Head: The upper part of the human body, or the front or upper part of the body of an animal, typically separated from the rest of the body by a neck, and containing the brain, mouth, and sense organs.Head and Neck Neoplasms: Soft tissue tumors or cancer arising from the mucosal surfaces of the LIP; oral cavity; PHARYNX; LARYNX; and cervical esophagus. Other sites included are the NOSE and PARANASAL SINUSES; SALIVARY GLANDS; THYROID GLAND and PARATHYROID GLANDS; and MELANOMA and non-melanoma skin cancers of the head and neck. (from Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 4th ed, p1651)Head Movements: Voluntary or involuntary motion of head that may be relative to or independent of body; includes animals and humans.Femur Head: The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)Sperm Head: The anterior portion of the spermatozoon (SPERMATOZOA) that contains mainly the nucleus with highly compact CHROMATIN material.Symptom Assessment: Evaluation of manifestations of disease.Femur Head Necrosis: Aseptic or avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The major types are idiopathic (primary), as a complication of fractures or dislocations, and LEGG-CALVE-PERTHES DISEASE.Head Injuries, Closed: Traumatic injuries to the cranium where the integrity of the skull is not compromised and no bone fragments or other objects penetrate the skull and dura mater. This frequently results in mechanical injury being transmitted to intracranial structures which may produce traumatic brain injuries, hemorrhage, or cranial nerve injury. (From Rowland, Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 9th ed, p417)Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Craniocerebral Trauma: Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Behavioral Symptoms: Observable manifestations of impaired psychological functioning.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Carcinoma, Squamous Cell: A carcinoma derived from stratified SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. It may also occur in sites where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Affective Symptoms: Mood or emotional responses dissonant with or inappropriate to the behavior and/or stimulus.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Head Protective Devices: Personal devices for protection of heads from impact, penetration from falling and flying objects, and from limited electric shock and burn.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Fatigue: The state of weariness following a period of exertion, mental or physical, characterized by a decreased capacity for work and reduced efficiency to respond to stimuli.Humeral Head: The portion of the upper rounded extremity fitting into the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA. (from Stedman, 27th ed)Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Pediculus: Lice of the genus Pediculus, family Pediculidae. Pediculus humanus corporus is the human body louse and Pediculus humanus capitis is the human head louse.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Schizophrenia: A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.Respiration Disorders: Diseases of the respiratory system in general or unspecified or for a specific respiratory disease not available.Cough: A sudden, audible expulsion of air from the lungs through a partially closed glottis, preceded by inhalation. It is a protective response that serves to clear the trachea, bronchi, and/or lungs of irritants and secretions, or to prevent aspiration of foreign materials into the lungs.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: Symptoms of disorders of the lower urinary tract including frequency, NOCTURIA; urgency, incomplete voiding, and URINARY INCONTINENCE. They are often associated with OVERACTIVE BLADDER; URINARY INCOMPETENCE; and INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS. Lower urinary tract symptoms in males were traditionally called PROSTATISM.Lice Infestations: Parasitic attack or subsistence on the skin by members of the order Phthiraptera, especially on humans by Pediculus humanus of the family Pediculidae. The hair of the head, eyelashes, and pubis is a frequent site of infestation. (From Dorland, 28th ed; Stedman, 26th ed)Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Headache: The symptom of PAIN in the cranial region. It may be an isolated benign occurrence or manifestation of a wide variety of HEADACHE DISORDERS.Gastroesophageal Reflux: Retrograde flow of gastric juice (GASTRIC ACID) and/or duodenal contents (BILE ACIDS; PANCREATIC JUICE) into the distal ESOPHAGUS, commonly due to incompetence of the LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Schizophrenic Psychology: Study of mental processes and behavior of schizophrenics.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Psychotic Disorders: Disorders in which there is a loss of ego boundaries or a gross impairment in reality testing with delusions or prominent hallucinations. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Gastrointestinal Diseases: Diseases in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Urination Disorders: Abnormalities in the process of URINE voiding, including bladder control, frequency of URINATION, as well as the volume and composition of URINE.Respiratory Tract DiseasesChronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Brain Concussion: A nonspecific term used to describe transient alterations or loss of consciousness following closed head injuries. The duration of UNCONSCIOUSNESS generally lasts a few seconds, but may persist for several hours. Concussions may be classified as mild, intermediate, and severe. Prolonged periods of unconsciousness (often defined as greater than 6 hours in duration) may be referred to as post-traumatic coma (COMA, POST-HEAD INJURY). (From Rowland, Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 9th ed, p418)Neck: The part of a human or animal body connecting the HEAD to the rest of the body.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Psychophysiologic Disorders: A group of disorders characterized by physical symptoms that are affected by emotional factors and involve a single organ system, usually under AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM control. (American Psychiatric Glossary, 1988)Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Respiratory Sounds: Noises, normal and abnormal, heard on auscultation over any part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT.Personality Inventory: Check list, usually to be filled out by a person about himself, consisting of many statements about personal characteristics which the subject checks.Prodromal Symptoms: Clinical or physiological indicators that precede the onset of disease.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Hot Flashes: A sudden, temporary sensation of heat predominantly experienced by some women during MENOPAUSE. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Reflex, Vestibulo-Ocular: A reflex wherein impulses are conveyed from the cupulas of the SEMICIRCULAR CANALS and from the OTOLITHIC MEMBRANE of the SACCULE AND UTRICLE via the VESTIBULAR NUCLEI of the BRAIN STEM and the median longitudinal fasciculus to the OCULOMOTOR NERVE nuclei. It functions to maintain a stable retinal image during head rotation by generating appropriate compensatory EYE MOVEMENTS.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Rotation: Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Dyspnea: Difficult or labored breathing.Skull Fractures: Fractures of the skull which may result from penetrating or nonpenetrating head injuries or rarely BONE DISEASES (see also FRACTURES, SPONTANEOUS). Skull fractures may be classified by location (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, BASILAR), radiographic appearance (e.g., linear), or based upon cranial integrity (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, DEPRESSED).Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Dyspepsia: Impaired digestion, especially after eating.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A disorder with chronic or recurrent colonic symptoms without a clearcut etiology. This condition is characterized by chronic or recurrent ABDOMINAL PAIN, bloating, MUCUS in FECES, and an erratic disturbance of DEFECATION.Neck Muscles: The neck muscles consist of the platysma, splenius cervicis, sternocleidomastoid(eus), longus colli, the anterior, medius, and posterior scalenes, digastric(us), stylohyoid(eus), mylohyoid(eus), geniohyoid(eus), sternohyoid(eus), omohyoid(eus), sternothyroid(eus), and thyrohyoid(eus).Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.United StatesHealth Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Hallucinations: Subjectively experienced sensations in the absence of an appropriate stimulus, but which are regarded by the individual as real. They may be of organic origin or associated with MENTAL DISORDERS.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Constipation: Infrequent or difficult evacuation of FECES. These symptoms are associated with a variety of causes, including low DIETARY FIBER intake, emotional or nervous disturbances, systemic and structural disorders, drug-induced aggravation, and infections.Delusions: A false belief regarding the self or persons or objects outside the self that persists despite the facts, and is not considered tenable by one's associates.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Depressive Disorder, Major: Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Scalp DermatosesInfant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Head Injuries, Penetrating: Head injuries which feature compromise of the skull and dura mater. These may result from gunshot wounds (WOUNDS, GUNSHOT), stab wounds (WOUNDS, STAB), and other forms of trauma.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Life Change Events: Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.Affect: The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.Flatulence: Production or presence of gas in the gastrointestinal tract which may be expelled through the anus.Antipsychotic Agents: Agents that control agitated psychotic behavior, alleviate acute psychotic states, reduce psychotic symptoms, and exert a quieting effect. They are used in SCHIZOPHRENIA; senile dementia; transient psychosis following surgery; or MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; etc. These drugs are often referred to as neuroleptics alluding to the tendency to produce neurological side effects, but not all antipsychotics are likely to produce such effects. Many of these drugs may also be effective against nausea, emesis, and pruritus.Eye Movements: Voluntary or reflex-controlled movements of the eye.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Heartburn: Substernal pain or burning sensation, usually associated with regurgitation of gastric juice into the esophagus.Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)Cognitive Therapy: A direct form of psychotherapy based on the interpretation of situations (cognitive structure of experiences) that determine how an individual feels and behaves. It is based on the premise that cognition, the process of acquiring knowledge and forming beliefs, is a primary determinant of mood and behavior. The therapy uses behavioral and verbal techniques to identify and correct negative thinking that is at the root of the aberrant behavior.Brain Injuries: Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.Rhinitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA, the mucous membrane lining the NASAL CAVITIES.Acceleration: An increase in the rate of speed.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Premenstrual Syndrome: A combination of distressing physical, psychologic, or behavioral changes that occur during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Symptoms of PMS are diverse (such as pain, water-retention, anxiety, cravings, and depression) and they diminish markedly 2 or 3 days after the initiation of menses.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Irritable Mood: Abnormal or excessive excitability with easily triggered anger, annoyance, or impatience.Head Kidney: A primitive form of vertebrate kidney that is found in adults of some primitive FISHES and in the embryos of more advanced fishes. In some species of fishes it contains phagocytic cells and is also a major site of HEMATOPOIESIS, analogous to the mammalian BONE MARROW.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system. This includes disorders of the brain, spinal cord, cranial nerves, peripheral nerves, nerve roots, autonomic nervous system, neuromuscular junction, and muscle.Dizziness: An imprecise term which may refer to a sense of spatial disorientation, motion of the environment, or lightheadedness.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal: Allergic rhinitis that occurs at the same time every year. It is characterized by acute CONJUNCTIVITIS with lacrimation and ITCHING, and regarded as an allergic condition triggered by specific ALLERGENS.Vomiting: The forcible expulsion of the contents of the STOMACH through the MOUTH.Nausea: An unpleasant sensation in the stomach usually accompanied by the urge to vomit. Common causes are early pregnancy, sea and motion sickness, emotional stress, intense pain, food poisoning, and various enteroviruses.Musculoskeletal Diseases: Diseases of the muscles and their associated ligaments and other connective tissue and of the bones and cartilage viewed collectively.Palliative Care: Care alleviating symptoms without curing the underlying disease. (Stedman, 25th ed)Factor Analysis, Statistical: A set of statistical methods for analyzing the correlations among several variables in order to estimate the number of fundamental dimensions that underlie the observed data and to describe and measure those dimensions. It is used frequently in the development of scoring systems for rating scales and questionnaires.Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: An anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent, persistent obsessions or compulsions. Obsessions are the intrusive ideas, thoughts, or images that are experienced as senseless or repugnant. Compulsions are repetitive and seemingly purposeful behavior which the individual generally recognizes as senseless and from which the individual does not derive pleasure although it may provide a release from tension.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Deglutition Disorders: Difficulty in SWALLOWING which may result from neuromuscular disorder or mechanical obstruction. Dysphagia is classified into two distinct types: oropharyngeal dysphagia due to malfunction of the PHARYNX and UPPER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER; and esophageal dysphagia due to malfunction of the ESOPHAGUS.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: Disorders characterized by impairment of the ability to initiate or maintain sleep. This may occur as a primary disorder or in association with another medical or psychiatric condition.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.Psychological Tests: Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.Optic Disk: The portion of the optic nerve seen in the fundus with the ophthalmoscope. It is formed by the meeting of all the retinal ganglion cell axons as they enter the optic nerve.Bipolar Disorder: A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Age of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.Vestibule, Labyrinth: An oval, bony chamber of the inner ear, part of the bony labyrinth. It is continuous with bony COCHLEA anteriorly, and SEMICIRCULAR CANALS posteriorly. The vestibule contains two communicating sacs (utricle and saccule) of the balancing apparatus. The oval window on its lateral wall is occupied by the base of the STAPES of the MIDDLE EAR.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Glasgow Coma Scale: A scale that assesses the response to stimuli in patients with craniocerebral injuries. The parameters are eye opening, motor response, and verbal response.Antidepressive Agents: Mood-stimulating drugs used primarily in the treatment of affective disorders and related conditions. Several MONOAMINE OXIDASE INHIBITORS are useful as antidepressants apparently as a long-term consequence of their modulation of catecholamine levels. The tricyclic compounds useful as antidepressive agents (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, TRICYCLIC) also appear to act through brain catecholamine systems. A third group (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, SECOND-GENERATION) is a diverse group of drugs including some that act specifically on serotonergic systems.Interview, Psychological: A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Respiratory Function Tests: Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.Neurologic Examination: Assessment of sensory and motor responses and reflexes that is used to determine impairment of the nervous system.Mood Disorders: Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.Substance Withdrawal Syndrome: Physiological and psychological symptoms associated with withdrawal from the use of a drug after prolonged administration or habituation. The concept includes withdrawal from smoking or drinking, as well as withdrawal from an administered drug.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Hypesthesia: Absent or reduced sensitivity to cutaneous stimulation.Sickness Impact Profile: A quality-of-life scale developed in the United States in 1972 as a measure of health status or dysfunction generated by a disease. It is a behaviorally based questionnaire for patients and addresses activities such as sleep and rest, mobility, recreation, home management, emotional behavior, social interaction, and the like. It measures the patient's perceived health status and is sensitive enough to detect changes or differences in health status occurring over time or between groups. (From Medical Care, vol.xix, no.8, August 1981, p.787-805)Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Dust: Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Forced Expiratory Volume: Measure of the maximum amount of air that can be expelled in a given number of seconds during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination . It is usually given as FEV followed by a subscript indicating the number of seconds over which the measurement is made, although it is sometimes given as a percentage of forced vital capacity.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Delayed Diagnosis: Non-optimal interval of time between onset of symptoms, identification, and initiation of treatment.Agricultural Workers' Diseases: Diseases in persons engaged in cultivating and tilling soil, growing plants, harvesting crops, raising livestock, or otherwise engaged in husbandry and farming. The diseases are not restricted to farmers in the sense of those who perform conventional farm chores: the heading applies also to those engaged in the individual activities named above, as in those only gathering harvest or in those only dusting crops.Dissociative Disorders: Sudden temporary alterations in the normally integrative functions of consciousness.Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Paresthesia: Subjective cutaneous sensations (e.g., cold, warmth, tingling, pressure, etc.) that are experienced spontaneously in the absence of stimulation.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Hydra: A genus of freshwater polyps in the family Hydridae, order Hydroida, class HYDROZOA. They are of special interest because of their complex organization and because their adult organization corresponds roughly to the gastrula of higher animals.Skin Tests: Epicutaneous or intradermal application of a sensitizer for demonstration of either delayed or immediate hypersensitivity. Used in diagnosis of hypersensitivity or as a test for cellular immunity.Whiplash Injuries: Hyperextension injury to the neck, often the result of being struck from behind by a fast-moving vehicle, in an automobile accident. (From Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Neck Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the neck. It includes injuries to the skin, muscles, and other soft tissues of the neck.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Unconsciousness: Loss of the ability to maintain awareness of self and environment combined with markedly reduced responsiveness to environmental stimuli. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp344-5)Common Cold: A catarrhal disorder of the upper respiratory tract, which may be viral or a mixed infection. It generally involves a runny nose, nasal congestion, and sneezing.Peak Expiratory Flow Rate: Measurement of the maximum rate of airflow attained during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination. Common abbreviations are PEFR and PFR.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Parkinson Disease: A progressive, degenerative neurologic disease characterized by a TREMOR that is maximal at rest, retropulsion (i.e. a tendency to fall backwards), rigidity, stooped posture, slowness of voluntary movements, and a masklike facial expression. Pathologic features include loss of melanin containing neurons in the substantia nigra and other pigmented nuclei of the brainstem. LEWY BODIES are present in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus but may also be found in a related condition (LEWY BODY DISEASE, DIFFUSE) characterized by dementia in combination with varying degrees of parkinsonism. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1059, pp1067-75)Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Menopause: The last menstrual period. Permanent cessation of menses (MENSTRUATION) is usually defined after 6 to 12 months of AMENORRHEA in a woman over 45 years of age. In the United States, menopause generally occurs in women between 48 and 55 years of age.Colonic Diseases, Functional: Chronic or recurrent colonic disorders without an identifiable structural or biochemical explanation. The widely recognized IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME falls into this category.JapanXerostomia: Decreased salivary flow.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Climacteric: Physiologic period, characterized by endocrine, somatic, and psychic changes with the termination of ovarian function in the female. It may also accompany the normal diminution of sexual activity in the male.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Skull: The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.Cephalometry: The measurement of the dimensions of the HEAD.Trauma Severity Indices: Systems for assessing, classifying, and coding injuries. These systems are used in medical records, surveillance systems, and state and national registries to aid in the collection and reporting of trauma.Norway
Symptoms include incoordination, nystagmus, head tilt, seizures, and depression. Focal - The disease presents as a granuloma, ... The most common early symptoms are related to forebrain disease and include seizures and dementia, and later circling, head ... Symptoms may be acute or develop slowly over several months and depend on the location of the lesion. Ocular - This is an ... Symptoms include incoordination, reluctance to move, and neck rigidity. Encephalitis Meningitis Adamo F, O'Brien R (2004). "Use ...
Symptoms and signs: Speech and voice / Symptoms involving head and neck (R47-R49, 784) ... The utility of local cooling of the head and neck is controversial.[16] Some state that applying ice to the nose or forehead is ... Wackym,, James B. Snow,... P. Ashley (2009). Ballenger's otorhinolaryngology : head and neck surgery (17th ed.). Shelton, Conn ... Pressure should be firm and be applied for at least five minutes and up to 20 minutes; tilting the head forward helps decrease ...
Symptoms and signs: Speech and voice / Symptoms involving head and neck (R47-R49, 784) ... Wernicke K. (1995). "The aphasia symptom-complex: A psychological study on an anatomical basis (1875)". In Paul Eling (ed.). ...
Symptoms and signs: Speech and voice / Symptoms involving head and neck (R47-R49, 784) ... Versus symptoms[edit]. Signs are different from symptoms, the subjective experiences, such as fatigue, that patients might ... "Symptoms become signs when they permit inference. Ordinarily, one single symptom by itself-such as pain or swelling, or ... A] symptom is a phenomenon, caused by an illness and observable directly in experience. We may speak of it as a manifestation ...
"The efficacy of hypertonic saline nasal irrigation for chronic sinonasal symptoms". Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 133 (1): 3-8. ... "The Efficacy of Hypertonic Saline Nasal Irrigation for Chronic Sinonasal Symptoms". Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. 133 ... "Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 12 (1): 9-13. doi:10.1097/00020840-200402000-00004. PMID 14712112.. ... It is also reported to be an effective measure against chronic sinus symptoms induced by work-place exposure to sawdust.[5] ...
Symptoms and signs: Speech and voice / Symptoms involving head and neck (R47-R49, 784) ... This disorder is called anomic aphasia when acquired by brain damage, usually from a head injury, stroke, or dementia.[11] ... Anomic aphasia is the inability to recall words and names and is a common symptom of patients with Aphasia and Alzheimer's ... ", "on the tip/point/head of the tongue", "on the top of the tongue", "on the front of the tongue", "sparkling at the end of ...
The symptoms resembled those of individuals who had suffered minor head injuries. One theory for a causal mechanism is that the ...
One should have a high level of suspicion when neurological symptoms occur upon head rotation. Symptoms tend to be worsened on ... Signs and symptoms[edit]. Possible symptoms include: *Sharp, shooting pain in the jaw, back of the throat, base of the tongue,[ ... In these cases, turning the head can cause compression of the artery or a tear inside the blood vessel, which restricts blood ... Diagnosis is suspected when a patient presents with the symptoms of the classic form of "Eagle syndrome" e.g. unilateral neck ...
Symptoms can include the dog shaking its head or scratching at its ears more frequently. The ear canal will appear inflamed, a ... a domed head and a shorter muzzle, while the English variety is taller with a narrower head and chest. Cocker spaniel coats ... Working type dogs tend to be larger with flatter heads and shorter ears. The coat also tends to be shorter and finer than the ... Symptoms can include discoloring of the pupil, and treatment may include surgery to remove the cataract. Lady, a female ...
Symptoms include weakness in limbs, head tremors, low appetite, nasal discharge, and death within 3-4 days. However, there are ... The virus can incubate from one day up to over a year before any symptoms begin to show. Symptoms have a rapid onset and can ... "Rabies Symptoms in Cats , petMD". www.petmd.com. Retrieved 2016-12-04.. ... In one study, 9 of 10 monkeys developed severe symptoms or died within 20 days of infection.[23] Rabies is often a concern for ...
Somatic symptoms can include sensations and pain in head, chest and back, abdomen, limbs, or whole body; whereas, mental and ... The appearance of symptoms during or after qigong practice has been explained in various ways by the psychiatric community, in ... Symptoms are often identified as being in one of three categories: panic, discomfort, and uncontrolled spontaneous movement; ... The Chinese medical literature includes a wider variety of symptoms associated with qigong deviation; the non-psychotic ...
Symptoms include scratching and shaking of the head. Treatment includes topical selamectin, or injections of ivermectin and ... Ear mites cause inflammatory symptoms, similar to bacterial and yeast infections. Symptoms include itching and redness of the ... However, since mite irritation is partly allergic (see scabies), symptoms may also outlive mites by weeks. Moreover, it may ...
Infected plants do not demonstrate symptoms until heading. Kernels of infected plants are replaced by masses of dark brown smut ... Smutted heads are hard and compact. Infected plants may be stunted. Occasionally smut sori may also develop in leaf blades, ...
Symptoms and signs: Speech and voice / Symptoms involving head and neck (R47-R49, 784) ... Non-specific symptoms[edit]. Non-specific symptoms are self-reported symptoms that do not indicate a specific disease process ... A symptom can be subjective or objective. Tiredness is a subjective symptom whereas cough or fever are objective symptoms.[2] ... In describing mental disorders,[5][6] especially schizophrenia, symptoms can be divided into positive and negative symptoms.[7] ...
Symptoms include bleeding from the back eyes and the head. The virus is 70 nm in diameter and replicates best at 20-30 degrees ...
The classic symptom of subarachnoid hemorrhage is thunderclap headache (a headache described as "like being kicked in the head ... Subarachnoid hemorrhage may also occur in people who have had a head injury. Symptoms may include headache, decreased level of ... Neurocognitive symptoms, such as fatigue, mood disturbances, and other related symptoms are common sequelae. Even in those who ... the back of the head).[7] About one-third of people have no symptoms apart from the characteristic headache, and about one in ...
The person may feel tired or "hung over" and have head pain, cognitive difficulties, gastrointestinal symptoms, mood changes, ... symptoms can resolve completely, symptoms can continue but become gradually less with time, symptoms may continue at the same ... During perimenopause symptoms often get worse before decreasing in severity.[139] While symptoms resolve in about two thirds of ... doi:10.1111/head.12948. PMC 5335856. PMID 27634619.. *^ a b c Levy D, Strassman AM, Burstein R (June 2009). "A critical view on ...
Treatment is required for: visual symptoms, strabismus, or incorrect head position. Acquired cases that have active ... Normalization of head position may occur but restoration of full motility is seldom achieved. A second procedure may be ... Harold W. Brown characterized the syndrome in many ways such as: Limited elevation in the eye when head is straight up Eyes ... This definition indicates that when the head is upright, the eye is restricted in movement due to problems with muscles and ...
"The efficacy of hypertonic saline nasal irrigation for chronic sinonasal symptoms". Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 133 (1): 3-8. ... "The Efficacy of Hypertonic Saline Nasal Irrigation for Chronic Sinonasal Symptoms". Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. 133 ... Nasal irrigation is used for a range of sinus and nasal symptoms. For chronic sinusitis it can be an effective add-on therapy. ... It is also reported to be an effective measure against chronic sinus symptoms induced by work-place exposure to sawdust. ...
Head drop may also be a presenting symptom. Dysphagia may occur, as can respiratory insufficiency. The etiology is unknown. ... Weakness in a limb-girdle distribution, hips and shoulders, after age 40 is generally the first symptom. Sometimes the weakness ...
When eaten it produces symptoms of violent shivering, head-shaking and fever. It can be fatal in smaller or less healthy ...
In other cases, alcohol consumption, head injury, or international travel precede symptoms. Lifestyle habits, such as stress, ... Because KLS is rare, other conditions with similar symptoms are usually considered first. MRIs can determine if the symptoms ... Another case with similar symptoms was described by Brierre de Boismont in 1862. Five patients with symptoms of persistent ... The severity of symptoms and the course of the syndrome vary between sufferers. Patients commonly have about 20 episodes over ...
focus & black dots - All fatigues, specially reading, brings on these Head symptoms ?? nervousness when E[mma] leaves me ..." [ ... Arguments for the Chagas hypothesis were mainly his gastric symptoms and some of his nervous signs and symptoms (caused in ... The symptoms abated as he aged, which is not typical for the disease, where age exacerbates the symptoms; He did not seem to ... These symptoms displayed by Darwin may have been diagnosed today as a form of dysautonomia known as hyperadrenergic postural ...
... the head is brought back to meet the K.E.D. unless crepitus, pain or resistance is met. If these symptoms are present, the head ... Head strap and Top torso strap. The head pad can bring the head too far forward for the side panels to fully immobilize it. ... Following application of the leg straps the void between the head and device is padded as needed and the head is secured. ... Care must be taken to secure the head properly to maintain neutral immobilization. If the head is too far forward, ...
Infected plants show symptoms of chlorosis, stunting and often do not properly head. Some of the most important fruits and ... In celery, CMV can cause streaking and spotting and can be often confused with symptoms of the celery mosaic virus. Symptoms of ... CMV shows symptoms on leaves known as the "shoestring" effect for most host species. This effect causes young leaves to appear ... Symptoms in Commelina diffusa CMV is mainly transmitted by aphids. It can also be spread mechanically by humans. However CMV is ...
Oscillopsia, visual symptoms of Bilateral Vestibulopathy only occur when the head is moving. For instance, when driving, a ... Symptoms typically include imbalance and visual problems. Dark or unsure situations generally increase this imbalance.The ... Transient visual blurring occurs with quick movements of the head. Your physician will make on your history, physical ... Computation of eye-head movements in oscllopsic patients: modifications: modifications induced by re-education. Adv ORL 42:294- ...
Signs and symptoms[edit]. The symptoms are pain and tenderness in the specific location of the hand, which corresponds to the ... Boxer's fracture of the 5th metacarpal head from punching a wall. Specialty. Emergency medicine, orthopedics. ... Diagnosis is generally suspected based on symptoms and confirmed with X-rays.[3] ... Symptoms include pain and a depressed knuckle.[2] ... Based on symptoms and confirmed by X-rays[3]. Treatment. Buddy ...
Distal symmetric polyneuropathy symptoms include atrophy of the distal leg muscles and the muscles of the head, and rear limb ... Symptoms start at the age of 8 to 10 weeks, and include frequent falling and walking on the hock. The prognosis is poor. The ... Symptoms include decreased or absent reflexes and muscle tone, weakness, or paralysis. It often occurs in the rear legs and is ... Symptoms usually start between the ages of 7 and 10 weeks, and include weakness, decreased reflexes, and loss of bark. Sensory ...
Results: The perceived location of voices (inside/outside the head), the number of voices, loudness, and personification did ... Characteristics of AVHs were quantified using the Psychotic Symptoms Rating Scales Auditory Hallucinations subscale. ...
... author the symptoms and signs of the psychological disorder that includes memory loss ... Symptoms of Dissociative Disorders. Symptoms associated with psychogenic amnesia include a memory loss associated with extreme ... Amnesia may be caused by a head injury or extensive psychological stress. With fugue, the individual develops amnesia and ... Paper Masters writes custom research papers on Dissociative Disorders and author the symptoms and signs of the psychological ...
This MNT Knowledge Center article explains the causes, risk factors, and symptoms of a head cold, as well as how to treat and ... A head cold is a viral infection of the upper respiratory tract. It is usually a mild illness, but it can have a significant ... What is a head cold?. A head cold may resemble other similar conditions but differs due to the location of the symptoms. ... A head cold occurs when a viral infection causes symptoms primarily in the head, such as a stuffy nose or a headache. It ...
Learn how to detect, prevent, and treat head injuries. ... A head injury is any harm to your brain, skull, or scalp. It ... You should see a doctor if you think you have a head injury. They will ask about how the injury occurred, your symptoms, and ... A head injury is any harm to your brain, skull, or scalp. Head injuries can be mild, moderate, or severe. Common types include: ... Other symptoms include ringing in your ears, neck pain, or vision problems. These symptoms often go away in a few weeks, but ...
Head lice are about 2 to 3 mm long and can infest the head, eyebrows and eyelashes. ... This Head Lice Symptoms page on EmpowHER Womens Health works best with javascript enabled in your browser.. Toggle navigation ... Head lice are about 2 to 3 mm long and can infest the head, eyebrows and eyelashes. Body lice are 2.3 to 3.6 mm long and live ... www.empowher.com/head-lice/content/battle-bugs-what-you-need-know-about-head-lice ...
In this article, learn about the types of head injuries, common symptoms, how to recognize a concussion, and when to see a ... Head injuries range from mild to severe. Some are treatable at home with ice and rest, while others are life-threatening and ... A head injury may present different symptoms. There are a range of head injury types, and the injury can be more or less severe ... Moderate and severe head injuries require immediate treatment. If the symptoms of a mild head injury last for more than 2 weeks ...
All head injuries should be treated seriously and assessed by a doctor. Get the facts about 6 major types. ... A head injury is an injury to your brain, skull, or scalp. ... What are the symptoms of a head injury?. Your head has more ... The symptoms of a severe head injury include many of the symptoms of minor head injuries. They can also include:. *. a loss of ... However, not all head injuries cause bleeding.. Its important to be aware of other symptoms to watch out for. Many symptoms of ...
In addition to causing sniffles and a sore throat, a head cold can leave you feeling tired and rundown for several days. Well ... Though a head cold is usually a mild illness, it can still impact your daily life. ... explain the causes and symptoms of this common condition, and show you how to find relief. ... Head cold symptoms usually appear one to three days after youve been exposed to the virus. Your symptoms should last for seven ...
A congested head may result in a myriad of unpleasant symptoms involving the eyes, ears, nose and throat. Thankfully, these are ... Head congestion is commonly known as a head cold, but may actually have several causes other than the cold virus. ... symptoms-head-congestion.html. 13 May 2017. Monroe, Heather. (2017, May 13). Symptoms of Head Congestion. . Retrieved from http ... www.ehow.co.uk/about_5094742_symptoms-head-congestion.html Monroe, Heather. "Symptoms of Head Congestion" last modified May 13 ...
They also can be physical symptoms of depression. Learn more from WebMD about how depression can be felt throughout the body. ... WebMDs Symptom Finder: Physical Symptoms of Depression - Head / Neck. Headaches, neck aches, dizziness. These problems have ... Print out this symptom diary, and fill it out. Then take it to your doctor to discuss what may be causing your symptoms. ... Excessive sleeping can also be a symptom of depression.. Keeping a symptom diary can help you identify patterns and understand ...
... from head to toe...adding in How often they effect you & for how long..and how debillitating each symptom may bee... ... have any of you just jotted down your symptoms... ... have any of you just jotted down your symptoms...from head to ... I keep a calendar on my computer just for symptoms. After 7 years of this, Ive noticed that my worst symptoms appear in ... Her symptoms sounded a lot like FM. Shes feeling much better. Thanks, Rose et al. Keeping a journal to share with Doc is great ...
Phosphorus - head - materia medica indications (symptoms) by T.F. Allen, Boericke, Boger, Clarke, Hahnemann, Hering, Kent ... Phosphorus - Head symptoms Phosphurus, Phosphorous, Phosphor, Phosphur, Phosph. Available in 4X-30X, 200X, 2C-30C, 200C, 1M-50M ... Head. GeneralModalities EtcRelationshipsMindVertigo, DizzinessEyeEarNoseFaceMouthSkinThroatChestCoughExpectorationRespiration ... from certain movements; rising (see morning, noon, night, etc., on rising, also movement; raising head); after rising ...
Read about head injury (traumatic brain injury) symptoms, treatment, criterion, types, recovery, and more. ... home/ neurology center/neurology a-z list/head injury index/head injury article/find a local doctor/local resources minnetonka, ... Head Injury (Brain Injury). Head injury facts. *Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) account for thousands of deaths each year in the ... Minnetonka Doctors and Specialists for Head Injury. Doctors in Minnetonka, MN. Dont see your city? Use the WebMD Physician ...
Symptoms following mild head injury: expectation as aetiology.. Mittenberg W1, DiGiulio DV, Perrin S, Bass AE. ... The checklist of symptoms was also administered to a group of patients with head injuries for comparison. Imaginary concussion ... Symptom expectations appear to share as much variance with postconcussion syndrome as head injury itself. An aetiological role ... Subjects indicated their current experiences of symptoms, then imagined having sustained a mild head injury in a motor vehicle ...
While head and neck cancers make up only about 4% of all cancer cases, at least 75% of them are caused by tobacco and alcohol ... Head and Neck Cancer Fact Sheet: National Cancer Institute. (n.d.). "Head and Neck Cancer." cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/head ... Head and Neck Cancers. Lets Talk About Head and Neck Cancers. Weve got the doctor-approved scoop on causes, symptoms, ... Head and Neck Overview: Thyroid, Head and Neck Cancer Foundation. (n.d.). "Head and Neck Cancer Guide." headandneckcancerguide. ...
HEADS UP to Parents. * HEADS UP to Youth Sports ... Concussion Symptoms Reported. *Headache or "pressure" in head. ... Signs and symptoms generally show up soon after the injury. However, you may not know how serious the injury is at first and ... Children and teens who show or report one or more of the signs and symptoms listed below, or simply say they just "dont feel ... If your child or teens concussion signs or symptoms get worse, you should take him or her to the emergency department right ...
Mental Symptoms - ABC Homeopathy Forum. Lycopodium Clavatum, Valeriana and Staphysagria are mentioned. 1 reply to 2006-09-13. ... and head pressure. The head pressure has gotten worse and I feel very hot in my upper body, face, head, chest tightness. 25th ... Head pressure / mental symptoms. I have follow-up appointment next saturday. Ive been quite badly stressed and anxious, ... If symptoms persist, seek professional medical attention. Bear in mind that even minor symptoms can be a sign of a more serious ...
Carbo Veg - HEAD indications (symptoms) from 12 materia medicas, linked and cross referenced. Available 6X-30X, 200X, 3C-30C, ... Carbo Vegetabilis - Head symptoms Vegetable Charcoal, Carbo Veg, Carboveg, Charcoal, Carbo-v. ... Below are the main rubriks (i.e strongest indications or symptoms) of Carbo Veg in traditional homeopathic usage, not reviewed ... certain movements; raising head. certain movements; rising (see morning, noon, night, etc., on rising, also movement; raising ...
Symptoms, Resources, Treatments and Tools for head aches. Find head aches information, treatments for head aches and head aches ... head aches - MedHelps head aches Center for Information, ... Posts on head aches (28). head ach - Migraines & Headaches ... Hi abut 2yrs ago since I hve been having this head ach....both of my front side of head pa... ... i usually suffer head aches when im expose to light. i dont know what to do. im so afrai... ...
Symptoms, Resources, Treatments and Tools for no head. Find no head information, treatments for no head and no head symptoms. ... no head - MedHelps no head Center for Information, ... Posts on no head (165254). Small hard nodules on the back of my ... My head has been hurting all day. Do anyone know anything I can take ? Its starting to fee... ... can the head of the penis over-grow?? and possibly b to big for the foreskin to retract? ...
Those with head lice may see crawling bugs on their skin,... ... Typical symptoms of head lice include an itchy scalp, swollen ... How do you treat head lice with Listerine?. A: To treat head lice with Listerine, soak the persons head with the mouthwash, ... Typical symptoms of head lice include an itchy scalp, swollen lymph nodes and pink eye, according to the American Academy of ... What do you do about head lice?. A: Apply a medicated shampoo, lotion or cream specially formulated to eradicate head lice to ...
Head lice are a common occurrence for millions of families across America and the world. Lice or louse are tiny almost ... Head Lice. Head lice is the most commonly occurrence of lice there is. Head lice and body lice look the same when you see it. A ... Head Lice Symptoms and Head Lice Facts. By kimmi9371 Jan 25, 2011 ... Head Lice Treatment. One of the main ways to remove the lice is to buy Lice treatment medication from a store. Often the ...
Find the most comprehensive real-world symptom and treatment data on head contusion at PatientsLikeMe. 5 patients with head ... 1 a head contusion patient reports severe anxious mood (33%). * 1 a head contusion patient reports moderate anxious mood (33%) ... 1 a head contusion patient reports severe depressed mood (33%). * 0 head contusion patients report moderate depressed mood (0%) ... What is head contusion?. A head contusion is a bruise to the brain. ...
Most cases of a lump on the back of the head is a result of a benign growth or a ... ... A bump on the back of the head may raise alarms as it could be more than just a bump. ... Symptoms of a Bump on the Back of the Head. Depending on the underlying cause and the condition of the bumps, a new growth may ... If a lump on the back of the head hurts to the touch, it may also have accompanying symptoms with characteristics that can ...
J Head Trauma Rehabil. 1999 Aug;14(4):337-50. Comparative Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Govt ... J Head Trauma Rehabil. 1999 Aug;14(4):337-50.. Postconcussive symptoms in children with mild closed head injuries.. Yeates KO1 ... To examine the incidence and neuropsychological, behavioral, and neuroimaging correlates of postconcussive symptoms (PCS) in ... children with mild closed head injuries (CHI).. DESIGN: 26 Children with mild CHI and 8 of their uninjured siblings, from 8 to ...
  • In order to determine the influence of the socio-economic status of the family and the hygienic practices in the home on the prevalence of head lice infestation in children, 3,000 questionnaires were distributed to the parents of children in schools. (huji.ac.il)
  • And the stress associated with these responsibilities is related to health issues, such as PMS, lifestyle changes, membership in supportive groups, the use of stress control methods along with supplementary drugs and vitamins may help relieve the symptoms of the disease But information on the complete treatment of this disease is currently very limited [ 4 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Dissociative Disorders research papers author the symptoms and signs of the psychological disorder that includes memory loss and identity change. (papermasters.com)
  • Amnesia may be caused by a head injury or extensive psychological stress . (papermasters.com)
  • Symptoms associated with psychogenic amnesia include a memory loss associated with extreme psychological stress. (papermasters.com)
  • Menstrual cycle is one of the most important signs of reproductive system functioning in females, but sometimes this phenomenon is associated with signs and symptoms that cause physical and psychological problems for women. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Since precise pathophysiology of PMS is not known, there is no definitive treatment for it, and most of the symptom is being treated. (biomedcentral.com)
  • PMS refers to a set of repetitive symptoms that begins at the end of the secretion phase of the menstrual cycle (5-7 days before menstruation) and ends in the follicular phase (2-4 days after menstruation) [ 1 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Since 1990 over 16,000 school and kindergarten children in Israel were examined for infestation with head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis). (huji.ac.il)
  • Head louse infestations continue to be a public health problem worldwide. (huji.ac.il)
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