Dementia: An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.Dementia, Vascular: An imprecise term referring to dementia associated with CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS, including CEREBRAL INFARCTION (single or multiple), and conditions associated with chronic BRAIN ISCHEMIA. Diffuse, cortical, and subcortical subtypes have been described. (From Gerontol Geriatr 1998 Feb;31(1):36-44)Alzheimer Disease: A degenerative disease of the BRAIN characterized by the insidious onset of DEMENTIA. Impairment of MEMORY, judgment, attention span, and problem solving skills are followed by severe APRAXIAS and a global loss of cognitive abilities. The condition primarily occurs after age 60, and is marked pathologically by severe cortical atrophy and the triad of SENILE PLAQUES; NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLES; and NEUROPIL THREADS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1049-57)Dementia, Multi-Infarct: Loss of higher cortical functions with retained awareness due to multiple cortical or subcortical CEREBRAL INFARCTION. Memory, judgment, attention span, and impulse control are often impaired, and may be accompanied by PSEUDOBULBAR PALSY; HEMIPARESIS; reflex abnormalities, and other signs of localized neurologic dysfunction. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1060)Lewy Body Disease: A neurodegenerative disease characterized by dementia, mild parkinsonism, and fluctuations in attention and alertness. The neuropsychiatric manifestations tend to precede the onset of bradykinesia, MUSCLE RIGIDITY, and other extrapyramidal signs. DELUSIONS and visual HALLUCINATIONS are relatively frequent in this condition. Histologic examination reveals LEWY BODIES in the CEREBRAL CORTEX and BRAIN STEM. SENILE PLAQUES and other pathologic features characteristic of ALZHEIMER DISEASE may also be present. (From Neurology 1997;48:376-380; Neurology 1996;47:1113-1124)Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.AIDS Dementia Complex: A neurologic condition associated with the ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME and characterized by impaired concentration and memory, slowness of hand movements, ATAXIA, incontinence, apathy, and gait difficulties associated with HIV-1 viral infection of the central nervous system. Pathologic examination of the brain reveals white matter rarefaction, perivascular infiltrates of lymphocytes, foamy macrophages, and multinucleated giant cells. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp760-1; N Engl J Med, 1995 Apr 6;332(14):934-40)Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Behavioral Symptoms: Observable manifestations of impaired psychological functioning.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Atrophy: Decrease in the size of a cell, tissue, organ, or multiple organs, associated with a variety of pathological conditions such as abnormal cellular changes, ischemia, malnutrition, or hormonal changes.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Mild Cognitive Impairment: A prodromal phase of cognitive decline that may precede the emergence of ALZHEIMER DISEASE and other dementias. It may include impairment of cognition, such as impairments in language, visuospatial awareness, ATTENTION and MEMORY.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.Symptom Assessment: Evaluation of manifestations of disease.Parkinson Disease: A progressive, degenerative neurologic disease characterized by a TREMOR that is maximal at rest, retropulsion (i.e. a tendency to fall backwards), rigidity, stooped posture, slowness of voluntary movements, and a masklike facial expression. Pathologic features include loss of melanin containing neurons in the substantia nigra and other pigmented nuclei of the brainstem. LEWY BODIES are present in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus but may also be found in a related condition (LEWY BODY DISEASE, DIFFUSE) characterized by dementia in combination with varying degrees of parkinsonism. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1059, pp1067-75)Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Geriatric Assessment: Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or mental functioning in the older population group.Lewy Bodies: Intracytoplasmic, eosinophilic, round to elongated inclusions found in vacuoles of injured or fragmented neurons. The presence of Lewy bodies is the histological marker of the degenerative changes in LEWY BODY DISEASE and PARKINSON DISEASE but they may be seen in other neurological conditions. They are typically found in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus but they are also seen in the basal forebrain, hypothalamic nuclei, and neocortex.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Memory Disorders: Disturbances in registering an impression, in the retention of an acquired impression, or in the recall of an impression. Memory impairments are associated with DEMENTIA; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ENCEPHALITIS; ALCOHOLISM (see also ALCOHOL AMNESTIC DISORDER); SCHIZOPHRENIA; and other conditions.Psychomotor Agitation: A feeling of restlessness associated with increased motor activity. This may occur as a manifestation of nervous system drug toxicity or other conditions.tau Proteins: Microtubule-associated proteins that are mainly expressed in neurons. Tau proteins constitute several isoforms and play an important role in the assembly of tubulin monomers into microtubules and in maintaining the cytoskeleton and axonal transport. Aggregation of specific sets of tau proteins in filamentous inclusions is the common feature of intraneuronal and glial fibrillar lesions (NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLES; NEUROPIL THREADS) in numerous neurodegenerative disorders (ALZHEIMER DISEASE; TAUOPATHIES).Apolipoprotein E4: A major and the second most common isoform of apolipoprotein E. In humans, Apo E4 differs from APOLIPOPROTEIN E3 at only one residue 112 (cysteine is replaced by arginine), and exhibits a lower resistance to denaturation and greater propensity to form folded intermediates. Apo E4 is a risk factor for ALZHEIMER DISEASE and CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES.Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration: Heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by frontal and temporal lobe atrophy associated with neuronal loss, gliosis, and dementia. Patients exhibit progressive changes in social, behavioral, and/or language function. Multiple subtypes or forms are recognized based on presence or absence of TAU PROTEIN inclusions. FTLD includes three clinical syndromes: FRONTOTEMPORAL DEMENTIA, semantic dementia, and PRIMARY PROGRESSIVE NONFLUENT APHASIA.Neurofibrillary Tangles: Abnormal structures located in various parts of the brain and composed of dense arrays of paired helical filaments (neurofilaments and microtubules). These double helical stacks of transverse subunits are twisted into left-handed ribbon-like filaments that likely incorporate the following proteins: (1) the intermediate filaments: medium- and high-molecular-weight neurofilaments; (2) the microtubule-associated proteins map-2 and tau; (3) actin; and (4) UBIQUITINS. As one of the hallmarks of ALZHEIMER DISEASE, the neurofibrillary tangles eventually occupy the whole of the cytoplasm in certain classes of cell in the neocortex, hippocampus, brain stem, and diencephalon. The number of these tangles, as seen in post mortem histology, correlates with the degree of dementia during life. Some studies suggest that tangle antigens leak into the systemic circulation both in the course of normal aging and in cases of Alzheimer disease.Pick Disease of the Brain: A rare form of DEMENTIA that is sometimes familial. Clinical features include APHASIA; APRAXIA; CONFUSION; ANOMIA; memory loss; and personality deterioration. This pattern is consistent with the pathologic findings of circumscribed atrophy of the poles of the FRONTAL LOBE and TEMPORAL LOBE. Neuronal loss is maximal in the HIPPOCAMPUS, entorhinal cortex, and AMYGDALA. Some ballooned cortical neurons contain argentophylic (Pick) bodies. (From Brain Pathol 1998 Apr;8(2):339-54; Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1057-9)Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Homes for the Aged: Geriatric long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Cholinesterase Inhibitors: Drugs that inhibit cholinesterases. The neurotransmitter ACETYLCHOLINE is rapidly hydrolyzed, and thereby inactivated, by cholinesterases. When cholinesterases are inhibited, the action of endogenously released acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses is potentiated. Cholinesterase inhibitors are widely used clinically for their potentiation of cholinergic inputs to the gastrointestinal tract and urinary bladder, the eye, and skeletal muscles; they are also used for their effects on the heart and the central nervous system.Age of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.Hallucinations: Subjectively experienced sensations in the absence of an appropriate stimulus, but which are regarded by the individual as real. They may be of organic origin or associated with MENTAL DISORDERS.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Wandering Behavior: Moving oneself through space while confused or otherwise cognitively impaired. Patterns include akathisia, exhibiting neuroleptic-induced pacing and restlessness; exit seekers who are often newly admitted institution residents who try to open locked exit doors; self-stimulators who perform other activities such as turning doorknobs, in addition to continuous pacing; and modelers who shadow other pacers.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Temporal Lobe: Lower lateral part of the cerebral hemisphere responsible for auditory, olfactory, and semantic processing. It is located inferior to the lateral fissure and anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE.Institutionalization: The caring for individuals in institutions and their adaptation to routines characteristic of the institutional environment, and/or their loss of adaptation to life outside the institution.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Autopsy: Postmortem examination of the body.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Frontal Lobe: The part of the cerebral hemisphere anterior to the central sulcus, and anterior and superior to the lateral sulcus.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Nootropic Agents: Drugs used to specifically facilitate learning or memory, particularly to prevent the cognitive deficits associated with dementias. These drugs act by a variety of mechanisms. While no potent nootropic drugs have yet been accepted for general use, several are being actively investigated.Affective Symptoms: Mood or emotional responses dissonant with or inappropriate to the behavior and/or stimulus.Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale: A scale comprising 18 symptom constructs chosen to represent relatively independent dimensions of manifest psychopathology. The initial intended use was to provide more efficient assessment of treatment response in clinical psychopharmacology research; however, the scale was readily adapted to other uses. (From Hersen, M. and Bellack, A.S., Dictionary of Behavioral Assessment Techniques, p. 87)Plaque, Amyloid: Accumulations of extracellularly deposited AMYLOID FIBRILS within tissues.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Amyloid beta-Peptides: Peptides generated from AMYLOID BETA-PEPTIDES PRECURSOR. An amyloid fibrillar form of these peptides is the major component of amyloid plaques found in individuals with Alzheimer's disease and in aged individuals with trisomy 21 (DOWN SYNDROME). The peptide is found predominantly in the nervous system, but there have been reports of its presence in non-neural tissue.Residential Facilities: Long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.Delirium, Dementia, Amnestic, Cognitive Disorders: Cognitive disorders including delirium, dementia, and other cognitive disorders. These may be the result of substance use, trauma, or other causes.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Apathy: Lack of emotion or emotional expression; a disorder of motivation that persists over time.Neurodegenerative Diseases: Hereditary and sporadic conditions which are characterized by progressive nervous system dysfunction. These disorders are often associated with atrophy of the affected central or peripheral nervous system structures.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Psychological Tests: Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.Mental Competency: The ability to understand the nature and effect of the act in which the individual is engaged. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 6th ed).Aphasia, Primary Progressive: A progressive form of dementia characterized by the global loss of language abilities and initial preservation of other cognitive functions. Fluent and nonfluent subtypes have been described. Eventually a pattern of global cognitive dysfunction, similar to ALZHEIMER DISEASE, emerges. Pathologically, there are no Alzheimer or PICK DISEASE like changes, however, spongiform changes of cortical layers II and III are present in the TEMPORAL LOBE and FRONTAL LOBE. (From Brain 1998 Jan;121(Pt 1):115-26)Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.United StatesCerebrovascular Disorders: A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Antipsychotic Agents: Agents that control agitated psychotic behavior, alleviate acute psychotic states, reduce psychotic symptoms, and exert a quieting effect. They are used in SCHIZOPHRENIA; senile dementia; transient psychosis following surgery; or MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; etc. These drugs are often referred to as neuroleptics alluding to the tendency to produce neurological side effects, but not all antipsychotics are likely to produce such effects. Many of these drugs may also be effective against nausea, emesis, and pruritus.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Psychotic Disorders: Disorders in which there is a loss of ego boundaries or a gross impairment in reality testing with delusions or prominent hallucinations. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Supranuclear Palsy, Progressive: A degenerative disease of the central nervous system characterized by balance difficulties; OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS (supranuclear ophthalmoplegia); DYSARTHRIA; swallowing difficulties; and axial DYSTONIA. Onset is usually in the fifth decade and disease progression occurs over several years. Pathologic findings include neurofibrillary degeneration and neuronal loss in the dorsal MESENCEPHALON; SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS; RED NUCLEUS; pallidum; dentate nucleus; and vestibular nuclei. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1076-7)Behavior: The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.Early Diagnosis: Methods to determine in patients the nature of a disease or disorder at its early stage of progression. Generally, early diagnosis improves PROGNOSIS and TREATMENT OUTCOME.Geriatric Nursing: Nursing care of the aged patient given in the home, the hospital, or special institutions such as nursing homes, psychiatric institutions, etc.Cerebral Cortex: The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.Memory: Complex mental function having four distinct phases: (1) memorizing or learning, (2) retention, (3) recall, and (4) recognition. Clinically, it is usually subdivided into immediate, recent, and remote memory.Delusions: A false belief regarding the self or persons or objects outside the self that persists despite the facts, and is not considered tenable by one's associates.Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)Delirium: A disorder characterized by CONFUSION; inattentiveness; disorientation; ILLUSIONS; HALLUCINATIONS; agitation; and in some instances autonomic nervous system overactivity. It may result from toxic/metabolic conditions or structural brain lesions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp411-2)Aphasia: A cognitive disorder marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or express language in its written or spoken form. This condition is caused by diseases which affect the language areas of the dominant hemisphere. Clinical features are used to classify the various subtypes of this condition. General categories include receptive, expressive, and mixed forms of aphasia.Beneficence: The state or quality of being kind, charitable, or beneficial. (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). The ethical principle of BENEFICENCE requires producing net benefit over harm. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Schizophrenia: A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.Fatigue: The state of weariness following a period of exertion, mental or physical, characterized by a decreased capacity for work and reduced efficiency to respond to stimuli.Prodromal Symptoms: Clinical or physiological indicators that precede the onset of disease.Brain Diseases: Pathologic conditions affecting the BRAIN, which is composed of the intracranial components of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. This includes (but is not limited to) the CEREBRAL CORTEX; intracranial white matter; BASAL GANGLIA; THALAMUS; HYPOTHALAMUS; BRAIN STEM; and CEREBELLUM.IndianaMemantine: AMANTADINE derivative that has some dopaminergic effects. It has been proposed as an antiparkinson agent.Basal Ganglia Diseases: Diseases of the BASAL GANGLIA including the PUTAMEN; GLOBUS PALLIDUS; claustrum; AMYGDALA; and CAUDATE NUCLEUS. DYSKINESIAS (most notably involuntary movements and alterations of the rate of movement) represent the primary clinical manifestations of these disorders. Common etiologies include CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS; NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES; and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.Assisted Living Facilities: A housing and health care alternative combining independence with personal care. It provides a combination of housing, personalized supportive services and health care designed to meet the needs, both scheduled and unscheduled, of those who need help with activities of daily living. (www.alfa.org)Apolipoproteins E: A class of protein components which can be found in several lipoproteins including HIGH-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS; VERY-LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS; and CHYLOMICRONS. Synthesized in most organs, Apo E is important in the global transport of lipids and cholesterol throughout the body. Apo E is also a ligand for LDL receptors (RECEPTORS, LDL) that mediates the binding, internalization, and catabolism of lipoprotein particles in cells. There are several allelic isoforms (such as E2, E3, and E4). Deficiency or defects in Apo E are causes of HYPERLIPOPROTEINEMIA TYPE III.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Phenylcarbamates: Phenyl esters of carbamic acid or of N-substituted carbamic acids. Structures are similar to PHENYLUREA COMPOUNDS with a carbamate in place of the urea.DNA Repeat Expansion: An increase number of repeats of a genomic, tandemly repeated DNA sequence from one generation to the next.Executive Function: A set of cognitive functions that controls complex, goal-directed thought and behavior. Executive function involves multiple domains, such as CONCEPT FORMATION, goal management, cognitive flexibility, INHIBITION control, and WORKING MEMORY. Impaired executive function is seen in a range of disorders, e.g., SCHIZOPHRENIA; and ADHD.Neurologic Examination: Assessment of sensory and motor responses and reflexes that is used to determine impairment of the nervous system.alpha-Synuclein: A synuclein that is a major component of LEWY BODIES that plays a role in neurodegeneration and neuroprotection.SwedenLanguage Disorders: Conditions characterized by deficiencies of comprehension or expression of written and spoken forms of language. These include acquired and developmental disorders.Long-Term Care: Care over an extended period, usually for a chronic condition or disability, requiring periodic, intermittent, or continuous care.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Tauopathies: Neurodegenerative disorders involving deposition of abnormal tau protein isoforms (TAU PROTEINS) in neurons and glial cells in the brain. Pathological aggregations of tau proteins are associated with mutation of the tau gene on chromosome 17 in patients with ALZHEIMER DISEASE; DEMENTIA; PARKINSONIAN DISORDERS; progressive supranuclear palsy (SUPRANUCLEAR PALSY, PROGRESSIVE); and corticobasal degeneration.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.
doi:10.1111/j.1479-8301.2011.00366.x. "Posterior Cortical Atrophy , Signs, Symptoms, & Diagnosis". Dementia. Retrieved 2016-07- ... This is partially due to the gradual onset of PCA symptoms, the variety of symptoms, the rare nature of the disease and younger ... Additional symptoms include apraxia, a disorder of movement planning, alexia, an impaired ability to read, and visual agnosia, ... In rare cases, PCA can be caused by dementia with Lewy bodies and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. PCA usually affects people at an ...
progressive symptoms as described in the acronym. *dementia. *Myoneurogenic gastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE) * ... a rapid decline in function occurs and is marked by seizures, altered states of consciousness, dementia, ventilatory failure ... A subclass of these diseases that have neuromuscular symptoms are sometimes called mitochondrial myopathies. ... symptoms, and signs associated with the particular mutations that tend to cause them.[citation needed] ...
Symptoms can emerge any time after the age of 30; early symptoms include trouble controlling urination, trouble walking, and ... People eventually develop dementia. A person inherits loss-of-function mutations in the GBE1 gene from each parent, and the ... As of 2015 there was no cure or treatment, but the symptoms could be managed. People diagnosed with APBD can live a long time ... Along with evaluation of the symptoms and a neurological examination, a diagnosis can be made based on genetic testing. Whether ...
Symptoms and signs[edit]. This patient presented with progressive dementia, ataxia and incontinence. A clinical diagnosis of ... Later symptoms and signs are dementia (typically including loss of inhibition and ability to organize information), slurring of ... Other common early symptoms are changes in personality, general slowing of movement, and visual symptoms. ... The condition leads to symptoms including loss of balance, slowing of movement, difficulty moving the eyes, and dementia.[1] ...
Mental abilities generally decline into dementia. The specific symptoms vary somewhat between people. Symptoms usually begin ... The physical symptoms are usually the first to be noticed, as cognitive and behavioral symptoms are generally not severe enough ... Cognitive or behavioral symptoms are rarely the first symptoms diagnosed; they are usually only recognized in hindsight or when ... Sleep disturbances are also associated symptoms. Juvenile HD differs from these symptoms in that it generally progresses faster ...
HIV encephalopathy develop dementia (F02.4, B22.0†). There are many types of encephalopathy. Some examples include: ... Treating the underlying cause of the disorder may improve or reverse symptoms. However, in some cases, the encephalopathy may ... These permanent deficits can be considered a form of stable dementia. Some encephalopathies can be fatal. Brain damage ... Encephalopathies exhibits both neurologic and psychopathologic symptoms. Wernicke encephalopathy (alcoholic encephalopathy) ...
"Apathy in Dementia Methylphenidate Trial 2 (ADMET2)". Retrieved 26 February 2017. "Apathy: Anxiety's Unusual Symptom « Calm ... dementia (and dementias such as Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, and frontotemporal dementia), Korsakoff's syndrome, ... Methylphenidate has been the most widely studied drug for the treatment of apathy in dementia. Management of apathetic symptoms ... Cholinesterase inhibitors, used as the first line of treatment for the cognitive symptoms associated with dementia, have also ...
... is an autosomal recessive disorder of juvenile onset also known as Parkinson disease-9 (PARK9). Symptoms ... and dementia". Mov. Disord. 20 (10): 1264-71. doi:10.1002/mds.20511. PMID 15986421. ... include supranuclear gaze palsy, spasticity, and dementia. It can be associated with ATP13A2. It is named after Kufr Rakeb in ...
Hampton began showing symptoms of dementia in 2000. He died on July 4, 2010, at the Deer Hill Care Home in Lafayette, ...
... s are sometimes prescribed to treat behavioral symptoms of dementia. However, like antidepressants, they have ... Rebound symptoms are the return of the symptoms for which the patient was treated but worse than before. Withdrawal symptoms ... "Assessment and treatment of nursing home residents with depression or behavioral symptoms associated with dementia: a review of ... "Psychotropic medication use for behavioral symptoms of dementia". Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports. 6 (6): 490-5. doi ...
Other symptoms are headaches, dementia, and vision impairment. Characteristics of Parkinson's Disease are also similar to ... Neuropsychiatric symptoms, which may be the first or the most prominent manifestations, range from mild difficulty with ... Symptoms of this disease include deterioration of motor functions and speech, seizures, and other involuntary movement. ... Benke T, Karner E, Seppi K, Delazer M, Marksteiner J, Donnemiller E (August 2004). "Subacute dementia and imaging correlates in ...
This impairs blood sugar regulation and leads to the signs and symptoms of diabetes. Iron accumulation in the tissues and ... Some develop psychiatric problems and midlife dementia. The type of neurological disruption corresponds to associated regions ... To prevent the progression of symptoms of the disease, annual glucose tolerance tests beginning in early teen years to evaluate ... Repetitive use of FFP can even improve neurologic symptoms. Antioxidants such as vitamin E can be used simultaneously to ...
Early symptoms include memory problems, behavioral changes, poor coordination, and visual disturbances. Later dementia, ... The first symptom of CJD is usually rapidly progressive dementia, leading to memory loss, personality changes, and ... The symptoms of CJD are caused by the progressive death of the brain's nerve cells, which is associated with the build-up of ... Some of the symptoms like twitching can be managed but otherwise treatment is palliative care. The condition is fatal. Cases ...
Initial symptoms[edit]. The start of ALS may be so subtle that the symptoms are overlooked.[4] The earliest symptoms of ALS are ... With the discovery that TDP-43, FUS, and C9orf72 can cause ALS as well as related forms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD/ALS)[ ... meaning that symptoms start in a single spinal cord region, and progressive continuous spread, meaning that symptoms spread to ... as it had the typical symptoms of ALS accompanied by parkinsonism-like symptoms; the name in the local language is lytico-bodig ...
This constellation of symptoms is called carcinoid syndrome or (if acute) carcinoid crisis. Occasionally, haemorrhage or the ... Niacin deficiency, also known as pellagra, is associated with dermatitis, dementia, and diarrhea. ... Signs and symptoms[edit]. While most carcinoids are asymptomatic through the natural lifetime and are discovered only upon ... and which can lead to symptoms of cutaneous flushing, diarrhea, bronchoconstriction, and right-sided cardiac valve disease. It ...
Parkinson's disease is linked with Lewy body dementia for their similar hallucinatory symptoms. The symptoms strike during the ... Symptoms and signs: cognition, perception, emotional state and behaviour (R40-R46, 780.0-780.5, 781.1) ... Antipsychotic and atypical antipsychotic medication may also be utilized to treat the illness if the symptoms are severe and ... In all cases of hallucinations, medical attention should be sought out and informed of one's specific symptoms. ...
The classic symptom triad (gait disturbance, urinary incontinence, and dementia) was first described by Hakim and Adams in 1965 ... Its typical symptoms are urinary incontinence, dementia, and gait disturbance. CSF pressure is usually normal. Ventricles are ... Dementia is predominantly frontal lobe in nature and of the subcortical type of dementia. It presents in the form of abulia, ... The dementia is thought to result from traction on frontal and limbic fibers that also run in the periventricular region. ...
The physical symptoms are similar, but are accompanied with dementia. She is survived by her husband of 47 years, George and ...
About 40% of patients have a family history of dementia. Diagnosis is difficult. MRI, EEG, and tests for 14-3-3 protein and tau ... Patients present with psychiatric symptoms, speech deficits (aphasia and/or dysarthria), and cognitive impairment. Ataxia and ...
Neurological symptoms include ataxia, seizures, dementia, and difficulties with speech. Onset of adult GM1 is between ages 3 ... Symptoms include muscle atrophy, neurological complications that are less severe and progress at a slower rate than in other ... Symptoms of early infantile GM1 (the most severe subtype, with onset shortly after birth) may include neurodegeneration, ...
The prevalence of dementia increases with age and, to a lesser degree, duration of the disease. Dementia is associated with a ... In addition to motor symptoms, PD is accompanied by a diverse range of symptoms. A number of drugs have been used to treat some ... Some of these non-motor symptoms may be present at the time of diagnosis. Four motor symptoms are considered cardinal in PD: ... Other symptoms include sensory, sleep, and emotional problems. The main motor symptoms are collectively called "parkinsonism", ...
... neurological symptoms. The common reported psychological symptoms include: loss of memory and concentration emotional liability ... However, this is found to be difficult as many psychiatric disorders, like dementia, have common diagnosis. Diagnosing POS is ... Acute onset can be diagnosed when a large amount of psychological symptoms surface. The final stage of the disorder is made up ... "The main symptoms of psycho-organic syndrome". medical-notes-help.com. Retrieved 2015-11-02. "PEOI General psychopathology". ...
Other symptoms such as double vision can occur.[20] Not all patients experience all of these symptoms. ... A variant with combined features of MSA and Lewy body dementia may also exist.[unreliable medical source?][15] There have also ... with those affected first showing symptoms at the age of 50-60 years. [4] MSA often presents with some of the same symptoms as ... Signs and symptoms[edit]. MSA is characterized by the following, which can be present in any combination:[13][14] ...
Dementia is a variety of symptoms that apply to a decline in mental ability, not a specific disease. Geriatric psychologists ... Alzheimer's disease is the most common type of dementia, accounting for 60-80 percent of dementia cases. Similar to dementia, a ... "Dementia - Signs, Symptoms, Causes, Tests, Treatment, Care , alz.org". www.alz.org. Retrieved 2016-12-12. "Alzheimer's Disease ... Dementia , Alzheimer's Association". www.alz.org. Retrieved 2016-12-12. "Vascular Dementia , Signs, Symptoms, & Diagnosis". www ...
The most noticeable symptoms of this progressive disease are cognitive and motor impairments, as well as behavioral alterations ... These impairments can develop into dementia, chorea, and eventually death. At the molecular level, HD results from a mutation ... Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder, with symptoms emerging during an individual's mid- ...
Symptoms may also include increased hunger, feeling tired, and sores that do not heal.[3] Often symptoms come on slowly.[6] ... risk of cognitive dysfunction and dementia through disease processes such as Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.[26] ... Other symptoms may include loss of taste.[24] Many people, however, have no symptoms during the first few years and are ... Symptoms. Increased thirst, frequent urination, unexplained weight loss, increased hunger[3]. Complications. Hyperosmolar ...
Symptoms of primary progressive aphasia begin gradually, usually before the age of 65, and tend to worsen over time. Symptoms ... Primary progressive aphasia is a type of frontotemporal dementia, a cluster of related disorders that all originate in the ... In some cases, symptoms may vary depending on the speaking situation. For example, a person may need to pause frequently to ... But because these tests depend primarily on language skills, their usefulness declines as the symptoms of primary progressive ...
Symptoms include changes in behavior and personality and a decline in thinking and coordination. It is thought to happen as ... Frontotemporal dementia is a type of dementia that tends to start at a younger age than other types. ... Symptoms. Issues with planning and prioritizing alongside other behaviors may be a symptom of frontotemporal dementia. ... Dementia affects everyday activities and gets progressively worse. Symptoms of dementia include memory loss and difficulties ...
While the risk increases with age, dementia is not a normal part of aging. Learn about early signs, diagnosis, and treatment ... but a term that describes symptoms of impairment in memory, communication, and thinking. It is a feature of several common ... Dementia symptoms include memory loss, disorientation, and mood changes.. A person with dementia may show any of the symptoms ... Dementia is a collective term used to describe various symptoms of cognitive decline, such as forgetfulness. It is a symptom of ...
... learn about LBD symptoms, diagnosis, causes and treatments and how this disorder relates to Alzheimers and other dementias. ... Dementia symptoms consistent with Lewy body dementia develop first.. *When both dementia symptoms and movement symptoms are ... About Lewy body dementia. Most experts estimate that Lewy body dementia is the third most common cause of dementia after ... Movement symptoms are more likely to be an important cause of disability early in Lewy body dementia than in Alzheimers, ...
... learn about symptoms, diagnosis, causes, risks and treatments and key differences between FTD and Alzheimers. ... About frontotemporal dementia. The nerve cell damage caused by frontotemporal dementia leads to loss of function in these brain ... Other pages in Types of Dementia. * Types of Dementia * Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease ... Frontotemporal dementia used to be called Picks disease after Arnold Pick, M.D., a physician who in 1892 first described a ...
Lewy body dementia is the second most common cause of dementia after Alzheimers disease. Common symptoms of LBD include ... symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, heredity, life expectancy, stages, and prognosis. ... Lewy Body Dementia - Symptoms What symptoms have you or someone you know experienced with Lewy body dementia? ... Dementia Slideshow. What is dementia? Learn about dementia disorders such as Lewy Body Dementia, Alzheimers disease (AD), ...
Dementia is the name given to a group of neurological disorders that progressively deteriorate the ability of the brain to ... See the latest posts about Dementia Symptoms & Diagnosis in womens health ... The Latest in Dementia Symptoms & Diagnosis. * Are Dementia and Alzheimers Disease the Same? By Ann-Noreen Bird Blogger ... Symptoms. They often begin mildly and progress over time. Symptoms vary according to the cause of the dementia, but often ...
... symptoms of dementia in the most severe stage include not being able to perform activities needed for everyday living, such as ... This Dementia: Symptoms and Risks page on EmpowHER Womens Health works best with javascript enabled in your browser.. Toggle ... For example, symptoms of dementia in the most severe stage include not being able to perform activities needed for everyday ... The first stage of dementia is really not dementia. Rather, mild cognitive impairment is between what are normal memory ...
Understand the association between serious mental decline and normal aging and why senility and senile dementia arent ... learn about dementia and how it relates to Alzheimers and memory loss. ... Dementia symptoms, signs, causes, tests, diagnosis, stages, treatment and care - ... Learn more: Common Types of Dementia, What is Alzheimers?. Memory loss and other symptoms of dementia. Many people have memory ...
... middle and late stages and severity of dementia symptoms associated with the progression of Alzheimers disease. ... Dementia is a general term to describe the symptoms of mental decline that accompany Alzheimers and other brain diseases.). ... In the final stage of the disease, dementia symptoms are severe. Individuals lose the ability to respond to their environment, ... During the middle stage of Alzheimers, the dementia symptoms are more pronounced. the person may confuse words, get frustrated ...
Learn more about this stroke-related type of dementia that causes memory loss and reasoning problems. Prevention is possible, ... Symptoms. Vascular dementia symptoms vary, depending on the part of your brain where blood flow is impaired. Symptoms often ... Vascular dementia symptoms may be most clear-cut when they occur suddenly following a stroke. When changes in your thinking and ... Sometimes a characteristic pattern of vascular dementia symptoms follows a series of strokes or ministrokes. Changes in your ...
These drugs are now used internationally for two types of dementia that previously had no effective treatment. ... Researchers at Newcastle University realised that a type of drug used for one type of dementia might have benefits for others. ... Dealing with the psychiatric symptoms of dementia. University. Newcastle. Type of research. Clinical. Topic. Dementia. ... There are a number of types of dementia which originate in different ways and have a variety of symptoms. Dementia with Lewy ...
... many of them can also stimulate the brain and treat the Symptoms of dementia and... ... Symptoms of dementia will be different in different people and there can be different causes behind the occurrence of the ... A person suffering with symptoms of dementia can also have a complete loss of memory. He may also have sleeping habits even in ... A patient with dementia will have a very poor judgment and he may have some of the behavioral disorders like suspiciousness and ...
Lewy body dementia is the second most common cause of dementia after Alzheimers disease. Common symptoms of LBD include ... symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, heredity, life expectancy, stages, and prognosis. ... Lewy Body Dementia (Dementia with Lewy Bodies). Lewy body dementia facts*. *Lewy body dementia (LBD) facts Medically Edited by ... home/ neurology center/neurology a-z list/lewy body dementia (dementia with lewy bodies) index/lewy body dementia (dementia ...
Depressive symptoms that are present in midlife or in late life are associated with an increased risk of developing dementia, ... and risks of developing dementia, Alzheimer disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD; dementia resulting from brain damage from ... Depressive symptoms were present in 14.1 percent of study participants in midlife only, 9.2 percent in late life only and 4.2 ... When examining AD and VaD separately, patients with late-life depressive symptoms had a two-fold increase in AD risk, and ...
... common symptoms, types of dementia, whos at risk, reducing risks and what to do if you think you have dementia ... What are the symptoms of dementia?. Dementia is a term used to describe a collection of symptoms that occur when certain ... What are the main types of dementia?. Dementia isnt a disease in itself, its a term used to describe symptoms caused by other ... As we get older, many of us experience symptoms like these from time to time. Dementia-like symptoms can be caused by ...
To control dementia, invasive techniques can be used. Signs are inability to remember simple things such as names and things. ... The basic symptoms of age related dementia are also consistent with those of patients who suffer from Alzheimers Disease. It ... Dementia is a fairly common problem that comes with advanced age. But there is a fine line between age related dementia and the ... Loss of the fluency of language is another sign of dementia. Patients may not be able to remember clearly how to express ...
Dementia is when someone exhibits several different symptoms of dementia that involves changes in their brains functions and ... ability and is severe enough to cause problems in coping with daily life and that need treatment of dementia in order to ... Symptoms and treatment of Dementia. Dementia is when someone exhibits several different symptoms of dementia that involves ... All in all, symptoms of dementia need to be taken seriously so treatment for dementia can be started if it is deemed able to ...
Find the most comprehensive real-world symptom and treatment data on vascular dementia at PatientsLikeMe. 56 patients with ... and insomnia and use Hydrocodone-Acetaminophen and Pregabalin to treat their vascular dementia and its symptoms. ... vascular dementia experience fatigue, depressed mood, pain, anxious mood, ... What is vascular dementia?. Vascular dementia is the chronic reduced blood flow to the brain;usually as the result of a stroke ...
NEWS:DRUGS FOR ELDERLY CAUSE SYMPTOMS OF DEMENTIA. What Doctors Dont Tell You1 min read ... Collectively, these symptoms are known as anticholinergic effects and can include confusion, memory loss and impaired vision as ... found that some of the most common prescription and over the counter drugs could produce symptoms similar to those of dementia ... Tagged aselderly patientsold age symptomsOTC drugsside effectsWhat Doctors Dont Tell You ...
Vascular dementia is the second most common type of dementia - so what are the early signs to look out for? ... symptoms can affect people differently as it depends on which part of the brain has been damaged and what type of dementia a ... Dementia symptoms: Seven early signs of vascular dementia to watch out for. DEMENTIA symptoms can affect people differently as ... Dementia warning: Study reveals this spicy diet may increase your risk. * Dementia symptoms: Early signs of Alzheimers disease ...
Dementia is not a single disease. Its a non-specific syndrome that affects cognitive areas of the brain that control memory, ... Dementia symptoms can include changes in personality, mood and behavior. While some cases, such as dementia caused by ... Vascular dementia. Vascular dementia is caused by impaired blood flow to the brain. Although it can be caused by strokes, not ... Lewy body dementia (LBD). Lewy body dementia causes a progressive decline in mental abilities. In LBD, protein deposits, called ...
Learn the symptoms to watch out for in yourself and your older loved ones. ... Alzheimers and dementia onset typically occurs in the elderly, but it can happen to middle-aged people as well. ... Symptoms. Alzheimers and dementia onset typically occurs in the elderly, but it can happen to middle-aged people as well. ... What should be done if a stranger seems to be exhibiting dementia symptoms and is alone? By RVarney ...
For more information about dementia or to schedule an appointment, call (206) 341-1900. ... Dementia is a loss of brain function that occurs with certain diseases. ... Treatment of Dementia. The goal of treatment is to control the symptoms of dementia, which vary from patient to patient ... Though individual symptoms of dementia vary greatly depending on the cause, some common signs and symptoms include:. *Memory ...
... there are still gaps in knowledge about what causes or precipitates these symptoms, according to researchers. ... Behavioral and psychological symptoms are difficult for dementia patients and their caregivers, but despite research efforts, ... Dementia -- which affects 47.5 million people worldwide -- is almost always accompanied by BPSD. These symptoms, which include ... Researchers find gaps in knowledge about causes of symptoms in dementia patients. *Download PDF Copy ...
  • By following people over 65 with and without hearing problems for up to 25 years, researchers found that those with hearing problems were more likely to develop dementia. (express.co.uk)
  • Imagine if doctors could determine, many years in advance, who is likely to develop dementia. (healthcanal.com)
  • In some cases of dementia, it may be reversible or improved once the underlying cause has been treated. (canada.com)
  • Depressive symptoms that are present in midlife or in late life are associated with an increased risk of developing dementia, according to a report in the May issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, a JAMA Network publication. (redorbit.com)
  • Depressive symptoms were present in 14.1 percent of study participants in midlife only, 9.2 percent in late life only and 4.2 percent in both. (redorbit.com)
  • "These results indicate that DHA-rich and EPA-rich fish oils may be effective for depressive symptoms and health parameters, exerting variable effects on cognitive and physical outcomes," ​ wrote the researchers. (nutraingredients.com)
  • Our study confirms the presence of depressive symptoms in a large number of caregivers with high burden. (dovepress.com)
  • Nevertheless, this study demonstrates that depressive symptoms are mainly associated with sociodemographic variables and, to a lesser degree, physical and developmental burdens. (dovepress.com)
  • Eight percent of postmenopausal women in this sample reported depressive symptoms above a 0.06 cut point on the Burnam algorithm. (nih.gov)
  • Depressive disorder at baseline was associated with greater risk of incident MCI (hazard ratio (HR)=1.98, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.33-2.94), probable dementia (HR=2.03, 95% CI=1.15-3.60), and MCI or probable dementia (HR=1.92, 95% CI=1.35-2.73) after controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle and vascular risk factors, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, antidepressant use, and current and past hormone therapy status. (nih.gov)
  • Clinically significant depressive symptoms in women aged 65 and older are independently associated with greater incidence of MCI and probable dementia. (nih.gov)
  • Whether or not dementia is developed depends on the location in your brain where the stroke occurs as well as the severity of the stroke. (healthcentral.com)
  • In particular, it is difficult to discern much about the patient population studied due to a lack of reporting detail about patient characteristics, including age, sex, severity of dementia, co-morbidities, concomitant medications, and setting (i.e., community versus long-term care). (cadth.ca)
  • If the person has had mini strokes, often called TIAs, small areas of brain damage can eventually cause noticeable symptoms such as slowed thinking and forgetfulness, mood changes, hallucinations, confusion and a lack of social skills. (brighthub.com)
  • All in all, symptoms of dementia need to be taken seriously so treatment for dementia can be started if it is deemed able to help the patient. (infobarrel.com)
  • Generalized treatment for dementia involves medical care and day-to-day care by family members. (emedicinehealth.com)