Tarsiidae: The single family of PRIMATES in the infraorder TARSII, suborder HAPLORHINI. It is comprised of one genus, Tarsius, that inhabits southern Sumatra, Borneo, Sulawesi, and the Philippines.Strepsirhini: A suborder of PRIMATES consisting of the following five families: CHEIROGALEIDAE; Daubentoniidae; Indriidae; LEMURIDAE; and LORISIDAE.PrimatesAnatomy, Comparative: The comparative study of animal structure with regard to homologous organs or parts. (Stedman, 25th ed)Paleodontology: The study of the teeth of early forms of life through fossil remains.Geological Processes: Events and activities of the Earth and its structures.Zygoma: Either of a pair of bones that form the prominent part of the CHEEK and contribute to the ORBIT on each side of the SKULL.Platyrrhini: An infraorder of New World monkeys, comprised of the families AOTIDAE; ATELIDAE; CEBIDAE; and PITHECIIDAE. They are found exclusively in the Americas.Anatomic Variation: Peculiarities associated with the internal structure, form, topology, or architecture of organisms that distinguishes them from others of the same species or group.Cone Opsins: Photosensitive proteins expressed in the CONE PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS. They are the protein components of cone photopigments. Cone opsins are classified by their peak absorption wavelengths.Frontal Bone: The bone that forms the frontal aspect of the skull. Its flat part forms the forehead, articulating inferiorly with the NASAL BONE and the CHEEK BONE on each side of the face.Biological Processes: Biological activities and function of the whole organism in human, animal, microorgansims, and plants, and of the biosphere.Tupaiidae: The only family of the order SCANDENTIA, variously included in the order Insectivora or in the order Primates, and often in the order Microscelidea, consisting of five genera. They are TUPAIA, Ananthana (Indian tree shrew), Dendrogale (small smooth-tailed tree shrew), Urogale (Mindanao tree shrew), and Ptilocercus (pen-tailed tree shrew). The tree shrews inhabit the forest areas of eastern Asia from India and southwestern China to Borneo and the Philippines.Orbit: Bony cavity that holds the eyeball and its associated tissues and appendages.Cranial Sutures: A type of fibrous joint between bones of the head.Haplorhini: A suborder of PRIMATES consisting of six families: CEBIDAE (some New World monkeys), ATELIDAE (some New World monkeys), CERCOPITHECIDAE (Old World monkeys), HYLOBATIDAE (gibbons and siamangs), CALLITRICHINAE (marmosets and tamarins), and HOMINIDAE (humans and great apes).Primate Diseases: Diseases of animals within the order PRIMATES. This term includes diseases of Haplorhini and Strepsirhini.Macaca mulatta: A species of the genus MACACA inhabiting India, China, and other parts of Asia. The species is used extensively in biomedical research and adapts very well to living with humans.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Macaca fascicularis: A species of the genus MACACA which typically lives near the coast in tidal creeks and mangrove swamps primarily on the islands of the Malay peninsula.Dissection: The separation and isolation of tissues for surgical purposes, or for the analysis or study of their structures.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Papio: A genus of the subfamily CERCOPITHECINAE, family CERCOPITHECIDAE, consisting of five named species: PAPIO URSINUS (chacma baboon), PAPIO CYNOCEPHALUS (yellow baboon), PAPIO PAPIO (western baboon), PAPIO ANUBIS (or olive baboon), and PAPIO HAMADRYAS (hamadryas baboon). Members of the Papio genus inhabit open woodland, savannahs, grassland, and rocky hill country. Some authors consider MANDRILLUS a subgenus of Papio.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Callithrix: A genus of the subfamily CALLITRICHINAE occurring in forests of Brazil and Bolivia and containing seventeen species.Sequence Homology: The degree of similarity between sequences. Studies of AMINO ACID SEQUENCE HOMOLOGY and NUCLEIC ACID SEQUENCE HOMOLOGY provide useful information about the genetic relatedness of genes, gene products, and species.Macaca: A genus of the subfamily CERCOPITHECINAE, family CERCOPITHECIDAE, consisting of 16 species inhabiting forests of Africa, Asia, and the islands of Borneo, Philippines, and Celebes.Lentiviruses, Primate: A subgenus of LENTIVIRUS comprising viruses that produce immunodeficiencies in primates, including humans.Cercopithecidae: The family of Old World monkeys and baboons consisting of two subfamilies: CERCOPITHECINAE and COLOBINAE. They are found in Africa and part of Asia.Lemur: A genus of the family Lemuridae consisting of five species: L. catta (ring-tailed lemur), L. fulvus, L. macaco (acoumba or black lemur), L. mongoz (mongoose lemur), and L. variegatus (white lemur). Most members of this genus occur in forested areas on Madagascar and the Comoro Islands.Cebidae: A family of New World monkeys in the infraorder PLATYRRHINI, consisting of nine subfamilies: ALOUATTINAE; AOTINAE; Atelinae; Callicebinae; CALLIMICONINAE; CALLITRICHINAE; CEBINAE; Pithecinae; and SAIMIRINAE. They inhabit the forests of South and Central America, comprising the largest family of South American monkeys.Cheirogaleidae: A family of the order PRIMATES, suborder Strepsirhini (PROSIMII), containing five genera. All inhabitants of Madagascar, the genera are: Allocebus, Cheirogaleus (dwarf lemurs), Microcebus (mouse lemurs), Mirza, and Phaner.Pan troglodytes: The common chimpanzee, a species of the genus Pan, family HOMINIDAE. It lives in Africa, primarily in the tropical rainforests. There are a number of recognized subspecies.Saimiri: A genus of the family CEBIDAE consisting of four species: S. boliviensis, S. orstedii (red-backed squirrel monkey), S. sciureus (common squirrel monkey), and S. ustus. They inhabit tropical rain forests in Central and South America. S. sciureus is used extensively in research studies.Monkey Diseases: Diseases of Old World and New World monkeys. This term includes diseases of baboons but not of chimpanzees or gorillas (= APE DISEASES).Cebus: A genus of the family CEBIDAE, subfamily CEBINAE, consisting of four species which are divided into two groups, the tufted and untufted. C. apella has tufts of hair over the eyes and sides of the head. The remaining species are without tufts - C. capucinus, C. nigrivultatus, and C. albifrons. Cebus inhabits the forests of Central and South America.Electron Transport Complex IV: A multisubunit enzyme complex containing CYTOCHROME A GROUP; CYTOCHROME A3; two copper atoms; and 13 different protein subunits. It is the terminal oxidase complex of the RESPIRATORY CHAIN and collects electrons that are transferred from the reduced CYTOCHROME C GROUP and donates them to molecular OXYGEN, which is then reduced to water. The redox reaction is simultaneously coupled to the transport of PROTONS across the inner mitochondrial membrane.National Academy of Sciences (U.S.): A United States organization of distinguished scientists and engineers established for the purpose of investigating and reporting upon any subject of art or science as requested by any department of government. The National Research Council organized by NAS serves as the principal operating agency to stimulate and support research.Unionidae: A family of freshwater mussels in the class BIVALVIA. They differ from ZEBRA MUSSELS in that they are larger and posses a larval stage called glochidia, which requires attachment to the GILLS or fins of particular species of FISHES.DNA, Mitochondrial: Double-stranded DNA of MITOCHONDRIA. In eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GENOME is circular and codes for ribosomal RNAs, transfer RNAs, and about 10 proteins.Alligators and Crocodiles: Large, long-tailed reptiles, including caimans, of the order Loricata.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Lions: Large, chiefly nocturnal mammals of the cat family FELIDAE, species Panthera leo. They are found in Africa and southern Asia.Sea Lions: A group comprised of several species of aquatic carnivores in different genera, in the family Otariidae. In comparison to FUR SEALS, they have shorter, less dense hair.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Veterinary Medicine: The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Borneo: An island in the Malay Archipelago, east of Sumatra, north of Java, and west of Celebes. It is the third largest island in the world. Its name is a Portuguese alteration of BRUNEI, located on it. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p163; Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p73)Begoniaceae: A plant family of the order Violales (by some in Begoniales), subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. Members are found throughout tropical and warm temperate habitats. Most are perennial herbs with monoecious flowers (both sexes on the same plant). Fruits are usually capsules containing many tiny seeds.PhilippinesAsia, Southeastern: The geographical area of Asia comprising BORNEO; BRUNEI; CAMBODIA; INDONESIA; LAOS; MALAYSIA; the MEKONG VALLEY; MYANMAR (formerly Burma), the PHILIPPINES; SINGAPORE; THAILAND; and VIETNAM.
The tarsier is the smallest living primate that exists in several South East Asian countries today. The Philippine tarsier, ... "Primate Factsheets: Tarsier (Tarsius) Taxonomy, Morphology, & Ecology". pin.primate.wisc.edu. Retrieved 2016-01-27. "Endangered ... The Philippine tarsier, amongst the world's smallest primates, is indigenous to the island. A strait separates Bohol from Cebu ... "Tarsius syrichta (Philippine Tarsier, Phillipine Tarsier)". www.iucnredlist.org. Retrieved 2016-01-27. " ...
Groves, C. P. (1998). "Systematics of tarsiers and lorises". Primates. 39 (1): 13-27. doi:10.1007/BF02557740. Groves, C. P. ( ... MacKinnon, J.; MacKinnon, K. (1987). "Conservation status of the primates of the Indo-Chinese sub-region" (PDF). Primate ... Primates of the Oriental Night. Proceedings of the Indonesian Workshop: Taxonomy, Husbandry, and Conservation of Tarsiers and ... "Conservation status of primates in Malesia, with special reference to Indonesia" (PDF). Primate Conservation. 8: 175-183. ...
... primates. ORDER PRIMATES Suborder Strepsirrhini: lemurs, lorises, and galagos Suborder Haplorhini: tarsiers, monkeys, and apes ... "Primate Evolution: John Fleagle and Chris Gilbert". All the World's Primates. Primate Conservation, Inc. Retrieved 18 December ... Like monkeys, tarsiers are haplorhine primates; however, they are also not monkeys. Apes emerged within the catarrhines with ... "Early Primate Evolution: The First Primates". anthro.palomar.edu. Retrieved 2017-08-12. Bajpai, Sunil; Kay, Richard F.; ...
Groves, Colin P. (1998). "Systematics of tarsiers and lorises" (PDF). Primates. 39 (1): 13-27. doi:10.1007/BF02557740. Groves, ... Primate Eye. Primate Society of Great Britain. 96: 902. Archived from the original (PDF) on 23 January 2011. Retrieved 23 ... The Philippine slow loris (Nycticebus menagensis) is a strepsirrhine primate and a species of slow loris that is native to the ... Walker, M. (13 December 2012). "Primate species: new slow loris found in Borneo". BBC News. Archived from the original on 24 ...
... tarsiers, and the early primates. Order Primates Suborder Strepsirrhini: non-tarsier prosimians Infraorder †Adapiformes: ... tarsiers, monkeys and apes Infraorder †Omomyiformes: extinct "tarsier-like" primates Infraorder Tarsiiformes: tarsiers ... The division of the order Primates into two evolutionary grades, Prosimii ("lower primates") and Anthropoidea ("higher primates ... ISBN 978-0-8018-8472-6. Groves, C. P. (1998). "Systematics of tarsiers and lorises". Primates. 39 (1): 13-27. doi:10.1007/ ...
Schwartz, J.H. (2003). "How Close Are the Similarities between Tarsius and Other Primates". Tarsiers: past, present, and future ... tarsier to just those tarsiers on the island of Selayar, making the name T. fuscus valid once again for the tarsiers near ... At one point the taxon was downgraded to a junior synonym of the spectral tarsier (T. tarsier). However, when that species' ... It has shorter skull and shorter toothrows than most other tarsiers. It also has shorter hind feet than other tarsiers. The ...
Sussman, R. W.: Primate Ecology and Social Structure Volume 1: Lorises, Lemurs and Tarsiers. Needham Heights, MA: Pearson ... Primates in Peril: The World's 25 Most Endangered Primates 2008-2010. , s. 23-26, 2009. Arlington, VA.: IUCN/SSC Primate ... a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Strier, K.: Primate Behavioral Ecology. Wyd. 3.. Allyn & Bacon, 2007, s. 7, 64, 71, ... Primates". 4 (2), s. 1-10, 1963. DOI: 10.1007/BF01659148. *↑ Kay, R. F.. The functional adaptations of primate molar teeth. „ ...
... of the living tarsiers and are often classified within Tarsiiformes. Other fossil primates, which include Microchoeridae, ... Primate Adaptation and Evolution. San Diego, Academic Press. Ankel-Simons, F. (2007). Primate Anatomy (3rd ed.). Academic Press ... extinct relative of primates. These conflicting classifications lie at the heart of the debate over early primate evolution. ... Tarsiers (family Tarsiidae) are the only living members of the infraorder, and also include the extinct Tarsius eocaenus from ...
Primate skeleton could give clues about human origins (BBC News) Gron, Kurt J. (July 2008). "Primate Factsheets: Tarsier ( ... Resembling tarsiers and simians (monkeys, apes, and humans), it was a haplorhine primate, and it also may have resembled the ... As of 2013, it is the oldest fossil haplorhine primate skeleton discovered, and is most closely related to tarsiers and the ... Unlike tarsiers, however, its smaller eyes suggest it was diurnal, a pattern previously suggested by other early haplorhines, ...
... although prosimian primates (strepsirrhines and tarsiers) possess at least one grooming claw on each foot to compensate. ... However, studies of tarsier dentition showed that only some tarsier species exhibit the characteristic striations on their ... Primates. 26: 73-84. doi:10.1007/BF02389048. Sargis, E. J. (2004). "New views on tree shrews: The role of Tupaiids in primate ... Fossils and gummivory in early primate evolution". In Burrows, A. M.; Nash, L. T. The Evolution of Exudativory in Primates. ...
... basal offshoots of the tarsier lineage]. stem primates more closely related to adapids than to living primate taxa. Attempts to ... Like primates alive today, omomyids had grasping hands and feet with digits tipped by nails instead of claws. Features of their ... In at least one genus (Necrolemur), the lower leg bones, the tibia and fibula, were fused as in modern tarsiers. This feature ... Omomyidae is a family of early primates that radiated during the Eocene epoch between about 55 to 34 million years ago (mya). ...
Like modern tarsiers, it also possessed long fingers and toes, and a lengthy, balancing, tail. It was also characterised by a ... ISBN 1-84028-152-9. Fossil Primates from the University of Leeds [1] and [2] Marc Godinot and Marian Dagosto: Astragalus of ... The 25 centimetres (9.8 in) long creature probably resembled a tarsier; it was a nocturnal hunter with very large eyes and ears ... 1321-1324 Marian Dagosto: The distal tibia of primates with special reference to the omomyidae, International Journal of ...
Rasmussen, D.T.; Conroy, G.C.; Simons, E.L. (1998). "Tarsier-like locomotor specializations in the Oligocene primate ... Afrotarsius is a primate found in the Paleogene of Africa. The first species to be named, Afrotarsius chatrathi, was named in ... A tarsier-like tibiofibula was allocated to Afrotarsius in 1998, but the identity of this bone is controversial. In 2010, a ... sp., premier Tarsiidae (Primates, Mammalia) fossile d'Asie". Comptes Rendus de l'Académie des Sciences. 304 (19): 1213-1215. ...
ISBN 1-881173-88-7. Sussman, R.W. (2003) [1999]. Primate Ecology and Social Structure. Vol. 1: Lorises, Lemurs, and Tarsiers ( ... ISBN 0-536-74363-0. Gron, KJ (17 August 2007). "Primate Factsheets: Ruffed lemur (Varecia) Taxonomy, Morphology, & Ecology". ... ISBN 978-0-300-12550-4. Gron, KJ (2007). "Primate Factsheets: Ruffed lemur (Varecia) Taxonomy, Morphology, & Ecology". National ... as in other primates. The female builds a nest where infants remain until they can leave it on their own. For the first 2 weeks ...
Primates of the Oriental Night. Proceedings of the Indonesian Workshop: Taxonomy, husbandry, and conservation of tarsiers and ... Sussman, R.W. (2003). Primate Ecology and Social Structure. Volume 1: Lorises, Lemurs, and Tarsiers (Revised First ed.). Boston ... Phillips, E.M.; Walker, A. (2002). "Chapter 6: Fossil lorisoids". In Hartwig, W.C. The Primate Fossil Record. The Primate ... Slow lorises are a group of several species of nocturnal strepsirrhine primates that make up the genus Nycticebus. Found in ...
Primates in the park include the spectral tarsier and the vulnerable booted macaque. The park also protects 11 reptile and 20 ...
a similar paper by these authors is free online at New light on the dates of primate origins and divergence Archived 2007-07-20 ... Martin, R.D.; Soligo, C.; Tavaré, S. (2007). "Primate Origins: Implications of a Cretaceous Ancestry". Folia Primatologica. 78 ... Bats are fairly close relatives of primates.. *The closest living relatives of elephants are the aquatic sirenians, while their ... Bats are closer to Carnivora and odd-toed ungulates than to Primates and Dermoptera (colugos). ...
Sussman, R. (1999). Primate Ecology and Social Structure Volume 1: Lorises, Lemurs and Tarsiers. Pearson Custom Publishing. p. ... Collectively, lemurs (infraorder Lemuriformes) are classified as strepsirrhine primates. Originally listed as a subspecies of ... is a medium-sized strepsirrhine primate and one of twelve species of brown lemur in the family Lemuridae. It is only found in ...
Sussman, R. (1999). Primate Ecology and Social Structure Volume 1: Lorises, Lemurs and Tarsiers. Pearson Custom Publishing. pp ... The gray mouse lemur is one of the smallest primates in the world, yet it is also the largest mouse lemur. Its total length is ... Fleagle, J. (1999). Primate Adaptation and Evolution (2nd ed.). Academic Press. p. 86. ISBN 0-12-260341-9. Muldoon, K.M.; de ... As its name implies, the gray mouse lemur is a lemur, a type of primate, and belongs to the suborder Strepsirrhini and ...
ISBN 978-0-19-517133-4. Robert W. Sussman (1999). Primate Ecology and Social Structure Volume 1: Lorises, Lemurs and Tarsiers. ... ISBN 1-881173-88-7. Noel Rowe (1996). The Pictorial Guide to the Living Primates. p. 40. ISBN 0-9648825-0-7. name=perspective> ...
ISBN 1-881173-88-7. Robert W. Sussman (1999). Primate Ecology and Social Structure Volume 1: Lorises, Lemurs and Tarsiers. pp. ... Primates in Perspective. p. 53. ISBN 978-0-19-517133-4. ARKive - images and movies of the black lemur (Eulemur macaco). ... ISBN 978-0-300-12550-4. Noel Rowe (1996). The Pictorial Guide to the Living Primates. pp. 41-42. ISBN 0-9648825-0-7. Russell ... has blue eyes and is the only primate other than humans to have blue eyes, while Eulemur macaco, the black lemur, has brown or ...
Wild pigs and deers are the most frequently hunted animals by the locals while primates can be hunted incidentally. 122 species ... Totally protected mammals include gibbon, langurs, black giant squirrel, slow loris, and tarsier. Civets, otters, bats, ... treeshrew, and primates are also included under Sarawak Wildlife Protection Ordinance 1998. ...
Tourists also come to see the tarsier, a small nocturnal animal with large red eyes. It is one of the world's smallest primates ...
2006, p. 43 Sussman, R.W. (2003) [1999]. Primate Ecology and Social Structure. Vol. 1: Lorises, Lemurs, and Tarsiers (Revised ... 2006, p. 57 Gron, KJ (2007-08-17). "Primate Factsheets: Ruffed lemur (Varecia) Conservation". Wisconsin Primate Research Center ... Gron, KJ (2007-08-17). "Primate Factsheets: Ruffed lemur (Varecia) Behavior". Wisconsin Primate Research Center (WPRC). ... 2006 Gron, KJ (2007-08-17). "Primate Factsheets: Ruffed lemur (Varecia) Taxonomy, Morphology, & Ecology". Wisconsin Primate ...
Insectivory also features to various degrees amongst primates, such as marmosets, tamarins, tarsiers, galagos and aye-aye. ... Stetoff, Rebecca (2006). The Primate Order. Marshall Cavendish. p. 92. ISBN 978-0-7614-1816-0. Jones, S., Martin, R., & Pilbeam ... There is some suggestion that the earliest primates were nocturnal, arboreal insectivores. Insectivorous plants are plants that ...
... and tarsiers likely followed almost immediately after primates first evolved.[16] Although few fossils of living primate groups ... listen); STREP-sə-RY-nee) is a suborder of primates that includes the lemuriform primates, which consist of the lemurs of ... The noses of five prosimian primates: A) dwarf lemur, B) greater galago, C) lesser galago, D) aye-aye, and E) a tarsier. A ... Schwartz, J. H. (2003). "Chapter 3: How close are the similarities between Tarsius and other primates?". Tarsiers: Past, ...
Systematics of tarsiers and lorises. Primates 39(1):13-27.. Grow NB, Gursky-Doyen SL. In Review. Preliminary data on the ... Primates in perspective. New York: Oxford U Pr. p73-85.. Gursky S. 2003b. Territoriality in the spectral tarsier, Tarsius ... The axial skeleton of primates: how does genus Tarsius fit? In: Wright PC, Simons EL, Gursky S, editors. Tarsiers: past, ... Habitat use analysis of Dians tarsier (Tarsius dianae) in a mixed-species plantation in Sulawesi, Indonesia. Primates 49(2): ...
... we identify three herpesviruses within the genome data of their primate hosts, including the first endogenous herpesvirus. All ... Primates Is the Subject Area "Primates" applicable to this article? Yes. No. ...
... is one of the smallest primates in the world, standing at about 8.5 to 16 centimeters in size (imagine ... Interview with the Philippine Tarsier. Liam Faught and Zachary Healy Tarsius syrichta. (Philippine Tarsier). Click on an image ... Most tarsiers breed twice a year. A baby tarsier can begin to climb after just two days, and can jump between branches after ... The Philippine tarsier is a bilaterally symmetrical species. The tarsier has big, bat-like ears and a round head, but what ...
Make research projects and school reports about primate easy with credible articles from our FREE, online encyclopedia and ... Primates. The mammals (warm-blooded animals) called primates include the lower primates (lemurs, lorises, and tarsiers) and the ... Lower primates: Lemurs, lorises, tarsiers. The lower primates, including the lemurs, lorises, and tarsiers, were the first ... Primates Animal Sciences COPYRIGHT 2002 The Gale Group Inc.. Primates. Primates are one group (order) of mammals that evolved ...
... Lemurs, tarsiers, monkeys, apes, and humans. Click on an image to view larger version & data in a new window ... Electronic Zoo Primates Page. Links to primate information on the web. *Tim Knights Primate Gallery. Primate photos, ... Steve Blooms Primates Project. A collection of great primate photos. Title Illustrations. Click on an image to view larger ... Tarsier-like locomotor specializations in the Oligocene primate Afrotarsius. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences ( ...
Pygmy tarsier, a tiny primate, rediscovered in Indonesia. November 19, 2008 - Susannah F. Locke ...
Marmoset; Lemur; Bushbaby; Slow Loris; Tarsier; Squirrel Monkey; etc..." For more information see John W. Kappelman, Jr. ... Nonhuman Primate Brain Atlases Nonhuman Primate Clinical Medicine & Husbandry Nonhuman Primate Formulary Infant Primate ... Nonhuman Primate Nutrition Nonhuman Primate Diseases Acquisition, Care, Breeding & Use of Nonhuman Primates Nonhuman Primate ... Nonhuman Primate Clinical Medicine Nonhuman Primate Formulary NONHUMAN PRIMATE FORMULARY - APV PRIMATE FORMULARY - (SPREADSHEET ...
Dians tarsiers (T. dentatus) and Lariang tarsiers (T. lariang) are small (12 cm) nocturnal primate species endemic to Sulawesi ... 1998) Tarsier-like locomotor specializations in the Oligocene primate Afrotarsius. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 95:14848-14850. ... 1991) First skulls of the early Eocene primate Shoshonius cooperi and the anthropoid-tarsier dichotomy. Nature 349:64-67. ... 2008) Tarsius tumpara: A new tarsier species from Siau Island, North Sulawesi. Primate Conservation 23:55-64. ...
Mouse lemurs are tiny primates with a head and body length of 5.5 inches or less. They live in Madagascar. Many of them are ... Tarsiers: Strange and Threatened Primates of Southeast Asia. by Linda Crampton. 31 ... Mouse lemurs are primates, like other lemurs, monkeys, gibbons, apes, and humans. Although lemurs are considered to be the most ... In addition, they belong to the order known as Primates, as we do. We belong to the family Hominidae while mouse lemurs belong ...
... or wet-nosed primates, consisting of non-tarsier prosimians, and the suborder Haplorhini, or dry-nosed primates, consisting of ... Range of the nonhuman primates (green) A primate (/ˈpraɪmeɪt/ (. listen) PRY-mayt) is a mammal of the order Primates (Latin: " ... Sussman, R. W. (1999). Primate Ecology and Social Structure Volume 1: Lorises, Lemurs and Tarsiers. Needham Heights, MA: ... Suborder Haplorhini, the simple-nosed or "dry-nosed" primates, is composed of two sister clades.[1] Prosimian tarsiers in the ...
Gron, Kurt J. (July 2008). "Primate Factsheets: Tarsier (Tarsius) Taxonomy, Morphology, & Ecology". National Primate Research ... spectrumgurskyae Jatnas tarsier, T. supriatnai Spectral tarsier, T. tarsier Siau Island tarsier, T. tumpara Pygmy tarsier, T. ... Genus Tarsius Dians tarsier, T. dentatus Lariang tarsier, T. lariang Peleng tarsier, T. pelengensis Sangihe tarsier, T. ... Philippine Tarsier Foundation Tarsier skeleton - Skeleton from the University of Texas at Austin "Tarsier.org". Retrieved ...
Two new tarsier species (Tarsiidae, Primates) and the biogeography of Sulawesi, Indonesia. Primate Conservation 31. Mogk, K. ( ... The spectral tarsier (Tarsius spectrum, also called Tarsius tarsier) is a species of tarsier found on the island of Selayar in ... It is apparently less specialized than the Philippine tarsier or Horsfields tarsier; for example, it lacks adhesive toes. It ... in captivity the closely related Horsfields tarsier can live up to 17 years and it is thought the spectral tarsier may have ...
The tarsiers are prosimian (non-monkey) primates. They got their name from the long bones in their feet. They are now placed ... Tarsiers are the only primates which are wholly carnivorous. They mainly eat insects, but some are also known to eat birds and ... The tarsiers brain is different from other primates in one respect. The sequence of cell layers in the lateral geniculate ... Tarsiers can catch prey like birds even if they are in motion as the tarsiers jump from tree to tree to catch their prey.[1] ...
Fossil Primates: The Stem Group.. The First Fossil Euprimates.. Eocene "Lemurs" and "Tarsiers". ... His areas of interest include: Bipedal locomotion, Gait analysis, and Origin and differentiation of primates in addition to ...
Convergence and the spectral tarsier. Divergence and Daubentonia? A return to the entire Order: functional data, taxonomic ... How anatomies arrange primates. How primates arrange primates. How primates arrange anatomies. Previous essays into ... Fertility and birth rates among captive nonhuman primates: A bibliography, 1968-1983. Caminiti, B. Seattle: Primate Information ... Primate Report, No. 11, April 1984. (German Primate Center). . . . This issue includes various notes about the activities and ...
ORDER PRIMATES *Suborder Strepsirrhini: lemurs, lorises, and galagos. *Suborder Haplorhini: tarsiers, monkeys, and apes * ... Lemurs, lorises, and galagos are not monkeys; instead they are strepsirrhine primates. Like monkeys, tarsiers are haplorhine ... "Early Primate Evolution: The First Primates". www2.palomar.edu. Retrieved 2018-10-21.. ... "Early Primate Evolution: The First Primates". anthro.palomar.edu. Retrieved 2017-08-12.. ...
Tarsier (Carlito syrichta) , Source. Promimians (Order Primate). *Depending on how many students you have, assign each ... Includes the smallest primates that look the least like monkeys: lemurs, bush babies, lorises, pottos, & tarsiers ... Note: Some zoologists no longer include this subspecies of the primate order & divide tarsiers into one subspecies & the others ... Apes (Order Primates). *Depending on how many students you have, assign each ape to a different student if needed.* ...
Sulawesi tarsier (primate). tarsier: The South Sulawesi, or spectral, tarsier (T. tarsier, formerly called T. spectrum) is ...
spectral tarsier (primate). tarsier: The South Sulawesi, or spectral, tarsier (T. tarsier, formerly called T. spectrum) is ... spectacled langur (primate). langur: geei) from Bhutan, the spectacled langur (T. obscurus) from the Malay Peninsula, with ...
Tarsiers. The remaining group of prosimians, the tarsiers, belong to the suborder Haplorrhini, the "dry nosed" primates, along ... ORDER PRIMATES *Suborder Strepsirrhini: non-tarsier prosimians *Infraorder Lemuriformes *Superfamily Cheirogaleoidea *Family ... Thus, present day taxonomies have the primates divided into the suborder Strepsirrhini, with all prosimians except the tarsiers ... is an informal grouping of primates consisting of those belonging to the Primates suborder Strepsirrhini and the tarsiers of ...
Tarsier. Tarsius syrichta. Sep. 2013 (Tarsius_syrichta-2.0.1/tarSyr2). Sep. 2013 (Tarsius_syrichta-2.0.1/tarSyr2). MAF Net. ... Mammals Multiz Alignment & Conservation (27 primates) (. All Comparative Genomics tracks). Maximum display mode: hide. dense. ... bushbaby, bonobo, gorilla, golden snub-nosed monkey, mouse lemur, proboscis monkey, squirrel monkey, tarsier, tree shrew. ... bonobo, green monkey, gibbon, proboscis monkey, golden snub-nosed monkey, squirrel monkey, tarsier. ...
For the alignments to Tarsier and Bonobo, chains scoring below a minimum score of 3000 were discarded; the remaining chains ... Primate Genomes, Chain and Net Alignments (. All Comparative Genomics tracks). Maximum display mode: hide. dense. squish. pack ...
1973) Tarsius bancanus (Horsfields Tarsier) preying on snakes. Laboratory Primates Newsletter 12:18-19. ... 1983) Party size and early detection of predators in Sumatran forest primates. Primates 24:211-221. ... Nonhuman primates also dispatch relatively large venomous species, which was exemplified by a Bornean tarsier (Tarsius bacanus ... if ancient snakes ate ancestral primates, then living members of core primate lineages should occur in the diets of serpentine ...
Sussman, R. W.: Primate Ecology and Social Structure Volume 1: Lorises, Lemurs and Tarsiers. Needham Heights, MA: Pearson ... Primates in Peril: The Worlds 25 Most Endangered Primates 2008-2010. , s. 23-26, 2009. Arlington, VA.: IUCN/SSC Primate ... a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Strier, K.: Primate Behavioral Ecology. Wyd. 3.. Allyn & Bacon, 2007, s. 7, 64, 71, ... Primates". 4 (2), s. 1-10, 1963. DOI: 10.1007/BF01659148. *↑ Kay, R. F.. The functional adaptations of primate molar teeth. „ ...
We classify extant tarsiers in 3 genera- Tarsius, Cephalopachus, and Carlito-each of which originated in the Miocene, or ... We revise the taxonomy of the primate family Tarsiidae. ... A new tarsier species from Siau Island, North Sulawesi. Primate ... Groves, C. P. (1998). Systematics of tarsiers and lorises. Primates, 39, 13-27.CrossRefGoogle Scholar ... We revise the taxonomy of the primate family Tarsiidae. We classify extant tarsiers in 3 genera-Tarsius, Cephalopachus, and ...
  • 2000. The oldest known anthropoid postcranial fossils and the early evolution of higher primates. (tolweb.org)
  • Fossils of tarsiiform primates are found in Asia, Europe, and North America, with disputed fossils from Africa, but extant tarsiers are restricted to several Southeast Asian islands in Indonesia, Philippines, and Malaysia, The fossil record indicates that their dentition has not changed much, except in size, in the past 45 million years. (wikipedia.org)
  • But other lines of enquiry (along with the general rareness of small-animal fossils from that far back) suggest that primates probably emerged ~85 million years ago, in the mid-Creataceous era - with evidence pointing toward an origin in what would now be considered to be a part of Asia (of course, the land masses of the world back then were connected in very different ways). (scienceheathen.com)
  • Gebo said the primate fossils are much younger geologically than the soft Shanghuang limestone where they were found. (washingtonpost.com)
  • The remains, unearthed in China and estimated at 55 million years old, are some 7 million years older than the next oldest primate fossils, according to a team of scientists describing the discovery in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature. (csmonitor.com)
  • Representing nine different taxonomic families of primates and as many as 25 species, the specimens include numerous fossils attributed to Eosimias , the very first anthropoid known to date, and three fossils attributed to a new and much more advanced anthropoid. (eurekalert.org)
  • The fossils are extraordinarily small, but in terms of quantity this is the largest single assemblage of fossil primate finger and toe specimens ever recorded," said Gebo, an NIU professor of anthropology and biology who specializes in the study of primate anatomy. (eurekalert.org)
  • All of the finger and toe fossils imply tree-dwelling primates with grasping digits in both hands and feet. (eurekalert.org)
  • Very few primate fossils are known between the late Eocene and early Oligocene, when there was a sharp change in global climate. (talkorigins.org)
  • This spectacular specimen (pictured) is one of the most complete and beautifully preserved primate fossils ever found. (amnh.org)
  • This possibility is raised by the discovery in China of a remarkably varied collection of early primate fossils. (newscientist.com)
  • History in Pittsburgh and their Chinese colleagues at the Academia Sinica in Peking allocated the new fossils to four different primate groups, including the small group of Southeast Asian primates known as the tarsiers, and another that they call 'basal simians' (Nature, vol 368, p 604). (newscientist.com)
  • Other fossils suggest that the first primate had extraordinarily long fingers, he says. (newscientist.com)
  • 1989. A molecular view of primate phylogeny and important systematic and evolutionary questions. (tolweb.org)
  • Because of their exceptionally long independent evolution, a range diminution of their Eocene relatives, and a remarkable subsequent diversification in Southeast Asia, tarsiers are of particular importance to evolutionary primatologists. (pnas.org)
  • Williams et al outlined evolutionary features, including in stem groupings, contrasted against the other primates such as the tarsiers and the lemuriformes . (wikipedia.org)
  • Relationships between primates and snakes are of widespread interest from anthropological, psychological, and evolutionary perspectives, but surprisingly, little is known about the dangers that serpents have posed to people with prehistoric lifestyles and nonhuman primates. (pnas.org)
  • These findings, interpreted within the context of snake and primate phylogenies, corroborate the hypothesis that complex ecological interactions have long characterized our shared evolutionary history. (pnas.org)
  • In addition to providing evolutionary insights into the physiological and behavioral evolution of the human lineage, primates exhibit an extraordinarily diverse array of behaviors and social systems, which allows them to exploit many habitats within the tropics, ranging from savanna-woodland to rain forest. (wwnorton.com)
  • Alternatively, these distinctive adaptations to nocturnal life may have originated relatively recently during the course of tarsier evolutionary history. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • The skull of a tarsier, from The Descent of Primates.At the turn of the 20th century evolutionary biologists faced a significant problem. (scienceblogs.com)
  • The new finds add to a growing body of evidence of a rich evolutionary history of primates in Asia, raising questions about the long-held view that human origins can most probably be traced to Africa. (washingtonpost.com)
  • The primate finds may also help forge linkages in the evolutionary chain between early primates, which made their appearance about 66 million years ago, and anthropoids, which evolved 40 million to 50 million years ago. (washingtonpost.com)
  • This immature female Darwinius masillae, nicknamed Ida, somewhat resembles lemurs, an early branch of the primate evolutionary tree. (amnh.org)
  • Despite several leading hypotheses, the reasons for the different evolutionary paths taken by Old and New World primates for trichromacy are still unclear and remain to be confirmed. (frontiersin.org)
  • Memmerbs of Ceboidea, Cercopithecoidea, and Hominoidea lived around 55 million years ago, and form a single clade on the primate evolutionary tree. (chegg.com)
  • In addition to being the oldest known example of an early primate skeleton, the new fossil is a path toward learning about a pivotal event in primate and human evolution - the evolutionary divergence between the lineage leading to modern monkeys, apes and humans (collectively known as anthropoids) and living tarsiers. (science20.com)
  • Archicebus belongs to an entirely separate branch of the primate evolutionary tree that lies much closer to the lineage leading to modern monkeys, apes and humans, the researchers say, while Darwinius and Notharctus are adapiform primates that are early relatives of living lemurs, the most distant branch of the primate family tree with respect to humans and other anthropoids. (science20.com)
  • Collaborator Dr. Daniel Gebo of Northern Illinois University said that, "The tiny size and very basal evolutionary position of Archicebus support the idea that the earliest primates, as well as the common ancestor of tarsiers and anthropoids, were miniscule. (science20.com)
  • The evolutionary relationships among primates and their potential relatives, and among the major lineages within the Primate order have been debated intensively for many years. (science20.com)
  • Both the phylogenetic distribution and antiquity of primate grooming phalanges now strongly suggest that ancestral euprimates had grooming claws, that these structures were modified from a primitive claw rather than a flat nail, and that the evolutionary loss of 'grooming claws' represents an apomorphy for crown anthropoids. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • There is still no consensus about the affinities of extant tarsiers to the Omomyidae, a family of extinct haplorhine primates with an Eocene distribution throughout most of the northern hemisphere ( 16 ). (pnas.org)
  • The three Alu insertions characterized underpin the monophyly of haplorhine primates (Anthropoidea and Tarsioidea) from a novel perspective. (genetics.org)
  • On the basis of faunal associations, size, and morphology, these specimens are recognized as the grooming phalanges of five genera of haplorhine primates, including one of the oldest known euprimates (∼56 Ma), Teilhardina brandti. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • 1998. Toward a phylogenetic classification of primates based on DNA evidence complemented by fossil evidence. (tolweb.org)
  • Among those animals whose phylogenetic uniqueness has sparked high interest and controversial discussion over the past decades are tarsiers. (pnas.org)
  • Many phylogenetic reconstructions place omomyids as ancestors to tarsiers, giving rise to only tarsiids ( 17 ), to independent tarsiid and anthropoid lineages ( 16 ), or to a tarsier-anthropoid clade ( 5 , 6 ). (pnas.org)
  • Snakes are uncommonly cited as killing nonhuman primates ( 1 , 3 , 6 , 13 ), predation on and competition with snakes typically is not mentioned with respect to primate evolution ( 1 , 14 ), and these reciprocal relationships have not been evaluated in comprehensive natural history and phylogenetic frameworks. (pnas.org)
  • Here, we show that 20th century hunter-gatherers had intense, complex interactions with giant serpents and then evaluate our findings in the context of the natural history and phylogenetic relationships of primates and snakes. (pnas.org)
  • Transpositions of Alu sequences, representing the most abundant primate short interspersed elements (SINE), were evaluated as molecular cladistic markers to analyze the phylogenetic affiliations among the primate infraorders. (genetics.org)
  • ONE of the most controversial issues in the intraordinal relationships of living primates is the phylogenetic affiliation of tarsiers to strepsirhine and anthropoid primates. (genetics.org)
  • With intent of resolving these conflicting proposals for the phylogenetic relationships of anthropoids, strepsirhines, and tarsiers, a molecular cladistic approach was chosen in which the presence/absence pattern of short interspersed elements, or SINEs, was examined at orthologous loci in representatives of the different primate infraorders. (genetics.org)
  • 1989) specifically stated that, within their favoured phylogenetic scheme, megabats would be outside of the clade Primates, and thus not primates in the true sense (p. 551). (scienceblogs.com)
  • Phylogenetic tree of primate TAAR3 orthologs analyzed for open reading frames in the present study. (nih.gov)
  • Phylogenetic tree of all primate TAAR4 orthologs analyzed for ORF. (nih.gov)
  • To test these different hypotheses and determine the phylogenetic position of the new primate, we developed a massive data matrix including more than 1000 anatomical characters and scored for 157 mammals," said collaborator Dr. Jin Meng of the American Museum of Natural History in New York. (science20.com)
  • The tarsier lineage split from all other extant primates at least 58 Mya ( 7 ), and possibly even much earlier ( 4 , 9 ). (pnas.org)
  • The rather cosmopolitan status that the primate lineage boasts is one of a number of reasons to study their adaptive strategies in the context of evolution. (wwnorton.com)
  • Lemurs (Lemuriformes) can only be found on Madagascar and the Comoro Islands, and represent a lineage of primates that have evolved in isolation from other such groups over the past 120 million years. (wwnorton.com)
  • Some of the skeleton's anatomical characteristics resemble in miniature those of its tarsier lineage. (nytimes.com)
  • The accompanying image by Peter Schouten, commissioned by John Pettigrew, depicts the 'flying primate' hypothesis in graphic form: note that colugos and megabats branch off from the primate lineage, and aren't alongside microbats. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Dr. Marian Dagosto notes that, "Even though Archicebus appears to be a very basal member of the tarsier lineage, it resembles early anthropoids in several features, including its small eyes and monkey-like feet. (science20.com)
  • The once holarctic tarsiiform primates ( 16 ) are now represented by a single monophyletic group inhabiting a small fraction of their Eocene range-Southeast Asia, the only region assumed to have retained Eocene-like rain forest habitats through the Neogene ( 19 ). (pnas.org)
  • Shanghuang is truly an amazingly diverse fossil primate locality, unequaled across the Eocene," Gebo said. (eurekalert.org)
  • Cantius (early Eocene) -- One of the first true primates (or "primates of modern aspect"), more advanced than the plesiadapids (more teeth lost, bar behind the eye, grasping hand & foot) and beginning to show some lemur-like arboreal adaptations. (talkorigins.org)
  • Pelycodus & related species (early Eocene) -- Primitive lemur-like primates. (talkorigins.org)
  • The tarsiers, lemurs, and New World monkeys split off in the Eocene. (talkorigins.org)
  • Amphipithecus , Pondaungia (late Eocene, Burma) -- Very early Old World primates known only from fragments. (talkorigins.org)
  • Infraorder containing one living family of tarsiers and the Eocene to Early Miocene families Anaptomorphidae and Omomyidae. (getty.edu)
  • A reassessment of mammalian alpha-A-crystallin sequences using DNA sequencing: Implications for anthropoid affinities of tarsier. (tolweb.org)
  • Its tarsiid affinities have been widely challenged, and Afrotarsius is more plausibly interpreted as a basal anthropoid primate [ 1 , 5 , 8 ]. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Pettigrew and colleagues weren't the first to question bat monophyly: John E. Hill of the then British Museum (Natural History) had done this as early as 1976, Smith & Madkour (1980) argued that micro- and megabats were of separate origins, and Hill & Smith (1984), in one of the best and oft-cited overviews of bat evolution and biology, expressed scepticism of bat monophyly and a preference for megabat-primate affinities (p. 36). (scienceblogs.com)
  • About the size of a rat, the Horsefield's tarsier is a tiny primate. (npr.org)
  • A three-dimensional reconstruction of the skeleton of Archicebus achilles, a tiny primate that is believed to have lived some 55 million years ago. (nytimes.com)
  • If our results confirm the antiquity of modern tarsier orbital morphology (and their secondarily nocturnal adaptations), this will support the proposal that haplorhines were primitively diurnal, a condition retained in early anthropoids. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • The size of their teeth hints that in life these animals weighed around 3.5 ounces (100 grams), roughly the size of a modern tarsier. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Little is known, however, on the processes shaping the radiation of these small enigmatic primates-especially on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, their center of endemism. (pnas.org)
  • Here, we describe effects of plate-tectonic movements, Pleistocene sea level changes, and hybridization on the divergence of central Sulawesi tarsiers. (pnas.org)
  • This study exemplifies that the distribution of tarsier acoustic forms on Sulawesi is consistent with the allocation of genetic variability and that plate-tectonic and glacial events have left traceable marks in the biogeography of this island's unique fauna. (pnas.org)
  • Living tarsiers are on several southeast Asian islands, including the Philippines , Sulawesi , Borneo , and Sumatra . (wikipedia.org)
  • Today, tarsiers live only in the rainforests of Borneo, Sumatra, Sulawesi and the Philippines. (newscientist.com)
  • As primatologists are getting close to realizing the diversity of extant primates, the phylogeographic history and underlying processes of several major primate groups are still far from understood. (pnas.org)
  • Among extant primates, the keratinized structure on the pedal dpII widely varies in form. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • The results fit pretty well with the molecular evidence that suggests that tarsier-like creatures and and anthropoids split from the third group about 60 million years ago, says Gregg Gunnell, a Duke University paleontologist currently on a fossil-hunting expedition in the Dominican Republic. (csmonitor.com)
  • Some characteristics, like the monkeylike heel and ankle, appear to reaffirm the close tarsier connection to anthropoids, which is why the species has been named Archicebus achilles, a reference to the best-known heel bone in Western culture. (nytimes.com)
  • A rhinarium is lacking, as one is in anthropoids, but the distribution of sebaceous and apocrine glands around the mouth (the "circum-oral organ"), bearing hairs that interdigitate between upper and lower lip, and the development of distinct labial papillae internally that are spaced to cover the gaps between neighboring teeth, make the tarsier a most unusual primate indeed (Klauer). (docme.ru)
  • Now, an international team of scientists has unearthed a new fossil in Southeast Asia that may prove that anthropoids originated in what is now the East, shedding light on a pivotal step in primate and human evolution. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Archicebus marks the first time that we have a reasonably complete picture of a primate close to the divergence between tarsiers and anthropoids. (science20.com)
  • Extant strepsirrhines and tarsiers have narrow, distally tapering, dorsally inclined nails (termed a 'grooming claws' for their use in autogrooming), while extant anthropoids have more typical nails that are wider and lack distal tapering or dorsal inclination. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • The world's oldest known fossil primate skeleton, unearthed from an ancient lake bed in central China's Hubei Province, near the course of the modern Yangtze River, represents a previously unknown genus and species that has been named Archicebus achilles , according to the paper in Nature . (science20.com)
  • But the team concluded that the skeleton from Hubei, which is much smaller, belonged to an entirely separate branch of the primate family tree. (nytimes.com)
  • On the one hand, neontological-morphological data exist that point toward a sister group relationship between tarsiers and the Anthropoidea (Platyrrhini and Catarrhini). (genetics.org)
  • This is partly due to the incongruence between phylogenies based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences: on the one hand, the limited set of molecular data based on nuclear DNA sequence comparisons presently points toward a sister group relationship of tarsiers and Anthropoidea, although the statistical support for the branches in question and the small number of loci analyzed so far do not allow this problem to be regarded as settled. (genetics.org)
  • Mammals with rhinariums tend to have a stronger sense of olfaction , and the loss of the rhinarium in the haplorrhine primates is related to their decreased reliance on olfaction, being associated with other derived characteristics such as a reduced number of turbinates. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • The following characters distinguish the primate order from other mammalian groups. (wwnorton.com)
  • Functional analyses showed that ligands activating the murine TAAR3, TAAR4 and TAAR5 do not activate intact primate and mammalian orthologs, although they evolve under purifying selection and hence must be functional. (nih.gov)
  • Its limb proportions (e.g., extremely long fore and hind limb in relation to the spine) are unique among primates, as is the shortness of its cuboid and the orientation of its trochlear facet, which does not allow for lateral deviation of the foot (Shultz). (docme.ru)
  • Combining these measurements with similar data from other studies, the team compared daily energy expenditure among primates to that of other mammals. (science20.com)
  • All strepsirrhines except the aye-ayes also have a toothcomb-a comblike projection of their incisors and canine teeth that is used for grooming-while the tarsiers lack a toothcomb. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Boyer and his colleagues, who analysed the fossil, say it belonged to an early primate called Donrussellia provincialis , which was previously known only from fossil teeth. (newscientist.com)
  • A limited number of field observations suggest that some of these gummivorous primate species actively elicit tree exudate flow by mechanically damaging trees with their anterior teeth. (docme.ru)
  • The Primate Fossil Record. (tolweb.org)
  • They also have the longest continuous fossil record of any primate. (wikipedia.org)
  • There's nothing else known from the primate fossil record that resembles this fossil, especially from this time period," said Christopher Beard, a vertebrate paleontologist with the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh and a member of the international team reporting the discovery, in a press briefing. (csmonitor.com)
  • As a group, primates first appear in the fossil record about 56 million years ago in the northern hemisphere, the researchers say. (csmonitor.com)
  • With A. achilles ' remains in hand to help to set the time line, it appears that within the first million years covered by the current fossil record, primates has split into three broad groups. (csmonitor.com)
  • Primates first appear in the fossil record about 57 million years ago. (newscientist.com)
  • Since the strepsirrhines do not have this mutation and have retained the ability to make vitamin C, the genetic trait that confers the need for it in the diet would tend to place tarsiers with haplorrhines. (wikipedia.org)
  • Biology of Tarsiers is a source of some wonderfully interesting information on all sorts of aspects of the tarsier-from its taxonomic history to its brown body fat, eyes, brain, snout, diet, locomotion, and activity rhythms. (docme.ru)