Succinylcholine: A quaternary skeletal muscle relaxant usually used in the form of its bromide, chloride, or iodide. It is a depolarizing relaxant, acting in about 30 seconds and with a duration of effect averaging three to five minutes. Succinylcholine is used in surgical, anesthetic, and other procedures in which a brief period of muscle relaxation is called for.Neuromuscular Depolarizing Agents: Drugs that interrupt transmission at the skeletal neuromuscular junction by causing sustained depolarization of the motor end plate. These agents are primarily used as adjuvants in surgical anesthesia to cause skeletal muscle relaxation.CholinesterasesNeuromuscular Nondepolarizing Agents: Drugs that interrupt transmission at the skeletal neuromuscular junction without causing depolarization of the motor end plate. They prevent acetylcholine from triggering muscle contraction and are used as muscle relaxants during electroshock treatments, in convulsive states, and as anesthesia adjuvants.Decamethonium Compounds: Compounds that contain the decamethylenebis(trimethyl)ammonium radical. These compounds frequently act as neuromuscular depolarizing agents.Kymography: The recording of wavelike motions or undulations. It is usually used on arteries to detect variations in blood pressure.Bis-Trimethylammonium Compounds: Compounds containing polymethylene bis-trimethylammonium cations. Members of this group frequently act as ganglionic blockers and neuromuscular depolarizing agents.Tetraisopropylpyrophosphamide: N,N',N'',N'''-Tetraisopropylpyrophosphamide. A specific inhibitor of pseudocholinesterases. It is commonly used experimentally to determine whether pseudo- or acetylcholinesterases are involved in an enzymatic process.Muscle Relaxants, Central: A heterogeneous group of drugs used to produce muscle relaxation, excepting the neuromuscular blocking agents. They have their primary clinical and therapeutic uses in the treatment of muscle spasm and immobility associated with strains, sprains, and injuries of the back and, to a lesser degree, injuries to the neck. They have been used also for the treatment of a variety of clinical conditions that have in common only the presence of skeletal muscle hyperactivity, for example, the muscle spasms that can occur in MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1991, p358)Neuromuscular Junction: The synapse between a neuron and a muscle.Dibucaine: A local anesthetic of the amide type now generally used for surface anesthesia. It is one of the most potent and toxic of the long-acting local anesthetics and its parenteral use is restricted to spinal anesthesia. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1006)Edrophonium: A rapid-onset, short-acting cholinesterase inhibitor used in cardiac arrhythmias and in the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. It has also been used as an antidote to curare principles.Gallamine Triethiodide: A synthetic nondepolarizing blocking drug. The actions of gallamine triethiodide are similar to those of TUBOCURARINE, but this agent blocks the cardiac vagus and may cause sinus tachycardia and, occasionally, hypertension and increased cardiac output. It should be used cautiously in patients at risk from increased heart rate but may be preferred for patients with bradycardia. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1992, p198)Androstanols: Androstanes and androstane derivatives which are substituted in any position with one or more hydroxyl groups.Cholinesterase Inhibitors: Drugs that inhibit cholinesterases. The neurotransmitter ACETYLCHOLINE is rapidly hydrolyzed, and thereby inactivated, by cholinesterases. When cholinesterases are inhibited, the action of endogenously released acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses is potentiated. Cholinesterase inhibitors are widely used clinically for their potentiation of cholinergic inputs to the gastrointestinal tract and urinary bladder, the eye, and skeletal muscles; they are also used for their effects on the heart and the central nervous system.Alfentanil: A short-acting opioid anesthetic and analgesic derivative of FENTANYL. It produces an early peak analgesic effect and fast recovery of consciousness. Alfentanil is effective as an anesthetic during surgery, for supplementation of analgesia during surgical procedures, and as an analgesic for critically ill patients.Vecuronium Bromide: Monoquaternary homolog of PANCURONIUM. A non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent with shorter duration of action than pancuronium. Its lack of significant cardiovascular effects and lack of dependence on good kidney function for elimination as well as its short duration of action and easy reversibility provide advantages over, or alternatives to, other established neuromuscular blocking agents.Neuromuscular Blockade: The intentional interruption of transmission at the NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION by external agents, usually neuromuscular blocking agents. It is distinguished from NERVE BLOCK in which nerve conduction (NEURAL CONDUCTION) is interrupted rather than neuromuscular transmission. Neuromuscular blockade is commonly used to produce MUSCLE RELAXATION as an adjunct to anesthesia during surgery and other medical procedures. It is also often used as an experimental manipulation in basic research. It is not strictly speaking anesthesia but is grouped here with anesthetic techniques. The failure of neuromuscular transmission as a result of pathological processes is not included here.Intubation, Intratracheal: A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.Methohexital: An intravenous anesthetic with a short duration of action that may be used for induction of anesthesia.Preanesthetic Medication: Drugs administered before an anesthetic to decrease a patient's anxiety and control the effects of that anesthetic.Anesthesia, General: Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.Isoquinolines: A group of compounds with the heterocyclic ring structure of benzo(c)pyridine. The ring structure is characteristic of the group of opium alkaloids such as papaverine. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Pentazocine: The first mixed agonist-antagonist analgesic to be marketed. It is an agonist at the kappa and sigma opioid receptors and has a weak antagonist action at the mu receptor. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1991, p97)Hexamethonium Compounds: Compounds containing the hexamethylenebis(trimethylammonium) cation. Members of this group frequently act as antihypertensive agents and selective ganglionic blocking agents.Neuromuscular Blocking Agents: Drugs that interrupt transmission of nerve impulses at the skeletal neuromuscular junction. They can be of two types, competitive, stabilizing blockers (NEUROMUSCULAR NONDEPOLARIZING AGENTS) or noncompetitive, depolarizing agents (NEUROMUSCULAR DEPOLARIZING AGENTS). Both prevent acetylcholine from triggering the muscle contraction and they are used as anesthesia adjuvants, as relaxants during electroshock, in convulsive states, etc.Anesthesia, Intravenous: Process of administering an anesthetic through injection directly into the bloodstream.Thiopental: A barbiturate that is administered intravenously for the induction of general anesthesia or for the production of complete anesthesia of short duration.Tubocurarine: A neuromuscular blocker and active ingredient in CURARE; plant based alkaloid of Menispermaceae.Muscle Spindles: Skeletal muscle structures that function as the MECHANORECEPTORS responsible for the stretch or myotactic reflex (REFLEX, STRETCH). They are composed of a bundle of encapsulated SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS, i.e., the intrafusal fibers (nuclear bag 1 fibers, nuclear bag 2 fibers, and nuclear chain fibers) innervated by SENSORY NEURONS.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Choline: A basic constituent of lecithin that is found in many plants and animal organs. It is important as a precursor of acetylcholine, as a methyl donor in various metabolic processes, and in lipid metabolism.Genetics, Medical: A subdiscipline of human genetics which entails the reliable prediction of certain human disorders as a function of the lineage and/or genetic makeup of an individual or of any two parents or potential parents.Phosphoric Acids: Inorganic derivatives of phosphoric acid (H3PO4). Note that organic derivatives of phosphoric acids are listed under ORGANOPHOSPHATES.Benzoates: Derivatives of BENZOIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the carboxybenzene structure.Muscles: Contractile tissue that produces movement in animals.Anesthesia, Inhalation: Anesthesia caused by the breathing of anesthetic gases or vapors or by insufflating anesthetic gases or vapors into the respiratory tract.Propofol: An intravenous anesthetic agent which has the advantage of a very rapid onset after infusion or bolus injection plus a very short recovery period of a couple of minutes. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1992, 1st ed, p206). Propofol has been used as ANTICONVULSANTS and ANTIEMETICS.Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Drug Interactions: The action of a drug that may affect the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of another drug.Acetylcholinesterase: An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of ACETYLCHOLINE to CHOLINE and acetate. In the CNS, this enzyme plays a role in the function of peripheral neuromuscular junctions. EC 3.1.1.7.Anura: An order of the class Amphibia, which includes several families of frogs and toads. They are characterized by well developed hind limbs adapted for jumping, fused head and trunk and webbed toes. The term "toad" is ambiguous and is properly applied only to the family Bufonidae.Cardiovascular System: The HEART and the BLOOD VESSELS by which BLOOD is pumped and circulated through the body.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Acetylcholine: A neurotransmitter found at neuromuscular junctions, autonomic ganglia, parasympathetic effector junctions, a subset of sympathetic effector junctions, and at many sites in the central nervous system.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Electronic Mail: Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.Food Dispensers, Automatic: Mechanical food dispensing machines.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Postal Service: The functions and activities carried out by the U.S. Postal Service, foreign postal services, and private postal services such as Federal Express.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.
Fellini AA, Bernstein RL, Zauder HL (Oct 1963). "Bronchospasm due to suxamethonium; report of a case". British Journal of ... It can also be used to help with endotracheal intubation but suxamethonium (succinylcholine) is generally preferred if this ... Katz AM, Mulligan PG (Oct 1972). "Bronchospasm induced by suxamethonium. A case report". British Journal of Anaesthesiology. 44 ... Eustace BR (Oct 1967). "Suxamethonium induced bronchospasm". Anaesthesia. 22 (4): 638-641. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2044.1967.tb10161 ...
"Unusual reaction to suxamethonium chloride". Br Med J. 2 (5525): 1305. doi:10.1136/bmj.2.5525.1305. PMC 1944316 . PMID 5924819 ... enflurane or the depolarizing muscle relaxants suxamethonium and decamethonium used primarily in general anesthesia. In rare ...
Choline derivatives: Suxamethonium (Succinylcholine). *Polyalkylene derivatives: Hexamethonium. ACh release inhibitors. * ...
Choline derivatives: Suxamethonium (Succinylcholine). *Polyalkylene derivatives: Hexamethonium. ACh release inhibitors. * ...
Choline derivatives: Suxamethonium (Succinylcholine). *Polyalkylene derivatives: Hexamethonium. ACh release inhibitors. * ...
Choline derivatives: Suxamethonium (Succinylcholine). *Polyalkylene derivatives: Hexamethonium. ACh release inhibitors. * ...
It is used for standard endotracheal intubation, as well as for rapid sequence induction (RSI) where suxamethonium chloride, ...
Examples include the nicotinic agonists suxamethonium and decamethonium. Zuckerman, Marvin (1991-05-31). Psychobiology of ...
Decamethonium and suxamethonium also have this same interonium distance. Pancuronium is used with general anesthesia in surgery ...
Baraka A (August 1975). "Hexafluorenium-suxamethonium interaction in patients with normal versus atypical cholinesterase". Br J ...
Suxamethonium Hexamethonium Lee C, Jones T (May 2002). "Molecular conformation-activity relationship of decamethonium congeners ...
Mutant alleles at the BCHE locus are responsible for suxamethonium sensitivity. Homozygous persons sustain prolonged apnea ... after administration of the muscle relaxant suxamethonium in connection with surgical anesthesia. The activity of ...
Nesset was convicted in March 1983 of poisoning 22 patients with suxamethonium chloride. He was also convicted of one count of ... Nesset initially confessed to the murders of 27 patients who he claimed to have killed by injecting them with suxamethonium ...
It is also used to help with endotracheal intubation; however, suxamethonium (succinylcholine) is generally preferred if this ...
... www.nps.org.au/medicines/surgical-preparations/muscle-relaxants-for-surgery/suxamethonium-chloride/suxamethonium-chloride- ... Suxamethonium could not be used in these packs because of the requirement for refrigeration. This was certainly an issue in ... It has some advantages over suxamethonium: Less K+ Possibly less muscle pain after use Storage does not require refrigeration ... "Plasma potassium changes following suxamethonium and suxethonium in normal patients and in patients in renal failure". Br J ...
The first observations of genetic variation in drug response date from the 1950s, involving the muscle relaxant suxamethonium ... One in 3500 Caucasians has less efficient variant of the enzyme (butyrylcholinesterase) that metabolizes suxamethonium chloride ...
... is an ester of succinic acid and choline created by the metabolism of suxamethonium chloride. Succinic acid ...
Fentanyl alone would be used, followed by the short-action muscle relaxant suxamethonium: coinduction is typically not used in ...
Suxamethonium is not recommended for muscular paralysis as it may increase the risk of cardiac dysrhythmia from hyperkalemia ...
These drugs could have included morphine and suxamethonium chloride as they were found in his locker with fresh and used ...
Norway withdrew pholcodine from the market in 2007, and the prevalence of anti-suxamethonium antibodies fell by over 80% in two ...
The patient is given a sedative and paralytic agent, usually midazolam / suxamethonium / propofol and intubation is quickly ...
Acetylcholine Carbachol Suxamethonium α-Bungarotoxin α-Conotoxin Hexamethonium Pancuronium Tubocurarine Ganglion type nicotinic ...
... and can prolong the duration of action of suxamethonium (succinylcholine) and other drugs whose breakdown in the body depends ...
... suxamethonium), a fast-acting muscle relaxant. He was then suffocated with a pillow, though their investigation and final ...
Some classic examples of this type of interaction include that thiopentone and suxamethonium should not be placed in the same ...
Intermittent Suxamethonium Injections. Br Med J 1959; 1 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.1.5128.1045-a (Published 18 April 1959 ...
Suxamethonium has been described as a "perfect poison" for murder, and has been used by criminals in murders. Suxamethonium ... Suxamethonium chloride, also known as suxamethonium or succinylcholine, is a medication used to cause short-term paralysis as ... Suxamethonium is available as a generic medication. The wholesale cost in the developing world is about 0.45 to 1.31 USD a dose ... Suxamethonium was described as early as 1906 and came into medical use in 1951. It is on the World Health Organizations List ...
Suxamethonium and Post-operative Muscle Pain Br Med J 1957; 1 :523 ... Suxamethonium and Post-operative Muscle Pain. Br Med J 1957; 1 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.1.5017.523-c (Published 02 ...
Suxamethonium, also known as suxamethonium chloride or succinylcholine, is a muscle relaxant sold under the trade names ... Retrieved from "https://www.SNPedia.com/index.php?title=Suxamethonium&oldid=1090684" ...
Retrieved from "https://www.wikidoc.org/index.php/Special:Browse/:Suxamethonium-5Fchloride" ...
Suxamethonium is sold under the trade names Anectine and Scoline.. Suxamethonium acts as a depolarizing neuromuscular blocker. ... Suxamethonium is a hygroscopic compound.[1] The compound consists of two acetylcholine molecules that are linked by their ... Carl Coppolino.[3] Suxamethonium was the drug used to murder Nevada State Controller Kathy Augustine[4], and was used by ... Suxamethonium is a white crystalline substance, it is odourless; solutions have a pH of about 4, the dihydrate melts about 160 ...
Christensen RE, et al. Adverse Events in Radiation Oncology: A Case Series from Wake Up Safe, the Pediatric Anesthesia Quality Improvement Initiative. Pediatric Anesthesia 2018: 23 Dec 2018. Available from: URL: http://doi.org/10.1111/pan.13567 - USA ...
... is a brand of medicine containing the active ingredient Suxamethonium chloride. Find out about s... ... Suxamethonium Chloride Injection is not addictive.. Before you are given Suxamethonium Chloride Injection. You may already have ... How Suxamethonium Chloride Injection is given. Suxamethonium Chloride Injection will be given to you by an anaesthetist. It ... Suxamethonium Chloride Injection BP (Solution for injection). Active ingredient. Suxamethonium chloride. Schedule. S4. Consumer ...
Muscle pain is one of the side effects of suxamethonium chloride, an anaesthetic drug used to cause short-term paralysis. In ... Muscle pain is one of the side effects of suxamethonium chloride, an anaesthetic drug used to cause short-term paralysis. In ... Failure of magnesium sulphate to prevent suxamethonium induced muscle pains. Anaesthesia. . 1985 May;40(5):488-490. PubMed # ... Failure of magnesium sulphate to prevent suxamethonium induced muscle pains. updated Oct 21, 2017. ...
Home » Pharmacology » Suxamethonium -Depolarizing Neuromuscular Blocker. Suxamethonium -Depolarizing Neuromuscular Blocker. ... Suxamethonium is the only drug used in the category of depolarizing neuromuscular blockers and is synthetic, consisting of 2 ... In contrast to acetyl choline, which is hydrolyzed in synaptic cleft, this suxamethonium is not rapidly metabolized. It remains ... Local anesthetics can potentiate the effects of suxamethonium e.g. Procaine or lidocaine can potentiate the effects. ...
Suxamethonium acts by mimicking acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction but hydrolysis is much slower than for ...
Get up-to-date information on Suxamethonium side effects, uses, dosage, overdose, pregnancy, alcohol and more. Learn more about ... How was your experience with Suxamethonium?. First, a little about yourself. Male Female ... Suxamethonium falls into category C:. In animal studies, pregnant animals were given this medication and had some babies born ... Suxamethonium should be used during pregnancy only if the possible benefit outweighs the possible risk to the unborn baby. ...
Choline derivatives: Suxamethonium (Succinylcholine). *Polyalkylene derivatives: Hexamethonium. ACh release inhibitors. * ...
Suxamethonium (Succinylcholine) is an adjunct to general anesthesia, to facilitate tracheal intubation, and to provide skeletal ...
Suxamethonium Talampicillin Temazepam Tetracaine [Tetracyclines] Thiouracils Thyroxine Tiaprofenic acid Ticarcillin Tienilic ...
Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is one of the porphyrias, a group of diseases involving defects in heme metabolism and that results in excessive secretion of porphyrins and porphyrin precursors. AIP manifests itself by abdomen pain, neuropathies, and constipation, but, unlike most types of porphyria, patients with AIP do not have a rash.
e.g. Suxamethonium).. Please tell your doctor or nurse before. being given the injection if you have:. •. •. •. •. •. •. •. •. ... e.g. Suxamethonium).. Please tell your doctor or nurse before. being given the injection if you have:. •. •. •. •. •. •. •. •. ...
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. ...
Drug: Suxamethonium Suxamethonium (0.5-1.0 mg/kg)is used for muscle relaxation along with Methohexitone (0.75-1.0 mg/kg) for ... Drug: Suxamethonium Suxamethonium (0.5-1.0 mg/kg)is used for muscle relaxation along with Methohexitone (0.75-1.0 mg/kg) for ... Methohexitone (0.75-1.0 mg/kg) is used for anaesthesia with suxamethonium (0.5-1.0 mg/kg) as muscle relaxant. Seizure threshold ... Methohexitone (0.75-1.0 mg/kg) is used for anaesthesia with suxamethonium (0.5-1.0 mg/kg) as muscle relaxant. Seizure threshold ...
As a highly flexible technique, ion chromatography (IC) has many practical applications in the pharmaceutical field. This article reviews some relevant trends and recent developments in IC application.
Lupprian, K. G., Churchill-Davidson, H. C.: Effect of suxamethonium on cardiac rhythm. Brit. med. J. 2, 1774 (1960).PubMed ... Bullough, J.: Intermittent suxamethonium injections. Brit. med. J. 1, 786 (1959).CrossRefGoogle Scholar ...
Suxamethonium (muscle relaxant). Neostigmin (medicine used to treat a disease called myasthenia gravis). Ciclosporin (medicine ...
Suxamethonium Chloride 13. View Price - Disclaimer : The Price of the drugs indicated above may not match the actual price at ...
  • 1,5-2,5 mg propofol/kg legemsvægt gives i.v. med en hastighed af højst 40 mg/10 sek. (medicin.dk)
  • Suxamethonium is the only drug used in the category of depolarizing neuromuscular blockers and is synthetic, consisting of 2 molecules of acetyl choline joined together. (howmed.net)
  • In contrast to acetyl choline , which is hydrolyzed in synaptic cleft, this suxamethonium is not rapidly metabolized. (howmed.net)
  • Certain local anesthetics like procaine are also metabolized by pseudocholine esterase, which can potentiate the effects of succinyl choline (suxamethonium) when given together. (howmed.net)
  • Dersom en længerevarende hypnotisk virkning ønskes, kan den intravenøse injektion gentages, idet der sædvanligvis gives 25-50 mg efter behov, eller anæstesien kan fortsættes med intravenøs infusion af 4-12 mg/kg legemsvægt/time (afhængigt af den samtidige dosering af opioid) i separat vene eller via en trevejshane og under anvendelse af infusionspumpe. (medicin.dk)
  • Til sedering af patienter på intensiv afdeling anbefales kontinuerlig infusion, sædvanligvis opnås tilfredsstillende sedation ved en infusionshastighed på 0,3-4,0 mg/kg legemsvægt/time. (medicin.dk)
  • Malignant hyperthermia (MH) from suxamethonium administration can result in a drastic and uncontrolled increase in skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism. (wikipedia.org)
  • In fit unpremedicated patients undergoing minor operations and who were ambulant on the afternoon of the operations, pretreatment with magnesium sulphate given intravenously did not reduce the incidence of suxamethonium [anaesthetic] induced myalgia below that in a similar series who received no prophylactic therapy. (painscience.com)
  • MH is triggered after exposure to specific anaesthetic drugs - the volatile anaesthetic agents (such as isoflurane) and suxamethonium. (asa.org.au)
  • A typical increase of potassium ion serum concentration on administration of suxamethonium is 0.5 mmol per liter. (wikipedia.org)
  • Suxamethonium does not produce unconsciousness or anesthesia, and its effects may cause considerable psychological distress while simultaneously making it impossible for a patient to communicate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Local anesthetics can potentiate the effects of suxamethonium e.g. (howmed.net)
  • This is useful because if the activity is low it suggests an atypical enzyme variant is present and that the patient is at risk of prolonged effects from the muscle relaxants suxamethonium or mivacurium. (labtestsonline.org.uk)
  • Take suxamethonium exactly as prescribed by your doctor. (rxwiki.com)
  • You wonder whether your choice of a longer acting NMBA compared to the more traditionally used suxamethonium could have delayed your recognition of awareness and led to under-sedation. (bestbets.org)
  • Police said that the hunt was on to find more of the syringes, which contained enough suxamethonium to kill the animals immediately. (straitstimes.com)