Tachycardia: Abnormally rapid heartbeat, usually with a HEART RATE above 100 beats per minute for adults. Tachycardia accompanied by disturbance in the cardiac depolarization (cardiac arrhythmia) is called tachyarrhythmia.Tachycardia, Ventricular: An abnormally rapid ventricular rhythm usually in excess of 150 beats per minute. It is generated within the ventricle below the BUNDLE OF HIS, either as autonomic impulse formation or reentrant impulse conduction. Depending on the etiology, onset of ventricular tachycardia can be paroxysmal (sudden) or nonparoxysmal, its wide QRS complexes can be uniform or polymorphic, and the ventricular beating may be independent of the atrial beating (AV dissociation).Tachycardia, Supraventricular: A generic expression for any tachycardia that originates above the BUNDLE OF HIS.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Tachycardia, Atrioventricular Nodal Reentry: Abnormally rapid heartbeats caused by reentry of atrial impulse into the dual (fast and slow) pathways of ATRIOVENTRICULAR NODE. The common type involves a blocked atrial impulse in the slow pathway which reenters the fast pathway in a retrograde direction and simultaneously conducts to the atria and the ventricles leading to rapid HEART RATE of 150-250 beats per minute.Tachycardia, Ectopic Atrial: Abnormally rapid heartbeats originating from one or more automatic foci (nonsinus pacemakers) in the HEART ATRIUM but away from the SINOATRIAL NODE. Unlike the reentry mechanism, automatic tachycardia speeds up and slows down gradually. The episode is characterized by a HEART RATE between 135 to less than 200 beats per minute and lasting 30 seconds or longer.Dictionaries, MedicalDictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Electronic Mail: Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.Food Dispensers, Automatic: Mechanical food dispensing machines.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Postal Service: The functions and activities carried out by the U.S. Postal Service, foreign postal services, and private postal services such as Federal Express.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome: A syndrome of ORTHOSTATIC INTOLERANCE combined with excessive upright TACHYCARDIA, and usually without associated ORTHOSTATIC HYPOTENSION. All variants have in common an excessively reduced venous return to the heart (central HYPOVOLEMIA) while upright.Dizziness: An imprecise term which may refer to a sense of spatial disorientation, motion of the environment, or lightheadedness.Tilt-Table Test: A standard and widely accepted diagnostic test used to identify patients who have a vasodepressive and/or cardioinhibitory response as a cause of syncope. (From Braunwald, Heart Disease, 7th ed)Hypotension, Orthostatic: A significant drop in BLOOD PRESSURE after assuming a standing position. Orthostatic hypotension is a finding, and defined as a 20-mm Hg decrease in systolic pressure or a 10-mm Hg decrease in diastolic pressure 3 minutes after the person has risen from supine to standing. Symptoms generally include DIZZINESS, blurred vision, and SYNCOPE.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Tachycardia, Paroxysmal: Abnormally rapid heartbeats with sudden onset and cessation.Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome: A form of ventricular pre-excitation characterized by a short PR interval and a long QRS interval with a delta wave. In this syndrome, atrial impulses are abnormally conducted to the HEART VENTRICLES via an ACCESSORY CONDUCTING PATHWAY that is located between the wall of the right or left atria and the ventricles, also known as a BUNDLE OF KENT. The inherited form can be caused by mutation of PRKAG2 gene encoding a gamma-2 regulatory subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase.Catheter Ablation: Removal of tissue with electrical current delivered via electrodes positioned at the distal end of a catheter. Energy sources are commonly direct current (DC-shock) or alternating current at radiofrequencies (usually 750 kHz). The technique is used most often to ablate the AV junction and/or accessory pathways in order to interrupt AV conduction and produce AV block in the treatment of various tachyarrhythmias.Atrioventricular Node: A small nodular mass of specialized muscle fibers located in the interatrial septum near the opening of the coronary sinus. It gives rise to the atrioventricular bundle of the conduction system of the heart.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Tachycardia, Sinus: Simple rapid heartbeats caused by rapid discharge of impulses from the SINOATRIAL NODE, usually between 100 and 180 beats/min in adults. It is characterized by a gradual onset and termination. Sinus tachycardia is common in infants, young children, and adults during strenuous physical activities.Flecainide: A potent anti-arrhythmia agent, effective in a wide range of ventricular and atrial ARRHYTHMIAS and TACHYCARDIAS.Anti-Arrhythmia Agents: Agents used for the treatment or prevention of cardiac arrhythmias. They may affect the polarization-repolarization phase of the action potential, its excitability or refractoriness, or impulse conduction or membrane responsiveness within cardiac fibers. Anti-arrhythmia agents are often classed into four main groups according to their mechanism of action: sodium channel blockade, beta-adrenergic blockade, repolarization prolongation, or calcium channel blockade.Chronobiology Disorders: Disruptions of the rhythmic cycle of bodily functions or activities.Arrhythmias, Cardiac: Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.Electrocoagulation: Procedures using an electrically heated wire or scalpel to treat hemorrhage (e.g., bleeding ulcers) and to ablate tumors, mucosal lesions, and refractory arrhythmias. It is different from ELECTROSURGERY which is used more for cutting tissue than destroying and in which the patient is part of the electric circuit.Atrial Fibrillation: Abnormal cardiac rhythm that is characterized by rapid, uncoordinated firing of electrical impulses in the upper chambers of the heart (HEART ATRIA). In such case, blood cannot be effectively pumped into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES). It is caused by abnormal impulse generation.Ablation Techniques: Removal of tissue by vaporization, abrasion, or destruction. Methods used include heating tissue by hot liquids or microwave thermal heating, freezing (CRYOABLATION), chemical ablation, and photoablation with LASERS.Stellate Ganglion: A paravertebral sympathetic ganglion formed by the fusion of the inferior cervical and first thoracic ganglia.Cardiac Imaging Techniques: Visualization of the heart structure and cardiac blood flow for diagnostic evaluation or to guide cardiac procedures via techniques including ENDOSCOPY (cardiac endoscopy, sometimes refered to as cardioscopy), RADIONUCLIDE IMAGING; MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; TOMOGRAPHY; or ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Atrial Flutter: Rapid, irregular atrial contractions caused by a block of electrical impulse conduction in the right atrium and a reentrant wave front traveling up the inter-atrial septum and down the right atrial free wall or vice versa. Unlike ATRIAL FIBRILLATION which is caused by abnormal impulse generation, typical atrial flutter is caused by abnormal impulse conduction. As in atrial fibrillation, patients with atrial flutter cannot effectively pump blood into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES).Heart Conduction System: An impulse-conducting system composed of modified cardiac muscle, having the power of spontaneous rhythmicity and conduction more highly developed than the rest of the heart.Electrocardiography, Ambulatory: Method in which prolonged electrocardiographic recordings are made on a portable tape recorder (Holter-type system) or solid-state device ("real-time" system), while the patient undergoes normal daily activities. It is useful in the diagnosis and management of intermittent cardiac arrhythmias and transient myocardial ischemia.Atrial Premature Complexes: A type of cardiac arrhythmia with premature atrial contractions or beats caused by signals originating from ectopic atrial sites. The ectopic signals may or may not conduct to the HEART VENTRICLES. Atrial premature complexes are characterized by premature P waves on ECG which are different in configuration from the P waves generated by the normal pacemaker complex in the SINOATRIAL NODE.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Urology Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of diagnostic and therapeutic services for the urologic patient.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Caffeine: A methylxanthine naturally occurring in some beverages and also used as a pharmacological agent. Caffeine's most notable pharmacological effect is as a central nervous system stimulant, increasing alertness and producing agitation. It also relaxes SMOOTH MUSCLE, stimulates CARDIAC MUSCLE, stimulates DIURESIS, and appears to be useful in the treatment of some types of headache. Several cellular actions of caffeine have been observed, but it is not entirely clear how each contributes to its pharmacological profile. Among the most important are inhibition of cyclic nucleotide PHOSPHODIESTERASES, antagonism of ADENOSINE RECEPTORS, and modulation of intracellular calcium handling.Coffee: A beverage made from ground COFFEA beans (SEEDS) infused in hot water. It generally contains CAFFEINE and THEOPHYLLINE unless it is decaffeinated.Cacao: A tree of the family Sterculiaceae (or Byttneriaceae), usually Theobroma cacao, or its seeds, which after fermentation and roasting, yield cocoa and chocolate.Carbonated Beverages: Drinkable liquids combined with or impregnated with carbon dioxide.Tea: The infusion of leaves of CAMELLIA SINENSIS (formerly Thea sinensis) as a beverage, the familiar Asian tea, which contains CATECHIN (especially epigallocatechin gallate) and CAFFEINE.

Site of myocardial infarction. A determinant of the cardiovascular changes induced in the cat by coronary occlusion. (1/1171)

The influence of site of acute myocardial infarction on heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac output, total peripheral resistance (TPR), cardiac rhythm, and mortality was determined in 58 anesthetized cats by occlusion of either the left anterior descending (LAD), left circumflex or right coronary artery. LAD occlusion resulted in immediate decrease in cardiac output, heart rate, and blood pressure, an increase in TPR, and cardiac rhythm changes including premature ventricular beats, ventricular tachycardia, and occasionally ventricular fibrillation. The decrease in cardiac output and increase in TPR persisted in the cats surviving a ventricular arrhythmia. In contrast, right coronary occlusion resulted in a considerably smaller decrease in cardiac output. TPR did not increase, atrioventricular condition disturbances were common, and sinus bradycardia and hypotension persisted in the cats recovering from an arrhythmia. Left circumflex ligation resulted in cardiovascular changes intermediate between those produced by occlusion of the LAD or the right coronary artery. Mortality was similar in each of the three groups. We studied the coronary artery anatomy in 12 cats. In 10, the blood supply to the sinus node was from the right coronary artery and in 2, from the left circumflex coronary artery. The atrioventricular node artery arose from the right in 9 cats, and from the left circumflex in 3. The right coronary artery was dominant in 9 cats and the left in 3. In conclusion, the site of experimental coronary occlusion in cats is a major determinant of the hemodynamic and cardiac rhythm changes occurring after acute myocardial infarction. The cardiovascular responses evoked by ligation are related in part to the anatomical distribution of the occluded artery.  (+info)

Regional differences in the recovery course of tachycardia-induced changes of atrial electrophysiological properties. (2/1171)

BACKGROUND: Regional differences in recovery of tachycardia-induced changes of atrial electrophysiological properties have not been well studied. METHODS AND RESULTS: In the control group (5 dogs), atrial effective refractory period (AERP) and inducibility of atrial fibrillation (AF) were assessed before and every 4 hours for 48 hours after complete atrioventricular junction (AVJ) ablation with 8-week VVI pacing. In experimental group 1 (15 dogs), AERP and inducibility of AF were assessed before and after complete AVJ ablation with 8-week rapid right atrial (RA) pacing (780 bpm) and VVI pacing. In experimental group 2 (7 dogs), AERP and inducibility of AF were assessed before and after 8-week rapid left atrial (LA) pacing and VVI pacing. AERP and inducibility and duration of AF were obtained from 7 epicardial sites. In the control group, atrial electrophysiological properties obtained immediately and during 48-hour measurements after pacing did not show any change. In the 2 experimental groups, recovery of atrial electrophysiological properties included a progressive recovery of AERP shortening, recovery of AERP maladaptation, and decrease of duration and episodes of reinduced AF. However, recovery of shortening and maladaptation of AERP and inducibility of AF was slower at the LA than at the RA and Bachmann's bundle. CONCLUSIONS: The LA had a slower recovery of tachycardia-induced changes of atrial electrophysiological properties, and this might play a critical role in initiation of AF.  (+info)

Ketotifen and cardiovascular effects of xamoterol following single and chronic dosing in healthy volunteers. (3/1171)

AIMS: To study whether desensitization occurs after long-term administration of the 1-adrenoceptor partial agonist xamoterol and, if so, whether this can be influenced by ketotifen. METHODS: In a double-blind, randomized design 10 young, healthy males received ketotifen (2 x 1 mg day(-1) p.o.) or placebo for 3 weeks with xamoterol (2 x 200 mg day(-1) p.o.) administered concomitantly during the last 2 weeks. 'l1-adrenoceptor mediated responses were assessed as exercise-induced tachycardia and isoprenaline-induced shortening of heart rate corrected electromechanical systole (QS2c); isoprenaline-induced tachycardia was measured as a mixed beta1-/beta2-adrenoceptor-mediated effect. RESULTS: The first dose of xamoterol significantly increased resting heart rate and systolic blood pressure and significantly shortened QS2c. The last dose of xamoterol after 2 weeks of treatment still produced the same responses. Ketotifen did not influence these effects of xamoterol on resting haemodynamics. The first dose of xamoterol caused a rightward shift of the exercise- and isoprenaline-induced tachycardia (mean dose ratios+/-s.e.mean: 1.20+/-0.05 and 2.46+/-0.23) and the isoprenaline-evoked shortening of QS2c (dose ratio 3.59+/-0.68). This rightward shift was even more pronounced after 2 weeks xamoterol treatment. This additional rightward shift after 2 weeks of xamoterol was not affected by ketotifen (mean difference (95% CI) of log transformed dose ratios between placebo and ketotifen: exercise tachycardia 0.001 (-0.03; 0.04); isoprenaline tachycardia 0.03 (-0.15; 0.21); isoprenaline induced shortening of QS2c 0.13 (-0.22; 0.48)). CONCLUSIONS: In humans xamoterol is a partial beta1-adrenoceptor agonist with positive chrono- and inotropic effects at rest and antagonistic properties under conditions of beta-adrenoceptor stimulation. These effects were well maintained after chronic dosing with no signs of beta1-adrenoceptor desensitization. Ketotifen does not change the beta-adrenoceptor mediated responses of xamoterol after chronic dosing.  (+info)

LocaLisa: new technique for real-time 3-dimensional localization of regular intracardiac electrodes. (4/1171)

BACKGROUND: Estimation of the 3-dimensional (3D) position of ablation electrodes from fluoroscopic images is inadequate if a systematic lesion pattern is required in the treatment of complex arrhythmogenic substrates. METHODS AND RESULTS: We developed a new technique for online 3D localization of intracardiac electrodes. Regular catheter electrodes are used as sensors for a high-frequency transthoracic electrical field, which is applied via standard skin electrodes. We investigated localization accuracy within the right atrium, right ventricle, and left ventricle by comparing measured and true interelectrode distances of a decapolar catheter. Long-term stability was analyzed by localization of the most proximal His bundle before and after slow pathway ablation. Electrogram recordings were unaffected by the applied electrical field. Localization data from 3 catheter positions, widely distributed within the right atrium, right ventricle, or left ventricle, were analyzed in 10 patients per group. The relationship between measured and true electrode positions was highly linear, with an average correlation coefficient of 0.996, 0.997, and 0.999 for the right atrium, right ventricle, and left ventricle, respectively. Localization accuracy was better than 2 mm, with an additional scaling error of 8% to 14%. After 2 hours, localization of the proximal His bundle was reproducible within 1.4+/-1.1 mm. CONCLUSIONS: This new technique enables accurate and reproducible real-time localization of electrode positions in cardiac mapping and ablation procedures. Its application does not distort the quality of electrograms and can be applied to any electrode catheter.  (+info)

Effects of pacing-induced and balloon coronary occlusion ischemia on left atrial function in patients with coronary artery disease. (5/1171)

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare left atrial (LA) function in 16 patients with distal left anterior descending (LAD) and in 16 patients with proximal left circumflex (LCx) coronary artery stenosis at rest and immediately after pacing-induced tachycardia (LAD-pacing [P] and LCx-P) or coronary occlusion (LAD-CO and LCx-CO). BACKGROUND: During left ventricular (LV) ischemia, compensatory augmentation of LA contraction enhances LV filling and performance. The left atrium is supplied predominantly by branches arising from the LCx. Therefore, we hypothesized that one mechanism for the loss of atrial contraction may be ischemic LA dysfunction. METHODS: Left ventricular and LA pressure-area relations were derived from simultaneous double-tip micromanometer pressure recordings and automatic boundary detection echocardiograms. RESULTS: Immediately after pacing or after coronary occlusion, LV end-diastolic pressure, LV relaxation, LA mean pressure and LV stiffness significantly increased in all patients. However, the area of the A loop of the LA pressure-area relation, representing the LA pump function, significantly decreased in groups LCx-P and LCx-CO (from 14+/-3 to 9+/-2, and from 16+/-4 to 9+/-2 mm Hg.cm2, respectively, p < 0.05), whereas it increased in groups LAD-P and LAD-CO (from 12+/-3 to 54+/-10, and from 16+/-3 to 49+/-8 mm Hg.cm2, respectively, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with LAD stenosis, LV supply or demand ischemia is associated with enhanced LA pump function. However, in patients with proximal LCx stenosis who develop the same type and degree of ischemia, LA branches might have been affected, rendering the LA ischemic and unable to increase its booster pump function.  (+info)

Frequency of arrhythmias and other cardiac abnormalities in fulminant hepatic failure. (6/1171)

In a series of 106 patients with fulminant hepatic failure and grade 4 encephalopathy, cardiac arrhythmias and other abnormalities occurred in 92 per cent. The most common was sinus tachycardia (75%) and this was the only abnormality in 22 per cent of the patients. Sudden cardiac arrest occurred in 25 per cent, various ectopic beats in 20 per cent, and heart block or bradycardia in 18 per cent. Other electrocardiographic abnormalities, mostly of the T wave and ST segment, were found in 31 per cent. Cardiac and respiratory arrests were usually unrelated to each other and both frequently occurred without warning. Only 7 out of 71 patients with arrhythmias other than sinus tachycardia survived, compared with 15 out of 31 patients without them (P less than 0-005). During the latter part of the series when an arrhythmia computer was used to monitor 38 patients, it was shown that significantly lower arterial oxygen levels occurred in those with arrhythmias, other than sinus tachycardia, than in those without. They were also found to be more acidotic and hyperkalaemic, and a higher number required dialysis and ventilation. Macroscopical cardiac abnormalities including scattered petechial haemorrhages, small pericardial effusions, and fatty, pale, and flabby ventricles, were found at necropsy in 64 per cent of the patients examined. Combinations of these macroscopical abnormalities occurred, particularly in the paracetamol overdose group. Another necropsy finding of possible significance in the pathogenesis of arrhythmias was cerebral oedema, present in 48 per cent of the patients examined, and often associated with coning of the brain stem. However, 7 of the 16 patients who suffered asystolic cardiac arrests had no macroscopical abnormality of either heart or brain. In the management of patients with fulminant hepatic failure continuous cardiac monitoring is essential. Correction of the biochemical and coagulation defects may decrease the frequency of arrhythmias but studies of the mechanism and control of cerebral oedema and its relation to cardiovascular function are urgently needed.  (+info)

Sino-aortic denervation augments the increase in blood pressure seen during paradoxical sleep in the rat. (7/1171)

Using a computer assisted telemetric system, we have re-examined the effect of sino-aortic denervation (SAD) on the changes in arterial blood pressure (AP) and heart rate (HR) during sleep in the rat suitably recovered from the operation. Eight 1 hourly polygraphic recordings were performed 4 weeks after the initial SAD surgery. In the SAD rats, the increase in AP during paradoxical sleep (PS) was much larger than that in sham-operated rats. HR in the SAD rats increased on-going from slow-wave sleep to PS, but it showed no change in sham-operated rats. The present study suggests that chronic SAD causes the enhanced AP increase during PS concomitantly with the persistent hypertension and tachycardia across sleep-wake states.  (+info)

Aryl propanolamines: comparison of activity at human beta3 receptors, rat beta3 receptors and rat atrial receptors mediating tachycardia. (8/1171)

1. The in vitro activity of four aryl propanolamines was compared to two prototypic beta3 receptor agonists, CGP 12177 and CL316243 at the human beta3 receptor, the rat beta3 receptor in the stomach fundus and receptors mediating atrial tachycardia. 2. L-739,574 was the most potent (EC50 = 9 nM) and selective agonist at the human beta3 receptor with high maximal response (74% of the maximal response to isoproterenol). 3. A phenol-biaryl ether analogue possessed modest affinity for the human beta3 receptor (EC50 = 246 nM), but was highly efficacious with a maximal response 82% of the maximal response to isoproterenol. The other derivatives were intermediate in potency with low maximal responses. 4. These agonists at the human beta3 receptor did not activate the rat beta3 receptor in the rat stomach fundus. In fact, the aryl propanolamines (10(-6) M) inhibited CL316243-induced activation of the rat beta3 receptor. Thus, agonist activity at the human beta3 receptor translated into antagonist activity at the rat beta3 receptor. 5. L739,574 and the phenol biaryl ether increased heart rate via beta1 receptors. 6. Although CGP12177 produced atrial tachycardia, neither the indole sulphonamide nor biphenyl biaryl ether did, although both had high affinity for the human beta3 receptor. Thus, the atrial tachycardic receptor was not identical to the human beta3 receptor. 7. These studies (a) characterized four aryl propanolamines with high affinity at the human beta3 receptor, (b) found that they were antagonists at the rat beta3 receptor, an observation with profound implications for in vivo rat data, and (c) established that the rodent atrial non-beta1, beta2 or beta3 tachycardic receptor was also unrelated to the human beta3 receptor.  (+info)

  • The findings of this study have important implications for the advancement of improved criteria for stratifying arrhythmia risk in post-infarction patients and for the development of new approaches for determining the ablation targets of infarct-related tachycardia. (elsevier.com)
  • Certain diseases can contribute to tachycardia, including hyperthyroidism and anemia, and tachycardia can be an accompanying symptom of fever in some illnesses. (reference.com)
  • This disorder has been called the postural tachycardia syndrome or POTS [ 1-3 ]. (uptodate.com)
  • Considering taking a vitamin or supplement to treat Postural+Tachycardia+Syndrome+(Pots)? (webmd.com)
  • Below is a list of common natural remedies used to treat or reduce the symptoms of Postural+Tachycardia+Syndrome+(Pots). (webmd.com)
  • Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a disabling condition that commonly affects otherwise normal young females. (nih.gov)
  • POT syndrome (POTS, postrual orthostatic tachycardia syndrome) is a nervous system disorder that causes lightheadedness and fainting when a person stands up. (medicinenet.com)
  • We report on a series of patients who developed autonomic dysfunction in the form of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). (nih.gov)
  • A new scientific paper from Prof Newton's group (published this year in the Journal of Internal Medicine ) describes postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), an aspect of autonomic dysfunctionthat can produce substantial disability among otherwise healthy people. (prohealth.com)
  • The current study aimed to investigate the association between vitamin B 12 levels and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) during adolescence when accelerated myelin synthesis increases the vitamin B 12 need. (aappublications.org)
  • Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is one of the most common forms of chronic orthostatic intolerance in the general population. (aappublications.org)
  • Patients with postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) have exaggerated orthostatic tachycardia often following a viral illness, suggesting autoimmunity may play a pathophysiological role in POTS. (prohealth.com)
  • POTS patients have elevated alpha1AR autoantibodies exerting a partial peripheral antagonist effect resulting in a compensatory sympathoneural activation of alpha1AR for vasoconstriction and concurrent betaAR-mediated tachycardia. (prohealth.com)
  • These findings may explain the increased standing plasma norepinephrine and excessive tachycardia observed in many POTS patients. (prohealth.com)
  • David C. Kem, MD, Autoimmune Basis for Postural Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS). (prohealth.com)
  • The presence of a paced rhythm exactly at the upper rate limit with atrial sensing and exact A-V association warrants evaluation for pacemaker-mediated tachycardia (PMT). (medscape.com)
  • Pacemaker-mediated tachycardia: manufacturer specifics and spectrum of cases. (medscape.com)
  • Tracking of atrial flutter during DDD pacing: another form of pacemaker-mediated tachycardia. (medscape.com)
  • Validation of device algorithm to differentiate pacemaker-mediated tachycardia from tachycardia due to atrial tracking. (medscape.com)
  • Accuracy of the pacemaker-mediated tachycardia algorithm in Boston Scientific devices. (medscape.com)
  • Telemetered ECG tracing with surface lead II (top) and intracardiac electrograms (atrial electrogram [center] and ventricular electrogram [lower]) and marker channel (bottom) showing pacemaker-mediated tachycardia (PMT). (medscape.com)
  • Telemetered ECG tracing showing atrioventricular (AV)-paced rhythm at 60/min after termination of the pacemaker-mediated tachycardia (PMT). (medscape.com)
  • Sometimes, the medical team may not be able to identify the exact cause of the tachycardia. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The aim of treatment is to address the cause of the tachycardia. (medicalnewstoday.com)