Hernia, Inguinal: An abdominal hernia with an external bulge in the GROIN region. It can be classified by the location of herniation. Indirect inguinal hernias occur through the internal inguinal ring. Direct inguinal hernias occur through defects in the ABDOMINAL WALL (transversalis fascia) in Hesselbach's triangle. The former type is commonly seen in children and young adults; the latter in adults.Hernia: Protrusion of tissue, structure, or part of an organ through the bone, muscular tissue, or the membrane by which it is normally contained. Hernia may involve tissues such as the ABDOMINAL WALL or the respiratory DIAPHRAGM. Hernias may be internal, external, congenital, or acquired.Hernia, Diaphragmatic: Protrusion of abdominal structures into the THORAX as a result of congenital or traumatic defects in the respiratory DIAPHRAGM.Hernia, Ventral: A hernia caused by weakness of the anterior ABDOMINAL WALL due to midline defects, previous incisions, or increased intra-abdominal pressure. Ventral hernias include UMBILICAL HERNIA, incisional, epigastric, and spigelian hernias.Hernia, Abdominal: A protrusion of abdominal structures through the retaining ABDOMINAL WALL. It involves two parts: an opening in the abdominal wall, and a hernia sac consisting of PERITONEUM and abdominal contents. Abdominal hernias include groin hernia (HERNIA, FEMORAL; HERNIA, INGUINAL) and VENTRAL HERNIA.Hernia, Hiatal: STOMACH herniation located at or near the diaphragmatic opening for the ESOPHAGUS, the esophageal hiatus.Hernia, Femoral: A groin hernia occurring inferior to the inguinal ligament and medial to the FEMORAL VEIN and FEMORAL ARTERY. The femoral hernia sac has a small neck but may enlarge considerably when it enters the subcutaneous tissue of the thigh. It is caused by defects in the ABDOMINAL WALL.Hernia, Umbilical: A HERNIA due to an imperfect closure or weakness of the umbilical ring. It appears as a skin-covered protrusion at the UMBILICUS during crying, coughing, or straining. The hernia generally consists of OMENTUM or SMALL INTESTINE. The vast majority of umbilical hernias are congenital but can be acquired due to severe abdominal distention.Herniorrhaphy: Surgical procedures undertaken to repair abnormal openings through which tissue or parts of organs can protrude or are already protruding.Surgical Mesh: Any woven or knit material of open texture used in surgery for the repair, reconstruction, or substitution of tissue. The mesh is usually a synthetic fabric made of various polymers. It is occasionally made of metal.Hernia, Diaphragmatic, Traumatic: The type of DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA caused by TRAUMA or injury, usually to the ABDOMEN.Hernia, Obturator: A pelvic hernia through the obturator foramen, a large aperture in the hip bone normally covered by a membrane. Obturator hernia can lead to intestinal incarceration and INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION.Polypropylenes: Propylene or propene polymers. Thermoplastics that can be extruded into fibers, films or solid forms. They are used as a copolymer in plastics, especially polyethylene. The fibers are used for fabrics, filters and surgical sutures.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Abdominal Wall: The outer margins of the ABDOMEN, extending from the osteocartilaginous thoracic cage to the PELVIS. Though its major part is muscular, the abdominal wall consists of at least seven layers: the SKIN, subcutaneous fat, deep FASCIA; ABDOMINAL MUSCLES, transversalis fascia, extraperitoneal fat, and the parietal PERITONEUM.Fascia: Layers of connective tissue of variable thickness. The superficial fascia is found immediately below the skin; the deep fascia invests MUSCLES, nerves, and other organs.Intestinal Obstruction: Any impairment, arrest, or reversal of the normal flow of INTESTINAL CONTENTS toward the ANAL CANAL.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Sutures: Materials used in closing a surgical or traumatic wound. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Laparotomy: Incision into the side of the abdomen between the ribs and pelvis.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Groin: The external junctural region between the lower part of the abdomen and the thigh.Surgical Stomas: Artificial openings created by a surgeon for therapeutic reasons. Most often this refers to openings from the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT through the ABDOMINAL WALL to the outside of the body. It can also refer to the two ends of a surgical anastomosis.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Symptom Assessment: Evaluation of manifestations of disease.Gastroesophageal Reflux: Retrograde flow of gastric juice (GASTRIC ACID) and/or duodenal contents (BILE ACIDS; PANCREATIC JUICE) into the distal ESOPHAGUS, commonly due to incompetence of the LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Anesthesia, Local: A blocking of nerve conduction to a specific area by an injection of an anesthetic agent.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Ambulatory Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on an outpatient basis. It may be hospital-based or performed in an office or surgicenter.Rectus Abdominis: A long flat muscle that extends along the whole length of both sides of the abdomen. It flexes the vertebral column, particularly the lumbar portion; it also tenses the anterior abdominal wall and assists in compressing the abdominal contents. It is frequently the site of hematomas. In reconstructive surgery it is often used for the creation of myocutaneous flaps. (From Gray's Anatomy, 30th American ed, p491)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Fundoplication: Mobilization of the lower end of the esophagus and plication of the fundus of the stomach around it (fundic wrapping) in the treatment of GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX that may be associated with various disorders, such as hiatal hernia. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Round Ligament: A fibromuscular band that attaches to the UTERUS and then passes along the BROAD LIGAMENT, out through the INGUINAL RING, and into the labium majus.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Phenyl Ethers: Ethers that are linked to a benzene ring structure.Behavioral Symptoms: Observable manifestations of impaired psychological functioning.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Surgical Wound Dehiscence: Pathologic process consisting of a partial or complete disruption of the layers of a surgical wound.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Testicular Hydrocele: Accumulation of serous fluid between the layers of membrane (tunica vaginalis) covering the TESTIS in the SCROTUM.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Laparoscopes: ENDOSCOPES for examining the abdominal and pelvic organs in the peritoneal cavity.Fetal Diseases: Pathophysiological conditions of the FETUS in the UTERUS. Some fetal diseases may be treated with FETAL THERAPIES.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Colostomy: The surgical construction of an opening between the colon and the surface of the body.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Tissue Adhesions: Pathological processes consisting of the union of the opposing surfaces of a wound.Inguinal Canal: The tunnel in the lower anterior ABDOMINAL WALL through which the SPERMATIC CORD, in the male; ROUND LIGAMENT, in the female; nerves; and vessels pass. Its internal end is at the deep inguinal ring and its external end is at the superficial inguinal ring.Affective Symptoms: Mood or emotional responses dissonant with or inappropriate to the behavior and/or stimulus.Appendectomy: Surgical removal of the vermiform appendix. (Dorland, 28th ed)Diaphragmatic Eventration: A congenital abnormality characterized by the elevation of the DIAPHRAGM dome. It is the result of a thinned diaphragmatic muscle and injured PHRENIC NERVE, allowing the intra-abdominal viscera to push the diaphragm upward against the LUNG.Scrotum: A cutaneous pouch of skin containing the testicles and spermatic cords.Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Surgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Esophagitis: INFLAMMATION, acute or chronic, of the ESOPHAGUS caused by BACTERIA, chemicals, or TRAUMA.Cecal Diseases: Pathological developments in the CECUM.Peritoneal Diseases: Pathological processes involving the PERITONEUM.Orchiopexy: A surgical procedure in which an undescended testicle is sutured inside the SCROTUM in male infants or children to correct CRYPTORCHIDISM. Orchiopexy is also performed to treat TESTICULAR TORSION in adults and adolescents.Spermatic Cord: Either of a pair of tubular structures formed by DUCTUS DEFERENS; ARTERIES; VEINS; LYMPHATIC VESSELS; and nerves. The spermatic cord extends from the deep inguinal ring through the INGUINAL CANAL to the TESTIS in the SCROTUM.Polytetrafluoroethylene: Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.Esophagus: The muscular membranous segment between the PHARYNX and the STOMACH in the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Surgical Stapling: A technique of closing incisions and wounds, or of joining and connecting tissues, in which staples are used as sutures.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Manometry: Measurement of the pressure or tension of liquids or gases with a manometer.Esophagitis, Peptic: INFLAMMATION of the ESOPHAGUS that is caused by the reflux of GASTRIC JUICE with contents of the STOMACH and DUODENUM.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Gastropexy: Surgical fixation of the stomach to the abdominal wall.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Cough: A sudden, audible expulsion of air from the lungs through a partially closed glottis, preceded by inhalation. It is a protective response that serves to clear the trachea, bronchi, and/or lungs of irritants and secretions, or to prevent aspiration of foreign materials into the lungs.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Diaphragm: The musculofibrous partition that separates the THORACIC CAVITY from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY. Contraction of the diaphragm increases the volume of the thoracic cavity aiding INHALATION.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Endoscopy, Digestive System: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the digestive tract.Abdominal Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving organs in the abdominal cavity.Respiration Disorders: Diseases of the respiratory system in general or unspecified or for a specific respiratory disease not available.Esophagogastric Junction: The area covering the terminal portion of ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of STOMACH at the cardiac orifice.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Abdomen: That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.Appendix: A worm-like blind tube extension from the CECUM.Fascia Lata: CONNECTIVE TISSUE of the anterior compartment of the THIGH that has its origins on the anterior aspect of the iliac crest and anterior superior iliac spine, and its insertion point on the iliotibial tract. It plays a role in medial rotation of the THIGH, steadying the trunk, and in KNEE extension.Fatigue: The state of weariness following a period of exertion, mental or physical, characterized by a decreased capacity for work and reduced efficiency to respond to stimuli.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Heartburn: Substernal pain or burning sensation, usually associated with regurgitation of gastric juice into the esophagus.Appendicitis: Acute inflammation of the APPENDIX. Acute appendicitis is classified as simple, gangrenous, or perforated.Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: Application of a life support system that circulates the blood through an oxygenating system, which may consist of a pump, a membrane oxygenator, and a heat exchanger. Examples of its use are to assist victims of smoke inhalation injury, respiratory failure, and cardiac failure.Broad Ligament: A broad fold of peritoneum that extends from the side of the uterus to the wall of the pelvis.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the gastrointestinal tract.Fetal Organ Maturity: Functional competence of specific organs or body systems of the FETUS in utero.Gastrointestinal Diseases: Diseases in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Surgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Peritoneum: A membrane of squamous EPITHELIAL CELLS, the mesothelial cells, covered by apical MICROVILLI that allow rapid absorption of fluid and particles in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. The peritoneum is divided into parietal and visceral components. The parietal peritoneum covers the inside of the ABDOMINAL WALL. The visceral peritoneum covers the intraperitoneal organs. The double-layered peritoneum forms the MESENTERY that suspends these organs from the abdominal wall.Thoracotomy: Surgical incision into the chest wall.Radiography, Thoracic: X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.Barium Sulfate: A compound used as an x-ray contrast medium that occurs in nature as the mineral barite. It is also used in various manufacturing applications and mixed into heavy concrete to serve as a radiation shield.Abnormalities, MultipleEnterostomy: Creation of an artificial external opening or fistula in the intestines.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Abdomen, Acute: A clinical syndrome with acute abdominal pain that is severe, localized, and rapid in onset. Acute abdomen may be caused by a variety of disorders, injuries, or diseases.Ultrasonography, Prenatal: The visualization of tissues during pregnancy through recording of the echoes of ultrasonic waves directed into the body. The procedure may be applied with reference to the mother or the fetus and with reference to organs or the detection of maternal or fetal disease.Esophagoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the esophagus.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Schizophrenia: A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Abdominal Wound Closure Techniques: Methods to repair breaks in abdominal tissues caused by trauma or to close surgical incisions during abdominal surgery.Ileostomy: Surgical creation of an external opening into the ILEUM for fecal diversion or drainage. This replacement for the RECTUM is usually created in patients with severe INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES. Loop (continent) or tube (incontinent) procedures are most often employed.Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: Symptoms of disorders of the lower urinary tract including frequency, NOCTURIA; urgency, incomplete voiding, and URINARY INCONTINENCE. They are often associated with OVERACTIVE BLADDER; URINARY INCOMPETENCE; and INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS. Lower urinary tract symptoms in males were traditionally called PROSTATISM.Pneumoperitoneum, Artificial: Deliberate introduction of air into the peritoneal cavity.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Intestinal Perforation: Opening or penetration through the wall of the INTESTINES.Perineum: The body region lying between the genital area and the ANUS on the surface of the trunk, and to the shallow compartment lying deep to this area that is inferior to the PELVIC DIAPHRAGM. The surface area is between the VULVA and the anus in the female, and between the SCROTUM and the anus in the male.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Omentum: A double-layered fold of peritoneum that attaches the STOMACH to other organs in the ABDOMINAL CAVITY.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Schizophrenic Psychology: Study of mental processes and behavior of schizophrenics.Psychotic Disorders: Disorders in which there is a loss of ego boundaries or a gross impairment in reality testing with delusions or prominent hallucinations. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Emergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Learning Curve: The course of learning of an individual or a group. It is a measure of performance plotted over time.Surgery, Veterinary: A board-certified specialty of VETERINARY MEDICINE, requiring at least four years of special education, training, and practice of veterinary surgery after graduation from veterinary school. In the written, oral, and practical examinations candidates may choose either large or small animal surgery. (From AVMA Directory, 43d ed, p278)Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Polyglactin 910: A polyester used for absorbable sutures & surgical mesh, especially in ophthalmic surgery. 2-Hydroxy-propanoic acid polymer with polymerized hydroxyacetic acid, which forms 3,6-dimethyl-1,4-dioxane-dione polymer with 1,4-dioxane-2,5-dione copolymer of molecular weight about 80,000 daltons.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Pelvic Pain: Pain in the pelvic region of genital and non-genital origin and of organic or psychogenic etiology. Frequent causes of pain are distension or contraction of hollow viscera, rapid stretching of the capsule of a solid organ, chemical irritation, tissue ischemia, and neuritis secondary to inflammatory, neoplastic, or fibrotic processes in adjacent organs. (Kase, Weingold & Gershenson: Principles and Practice of Clinical Gynecology, 2d ed, pp479-508)Lumbosacral Region: Region of the back including the LUMBAR VERTEBRAE, SACRUM, and nearby structures.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Urination Disorders: Abnormalities in the process of URINE voiding, including bladder control, frequency of URINATION, as well as the volume and composition of URINE.Fibrin Tissue Adhesive: An autologous or commercial tissue adhesive containing FIBRINOGEN and THROMBIN. The commercial product is a two component system from human plasma that contains more than fibrinogen and thrombin. The first component contains highly concentrated fibrinogen, FACTOR VIII, fibronectin, and traces of other plasma proteins. The second component contains thrombin, calcium chloride, and antifibrinolytic agents such as APROTININ. Mixing of the two components promotes BLOOD CLOTTING and the formation and cross-linking of fibrin. The tissue adhesive is used for tissue sealing, HEMOSTASIS, and WOUND HEALING.Respiratory Tract DiseasesCase-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Rectal Prolapse: Protrusion of the rectal mucous membrane through the anus. There are various degrees: incomplete with no displacement of the anal sphincter muscle; complete with displacement of the anal sphincter muscle; complete with no displacement of the anal sphincter muscle but with herniation of the bowel; and internal complete with rectosigmoid or upper rectum intussusception into the lower rectum.Conversion to Open Surgery: Changing an operative procedure from an endoscopic surgical procedure to an open approach during the INTRAOPERATIVE PERIOD.Cryptorchidism: A developmental defect in which a TESTIS or both TESTES failed to descend from high in the ABDOMEN to the bottom of the SCROTUM. Testicular descent is essential to normal SPERMATOGENESIS which requires temperature lower than the BODY TEMPERATURE. Cryptorchidism can be subclassified by the location of the maldescended testis.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Vomiting: The forcible expulsion of the contents of the STOMACH through the MOUTH.Duodenal Diseases: Pathological conditions in the DUODENUM region of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL).Mesocolon: The fold of peritoneum by which the COLON is attached to the posterior ABDOMINAL WALL.Psychophysiologic Disorders: A group of disorders characterized by physical symptoms that are affected by emotional factors and involve a single organ system, usually under AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM control. (American Psychiatric Glossary, 1988)Headache: The symptom of PAIN in the cranial region. It may be an isolated benign occurrence or manifestation of a wide variety of HEADACHE DISORDERS.Skin, Artificial: Synthetic material used for the treatment of burns and other conditions involving large-scale loss of skin. It often consists of an outer (epidermal) layer of silicone and an inner (dermal) layer of collagen and chondroitin 6-sulfate. The dermal layer elicits new growth and vascular invasion and the outer layer is later removed and replaced by a graft.Hypesthesia: Absent or reduced sensitivity to cutaneous stimulation.Respiratory Sounds: Noises, normal and abnormal, heard on auscultation over any part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT.Umbilicus: The pit in the center of the ABDOMINAL WALL marking the point where the UMBILICAL CORD entered in the FETUS.Flank Pain: Pain emanating from below the RIBS and above the ILIUM.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.Prostheses and Implants: Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.Personality Inventory: Check list, usually to be filled out by a person about himself, consisting of many statements about personal characteristics which the subject checks.Prodromal Symptoms: Clinical or physiological indicators that precede the onset of disease.Tensile Strength: The maximum stress a material subjected to a stretching load can withstand without tearing. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p2001)Incidental Findings: Unanticipated information discovered in the course of testing or medical care. Used in discussions of information that may have social or psychological consequences, such as when it is learned that a child's biological father is someone other than the putative father, or that a person tested for one disease or disorder has, or is at risk for, something else.Colonic Diseases: Pathological processes in the COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Esophageal Diseases: Pathological processes in the ESOPHAGUS.Ileal Diseases: Pathological development in the ILEUM including the ILEOCECAL VALVE.Emergency Treatment: First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Hot Flashes: A sudden, temporary sensation of heat predominantly experienced by some women during MENOPAUSE. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Esophageal pH Monitoring: Analysis of the HYDROGEN ION CONCENTRATION in the lumen of the ESOPHAGUS. It is used to record the pattern, frequency, and duration of GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Intestinal Fistula: An abnormal anatomical passage between the INTESTINE, and another segment of the intestine or other organs. External intestinal fistula is connected to the SKIN (enterocutaneous fistula). Internal intestinal fistula can be connected to a number of organs, such as STOMACH (gastrocolic fistula), the BILIARY TRACT (cholecystoduodenal fistula), or the URINARY BLADDER of the URINARY TRACT (colovesical fistula). Risk factors include inflammatory processes, cancer, radiation treatment, and surgical misadventures (MEDICAL ERRORS).Dyspnea: Difficult or labored breathing.Dyspepsia: Impaired digestion, especially after eating.Esophageal Stenosis: A stricture of the ESOPHAGUS. Most are acquired but can be congenital.Prenatal Diagnosis: Determination of the nature of a pathological condition or disease in the postimplantation EMBRYO; FETUS; or pregnant female before birth.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A disorder with chronic or recurrent colonic symptoms without a clearcut etiology. This condition is characterized by chronic or recurrent ABDOMINAL PAIN, bloating, MUCUS in FECES, and an erratic disturbance of DEFECATION.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Physical Examination: Systematic and thorough inspection of the patient for physical signs of disease or abnormality.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Colectomy: Excision of a portion of the colon or of the whole colon. (Dorland, 28th ed)Fetoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the fetus and amniotic cavity through abdominal or uterine entry.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Iatrogenic Disease: Any adverse condition in a patient occurring as the result of treatment by a physician, surgeon, or other health professional, especially infections acquired by a patient during the course of treatment.Methods: A series of steps taken in order to conduct research.United StatesClinical Protocols: Precise and detailed plans for the study of a medical or biomedical problem and/or plans for a regimen of therapy.
After puberty, additional symptoms can develop. In women, clitoromegaly and polycystic ovary syndrome can develop. This impairs ... Most with the disorder also have a prominent umbilicus or umbilical hernia. Commonly, patients will also have acromegaly with ... Medical diagnosis of CGL can be made after observing the physical symptoms of the disease: lipoatrophy (loss of fat tissues) ... Metformin reduces appetite and improves symptoms of hepatic steatosis and polycystic ovary syndrome. Leptin can also be used to ...
... , also called sports hernia, hockey hernia, hockey groin, Gilmore's Groin, or groin disruption is a medical ... Symptoms can often be reproduced by maneuvers such as performing sit-ups or crunches. Pain can also be elicited with the ... "Sports Hernia". Orthopedics.about.com. 2005-12-16. Retrieved 2011-11-13. Le Blanc, E; LeBlanc KA (2003). "Groin pain in ... Symptoms include pain during sports movements, particularly hip extension, and twisting and turning. This pain usually radiates ...
The treatment may also provide relief for hiatal hernia patients suffering acute symptoms. Paul Dickson (2004). War slang: ...
Liquid tobacco enemas were often given to ease the symptoms of a hernia. During the early 19th century the practice fell into ... Such enemas were often used to treat hernias. A middle-aged man was reported in 1843 to have died following an application, ... My object in ordering the tobacco infusion and smoke enemata was to favour the reduction of any obscure hernia or muscular ... performed to treat a strangulated hernia, and in a similar case in 1847 a woman was given a liquid tobacco enema, supplemented ...
Conditions that may result in similar symptoms include testicular torsion, inguinal hernia, and testicular cancer. Ultrasound ... Conditions that may result in similar symptoms include testicular torsion, inguinal hernia, and testicular cancer. Ultrasound ... Fever is also a common symptom. In the chronic version, the patient may have painful point tenderness but may or may not have ... Other symptoms may include swelling of the testicle, burning with urination, or frequent urination. Inflammation of the ...
A minority of individuals who undergo the TIF procedure also require a hiatal hernia repair operation. The procedure is ... Other medical and endoscopic treatments to alleviate GERD symptoms include: Stretta procedure Proton-pump Inhibitors (PPIs) "Is ... Transoral incisionless fundoplication may improve symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease, at least in the short term. ... Transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF) is an endoscope treatment designed to relieve symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux ...
A hernia in the lumbar region often compresses the nerve root exiting at the level below the disk. Thus, a herniation of the L4 ... Symptoms of a herniated disc can vary depending on the location of the herniation and the types of soft tissue that become ... Typically, symptoms are experienced only on one side of the body. If the prolapse is very large and presses on the nerves ... Symptoms can affect the back of the skull, the neck, shoulder girdle, scapula, arm, and hand. The nerves of the cervical plexus ...
Often, the first symptoms may include abdominal hernias, ear infections, runny noses, and colds. Since these symptoms are quite ... The symptoms of Hunter syndrome (MPS II) are generally not apparent at birth, but usually start to become noticeable after the ... The visible signs and symptoms of MPS II in younger people are usually the first clues leading to a diagnosis. In general, the ... The behavioral symptoms of Hunter syndrome generally precede neurodegeneration and often increase in severity until the mental ...
Patients generally have tender abdomens as a symptom. Symptoms do not include fever, vomiting, or leukocyosis. The pain is ... Acute Epiploic Appendigitis is usually associated with obesity, hernia and unaccustomed exercise. The inflammation of the ... The symptoms may mimic those of acute appendicitis, diverticulitis, or cholecystitis. The pain is characteristically intense ... Epiploic appendagitis presents with an acute onset of pain, commonly in the left lower quadrant the symptoms often lead to a ...
Signs and symptoms include abdominal pain, vomiting, bloating and not passing gas. Mechanical obstruction is the cause of about ... Small bowel obstructions are most often due to adhesions and hernias while large bowel obstructions are most often due to ... Pseudoobstruction Hernias containing bowel Crohn's disease causing adhesions or inflammatory strictures Neoplasms, benign or ... Causes of bowel obstruction include adhesions, hernias, volvulus, endometriosis, inflammatory bowel disease, appendicitis, ...
Too much stomach acid can cause symptoms of heartburn and indigestion, as well as irritating an inflamed stomach lining or a ... It is also indicated for symptomatic relief in oesophagitis, hiatus hernia, gastritis and iatrogenic gastritis. Kolanticon is a ... By binding to and neutralising excess acid, antacids help to relieve the symptoms of dyspepsia that are often experienced by ... It is indicated for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia (indigestion) and the symptoms of ...
Not all hiatus hernias cause symptoms however, although almost all people with Barrett's oesophagus or oesophagitis have a ... Hernias are described as rolling, in which the hernia is beside the oesophagus, or sliding, in which the hernia directly ... A hiatus hernia is a hernia common in adults in which parts of the lower esophagus or stomach that are normally in the abdomen ... Hernias may also occur as a result of congenital malformation, a congenital diaphragmatic hernia. When the pleuroperitoneal ...
Initially, symptoms are usually similar to those of the common cold with a runny nose, fever, and mild cough. This is then ... hernias, and vertebral artery dissection. Violent coughing can cause the pleura to rupture, leading to a pneumothorax. Vomiting ... The time between infection and the onset of symptoms is usually seven to ten days. Disease may occur in those who have been ... In children less than one year old and among those who are pregnant, they are recommended within six weeks of symptom onset. ...
Her 2013 season was affected by a recurring stomach illness which was eventually diagnosed as a symptom of a hiatus hernia. ...
Symptoms included nodular soft-tissue masses located around joints, with episodes of painful swelling of the masses and pain ... Many children also have umbilical or inguinal hernias. Nearly all children have some form of heart disease, An enzyme ... Physical symptoms generally include coarse or rough facial features (including a flat nasal bridge, thick lips, and enlarged ... MPS I S, Scheie syndrome, is the mildest form of MPS I. Symptoms generally begin to appear after age 5, with diagnosis most ...
After pelvic exenteration, many patients will have perineal hernia, often without symptoms, but only 3-10% will have perineal ... hernia requiring surgical repair. The procedure was first described by Alexander Brunschwig in 1948. Radwan RW, et al. ...
Treatise on hernia. Callow, London. Later editions from 1816 entitled Treatise on ruptures. Lawrence, W. 1833. A treatise on ... an anatomical description of each species with an account of its symptoms, progress, and treatment. 5th and last ed 1858. "The ... Treatise on hernia. Callow, London. Later editions from 1816 entitled Treatise on ruptures: ...
Ingestion of food is often associated with occurrence of symptoms; this may result in reluctance to feed. Associated symptoms, ... Successful treatment of the associated underlying disorder, such as GORD or hiatus hernia, may provide relief. Sandifer ... The classical symptoms of the syndrome are spasmodic torticollis and dystonia. Nodding and rotation of the head, neck extension ... Misdiagnosis as benign infantile spasms or epileptic seizures is common, particularly where clear signs or symptoms of gastro- ...
He died 16 July 1946 in Berlin during a hernia operation at the clinic Charité. The operation was carried out personally by the ... By this time Sauerbruch already showed symptoms of cerebral sclerosis, mistakes were made during the routine operation that ...
Types one and two have unremitting symptoms, whereas type three may show remitting symptoms. Type 1 - Symptoms not present upon ... Allergies and contact sensitivities to foods, metals, and other substances (see table). Hiatal hernia. Human immunodeficiency ... If symptom persist despite treatment a diagnosis of BMS is confirmed. BMS has been traditionally treated by reassurance and ... BMS is benign (importantly, it is not a symptom of oral cancer), but as a cause of chronic pain which is poorly controlled, it ...
... and that his symptoms worsened after his hernias. It was decided that Page would retire from performing with the Wiggles to ... Page had experienced health difficulties since December 2005, when he underwent a double hernia operation and withdrew from his ... which causes symptoms such as fatigue and loss of balance. Specialists believed that Page had mild episodes of the illness ...
Symptoms typically include lower abdominal pain of a sudden onset. The onset of symptoms, however, may also occur over a few ... Diverticula are actually micro-hernias of the colonic mucosa and submucosa through the colonic muscular layer where blood ... People with the above symptoms are commonly studied with computed tomography, or CT scan. The CT scan is very accurate (98%) in ... and whether symptoms persist after the first acute episode. In most cases, elective surgery is deemed to be indicated when the ...
If symptoms do occur, they typically appear before the age of two years. The most common presenting symptom is painless rectal ... It can also be present as an indirect hernia, typically on the right side, where it is known as a "Hernia of Littré". A case ... when a Meckel's diverticulum is constricted in an inguinal hernia, forming a Littré hernia that obstructs the intestine. ... At times, the symptoms are so painful that they may cause sleepless nights with acute pain felt in the foregut region, ...
Symptoms typically appear before a baby reaches about 5 months of age.[citation needed] Children are most commonly identified ... Placement of a feeding tube, fundoplication, and surgeries to correct hernias or other gastrointestinal structural problems are ... The prognosis varies widely from case to case, depending on the severity of the symptoms. However, almost all people reported ...
In both cases, initial diagnosis was inguinal hernia. In the first case, emergency surgery did not locate any hernia but found ... Subsequent symptoms and further tests revealed acute non-perforated appendicitis that required surgery. Appendectomy was ... "Bilateral round ligament varicosities mimicking inguinal hernia during pregnancy". Hernia. 13 (1): 85-8. doi:10.1007/s10029-008 ... RLP and inguinal hernia Several cases of varicosity, of the round ligament during pregnancy leading to RLP have been reported ...
Signs and symptoms[edit]. The condition is typically seen in premature infants, and the timing of its onset is generally ... Symptoms. Poor feeding, bloating, decreased activity, vomiting of bile[1]. Complications. Short-gut syndrome, intestinal ... Symptoms may progress rapidly to abdominal discoloration with intestinal perforation and peritonitis and systemic hypotension ... Initial symptoms include feeding intolerance and failure to thrive, increased gastric residuals, abdominal distension and ...
Find Umbilical hernia repair information, treatments for Umbilical hernia repair and Umbilical hernia repair symptoms. ... MedHelps Umbilical hernia repair Center for Information, Symptoms, Resources, Treatments and Tools for Umbilical hernia repair ... following umbilical hernia repair i have a fluid collection of fluid believed to be seroma ... ... I had a umbilical hernia repair with mesh not to long ago, and i was wondering would it be ... ...
Treatment Umbilical hernia repair. Symptoms and causes Umbilical hernia repair Prophylaxis Umbilical hernia repair ... Umbilical hernia repair is surgery to repair an umbilical hernia. An umbilical hernia is a sac formed from the inner lining of ... Smaller hernias with no symptoms sometimes can be watched. Surgery may pose greater risks for patients with serious medical ... Umbilical hernia repair may be needed in children for these reasons:. *The hernia is painful and stuck in the bulging position. ...
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19): Get the Facts on Symptoms and Prevention From Cynthia Snider, MD. ... An umbilical hernia usually is not painful or dangerous.. Hernias can vary in size from less than 0.4 in. (1 cm) to more than ... Umbilical hernia. An umbilical hernia is a bulge in the abdominal wall near the navel (umbilicus) that sometimes contains ... Most of these hernias are noticed when babies are a few days or weeks old, after the umbilical cord stump falls off. But ...
The cardinal clinical symptom is acute intestinal obstruction. In this case the patient had a positive Howship-Romberg sign, ... Keywords: Intestinal obstruction, Obturator hernia, strangulated hernia. Introduction. Obturator hernia is a rare pelvic hernia ... 6. Shipkov CD, Uchikov AP, Grigoriadis E. The obturator obturator hernia. hernia: difficult to diagnose, easy to repair. Hernia ... Obturator hernia was first described by Ronsil in 1724 [1]. The incidence is nearly 1% of all hernias [2]. With the nickname " ...
A femoral hernia is tissue that bulges out of a weak spot in the groin. Usually this tissue is part of the intestine. ... Femoral hernia repair is surgery to repair a hernia near the groin or upper thigh. ... A femoral hernia needs to be repaired, even if if it does not not cause symptoms. If the hernia is not repaired, the intestine ... Femoral hernia repair is surgery to repair a hernia near the groin or upper thigh. A femoral hernia is tissue that bulges out ...
Obturator hernias are rare and are often diagnosed late. This case report discusses an 82-year-old female who had symptoms of ... incipient hernias, and less-common types of hernias (e.g., an obturator hernia). The aim of this study is to evaluate the ... The hernia was repaired using a single suture and she made a good recovery. A review of the literature around obturator hernias ... Hernia is described as the protrusion of an organ into the wall of its normal containing cavity. Internal hernia (IH) involves ...
Strangulated hernia in quite common in surgical practice and always present with its typical symptoms. In this hardly found ... incipient hernias, and less-common types of hernias (e.g., an obturator hernia). The aim of this study is to evaluate the ... Femoral hernia accounts for only 3% of all the hernias and in only 0.5%-5% of the events, the appendix can travel through the ... INTRODUCTION: A De Garengeot hernia is a rare form of femoral hernia, where the appendix is found in the herniated sac. This ...
The hernia is enclosed by a sac formed by the lining of the cavity.... Explanation of obturator hernia ... Find out information about obturator hernia. protrusion of an internal organ or part of an organ through the wall of a body ... Clinical diagnosis of obturator hernia is difficult due to uncommon incidence, deep location, and infrequent symptoms and signs ... hernia. (redirected from obturator hernia). Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical. hernia,. protrusion of an internal ...
Femoral hernia has no symptoms. It causes pain in the abdominal junction. Various tests are required to diagnose the presence ... Hernia obstruction - in this case, the hernia that is the bulged tissues or part of the bowel gets stuck in the femoral canal. ... Femoral hernia is formed when the tissues in the lower abdomen pushes through the upper thigh region. This type of hernia is ... Hernia strangulation - strangulated hernia refers to a condition in which the protruded tissues of the abdomen get trapped in ...
Treatment for hiatal hernia include medication or surgery. ... Information about hiatal hernia caused by obesity, coughing, ... Hiatal hernia also causes symptoms of discomfort when it is associated with a condition called gastroesophageal reflux disease ... Lifestyle changes are often necessary to avoid symptoms of hiatal hernia.. *Modify your activities:*Minimize heavy lifting, ... The first visit for the symptoms of hiatal hernia may warrant tests to rule out more serious or life-threatening causes first, ...
Some people experience no symptoms, but others may have acid reflux and a bulge that moves up and down. Treatment options ... A hiatal hernia occurs when part of the stomach pushes through the diaphragm. Possible causes include injury, obesity, ... What is a spigelian hernia? Learn about spigelian hernias, a rare type of hernia that can cause painful symptoms and requires ... A hiatal hernia rarely causes symptoms, but might cause heartburn.. A hiatal hernia develops when body tissue or an organ ...
There are generally no symptoms of hiatal hernia, and it is incidentally discovered when a person is having tests for other ... Hiatal hernia is caused by obesity, being pregnant, age, or thinning of the phrenoesophageal membrane. ... What makes symptoms of a hiatal hernia more painful and worse?. *Symptoms of a hiatal hernia usually are worse after meals, and ... Paraesophageal hernias: People with paraesophageal hernias often have no symptoms, and surgery is required only if the hernias ...
Find out how and why umbilical hernias happen in babies or adults and when you need to seek treatment right away. ... Could a bulging belly button be a hernia? ... What Are Umbilical Hernia Symptoms?. *How Do Doctors Diagnose ... Umbilical Hernia in Adults. Adults with umbilical hernias may feel discomfort. You may also have signs of a strangulated hernia ... Mayo Clinic: "Umbilical Hernia." Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Umbilical Hernia." Cleveland Clinic: "Umbilical Hernia in Children." ...
... or inguinal hernia, until they visit their doctor for a routine exam. Many times, the hernia doesnt show any signs or symptoms ... Some people are not even aware they have a groin hernia, ... Groin hernia signs & symptoms. Joyce Starr Updated June 18, ... or inguinal hernia, until they visit their doctor for a routine exam. Many times, the hernia doesnt show any signs or symptoms ... Symptoms in Adults. Sometimes a groin hernia will show no signs that its even there until you stand up and notice a bulge, or ...
... symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis information provided by Cincinnati Childrens. ... Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) A congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a birth defect where there is an opening in the ... Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia TreatmentShow A baby with CDH needs surgery to properly place organs into the correct place and ... Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia DiagnosisShow Most of the time, CDH is found during an ultrasound around 18 weeks of pregnancy ...
... including symptoms and treatment, from experts at Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center. ... Incidence of Inguinal HerniaShow An inguinal hernia can occur at any age, but one-third of hernias in children appear in the ... Signs and Symptoms of Inguinal HerniaShow *Swelling or a bulge in the groin or scrotum may be seen during crying or straining, ... Incarcerated Inguinal HerniaShow If the bulge can be gently pressed back into the abdomen, the hernia is termed reducible. If ...
Symptoms. Inguinal hernia signs and symptoms include:. *A bulge in the area on either side of your pubic bone, which becomes ... Inguinal hernia. Inguinal hernia. Inguinal hernias occur when part of the membrane lining the abdominal cavity (omentum) or ... Previous inguinal hernia or hernia repair. Even if your previous hernia occurred in childhood, youre at higher risk of ... Signs and symptoms in children. Inguinal hernias in newborns and children result from a weakness in the abdominal wall thats ...
... symptoms, treatment and prevention plus additional in depth medical information. ... Hernia - an easy to understand guide covering causes, diagnosis, ... Symptoms. Most hernias cause a bulge under the skin (except ... Although not all hernias need to be operated on, hernias that cause symptoms or that become larger should be repaired by a ... Hiatus hernias that are not causing symptoms of acid reflux do not need to be treated. When symptoms occur, medicine may be ...
... Sometimes, mild discomfort or pain can occur in the region of the lump, as can swelling of ... incisional hernia, involving muscles at the site of a previous operation. * periumbilical hernia, which develops around the ... I would like to know what some of the symptoms of a hernia are. ... inguinal hernia and femoral hernia, both involving the groin ... A hernia is defined as the protrusion of an internal organ through a weakness in the muscle around it. ...
Find the most comprehensive real-world symptom and treatment data on umbilical hernia at PatientsLikeMe. 152 patients with ... and Vortioxetine to treat their umbilical hernia and its symptoms. ... umbilical hernia experience fatigue, depressed mood, pain, anxious mood, and insomnia and use Gabapentin, Hydroxyzine, ... What is umbilical hernia?. An umbilical (belly button area) hernia is an outward bulging (protrusion) of the abdominal lining ...
Learn more about the symptoms, treatment, causes and prevention of hernia during pregnancy. ... A hernia during pregnancy is not expected, but it can occur. ... Signs or Symptoms of Hernia. Not every woman experiences signs ... Hernia During Pregnancy: Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, and Prevention. A hernia refers to a medical condition that happens when ... Causes of Hernia. Hernias are the result of a weakness in the wall of a muscle or a muscle that never fully grows together. It ...
Find the most comprehensive real-world symptom and treatment data on flank hernia at PatientsLikeMe. 29 patients with flank ... hernia experience fatigue, depressed mood, pain, anxious mood, and insomnia. ... What is flank hernia?. Flank hernia is a specific type of a hernia located in the side of the abdominal wall. Flank hernias may ... Lets build this page together! When you share what its like to have flank hernia through your profile, those stories and data ...
A hiatal hernia occurs when part of the stomach pushes upwards into the chest through an opening (referred to as a hiatus) in ... This Hiatal Hernia: Symptoms, Causes and Risks page on EmpowHER Womens Health works best with javascript enabled in your ... A hiatal hernia occurs when part of the stomach pushes upwards into the chest through an opening (referred to as a hiatus) in ... I was diagnosed at age 20 with a hiatal hernia. The MD told me in my case it was most likely a defect I was born with. ...
Any hernia can be serious, but a strangulated hernia can quickly become an emergency, because the protruding part is twisted ... A hiatal hernia arises when part of the stomache protrudes through a hole in the abdominal wall. ... A hiatal hernia arises when part of the stomache protrudes through a hole in the abdominal wall. Any hernia can be serious, but ... Hiatal hernias in general can cause acid to back up into the oesophagus. With strangulated hiatal hernias, the acid reflux can ...
Medibank explains different types of Hernias & how they can be treated. ... Read information on Hernias including symptoms, causes & diagnosis. ... Symptoms of hernia. Generally, a hernia can be seen or felt on your body as a lump. Other symptoms of hernias include:. *Pain ... What is a hernia?. A hernia occurs when an organ like the intestine bulges out through a gap, or a weakened spot in the muscle ...
  • Prolonged presence of organs in the hernial sac leads to the formation of adhesions between the organs themselves or with the hernial sac, which hinders correction of the hernia, and an irreducible hernia is formed-that is, the hernial protrusion does not return to the abdominal cavity when the patient changes position. (thefreedictionary.com)
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