The removal of a limb or other appendage or outgrowth of the body. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Loss of a limb or other bodily appendage by accidental injury.
The part of a limb or tail following amputation that is proximal to the amputated section.
Prosthetic replacements for arms, legs, and parts thereof.
Common foot problems in persons with DIABETES MELLITUS, caused by any combination of factors such as DIABETIC NEUROPATHIES; PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISEASES; and INFECTION. With the loss of sensation and poor circulation, injuries and infections often lead to severe foot ulceration, GANGRENE and AMPUTATION.
The region of the lower limb in animals, extending from the gluteal region to the FOOT, and including the BUTTOCKS; HIP; and LEG.
The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.
Perception of painful and nonpainful phantom sensations that occur following the complete or partial loss of a limb. The majority of individuals with an amputated extremity will experience the impression that the limb is still present, and in many cases, painful. (From Neurol Clin 1998 Nov;16(4):919-36; Brain 1998 Sep;121(Pt 9):1603-30)
An alternative to amputation in patients with neoplasms, ischemia, fractures, and other limb-threatening conditions. Generally, sophisticated surgical procedures such as vascular surgery and reconstruction are used to salvage diseased limbs.
Death and putrefaction of tissue usually due to a loss of blood supply.
A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.
Amputation or separation at a joint. (Dorland, 28th ed)
General or unspecified injuries involving the fingers.
General or unspecified injuries involving the leg.
Any one of five terminal digits of the vertebrate FOOT.
Lesion on the surface of the skin of the foot, usually accompanied by inflammation. The lesion may become infected or necrotic and is frequently associated with diabetes or leprosy.
The farthest or outermost projections of the body, such as the HAND and FOOT.
Pathological processes involving any one of the BLOOD VESSELS in the vasculature outside the HEART.
Restoration of an organ or other structure to its original site.
Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.
A specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of foot disorders and injuries and anatomic defects of the foot.
The distal extremity of the leg in vertebrates, consisting of the tarsus (ANKLE); METATARSUS; phalanges; and the soft tissues surrounding these bones.
Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.
The physiological renewal, repair, or replacement of tissue.
The continuation of the femoral artery coursing through the popliteal fossa; it divides into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries.
The removal of foreign material and devitalized or contaminated tissue from or adjacent to a traumatic or infected lesion until surrounding healthy tissue is exposed. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.
Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.
Injuries resulting when a person is struck by particles impelled with violent force from an explosion. Blast causes pulmonary concussion and hemorrhage, laceration of other thoracic and abdominal viscera, ruptured ear drums, and minor effects in the central nervous system. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Membranous appendage of fish and other aquatic organisms used for locomotion or balance.
The anterior and posterior arteries created at the bifurcation of the popliteal artery. The anterior tibial artery begins at the lower border of the popliteus muscle and lies along the tibia at the distal part of the leg to surface superficially anterior to the ankle joint. Its branches are distributed throughout the leg, ankle, and foot. The posterior tibial artery begins at the lower border of the popliteus muscle, lies behind the tibia in the lower part of its course, and is found situated between the medial malleolus and the medial process of the calcaneal tuberosity. Its branches are distributed throughout the leg and foot.
The forepart of the foot including the metatarsals and the TOES.
The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.
General or unspecified injuries involving the arm.
The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.
A front limb of a quadruped. (The Random House College Dictionary, 1980)
A region of the lower extremity immediately surrounding and including the KNEE JOINT.
Lack of perfusion in the EXTREMITIES resulting from atherosclerosis. It is characterized by INTERMITTENT CLAUDICATION, and an ANKLE BRACHIAL INDEX of 0.9 or less.
The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.
Ulceration of the skin and underlying structures of the lower extremity. About 90% of the cases are due to venous insufficiency (VARICOSE ULCER), 5% to arterial disease, and the remaining 5% to other causes.
Anatomical and functional disorders affecting the foot.
The noninvasive measurement or determination of the partial pressure (tension) of oxygen and/or carbon dioxide locally in the capillaries of a tissue by the application to the skin of a special set of electrodes. These electrodes contain photoelectric sensors capable of picking up the specific wavelengths of radiation emitted by oxygenated versus reduced hemoglobin.
Amputation of a lower limb through the sacroiliac joint.
A non-atherosclerotic, inflammatory thrombotic disease that commonly involves small and medium-sized arteries or veins in the extremities. It is characterized by occlusive THROMBOSIS and FIBROSIS in the vascular wall leading to digital and limb ISCHEMIA and ulcerations. Thromboangiitis obliterans is highly associated with tobacco smoking.
The fitting and adjusting of artificial parts of the body. (From Stedman's, 26th ed)
Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The bone of the lower leg lateral to and smaller than the tibia. In proportion to its length, it is the most slender of the long bones.
Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.
A family of Urodela consisting of 15 living genera and about 42 species and occurring in North America, Europe, Asia, and North Africa.
Hospitals providing medical care to veterans of wars.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
General or unspecified injuries to the hand.
Conditions or pathological processes associated with the disease of diabetes mellitus. Due to the impaired control of BLOOD GLUCOSE level in diabetic patients, pathological processes develop in numerous tissues and organs including the EYE, the KIDNEY, the BLOOD VESSELS, and the NERVE TISSUE.
Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.
VASCULAR DISEASES that are associated with DIABETES MELLITUS.
Common occlusive arterial disease which is caused by ATHEROSCLEROSIS. It is characterized by lesions in the innermost layer (ARTERIAL INTIMA) of arteries including the AORTA and its branches to the extremities. Risk factors include smoking, HYPERLIPIDEMIA, and HYPERTENSION.
A sarcoma originating in bone-forming cells, affecting the ends of long bones. It is the most common and most malignant of sarcomas of the bones, and occurs chiefly among 10- to 25-year-old youths. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
The part of the foot between the tarsa and the TOES.
General or unspecified injuries involving the foot.
The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.
Chronic progressive degeneration of the stress-bearing portion of a joint, with bizarre hypertrophic changes at the periphery. It is probably a complication of a variety of neurologic disorders, particularly TABES DORSALIS, involving loss of sensation, which leads to relaxation of supporting structures and chronic instability of the joint. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.
The superior part of the upper extremity between the SHOULDER and the ELBOW.
A salamander found in Mexican mountain lakes and accounting for about 30 percent of the urodeles used in research. The axolotl remains in larval form throughout its life, a phenomenon known as neoteny.
Invasion of the site of trauma by pathogenic microorganisms.
Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.
A disorder present in the newborn infant in which constriction rings or bands, causing soft tissue depressions, encircle digits, extremities, or limbs and sometimes the neck, thorax, or abdomen. They may be associated with intrauterine amputations.
The tunnel in the lower anterior ABDOMINAL WALL through which the SPERMATIC CORD, in the male; ROUND LIGAMENT, in the female; nerves; and vessels pass. Its internal end is at the deep inguinal ring and its external end is at the superficial inguinal ring.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Neoplasms of whatever cell type or origin, occurring in the extraskeletal connective tissue framework of the body including the organs of locomotion and their various component structures, such as nerves, blood vessels, lymphatics, etc.
Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.
Former members of the armed services.
Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.
A tumor made up of nerve cells and nerve fibers. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Peripheral, autonomic, and cranial nerve disorders that are associated with DIABETES MELLITUS. These conditions usually result from diabetic microvascular injury involving small blood vessels that supply nerves (VASA NERVORUM). Relatively common conditions which may be associated with diabetic neuropathy include third nerve palsy (see OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES); MONONEUROPATHY; mononeuropathy multiplex; diabetic amyotrophy; a painful POLYNEUROPATHY; autonomic neuropathy; and thoracoabdominal neuropathy. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1325)
Surgical removal of an obstructing clot or foreign material which has been transported from a distant vessel by the bloodstream. Removal of a clot at its original site is called THROMBECTOMY.
Pathological processes involving any of the BLOOD VESSELS in the cardiac or peripheral circulation. They include diseases of ARTERIES; VEINS; and rest of the vasculature system in the body.
Sir James Syme - A new method of ankle amputation that did not involve amputating at the thigh. ... These include hip disarticulation, transfemoral prosthesis, knee disarticulation, transtibial prosthesis, Syme's amputation, ... Transradial (below the elbow amputation) and transtibial prostheses (below the knee amputation) typically cost between US $ ... Bigg, Henry Robert Heather (1885) Artificial Limbs and the Amputations which Afford the Most Appropriate Stumps in Civil and ...
Syme amputation) Knee disarticulation Hemi-pelvictomy (Hip disarticulation) Partial foot amputations (Pirogoff, Talo-Navicular ... Came to be known as "Anglesey Leg" or "Selpho Leg". Sir James Syme - A new method of ankle amputation that did not involve ... These include hip disarticulation, transfemoral prosthesis, knee disarticulation, transtibial prosthesis, Syme's amputation, ... Transradial (below the elbow amputation) and transtibial prostheses (below the knee amputation) typically cost between US $ ...
James Syme (1799-1870) pioneered the Symes Amputation for the ankle joint and successfully carried out the first hip ... He also described more efficient techniques for the effective ligation of the blood vessels during an amputation. In the same ... This also meant that operations were largely restricted to amputations and external growth removals. Beginning in the 1840s, ... In the 13th century in Europe skilled town craftsmen called barber-surgeons performed amputations and set broken bones while ...
"Syme's Amputation" (New York, 1871), and "Immobile Apparatus for Ununited Fractures" (New York, 1872). Hudson married and had a ... and amputations at the knee- and ankle-joints. He invented several prosthetic and orthopedic appliances to aid in such efforts ...
Epiphysiodesis Early amputations Application of a prosthesis There has been positive feedback with the use of Syme amputation. ...
... and James Syme (1799-1870) pioneered the Symes Amputation for the ankle joint and successfully carried out the first hip ... By type of procedure: Amputation involves cutting off a body part, usually a limb or digit; castration is also an example. ... He also described more efficient techniques for the effective ligation of the blood vessels during an amputation. The ... This also meant that operations were largely restricted to amputations and external growth removals. Beginning in the 1840s, ...
Common forms of ankle disarticulations include Pyrogoff, Boyd, and Syme amputations. A less common major amputation is the Van ... minor and major amputations. Minor amputations generally refer to the amputation of digits. Major amputations are commonly ... Types of amputations include: partial foot amputation amputation of the lower limb distal to the ankle joint ankle ... Facial amputations include but are not limited to: beheading decapitation amputation of the ears amputation of the nose ( ...
His private practice had become very considerable, his position having been assured ever since his amputation at the hip joint ... James Syme was born on 7 November 1799 at 51 Princes Street in Edinburgh. His father was John Syme WS of Cartmore and Lochore, ... In 1856, Syme's daughter Agnes married Joseph Lister, who in 1854 had been appointed first assistant surgeon to Syme at the ... When Liston removed to London in 1835 Syme became the leading consulting surgeon in Scotland. In 1847 Syme was accepted the ...
He had to sustain much opposition, especially from Syme, but he did not imitate his opponent's mode of controversy; and if on ... and amputations of limbs. His skill in dissection, and his careful study of the actions of the muscles which he had to cut ... for James Syme had already been very successful in this line of procedure. But Fergusson extended the principle from the ... he shared with James Syme the best surgical practice in Scotland. In 1840 Fergusson accepted the professorship of surgery at ...
The faster the surgery was, the lower the rate of complications (leading to reports of very quick amputations). The advent of ... Respected surgeons in Europe including Liston, Dieffenbach, Pirogov, and Syme quickly undertook numerous operations with ether ... Chaloner EJ, Flora HS, Ham RJ (August 2001). "Amputations at the London Hospital 1852-1857". Journal of the Royal Society of ... and extremity amputations. Before his death in 1835, Hanaoka performed more than 150 operations for breast cancer. However, ...
"I recommended immediate amputation" he wrote "more especially having the dread of secondary haemorrhage and lockjaw before my ... He was appointed House Surgeon in the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh under Professor James Syme (1799-1870) and Professor James ...
Syme, Rachel. "Julien Baker Believes in God". The New Yorker. Conde Nast. Cannon, Joshua; Shaw, Chris. "Beale Street Music Fest ... after an accident in his twenties resulting in the amputation of his leg, dedicated his life to making experimental prosthetic ...
Burrows, G. and B. Syme, (2000), Zero-base budgeting: origins and pioneers, Abacus, 36(2): 226-41. The Times, 20 July 1960, p. ... necessitating the amputation of his right arm, and, finally, in the Russian campaign, commanding an armoured train on the line ... and Syme, B. (2000), p.233. Debrett's Peerage & Baronetage. 2000. Hansard 1803-2005: contributions in Parliament by Hilton ...
Ronald Syme, The Roman Revolution (Oxford University Press, 1939, reprinted 2002), p. 57 online Archived 2016-05-13 at the ... as well as the injury and subsequent amputation of Malik's arm. Malik retrieved the Templar treasure that Altaïr had failed to ...
... and James Syme (1799-1870) pioneered the Symes Amputation for the ankle joint and successfully carried out the first hip ... By type of procedure: Amputation involves cutting off a body part, usually a limb or digit; castration is also an example. ... He also described more efficient techniques for the effective ligation of the blood vessels during an amputation. ... This also meant that operations were largely restricted to amputations and external growth removals. Beginning in the 1840s, ...
Syme amputation. Tue, 09/04/2012 - 13:18 - Dcarter_7 Hello. My daughter is two and she is going to have syme amputation in ... Re: Syme amputation. We opted to *not* get an amputation and just get a customized prothosis. It is essentially an AFO with a ... 3. Why do it now? You can always do an amputation later. There are some stories of people who opted to do a symes as a teenager ... 1. Why recommend the symes as opposed to no amputation? If the reason is "cosmetics" or "it will fit in pants" or "easier to ...
The goals of a Syme amputation are to remove diseased tissue or a non-usable foot and create a functional, painless limb. ... A Syme amputation is an amputation done through the ankle joint. The foot is removed but the heel pad is saved so the patient ... A Syme amputation is an amputation done through the ankle joint. The foot is removed but the heel pad is saved so the patient ... The goals of a Syme amputation are to remove diseased tissue or a non-usable foot and create a functional, painless limb. ...
Endoscopic revision of an infected Syme amputation. Case report and review of the literature.: Arthroscopic revision of intra- ... Endoscopic revision of an infected Syme amputation. Case report and review of the literature.. Authors * Prymka, M ... This paper presents the case of a 54-year-old man after a Syme amputation of his left leg because of diabetic gangrene of the ... To our knowledge, there is no description of endoscopic management of an infected amputation stump. ...
SYME AMPUTATION PERFORMED IN TWO STAGES. Spittler, August W.; Brennan, John J.; Payne, John W. ...
A Case of Bilateral Symes Amputation Br Med J 1947; 2 :211 (Published 09 August 1947) ...
Lindquist, C., E. B. Riska: Chopart, Pirogoff & Syme amputations. Acta orthop. scand. 37 (1966), 110-116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Wagner, F. W., Amputations of the foot and ankle-current status. Clin. Orthop. 122 (1977), 62-69.PubMedGoogle Scholar ... Boyd, H. B.: Amputation of the foot with calcaneotibial arthrodesis. J. Bone Jt Surg. 21-A (1939), 997-1000.Google Scholar ... Harris, W. R., E. A. Silverstein: Partial amputations of the Foot-a follow up study. Canad. J. Surg. 7 (1964), 6-11.PubMed ...
Amputation Flashcards Preview PTRS 746 Exam 1 Combined and Randomized , Amputation , Flashcards ... Q: ____% of those with PVD results in amputation will eventually undergo _________ amputations. ... Uncommon in individuals with congenital amputation 4. More common after crush injury or amputation in later life ... T/F: Amputations rates decrease with age and are twice as common in women. ...
Sir James Syme - A new method of ankle amputation that did not involve amputating at the thigh. ... These include hip disarticulation, transfemoral prosthesis, knee disarticulation, transtibial prosthesis, Symes amputation, ... Transradial (below the elbow amputation) and transtibial prostheses (below the knee amputation) typically cost between US $ ... Bigg, Henry Robert Heather (1885) Artificial Limbs and the Amputations which Afford the Most Appropriate Stumps in Civil and ...
Symes amputation. Ankle disarticulation amputation. Hemicorpectomy. Amputation of both legs and pelvis. ...
Syme amputation ( between 10 and 14 months of age ) *Prosthesis should be fitted within one month of the surgery. ... including amputation at less desirable level, and the lengthened extremity will still not be normal. ...
Amputation Surgeries. 20. Post-Op/Pre-Prosthetic Care. 21. Prosthetic Feet. 22. Partial Foot and Syme. 23. Transtibial ... Prosthetic Options for Persons with Upper Extremity Amputation. 31. Rehabilitation for Persons with Upper Extremity Amputation ... NEW! Chapter on Athletics after Amputation explores advanced training and athletics, including running and athletic competition ... Prosthetic Options for Persons with High and Bilateral Amputation. 26. Early Rehabilitation in Lower Extremity Dysvascular ...
For two patients, a Symes amputation was performed. The outcome was considered satisfactory in 17 patients (53%) and ... Amputation*. Ankle Joint / physiopathology, surgery. Child. Child, Preschool. Ectromelia / classification, physiopathology, ... Limb lengthening and deformity correction by the Ilizarov technique in type III fibular hemimelia: an alternative to amputation ... results for treatment of Type III congenital fibular hemimelia and can be considered a good alternative to amputation.. LEVEL ...
What is amputation in contiguity? Meaning of amputation in contiguity medical term. What does amputation in contiguity mean? ... Looking for online definition of amputation in contiguity in the Medical Dictionary? amputation in contiguity explanation free ... Symes amputation disarticulation of the foot with removal of both malleoli.. Teales amputation amputation with short and long ... Kinds of amputation include closed amputation, congenital amputation, open amputation, primary amputation, and secondary ...
Common forms of ankle disarticulations include Pyrogoff, Boyd, and Syme amputations. A less common major amputation is the Van ... minor and major amputations. Minor amputations generally refer to the amputation of digits. Major amputations are commonly ... Types of amputations include: partial foot amputation amputation of the lower limb distal to the ankle joint ankle ... Facial amputations include but are not limited to: beheading decapitation amputation of the ears amputation of the nose ( ...
15978409 - Symes amputation: a retrospective review of 10 cases.. 16959369 - Extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of malt ...
9.Bowker J. Partial foot and Syme amputations: an overview. Clin Prosthet Orthot 1987;12:10-13.. * Cited Here... ... amputation is through the metatarsals. The longest partial foot amputation is the distal metatarsal amputation, in which the ... Toe amputations may be for single or multiple toes (see Figure 1). The amputation may be a disarticulation or a resection ( ... The single size fits a Chopart amputation, as well as a long transmetatarsal amputation. There are no folds or seams to cause ...
All amputations distal to the ankle are designated minor. This includes the Syme procedure, in which the calcaneum, talus, and ... Total number of amputations, number of amputations after exclusion of cases with the ICD main diagnoses C00 D48, L00 L99, M00 ... Total number of amputations, number of amputations after exclusion of cases with the ICD main diagnoses C00 D48, L00 L99, M00 ... The term major amputation is used to mean any amputation above the ankle region, up to and including hemipelvectomy. ...
What is traumatic amputation? Meaning of traumatic amputation medical term. What does traumatic amputation mean? ... Looking for online definition of traumatic amputation in the Medical Dictionary? traumatic amputation explanation free. ... Symes amputation disarticulation of the foot with removal of both malleoli.. transfemoral amputation amputation of the lower ... above-knee (A-K) amputation transfemoral amputation.. below-elbow (B-E) amputation amputation of the upper limb between the ...
Amputation Surgeries. 20. Post-Op/Pre-Prosthetic Care. 21. Prosthetic Feet. 22. Partial Foot and Syme. 23. Transtibial ... Prosthetic Options for Persons with Upper Extremity Amputation. 31. Rehabilitation for Persons with Upper Extremity Amputation ... Prosthetic Options for Persons with High and Bilateral Amputation. 26. Early Rehabilitation in Lower Extremity Dysvascular ... Etiology of Amputation. 18. High Risk Foot and Wound Healing. 19. ...
... including the traditional approach of a Symes amputation. I have seen people do well with both the Symes approach and with ... People who have been diagnosed with cancer and are faced with the impending amputation of a leg find themselves in a state of ... The goal of tibia turn-up is to provide the person who faces a high-level, above-knee amputation with a longer, stronger ... For many years, the most common treatment for PFFD was to amputate at the ankle (Symes operation) and then fit the child with ...
Symes procedure, also called the terminal Syme operation is basically an amputation of the tip of the toe. It has nowadays no ... In the literature, the reader will find the names of Winograd, Zadik, Suppan, Frost, Kaplan and Syme. They are all surgical ...
perform amputations at lowest possible level to preserve function. *exception *Syme amputation is more efficient than midfoot ... Chopart or Boyd amputation (hindfoot amputation) *a partial foot amputation through the talonavicular and calcaneocuboid joints ... Syme amputation (ankle disarticulation) *patent tibialis posterior artery is required *more energy efficient than midfoot even ... OBQ06.53) Which of the following is most important to achieve a good outcome following a Syme amputation? Review Topic , Tested ...
Amputations in the foot area : (Chopart, Syme or Lisfranc) prostheses are made from carbon fibre or using the laminating ... Prostheses with amputations through the knee joint basically consist of a laminated funnel, a four-axis knee joint, a SACH foot ... Prostheses in amputations through the hip joint consist in their basic version of a laminated hip basket, hip joint, knee joint ... Amputation of the shank : basic prostheses consist of a laminated funnel, pipe connector, SACH foot and KBM or PTB suspension. ...
In 1843, Sir James Syme discovered a new method of ankle amputation that did not involve amputating at the thigh. This was ... He introduced modern amputation procedures (1529) to the medical community and made prostheses (1536) for upper- and lower- ... As the U. S. Civil War dragged on, the number of amputations rose astronomically, forcing Americans to enter the field of ... French Army barber/surgeon Ambroise Paré is considered by many to be the father of modern amputation surgery and prosthetic ...
Debate 4: Amputation...How Far Is Too Far?. 9:10 A.M.. Pro: Chopart and Syme Amputations Work Well Save As Much Function As ... Amputations in the Forefoot. Brian Schmidt, DPM. 8:40 A.M.. Role of Platelet Rich Gel and Other Growth Factors For Healing DFU ... Why Limb Preservation Matters: The Cost of Amputation. Niten Singh, MD. 8:30 A.M.. Disparities: Populations at Risk for DFU and ... Altering the Pathway to Amputation: "Change Direction or You May End Up Where You are Heading". Joseph Mills, MD. ...
Pro: Chopart and Syme Amputations Work Well Save As Much Function as Possible Christopher Attinger, MD ... Why Limb Preservation Matters: The Cost of Amputation. Niten Singh, MD. 8:30 A.M.. Disparities: Populations at Risk for DFU and ... Altering the Pathway to Amputation: "Change Direction or You May End Up Where You are Heading". Joseph Mills, MD. ... Below Knee Amputations as Viable Alternative to Limb Salvage Christopher Attinger, MD. ...
Syme amputation) Knee disarticulation Hemi-pelvictomy (Hip disarticulation) Partial foot amputations (Pirogoff, Talo-Navicular ... Came to be known as "Anglesey Leg" or "Selpho Leg". Sir James Syme - A new method of ankle amputation that did not involve ... These include hip disarticulation, transfemoral prosthesis, knee disarticulation, transtibial prosthesis, Symes amputation, ... Transradial (below the elbow amputation) and transtibial prostheses (below the knee amputation) typically cost between US $ ...
Syme Amputation Removal of foot at ankle (usually performed for injury, not for vascular problems). ... amputation is congenital or occurs at a young age.. 25. Lower Extremity Amputations*Hemipelvectomy Removal of leg and half of ... Medical Management of Amputation*If the amputation is planned, the individual is counseled on outcomes and attempts are made to ... undergone a similar amputation. *If the amputation is unplanned, attempts are made during surgery or medical management to ...
Symes amputation is, he stated, often useful (14), and although healing is delayed with the older two-stage approach, it is ... Higher amputations through the midfoot are the Lisfranc amputation at the tarsometatarsal joints and the Chopart amputation at ... Pinzur MS, Morrison C, Sage R, Stuck R, Osterman H, Vrbos L: Symes two-stage amputation in insulin-requiring diabetics with ... Partial foot amputations include toe, ray, midfoot, and Synes amputations. Ray resection is indicated for nonhealing ulcer of a ...
Distal Syme Hallux Amputation for Tip of Toe Wounds and Gangrene Complicated by Osteomyelitis of the Distal Phalanx: Surgical ...
  • For two patients, a Syme's amputation was performed. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Recommendation for surgical removal (Syme's amputation) of right foot was accepted by the parents and completed January 9, 1987 at age 10 months. (acpoc.org)
  • Syme's amputation involves a disarticulation of the ankle at the tibiotalar joint. (litfl.com)
  • A partial foot is characterized as an amputation occurring at the fore, mid or hind foot, not including the disarticulation of the ankle-foot, which is specified as a Syme's. (limbionics.com)
  • Common surgical procedures include disarticulation at Knee, Syme's amputation or Chopart amputation. (jocponline.com)
  • At three years old, my parents opted for a Syme's amputation to remove my left foot. (montnews.com)
  • The Syme's amputation is an ankle disarticulation or basically through the ankle amputation. (treasurestateoandp.com)
  • Rubin, G.: Prosthetic fitting problems of the quasi-Syme. (springer.com)
  • The two main subcategories of lower extremity prosthetic devices are trans-tibial (any amputation transecting the tibia bone or a congenital anomaly resulting in a tibial deficiency) and trans-femoral (any amputation transecting the femur bone or a congenital anomaly resulting in a femoral deficiency). (wikipedia.org)
  • Under these circumstances, it is difficult to talk openly with a surgeon about amputation and to meet with a prosthetist to discuss future prosthetic needs. (amputee-coalition.org)
  • The goal of tibia turn-up is to provide the person who faces a high-level, above-knee amputation with a longer, stronger residual limb for the prosthetic socket to lock onto. (amputee-coalition.org)
  • French Army barber/surgeon Ambroise Paré is considered by many to be the father of modern amputation surgery and prosthetic design. (amputee-coalition.org)
  • Typical effects of amputations include phantom pain, wound pain, depression, shortening of the muscles, tissue necrosis or skin death, failure to heal and prosthetic complications. (quellerfisher.com)
  • He has bone involvement throughout his residual forefoot and midfoot, and the best surgery may be a below-knee amputation, so we can get him into a prosthetic and he can live his life. (lermagazine.com)
  • Upper Extremity Prosthetic designs vary based on the level of amputation. (limbionics.com)
  • The first amputations were performed in the Neolithic times, the first recorded instance of an amputation and prosthetic replacing surgery appears in the book of the Vedas. (education-edge.com)
  • Forequarter amputation is the remotion of the full arm, shoulder blade, and collar bone, normally some bone is left in order to attach a prosthetic devices. (education-edge.com)
  • with this type of amputation the victim can still mobilise without a prosthetic devices. (education-edge.com)
  • it is normally more hard to make a prosthetic device for this type of amputation. (education-edge.com)
  • To assess improvement in functional outcomes following prosthetic fitting after lower limb amputation using a lower extremity functional scale in a cohort of the Pakistani population. (bvsalud.org)
  • We reviewed the results of early amputation and prosthetic fitting in twenty-five children (thirty-one extremities) who had longitudinal deficiency of the fibula and were managed between 1977 and 1992. (elsevier.com)
  • At the time of follow-up, the patients who had had a Syme amputation had more problems related to reformation of the calcaneus, instability of the heel pad, prosthetic suspension, and excessive length of the residual extremity. (elsevier.com)
  • The modified Boyd amputation improved the function of the heel pad and the prosthetic suspension and provided the optimum length of the residual extremity. (elsevier.com)
  • Paterson, R.: Memorial of the life of James Syme. (springer.com)
  • The following year he arrived in Edinburgh, to gain experience under Professor James Syme. (scotland.org.uk)
  • Referred to as the Napoleon of Surgery, James Syme was born to a family of renown in 1799 on Princes Street, Edinburgh. (litfl.com)
  • Miles A. James Syme (1799-1870) . (litfl.com)
  • Banov L, Banov J. James Syme (1799-1870), a great surgeon who promoted proctology . (litfl.com)
  • Dunea G. James Syme, the Napoleon of surgery (1799-1870) . (litfl.com)
  • A visit to Edinburgh in the fall of 1853 led to Lister's appointment as assistant to James Syme, the greatest surgical teacher of his day, and in October 1856 he was appointed surgeon to the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary. (britannica.com)
  • The Scottish surgeon James Syme (1799-1870) has been described as the boldest and most original operator of the end of the pre-anaesthetic era. (thomas-morris.uk)
  • Common partial foot amputations include the Chopart, Lisfranc, and ray amputations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chopart, Syme or Lisfranc) prostheses are made from carbon fibre or using the laminating technique. (phukethospital.com)
  • A number of options are available, depending on the depth and severity of the infection: toe, metatarsal ray, transmetatarsal, Lisfranc (a tarsometatarsal disarticulation), Chopart (disarticulation through the talonavicular and calcaneocuboid joints), and more proximal partial-foot amputations including the Pirogoff and Boyd (in which some of the calcaneus may be preserved), and the Syme, in which the residual limb ends at the distal base of the tibia. (lermagazine.com)
  • Resurrection of the amputations of Lisfranc and Chopart for diabetic gangrene. (wheelessonline.com)
  • Major amputations are commonly below-knee- or above-knee amputations Common partial foot amputations include the Chopart , Lisfranc , and ray amputations. (owiki.org)
  • 1 More proximal amputations include transtibial below-knee and transfemoral above-knee approaches. (lermagazine.com)
  • Amputations at any level have repercussions that may increase the risk of later, more proximal amputations, however-particularly if the initial amputation is made too distally in a misguided effort to save more of the foot than is feasible. (lermagazine.com)
  • The eponymous ankle amputation attributed to him was a triumph of conservative surgery in the days where more proximal amputations had much higher mortality rates. (litfl.com)
  • PFA's are historically known to have a significant failure rate and various complications, including ulcerations, skin breakdown, contracture and proximal amputations. (limbionics.com)
  • Lower-extremity prostheses provide replacements at varying levels of amputation. (wikipedia.org)
  • He introduced modern amputation procedures (1529) to the medical community and made prostheses (1536) for upper- and lower-extremity amputees. (amputee-coalition.org)
  • The expenses associated with medical care and prostheses after an amputation are considerable. (quellerfisher.com)
  • The aim of the course is not only to provide relevant knowledge on that amputation level and related biomechanical aspects, it is also to acquaint the participant with a contemporary production of ankle-free forefoot prostheses, where effort and effectiveness are in an acceptable ratio. (human-study.org)
  • This is a life changing amputation that takes a detail-oriented, highly trained and caring Prosthetist to ensure a comfortable and well working upper extremity prostheses. (limbionics.com)
  • Forearm (transradial) amputation- classified by the length of the remaining partial forearm stump. (swartzlaw.com)
  • amputations is twofold: to remove diseased tissue so that the wound will heal cleanly, and to construct a stump that will allow the attachment of a prosthesis or artificial replacement part. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Yet beneath the surface of these painful conversations are seeds of hope: Amputation can save a person's life, preoperative consultations can help people make better decisions, and children who are fitted early with a prosthesis can lead very active lives. (amputee-coalition.org)
  • Before having an above-knee amputation or a surgical fusion of the knee, patients should learn about the Van Nes rotationplasty and the tibia turn-up, two surgical procedures that may increase their mobility as prosthesis users. (amputee-coalition.org)
  • Ideally, rotationplasty gives patients a level of function that may be equivalent to a below-knee prosthesis user, even though they have experienced an above-knee amputation. (amputee-coalition.org)
  • A prosthesis utilized for acquired amputations or congenital absences of the hand, forearm and elbow, above the elbow. (floydbrace.com)
  • A prosthesis utilized for acquired amputations or congenital absences of the foot, ankle, shin and thigh, above the knee joint level. (floydbrace.com)
  • A prosthesis utilized for acquired amputations or congenital absences of the foot and ankle below the knee. (floydbrace.com)
  • This is not a common amputation but can be treated with a prosthesis if the patient is highly motivated to walk again. (limbionics.com)
  • The sooner the amputation is performed the easier and faster the rehabilitation and adaptation to the prosthesis. (jocponline.com)
  • The incidence of vascular amputation at or near the transmetatarsal level is eight times higher in diabetes patients than in those without diabetes, and one in four amputees ends up with contralateral amputations or reamputation. (lermagazine.com)
  • Another detailed study was made of 25 unilateral transtibial amputees who were all under the age of 45 years at the time of amputation for trauma. (oandplibrary.org)
  • Some patients are considered as partial hand or partial finger amputees, while others have above or below elbow amputations. (limbionics.com)
  • A less common major amputation is the Van Nes rotation, or rotationplasty, i.e. the turning around and reattachment of the foot to allow the ankle joint to take over the function of the knee. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term major amputation is used to mean any amputation above the ankle region, up to and including hemipelvectomy. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • 2 Some evidence suggests that sedentary patients may do better with limb salvage, whereas more active people may have better functional outcomes with early major amputation. (lermagazine.com)
  • This type of amputation is indicated for foot trauma, infection or tumors as well as certain types of limb deformities when the foot cannot be saved. (limbionics.com)
  • Rotationplasty is a type of amputation that is not very common but typically is used is in cases of osteosarcoma (bone cancer) and some congenital defects in the lower leg. (limbionics.com)
  • with this type of amputation there is no ability to hold on. (education-edge.com)
  • this type of amputation may impact balance and walking. (education-edge.com)
  • The benefit of this type of amputation is that it retains the distal weight bearing aspect of the lower leg bone. (treasurestateoandp.com)
  • Tibial - Fibular Bone Synostosis Permanent Solution In Pediatric Transtibial Amputations. (acpoc.org)
  • Many series report a ratio of at least two transtibial amputations to every transfemoral (above-knee) one. (oandplibrary.org)
  • Data were combined from four series that compared the healing rate of transtibial amputations in diabetics with that in patients with purely ischemic disease. (oandplibrary.org)
  • One study of 80 patients noted an interval of 23 months, on average, between transtibial amputations. (oandplibrary.org)
  • Above-elbow (transhumeral) amputation- amputation anywhere above the elbow and below the shoulder. (swartzlaw.com)
  • Amputation level is above the elbow - (also known as transhumeral). (finnieston.com)
  • In addition, traumatic amputation victims may suffer serious secondary complications such as bleeding, shock, infection or wrongful death . (quellerfisher.com)
  • How to diagnose a traumatic amputation? (swartzlaw.com)
  • In a disarticulation amputation, the bone is removed at the joint. (wikimd.org)
  • The goals of a Syme amputation are to remove diseased tissue or a non-usable foot and create a functional, painless limb. (aspenors.com)
  • This paper presents the case of a 54-year-old man after a Syme amputation of his left leg because of diabetic gangrene of the foot. (mysciencework.com)
  • Boyd, H. B.: Amputation of the foot with calcaneotibial arthrodesis. (springer.com)
  • Christie, J., C. B. Clowes, D. W. Lamb: Amputations through the middle part of the foot. (springer.com)
  • Greene, W. B., J. M. Cary: Partial foot amputations in children. (springer.com)
  • Harris, W. R., E. A. Silverstein: Partial amputations of the Foot-a follow up study. (springer.com)
  • Lange, T. A., R. J. Nasca: Traumatic partial foot amputation. (springer.com)
  • Parziale, J. R., K. A. K. Hahn: Functional considerations in partial foot amputations. (springer.com)
  • Wagner, F. W., Amputations of the foot and ankle-current status. (springer.com)
  • Although attempts have been made in the United States to better manage diabetes and the foot ulcers that can be complications of the disease, the number of resulting amputations has not decreased. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The goal of lowering amputation rates still further will be best served not only by applying the recognized preventive measures in patients with foot lesions, but also by further research into the causes of the recent changes in amputation numbers. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • In the attempt to ensure that only amputations indicated by peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and/or diabetes mellitus (diabetic foot syndrome, DFS) were included, we excluded amputations in patients with the principal diagnosis of tumor (C00 D48), cutaneous or subcutaneous disease (L00 L99), musculoskeletal disease (M00 M99), or injury/poisoning (S00 T98). (aerzteblatt.de)
  • The multidisciplinary approach to treating foot problems is an optimum intervention for prevention of amputations. (lww.com)
  • Course covers all aspects of diabetic foot care, including prevention, foot assessment, management of foot ulcers, and amputation. (wildirismedicaleducation.com)
  • These studies strongly suggest that the notion that diabetics do best with a primary transfemoral amputation for foot lesions should be discarded. (oandplibrary.org)
  • malleolar amputation of the foot a Syme s amputation. (accidentalfresh.com)
  • Some ppl refused amputation even thou their foot is all black and dead. (blogspot.com)
  • A partial foot amputation is often a result of advanced vascular disease, secondary to diabetes. (limbionics.com)
  • The rotationplasty involves a partial amputation of the leg above the knee followed by The lower leg and foot being rotated 180 degrees, the length is adjusted, and the tibia is then fused to the femur. (limbionics.com)
  • The lower limb amputations include: foot amputations, ankle disarticulation ( Syme amputation ) , below-knee ( trans-tibial ) amputation, knee-bearing amputation, above-knee ( trans-femoral ) amputation, and hip disarticulation. (education-edge.com)
  • A partially healed amputation site of the first ray of the right foot was appreciated with a necrotic ulceration on the dorsum of the foot probing directly to bone and tendinous structures. (faoj.org)
  • We present a case of eumycotic mycetoma with extensive involvement of foot for which a Boyd's amputation was done and treated with antifungal therapy with no recurrence. (faoj.org)
  • In the foot, amputation between the tarsometatarsal level and the level of the Syme procedure results in an equinus deformity due to imbalance between tendons acting at the ankle. (faoj.org)
  • BACKGROUND: Diabetic foot ulcers complications are the major cause of non-traumatic major limb amputation. (bvsalud.org)
  • We aimed at assessing the clinical profiles of diabetic foot ulcer patients undergoing major limb amputation in the Surgical Department at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC), a tertiary care hospital in North-eastern Tanzania. (bvsalud.org)
  • CONCLUSION: In this study, the cohort of patients suffering from diabetic foot ulcers treated in a tertiary care center in north-eastern Tanzania, the likelihood of amputation significantly correlated with the initial grade of the Meggit-Wagner ulcer classification. (bvsalud.org)
  • Foot Amputations - Amputation of any part of the foot. (treasurestateoandp.com)
  • Amputation is the intentional surgical removal of a limb or body part. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Amputation is the removal of a limb by trauma, medical illness, or surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, a Swedish study published last year examined the outcomes of amputations through or distal to the ankle joint in diabetes patients and reported that 79% healed in surviving patients. (lermagazine.com)
  • 2 The team goal is the prevention or delay of amputation and/or limb salvage of lower extremities. (lww.com)
  • Deciding who needs an amputation and who doesn't depends on a lot of factors," said David Armstrong, DPM, MD, PhD, professor of surgery and director of the Southern Arizona Limb Salvage Alliance (SALSA) at the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Tucson. (lermagazine.com)
  • In addition, in some communities, the option of amputation is not accepted culturally, and patient families wish to pursue limb salvage. (obgynkey.com)
  • We also underscore the utility of the Symes amputation, used in our case as an alternative to transtibial amputation for diabetic limb salvage. (faoj.org)
  • The knee disarticulation is an amputation performed between bone surfaces, rather than by cutting directly through bone. (limbionics.com)
  • Knee disarticulation is generally preferred for this condition, although centralization of the fibula (Brown procedure) combined with Symes amputation has been described for this situation. (jocponline.com)
  • Upper extremity amputations are often very difficult to handle physically and mentally. (limbionics.com)
  • A Syme amputation is an amputation done through the ankle joint. (aspenors.com)
  • An amputation through the ankle joint. (finnieston.com)
  • Common forms of ankle disarticulations include Pyrogoff, Boyd, and Syme amputations. (wikipedia.org)
  • A Syme amputation was performed on fifteen extremities (thirteen children), and a modified Boyd amputation (which included resection of the distal tibial physis) was performed on sixteen extremities (thirteen children). (elsevier.com)
  • One child had a Syme amputation on one side and a Boyd amputation on the other and is thus included in both groups. (elsevier.com)
  • With this amputation, the residual limb generally can tolerate some weight bearing, providing a long mechanical lever controlled by strong muscles. (limbionics.com)
  • We will begin volume control and residual limb shrinkage within 1-3 weeks after your amputation surgery. (treasurestateoandp.com)
  • It is also important not to wrap your residual limb too tightly above the end of the amputation because it will restrict circulation. (treasurestateoandp.com)
  • Lower Limb Amputation in Germany: An Analysis of Data From. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • 6 patients have undergone this amputation, 2 of whom were amputated bilaterally. (springer.com)
  • Amputations cannot be performed on patients with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, heart failure, or infection. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Patients with blood clotting disorders are also not good candidates for amputation. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In the Saint Vincent Declaration of 1989, representatives of governments, health authorities, and patients organizations from all European countries demanded, under the auspices of the World Health Organization (WHO), that the rate of amputations in diabetics be halved within 5 years ( 1 ). (aerzteblatt.de)
  • Patients undergoing amputation will need help in dealing with the changes in body image as they adjust to the loss of a limb. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Anesthesia had been introduced in the preceding decades, so patients were more comfortable during their operations and amputations. (wired.com)
  • Lister experimented on amputation patients at his hospital starting in 1865. (wired.com)
  • After the amputation surgery, patients require long-term rehabilitation, which may include strengthening the remaining muscles and relearning skills such as grasping objects or walking. (quellerfisher.com)
  • Lister was in charge of the new surgical block, where, despite the best of care during and after surgery, a horrifying 45-50% of surgical patients died from sepsis following amputations. (scotland.org.uk)
  • 4 Researchers at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Oakland, CA, reported that of 90 patients who underwent transmetatarsal amputation, 88 had postsurgical complications. (lermagazine.com)
  • Of 113 amputation patients (75% of whom had diabetes), only 65% were still alive at 10-month follow up, and 17% of those discharged with an intact contralateral limb later had that limb amputated. (lermagazine.com)
  • 9 Patients without underlying ischemia are significantly more likely to heal after transmetatarsal amputation. (lermagazine.com)
  • In modern-day it is used chiefly in paediatric patients as the complication and re-amputation rates are lower than in adult populations. (litfl.com)
  • This procedure is beneficial to patients because it creates the potential for more mobility and function as opposed to a typical above the knee amputation. (limbionics.com)
  • 74.19%) of all patients who underwent major limb amputation had mean hemoglobin level below 12 g/dl. (bvsalud.org)
  • The indications below refer to conditions which posed or pose questions demanding surgical opinion and debate, for amputation is rarely self-evident to patients. (rrnursingschool.biz)
  • Detailed lists of all major and minor amputations (coded 5-864 and 5-865, respectively, in the German procedure classification OPS) were provided by the Federal Statistical Office following submission of an analysis plan. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • This includes the Syme procedure, in which the calcaneum, talus, and mortise are removed. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • There are two general types of surgical procedure for amputation: (1) the closed or "flap" amputation and (2) the open or "guillotine" amputation. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • A variant of the trans-radial amputation is the Krukenberg procedure in which the radius and ulna are used to create a stump capable of a pincer action. (owiki.org)
  • A story from The Medical News , published in 1858, reports another procedure invented by Syme and which - in its day - was just as celebrated: total resection [removal] of the tongue. (thomas-morris.uk)
  • Augmentation of the traditional Chopart amputation with transfer of the tibialis anterior, tibialis posterior, and long toe extensor tendons to the talus and lengthening of the heal cord. (springer.com)
  • Blanco, J. S., J. A. Herring: Congenital Chopart amputation: a functional assessment. (springer.com)
  • For many years, transfemoral amputations were preferred to transtibial ones because it was felt that primary healing is easier to obtain at the thigh level. (oandplibrary.org)
  • More than 90% of amputations performed in the United States are due to circulatory complications of diabetes. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In the US, the majority of new amputations occur due to complications of the vascular system (the blood vessels), especially from diabetes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Victims of traumatic amputations are at risk of serious complications, such as bleeding, infection, shock, and/or death. (swartzlaw.com)
  • Distal Syme Hallux Amputation for Tip of Toe Wounds and Gangrene Complicated by Osteomyelitis of the Distal Phalanx: Surgical Technique and Outcome in Consecutive Cases. (nih.gov)
  • Skin and muscle flaps are then transposed over the stump,except in amputations for gangrene when the stump is left open and allowed to heal by secondary intention. (wikibooks.org)
  • Before an amputation is performed, extensive testing is done to determine the proper level of amputation. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Several or all of them can be done to help choose the proper level of amputation. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • A Syme amputation will not adequately treat the problem so a higher level of amputation is needed. (limbionics.com)
  • A specific level of amputation-also known as transhumoral. (amputeelawyer.com)
  • A specific level of amputation-also known as transtibial. (amputeelawyer.com)
  • Chapter on Athletics after Amputation explores advanced training and athletics, including running and athletic competition to enhance the quality of life for persons with amputation. (elsevier.com)
  • A special case is that of congenital amputation, a congenital disorder, where fetal limbs have been cut off by constrictive bands. (wikipedia.org)
  • Formally chartered in 1920 as the Amputations Association of the Great War , the organization pledged to "bind together in the spirit of fraternity all men who have lost a limb or limbs whilst giving their service to Canada. (waramps.ca)
  • 22% of amputations are trauma related and 68.6% of those are amputations of the upper limbs. (swartzlaw.com)
  • Phantom sensations and phantom pain may also occur after the removal of body parts other than the limbs, e.g. after amputation of the breast, extraction of a tooth (phantom tooth pain) or removal of an eye ( phantom eye syndrome ). (wikimd.org)
  • When the proximal tibia is present, it can be fused to the fibula with a Symes amputation, and a very reasonable functional limb is achieved. (jocponline.com)
  • In some cultures and religions, minor amputations or mutilations are considered a ritual accomplishment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Minor amputations generally refer to the amputation of digits. (wikipedia.org)
  • On the basis of DRG (diagnosis-related group) data, we received a list from the German Federal Statistical Office of all major and minor amputations documented in German hospitals from 2005 to 2014. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • Applied in cases of osteosarcoma and congenital lower-limb differences, rotationplasty involves a partial amputation of the leg above the knee. (amputee-coalition.org)
  • This can be a life-threatening and life-changing event, which may cause a complete amputation, where a limb or appendage is completely severed from the body, or a partial amputation, where some soft tissue remains at the site. (swartzlaw.com)
  • However, if there is a partial amputation, it must be determined if any part of the affected limb or appendage can be saved. (swartzlaw.com)
  • In general, physical preparation of the patient undergoing surgical amputation includes measures to promote optimum health and well-being, to establish nutritional and fluid balances, and to increase muscular strength and endurance levels. (thefreedictionary.com)