Surgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.Togo: A republic in western Africa, lying between GHANA on its west and BENIN on its east. Its capital is Lome.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Wound Infection: Invasion of the site of trauma by pathogenic microorganisms.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Surgical Wound Dehiscence: Pathologic process consisting of a partial or complete disruption of the layers of a surgical wound.Occlusive Dressings: Material, usually gauze or absorbent cotton, used to cover and protect wounds, to seal them from contact with air or bacteria. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Dermatologic Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures performed on the SKIN.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy: The application of a vacuum across the surface of a wound through a foam dressing cut to fit the wound. This removes wound exudates, reduces build-up of inflammatory mediators, and increases the flow of nutrients to the wound thus promoting healing.Debridement: The removal of foreign material and devitalized or contaminated tissue from or adjacent to a traumatic or infected lesion until surrounding healthy tissue is exposed. (Dorland, 27th ed)Astringents: Agents, usually topical, that cause the contraction of tissues for the control of bleeding or secretions.Bandages: Material used for wrapping or binding any part of the body.Sternum: A long, narrow, and flat bone commonly known as BREASTBONE occurring in the midsection of the anterior thoracic segment or chest region, which stabilizes the rib cage and serves as the point of origin for several muscles that move the arms, head, and neck.Sutures: Materials used in closing a surgical or traumatic wound. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Cefazolin: A semisynthetic cephalosporin analog with broad-spectrum antibiotic action due to inhibition of bacterial cell wall synthesis. It attains high serum levels and is excreted quickly via the urine.Suppuration: A pathologic process consisting in the formation of pus.Bandages, Hydrocolloid: Dressings comprised of a self-adhesive matrix to which hydrophilic absorbent particles are embedded. The particles consist of CELLULOSE derivatives; calcium ALGINATES; PECTINS; or GELS. The utility is based on providing a moist environment for WOUND HEALING.Surgical Equipment: Nonexpendable apparatus used during surgical procedures. They are differentiated from SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, usually hand-held and used in the immediate operative field.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Exudates and Transudates: Exudates are fluids, CELLS, or other cellular substances that are slowly discharged from BLOOD VESSELS usually from inflamed tissues. Transudates are fluids that pass through a membrane or squeeze through tissue or into the EXTRACELLULAR SPACE of TISSUES. Transudates are thin and watery and contain few cells or PROTEINS.Umbilicus: The pit in the center of the ABDOMINAL WALL marking the point where the UMBILICAL CORD entered in the FETUS.Prune Belly Syndrome: A syndrome characterized by abdominal wall musculature deficiency, cryptorchism, and urinary tract abnormalities. The syndrome derives its name from its characteristic distended abdomen with wrinkled skin.Lymphoma: A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell: Aggressive T-Cell malignancy with adult onset, caused by HUMAN T-LYMPHOTROPIC VIRUS 1. It is endemic in Japan, the Caribbean basin, Southeastern United States, Hawaii, and parts of Central and South America and sub-Saharan Africa.BooksFoodborne Diseases: Acute illnesses, usually affecting the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, brought on by consuming contaminated food or beverages. Most of these diseases are infectious, caused by a variety of bacteria, viruses, or parasites that can be foodborne. Sometimes the diseases are caused by harmful toxins from the microbes or other chemicals present in the food. Especially in the latter case, the condition is often called food poisoning.Double-Balloon Enteroscopy: Endoscopy of the small intestines accomplished while advancing the endoscope into the intestines from the stomach by alternating the inflation of two balloons, one on an innertube of the endoscope and the other on an overtube.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Surgical Drapes: Sterile fabric or fabric-like material used to isolate the surgical site from the rest of the body and other possible sources of contamination.ArchivesBiological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Directories as Topic: Lists of persons or organizations, systematically arranged, usually in alphabetic or classed order, giving address, affiliations, etc., for individuals, and giving address, officers, functions, and similar data for organizations. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Endometritis: Inflammation of the ENDOMETRIUM, usually caused by intrauterine infections. Endometritis is the most common cause of postpartum fever.Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures: Methods, procedures, and tests performed to diagnose disease, disordered function, or disability.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Cesarean Section: Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.Poaceae: A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.Compression Bandages: Strips of elastic material used to apply pressure to body parts to control EDEMA and aid circulation.Optical Tweezers: A technique that uses LASERS to trap, image, and manipulate small objects (biomolecules, supramolecular assembles, DENDRIMERS) in three dimensional space. (From Glossary of Biotechnology and Nanobiotechnology Terms, 4th ed.)Clothing: Fabric or other material used to cover the body.Iodine: A nonmetallic element of the halogen group that is represented by the atomic symbol I, atomic number 53, and atomic weight of 126.90. It is a nutritionally essential element, especially important in thyroid hormone synthesis. In solution, it has anti-infective properties and is used topically.Hydrogen Peroxide: A strong oxidizing agent used in aqueous solution as a ripening agent, bleach, and topical anti-infective. It is relatively unstable and solutions deteriorate over time unless stabilized by the addition of acetanilide or similar organic materials.Patient Readmission: Subsequent admissions of a patient to a hospital or other health care institution for treatment.BrazilInternational Classification of Diseases: A system of categories to which morbid entries are assigned according to established criteria. Included is the entire range of conditions in a manageable number of categories, grouped to facilitate mortality reporting. It is produced by the World Health Organization (From ICD-10, p1). The Clinical Modifications, produced by the UNITED STATES DEPT. OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, are larger extensions used for morbidity and general epidemiological purposes, primarily in the U.S.Clinical Coding: Process of substituting a symbol or code for a term such as a diagnosis or procedure. (from Slee's Health Care Terms, 3d ed.)Stalking: Course of conduct directed at a specific person that involves repeated (two or more occasions) visual or physical proximity, nonconsensual communication, or verbal, written, or implied threats, or a combination thereof, that would cause a reasonable person fear.Wounds, Penetrating: Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.Wounds, Stab: Penetrating wounds caused by a pointed object.

Cardiocutaneous fistula. (1/1865)

Infection of the Teflon pledgets on the heart suture line after left ventricular aneurysm repair, presenting late with a fistulous tract connecting the heart with the skin (cardiocutaneous fistula) is an uncommon but potentially serious condition. The case is reported of a 73 year old man who developed a cardiocutaneous fistula extending through the left hemidiaphragm and draining at the abdominal wall, which developed six years after left ventricular aneurysmectomy. Following radiographic evaluation, which established the diagnosis, the Teflon pledgets and fistulous tract were successfully surgically removed. Prompt diagnosis depends on a high index of suspicion. Eradication of infection requires excision of infected material, which must be planned on an individual basis.  (+info)

Disruption of skin perfusion following longitudinal groin incision for infrainguinal bypass surgery. (2/1865)

OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to investigate whether such an incision results in a reduction in blood flow, and therefore haemoglobin oxygen saturation, across the wound. DESIGN: Microvascular oxygenation was measured with lightguide spectrophotometry in 21 patients undergoing femoropopliteal or femorodistal bypass procedures. A series of measurements were made in the groin, medial and lateral to the surface marking of the femoral artery. The mean oxygen saturation on each side was calculated, and the contra-lateral groin was used as a control. The measurements were repeated at 2 and 7 days postop. RESULTS: Oxygen saturation in the skin of the operated groins was increased significantly from baseline at 2 days postop (f = 25.80, p < 0.001) and had begun to return to normal by day 7. The rise was more marked on the lateral side of the wound than on the medial (f = 12.32, p < 0.001). There was no such difference in the control groins. All wounds healed at 10 days. CONCLUSIONS: These results show a significant difference in skin oxygenation between the lateral and medial sides of the groin following longitudinal incision. This may contribute to the relatively high incidence of postoperative infection in these wounds.  (+info)

Comparison of Payne and Scott operations for morbid obesity. (3/1865)

One hundred five patients were operated upon for morbid obesity using accepted criteria for operation. Forty-five patients with the Payne operation (35 cm of jejunum anastomosed end-to-side to 10 cm of ileum) were compared with 45 patients having the Scott operation (30 cm of jejunum anatomosed end-to-end to 15 cm of ileum with the proximal cut end of ileum vented into the transverse colon). The weight loss in the first two years was similar, although the Scott procedure patients lost slightly more weight. Comparison of the two groups by a new grading system also showed little difference in the two procedures. The Scott procedure takes longer and subjects the patient to an additional anastomosis. Study of a smaller group of patients having the Scott operation with varying lengths of jejunum and ileum indicates that there should not be less than 30 cm of jejunum nor more than 15 cm of ileum left in continuity. The length of jejunum is particularly important in the production of weight loss, and accurate intraoperative measurement of intestinal length is crucial. In the postoperative period the length of functional jejunum and ileum can be determined by upper gastrointestinal barium roentgenograms.  (+info)

Streptococcal keratitis after myopic laser in situ keratomileusis. (4/1865)

A 24-year-old healthy male underwent uncomplicated laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in left eye. One day after the surgery, he complained of ocular pain and multiple corneal stromal infiltrates had developed in left eye. Immediately, the corneal interface and stromal bed were cleared, and maximal antibiotic treatments with fortified tobramycin (1.2%) and cefazolin (5%) were given topically. The causative organism was identified as 'Streptococcus viridans' both on smear and culture. Two days after antibiotic therapy was initiated, the ocular inflammation and corneal infiltrates had regressed and ocular pain was relieved. One month later, the patient's best corrected visual acuity had returned to 20/20 with -0.75 -1.00 x 10 degrees, however minimal stromal scarring still remained. This case demonstrates that microbial keratitis after LASIK, if treated promptly, does not lead to a permanent reduction in visual acuity.  (+info)

Enteral nutritional supplementation with key nutrients in patients with critical illness and cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials. (5/1865)

OBJECTIVE: To conduct a meta-analysis of 11 randomized controlled trials comparing enteral nutritional support supplemented with key nutrients versus standard enteral nutritional support to determine effects on morbidity and mortality rates and hospital stay. BACKGROUND DATA: Recent studies have shown that malnutrition occurs in up to 30% of patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery, resulting in an increased risk of postoperative complications and death. With the realization that key nutrients can modulate inflammatory, metabolic, and immune processes, enteral nutritional regimens (supplemented with large amounts of key nutrients) have been developed for clinical use. METHODS: Eleven prospective, randomized controlled trials evaluating 1009 patients treated with combinations of key nutrients (Impact, Immun-Aid) were evaluated. Outcome measures examined were the incidences of pneumonia, infectious complications, and death, and length of hospital stay. Meta-analyses were undertaken to obtain the odds ratio and 95% confidence interval for incidences of infectious complications, pneumonia, and death, and the weighted mean difference and 95% confidence interval for length of hospital stay. RESULTS: The provision of nutritional support supplemented with key nutrients to patients with critical illness resulted in a decrease in infectious complications when compared with patients receiving standard nutritional support and a significant reduction in overall hospital stay. Similar results were documented in patients with gastrointestinal cancer. However, there were no differences between patient groups for either pneumonia or death. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis has demonstrated that nutritional support supplemented with key nutrients results in a significant reduction in the risk of developing infectious complications and reduces the overall hospital stay in patients with critical illness and in patients with gastrointestinal cancer. However, there is no effect on death. These data have important implications for the management of such patients.  (+info)

Sternal wound infections in patients after coronary artery bypass grafting using bilateral skeletonized internal mammary arteries. (6/1865)

OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the risks of sternal wound infections in patients undergoing myocardial revascularization using bilateral skeletonized internal mammary arteries (IMAs). BACKGROUND: The skeletonized IMA is longer than the pedicled one, thus providing the cardiac surgeon with increased versatility for arterial myocardial revascularization without the use of vein grafts. It is isolated from the chest wall gently with scissors and silver clips, and no cauterization is employed. Preservation of collateral blood supply to the sternum and avoidance of thermal injury enable more rapid healing and decrease the risk of sternal wound infection. METHODS: From April 1996 to August 1997, 545 patients underwent arterial myocardial revascularization using bilateral skeletonized IMAs. The right gastroepiploic artery was used in 100 patients (18%). The average age of the patients was 65 years; 431 (79%) were men and 114 (21%) were women; 179 (33%) were older than 70 years of age; 166 (30%) were diabetics. The average number of grafts was 3.2 per patient. RESULTS: The 30-day operative mortality rate was 2% (n = 11). There were six perioperative infarcts (1.1%) and six strokes (1.1%); 9 patients had sternal infection (1.7%) and 15 (2.8%) had superficial infection. Risk factors for sternal infection were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emergency operation. Superficial sternal wound infections were more common in women and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, renal failure, or peripheral vascular disease. The 1-year actuarial survival rate was 97%. Two of the six late deaths were not cardiac-related. Late dehiscence occurred in three patients (0.6%). The death rate (early and late) of patients with any sternal complication was higher than that of patients without those complications (33% vs. 2.7%). CONCLUSIONS: Routine arterial myocardial revascularization using bilateral skeletonized IMAs is safe, and postoperative morbidity and mortality rates are low, even in elderly patients and those with diabetes. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emergency operations were found to be associated with an increased risk of sternal infections, and the authors recommend avoiding the use of bilateral skeletonized IMAs in patients with these preoperative risk factors.  (+info)

Microbiological profile of anterior chamber aspirates following uncomplicated cataract surgery. (7/1865)

Anterior chamber aspirate cultures were done for 66 patients who underwent either an uncomplicated intracapsular cataract extraction, extracapsular cataract extraction with posterior-chamber intraocular lens implantation, or phacoemulsification with posterior-chamber intraocular lens implantation. The aspirate was obtained at the time of wound closure. The aspirates were immediately transferred to the microbiology laboratory where one drop of the aspirate was placed on a glass slide for gram stain, and the remainder was unequally divided and inoculated into blood agar, chocolate agar and thioglycolate broth. The cultures were incubated at 37 degrees C with 5% CO2 and held for 5 days. Of 66 patients 4 (6%), had smear-positive anterior chamber aspirates. None of the aspirates showed any growth on any of the 3 culture media used. None of the eyes in the study developed endophthalmitis. This study concludes that there is no contamination of the anterior chamber by viable bacteria after cataract surgery, irrespective of the mode of intervention.  (+info)

Circumcision and neonatal tetanus: disclosure of risk and its reduction by topical antibiotics. (8/1865)

BACKGROUND: Previous case-control studies have paradoxically suggested that circumcisions protect against neonatal tetanus (NNT), but these observations have not been adjusted for differences in the length of survival of cases and controls. METHODS: Boy cases (n = 133) and their sex-matched controls (n = 399) were extracted from a population-based study of NNT undertaken in Punjab Province, Pakistan. In the resulting file, circumcisions were censored such that analysis was restricted to only those that occurred before onset in cases or before age of onset in the matched case for controls. The effect of topical antibiotics in circumcision wounds was then evaluated. RESULTS: After adjusting for confounders, circumcision before onset posed a significant risk for NNT (matched odds ratio [OR] = 3.1, 95% CI: 1.2-8.0). The risk of NNT in those circumcised before onset and treated with topical antibiotics did not differ significantly from the referent group who had not been circumcised before onset (matched OR = 1.1, 95% CI: 0.2-6.8), whereas the lack of topical use was associated with significant risk (matched OR = 4.2, 95% CI: 1.4-12.6). This suggests that topical antibiotics are likely to be highly effective in preventing NNT from circumcision wounds. We estimated an overall risk of about 16 fatal NNT cases per 1000 live boy births with circumcision wounds that were not protected by topical antibiotics, and that circumcision and umbilical wounds each accounted for about half of this overall risk in these boys. CONCLUSIONS: Topical antibiotics should be routinely applied to all wounds created by traditional circumcisions, to prevent NNT and sepsis from these frequently unsterile procedures.  (+info)

  • The study evaluated 30-day SSI outcomes for CleanCision , the novel wound retraction device that combines barrier protection and continuous intraoperative wound irrigation, against the standard wound protector used at Baylor Scott & White Health. (memorialcareinnovationfund.com)
  • Surgeon-specific surgical wound infection rates should be calculated and reported to individual surgeons. (utmb.edu)
  • A Surgical Wound Infection Task Force was convened by the Society of Hospital Epidemiology of America to evaluate how surgical wound infection surveillance should be done and to identify where more information is needed. (utmb.edu)
  • The Centers for Disease Control definitions of surgical wound infection should be used for routine surveillance because of their current widespread acceptance and reproducibility. (utmb.edu)