ... Ivory is the tusks and unusually large or projected teeth of animals, such as elephants and walruses. It consists of dentin and ...
Children with a full set of deciduous teeth (primary teeth) also have eight incisors, named the same way as in permanent teeth ... Young children may have from zero to eight incisors depending on the stage of their tooth eruption and tooth development. ... Incisors (from Latin incidere, "to cut") are the front teeth present in most mammals. They are located in the premaxilla above ... Apart from the first molars, the incisors are also the first permanent teeth to erupt, following the same order as the primary ...
Stanley specialized in the soft tissue in the core of teeth called 'pulp'. The pulp is responsible for creating tooth dentin ... Stanley also showed that the bacterial invasion of teeth could destroy the cells and cause a loss of tooth vitality. The ... The levels of tooth loss, oral hygiene scores, oral status, and the status of existing dentures are summarized. Official Web ... This will enable anyone to access his archive of teeth from anywhere in the world. Stem Cells Stem cells have the ability to ...
You can either maintain your white teeth or make them whiter with these toothpastes. Whitening toothpastes are usually less ... abrasive and are great for people with sensitive teeth. Harsh bleaching gels and chemicals may bother nerve endings and whit ... Whitening toothpastes are a great way to get gradually whiter teeth. ... Maximum enamel & dentin restoration protection. *"Anti-stain" support following Opalescence Bleaching treatment ...
The enamel safeguards the dentin, cementum, and dentist pulp.. If you get a torch and sparkle a light in the mouth you can see ... A nice smile and white teeth make a first impression that can last a lifetime. It is no secret that teeth lose their whiteness ... Your dental office has the ability to check the tooth and give you the greatest suggestions on how best to whiten your tooth. A ... The initially stage of teeth whitening would be to offer the teeth a good scrub, your dentistry hygienist can do doing so most ...
Etiology of Dentin Hypersensitivity. Teeth are comprised of three main layers: the outer protective enamel layer; the ... Within the dentin layer are dentin tubules, which contain a lymph-like fluid and odontoblast processes. Dentin is composed of ... Based on the hydrodynamic theory, dentin hypersensitivity is a transient tooth pain. To exhibit a response to the stimuli, the ... Dentin hypersensitivity is a sharp, acute pain that results from the exposure of dentin surfaces to stimuli, such as thermal, ...
Its really not tooth pain from zoom left happens abscess if untreated that bad. The dentin contains microscopic channels that ... Teeth whitening is an effective way to remove stains teeth darkening teeth discoloration and microbial germs. Get your teeth ... But what is the average price for exam/x-ray/teeth cleaning w/o insurance? ZOOM! Teeth Whitening safely whitens teeth an ... Home teeth whitening kits come in many forms. sz *** Question: Will the removal of wisdom teeth do any harm to the body to ...
Internal tooth discoloration is caused by changes in the enamel of the tooth and the dentin. The main causes of internal tooth ... Causes of Tooth Discoloration. Deciduous (baby) teeth are typically whiter than the adult teeth that appear later. As we age, ... Types of Teeth Whitening. There are various ways to whiten your teeth, but the two most common are in-office treatment and the ... Tooth whitening can last for one or more years, depending on how well you take care of your teeth, and if youre following up ...
There is the extrinsic discoloration, which means that your teeth get discolored because of external factors such as ... There are plenty of factors that can cause temporary or permanent tooth discolorations. ... The internal structure of your tooth called the dentin will get discolored (yellowish), and this type of staining is much more ... Laser teeth whitening is the most gentle whitening done in the office and if you want beautiful white teeth, you should try ...
How do I know if my cat has tooth resorption?. Once the sensitive dentin is exposed, tooth resorption is painful and manifests ... Tooth Resorption in Cats. Home » Pet Health » Pet Health Library » Library. What is tooth resorption?. Tooth resorption (TR) is ... the end result is erosion of cementum and dentin that often progresses into the pulp of the affected tooth. Tooth resorption is ... How are tooth resorptions treated?. Tooth resorption is believed to be progressive and can present itself in many stages. Once ...
A horse dentin study. Bone 2001;29:547-552. Dec CrossRef , PubMed , CAS , Web of Science® Times Cited: 21 28 Wu J, Hayakawa S, ... A horse dentin study. Bone 2001;29:547-552. Dec CrossRef , PubMed , CAS , Web of Science{\circledR} Times Cited: 21 28 Wu J, ...
There are three types of dentin found in a human tooth. The dentin that forms when a tooth erupts is called primary dentin and ... This type of dentin continues to grow throughout the life of the tooth. The third type of dentin, called reparative dentin, is ... Tooth #28 is sound Tooth #29 existing periapical abscess; tooth is extruded (charted in red) Tooth #30 needs an occlusal ... Permanent teeth that replace primary teeth are called succedaneous teeth. The only permanent teeth not called succedaneous are ...
Wnt-Responsive Odontoblasts Secrete New Dentin after Superficial Tooth Injury.. Zhao Y1,2, Yuan X2, Liu B3, Tulu US2, Helms JA2 ... The objective of our experiments was to identify new therapeutic strategies to stimulate dentin formation in an adult tooth. To ... Amplifying Wnt signaling in the pulp stimulates dentin secretion, and in the dentin injury model, we show that a liposomal ... new dentin formed. By PID28, (J) µCT sections show that a dentin bridge separates the injury site from the pulp (arrow). (K) ...
Dentin Sensitivity. Immune System Diseases. Tooth Diseases. Stomatognathic Diseases. Fluorides. Fluorides, Topical. Cariostatic ... Tooth Mousse and Fluoride in Dentin Hypersensitivity Treatment. This study has been completed. ... cracked-tooth syndrome, and which were confirmed by periapical radiographs and teeth with cervical fillings ... Treating cervical dentin hypersensitivity with fluoride varnish: a randomized clinical study. definition of Dentine ...
Substance of tooth produced by odontoblasts; surrounds the pulp of the tooth and is subjacent to enamel and cement. ... Substance of tooth produced by odontoblasts; surrounds the pulp of the tooth and is subjacent to enamel and cement. ...
The visible part of a tooth (the crown) consists of enamel covered dentin. Exposed dentin is sensitive to heat, cold and touch ... Dentin is mineralized connective tissue below the tooth enamel surface. It forms the majority of the tooth and the composition ... The dentin tubules (seen in cross section) have been formed by cytoplasmic extensions of the odontoblasts (dentin-producing ... Dentin region of a human tooth with canals or dentinal tubules (dental canaliculi), coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM ...
Scientists have invented a new type of dental filing that stimulates decayed teeth to regrow, perhaps eliminating the need for ... No More Root Canals? Stem Cell Fillings Repair Cavities By Regrowing Dentin Lost To Tooth Decay. Jul 7, 2016 04:57 PM By Dana ... The now hollowed-out tooth chamber is then filled with a permanent object known as a gutta-percha to keep the tooth free from ... The innovative tooth filling can be drilled and implanted into the decaying tooth just like a traditional filling. However, ...
During that time,the size of pulp cavity in these teeth decreased 25-30% depending on kind of tooth. The lowest ability to ... 84 teeth together), showed by the F-test, significantly different results in pulp vitality resulting in dentin production ... have much higher ability to continue dentin deposition despite chronic pulp inflammation. By comparison, teeth in the second ... Objective: To observe the reaction of dental pulp and periapical tissues in dogs less than 2 years of age after tooth fracture. ...
... ... Dentin hypersensitivity is a painful response to a non-noxious stimulus applied to exposed dentin. Two processes may expose ... Keywords: dentin hypersensitivity, laser treatment, low-output lasers, middle-output lasers, pulpal damage, treatment ... Exposure of root dentin is also multifactorial. Periodontal disease with gingival recession, some forms of periodontal surgery ...
Antimicrobial peptide Tooth development Cavity preparation Odontoblast Reparative dentin This is a preview of subscription ... Therefore, we investigated the role of CRAMP and FPR2 in tooth development, reparative dentin formation, and defense response. ... Expression and localization of CRAMP in rat tooth germ and during reparative dentin formation. ... In mature teeth, CRAMP was not detected, but FPR2 continued to be localized in the sub-odontoblastic layer. After cavity ...
The dentin adhesive systems were Prime & Bond NT (PB), Excite (EX), One-Step (OS), PQ1 (PQ), SingleBond (SB), Optibond Solo ... For this purpose, seven dentin adhesive systems were used with and without an unfilled resin (Heliobond) and the strength of ... All the tested adhesives except EX should be used with an unfilled resin when restoring fractured teeth by reattachment. ... the restored teeth was tested at a cross-head speed of either 1 or 500 mm/min. The hypothesis was that the strength of the ...
Sealing and dentin bond strength of adhesive systems in selected areas of perfused teeth ... Sealing and dentin bond strength of adhesive systems in selected areas of perfused teeth. Dental Materials, 17 . pp. 149-155. ... Dentin, Adhesive, Sealing, Perfusion, Permeability. Subjects:. Medical sciences , Medicine , Anatomy. Medical sciences , ... Access cavities were drilled through the amalgam to expose dentin (area range: 8.7±20.8 mm2) and measure the permeability of ...
You are here: Home / occlusal guard / Treatment and Remedies for Sensitive Teeth (Dentin Hypersensitivity) ... Sensitive teeth (Dentin Hypersensitivity) are characterized by a tingling sensation or sharp shooting pain that occurs when you ... Treatment and Remedies for Sensitive Teeth (Dentin Hypersensitivity). December 29, 2013. By alex Leave a Comment ... If single-tooth sensitivity continues for some time after the stimulus is gone, the tooth is more likely to require root canal ...
Weakened dentin[edit]. Intracoronal bleaching is a tooth whitening method that uses 30% more hydrogen peroxide. Such tooth ... Natural Tooth Shade[edit]. The perception of tooth colour is multi-factorial. Reflection and absorption of light by the tooth ... Tooth wear and ageing: Tooth wear is a progressive loss of enamel and dentine due to tooth erosion, abrasion and attrition. As ... The process of tooth whitening lightens the colour of a tooth.[1] Tooth whitening can be achieved by either changing the ...
A Smart Dentin Grinder® (SDG) (KometaBio) was devised, which grinds and sorts extracted teeth into dentin particulate of a ... Clean teeth, including crown and root dentin, are dried by air syringe and put into the grinding sterile chamber of the newly ... Processing extracted teeth for immediate grafting of autogenous dentin. May 6, 2015. by Implant Practice Team ... A tooth bank in Korea provides a service that prepares autogenic demineralized dentin matrix graft in block or granular types ( ...
RESULTS The mineral and organic dentin contents were more affected in autoclaved teeth than in the specimens stored in thymol. ... A secondary aim was to study the effects of the decontamination process and the storage procedure on dentin components. ... YAG laser irradiation as an alternative to acid etching and the manipulation process on the dentin structure. METHODS Twelve ... YAG laser etching on dentin mineral and organic components. ... changes in the peak area of organic and inorganic dentin ...
Sensitivity occurs when the dentin, a porous tissue in your teeth, becomes exposed. The dentin has microscopic channels, called ... What is Tooth Sensitivity?. People who suffer from tooth sensitivity avoid daily activities such as consuming hot or cold foods ... What are the Causes of Tooth Sensitivity?. Some factors which can contribute to tooth sensitivity include:. *Brushing too hard ... Temporary tooth sensitivity, which can occur after a professional teeth-whitening treatment but usually goes away shortly after ...
Dentin Clinic can bring your smile back with an efficient and gentle teeth whitening after a diagnosis. Read more about your ... Teeth whitening at home. At Dentin Clinic we basically recommend teeth whitening at home to our patients, who want a teeth ... whether or nor your teeth are suited for a teeth whitening. We then cleanse your teeth and take an imprint of your teeth to ... How long does a teeth whitening at Dentin Clinic last?. The duration of a teeth whitening varies from person to person. ...
  • A plasma-like biological fluid is present in the dentin tubules, and movement of this fluid can trigger mechanoreceptors present on nerves located at the pulp, thereby eliciting a pain response. (cdeworld.com)
  • Within the dentin layer are dentin tubules, which contain a lymph-like fluid and odontoblast processes. (cdeworld.com)
  • The widely accepted hydrodynamic theory states that stimuli (thermal, chemical, tactile, or evaporative) are transmitted to the pulpal nerves by mechanical receptors due to movement of fluid within open dentin tubules. (cdeworld.com)
  • The dentist will apply a rich concentration peroxide gel onto your teeth, and then he will apply a treatment with the laser light. (serenitydentalclinic.com)
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