Surgical Mesh: Any woven or knit material of open texture used in surgery for the repair, reconstruction, or substitution of tissue. The mesh is usually a synthetic fabric made of various polymers. It is occasionally made of metal.Hernia, Abdominal: A protrusion of abdominal structures through the retaining ABDOMINAL WALL. It involves two parts: an opening in the abdominal wall, and a hernia sac consisting of PERITONEUM and abdominal contents. Abdominal hernias include groin hernia (HERNIA, FEMORAL; HERNIA, INGUINAL) and VENTRAL HERNIA.Polypropylenes: Propylene or propene polymers. Thermoplastics that can be extruded into fibers, films or solid forms. They are used as a copolymer in plastics, especially polyethylene. The fibers are used for fabrics, filters and surgical sutures.Sutures: Materials used in closing a surgical or traumatic wound. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Laryngoplasty: Restoration, reconstruction, or improvement of a defective or damaged LARYNX.Device Approval: Process that is gone through in order for a device to receive approval by a government regulatory agency. This includes any required preclinical or clinical testing, review, submission, and evaluation of the applications and test results, and post-marketing surveillance. It is not restricted to FDA.Polydioxanone: An absorbable suture material used also as ligating clips, as pins for internal fixation of broken bones, and as ligament reinforcement for surgically managed ligament injuries. Its promising characteristics are elasticity, complete biodegradability, and lack of side effects such as infections.Equipment Safety: Freedom of equipment from actual or potential hazards.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Vagina: The genital canal in the female, extending from the UTERUS to the VULVA. (Stedman, 25th ed)Brain Injuries: Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.Carcinoma, Lewis Lung: A carcinoma discovered by Dr. Margaret R. Lewis of the Wistar Institute in 1951. This tumor originated spontaneously as a carcinoma of the lung of a C57BL mouse. The tumor does not appear to be grossly hemorrhagic and the majority of the tumor tissue is a semifirm homogeneous mass. (From Cancer Chemother Rep 2 1972 Nov;(3)1:325) It is also called 3LL and LLC and is used as a transplantable malignancy.Surgical Equipment: Nonexpendable apparatus used during surgical procedures. They are differentiated from SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, usually hand-held and used in the immediate operative field.Capital Expenditures: Those funds disbursed for facilities and equipment, particularly those related to the delivery of health care.Durable Medical Equipment: Devices which are very resistant to wear and may be used over a long period of time. They include items such as wheelchairs, hospital beds, artificial limbs, etc.Marketing: Activity involved in transfer of goods from producer to consumer or in the exchange of services.Organ Transplantation: Transference of an organ between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.Tissue Transplantation: Transference of tissue within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Wool: The hair of SHEEP or other animals that is used for weaving.Diptera: An order of the class Insecta. Wings, when present, number two and distinguish Diptera from other so-called flies, while the halteres, or reduced hindwings, separate Diptera from other insects with one pair of wings. The order includes the families Calliphoridae, Oestridae, Phoridae, SARCOPHAGIDAE, Scatophagidae, Sciaridae, SIMULIIDAE, Tabanidae, Therevidae, Trypetidae, CERATOPOGONIDAE; CHIRONOMIDAE; CULICIDAE; DROSOPHILIDAE; GLOSSINIDAE; MUSCIDAE; TEPHRITIDAE; and PSYCHODIDAE. The larval form of Diptera species are called maggots (see LARVA).Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Fear: The affective response to an actual current external danger which subsides with the elimination of the threatening condition.Steel: A tough, malleable, iron-based alloy containing up to, but no more than, two percent carbon and often other metals. It is used in medicine and dentistry in implants and instrumentation.Research Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Financing, Organized: All organized methods of funding.Research Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Hernia, Inguinal: An abdominal hernia with an external bulge in the GROIN region. It can be classified by the location of herniation. Indirect inguinal hernias occur through the internal inguinal ring. Direct inguinal hernias occur through defects in the ABDOMINAL WALL (transversalis fascia) in Hesselbach's triangle. The former type is commonly seen in children and young adults; the latter in adults.Hernia: Protrusion of tissue, structure, or part of an organ through the bone, muscular tissue, or the membrane by which it is normally contained. Hernia may involve tissues such as the ABDOMINAL WALL or the respiratory DIAPHRAGM. Hernias may be internal, external, congenital, or acquired.Hernia, Ventral: A hernia caused by weakness of the anterior ABDOMINAL WALL due to midline defects, previous incisions, or increased intra-abdominal pressure. Ventral hernias include UMBILICAL HERNIA, incisional, epigastric, and spigelian hernias.Hernia, Diaphragmatic: Protrusion of abdominal structures into the THORAX as a result of congenital or traumatic defects in the respiratory DIAPHRAGM.Herniorrhaphy: Surgical procedures undertaken to repair abnormal openings through which tissue or parts of organs can protrude or are already protruding.Counterfeit Drugs: Drugs manufactured and sold with the intent to misrepresent its origin, authenticity, chemical composition, and or efficacy. Counterfeit drugs may contain inappropriate quantities of ingredients not listed on the label or package. In order to further deceive the consumer, the packaging, container, or labeling, may be inaccurate, incorrect, or fake.Fraud: Exploitation through misrepresentation of the facts or concealment of the purposes of the exploiter.Thoracic Wall: The outer margins of the thorax containing SKIN, deep FASCIA; THORACIC VERTEBRAE; RIBS; STERNUM; and MUSCLES.Thoracoplasty: Surgical removal of ribs, allowing the chest wall to move inward and collapse a diseased lung. (Dorland, 28th ed)Central Nervous System Sensitization: An increased response to stimulation that is mediated by amplification of signaling in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM (CNS).Pelvic Floor: Soft tissue formed mainly by the pelvic diaphragm, which is composed of the two levator ani and two coccygeus muscles. The pelvic diaphragm lies just below the pelvic aperture (outlet) and separates the pelvic cavity from the PERINEUM. It extends between the PUBIC BONE anteriorly and the COCCYX posteriorly.Publications: Copies of a work or document distributed to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending. (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p181)Pelvic Organ Prolapse: Abnormal descent of a pelvic organ resulting in the protrusion of the organ beyond its normal anatomical confines. Symptoms often include vaginal discomfort, DYSPAREUNIA; URINARY STRESS INCONTINENCE; and FECAL INCONTINENCE.Uterine Prolapse: Downward displacement of the UTERUS. It is classified in various degrees: in the first degree the UTERINE CERVIX is within the vaginal orifice; in the second degree the cervix is outside the orifice; in the third degree the entire uterus is outside the orifice.Prolapse: The protrusion of an organ or part of an organ into a natural or artificial orifice.Urinary Incontinence, Stress: Involuntary discharge of URINE as a result of physical activities that increase abdominal pressure on the URINARY BLADDER without detrusor contraction or overdistended bladder. The subtypes are classified by the degree of leakage, descent and opening of the bladder neck and URETHRA without bladder contraction, and sphincter deficiency.Cystocele: A HERNIA-like condition in which the weakened pelvic muscles cause the URINARY BLADDER to drop from its normal position. Fallen urinary bladder is more common in females with the bladder dropping into the VAGINA and less common in males with the bladder dropping into the SCROTUM.Urodynamics: The mechanical laws of fluid dynamics as they apply to urine transport.Urinary Incontinence: Involuntary loss of URINE, such as leaking of urine. It is a symptom of various underlying pathological processes. Major types of incontinence include URINARY URGE INCONTINENCE and URINARY STRESS INCONTINENCE.Suburethral Slings: Support structures, made from natural or synthetic materials, that are implanted below the URETHRA to treat URINARY STRESS INCONTINENCE.Fecal Incontinence: Failure of voluntary control of the anal sphincters, with involuntary passage of feces and flatus.De Lange Syndrome: A syndrome characterized by growth retardation, severe MENTAL RETARDATION, short stature, a low-pitched growling cry, brachycephaly, low-set ears, webbed neck, carp mouth, depressed nasal bridge, bushy eyebrows meeting at the midline, hirsutism, and malformations of the hands. The condition may occur sporadically or be associated with an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance or duplication of the long arm of chromosome 3. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p231)Supreme Court Decisions: Decisions made by the United States Supreme Court.

Surgical options in the management of groin hernias. (1/566)

Inguinal and femoral hernias are the most common conditions for which primary care physicians refer patients for surgical management. Hernias usually present as swelling accompanied by pain or a dragging sensation in the groin. Most hernias can be diagnosed based on the history and clinical examination, but ultrasonography may be useful in differentiating a hernia from other causes of groin swelling. Surgical repair is usually advised because of the danger of incarceration and strangulation, particularly with femoral hernias. Three major types of open repair are currently used, and laparoscopic techniques are also employed. The choice of technique depends on several factors, including the type of hernia, anesthetic considerations, cost, period of postoperative disability and the surgeon's expertise. Following initial herniorrhaphy, complication and recurrence rates are generally low. Laparoscopic techniques make it possible for patients to return to normal activities more quickly, but they are more costly than open procedures. In addition, they require general anesthesia, and the long-term hernia recurrence rate with these procedures is unknown.  (+info)

Histological changes in the rat common carotid artery induced by aneurysmal wrapping and coating materials. (2/566)

Histological changes in and around the arterial walls of rats were investigated following topical application of aneurysmal wrapping and coating materials, including a fibrin glue, a cyanoacrylate glue (Biobond), and cotton fibers (Bemsheet). Bilateral common carotid arteries were exposed using sterile techniques, and one of the test materials was applied to the right artery. The left artery was used as the control. Changes in arterial histology were evaluated at 2 weeks, 1 month, 2 months, and 3 months after surgery. The fibrin glue was surrounded by intense inflammation at 2 weeks after surgery. Both the fibrin glue and inflammation had disappeared at 2 months, but the glue had induced mild inflammation in the adventitia. Biobond caused chronic inflammation, necrosis of the media, and thickening of the arterial wall due to fibrosis in both the media and adventitia. Bemsheet produced chronic inflammation, progressive fibrosis, and granuloma. Connective tissue increased in the adventitia, but no major changes were observed in the media. The Bemsheet fibers remained unchanged, and adhered to the arterial wall. Although arterial stenoses were not observed in the present study, the results suggest that cyanoacrylate glue can cause the arterial occlusive lesions observed following aneurysm surgery.  (+info)

Inguinal hernia repair: a survey of Canadian practice patterns. (3/566)

OBJECTIVE: To describe the preferences of general surgeons across Canada with respect to hernia repair technique. DESIGN: A survey by mailed questionnaire. PARTICIPANTS: All 1452 fellows of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada currently holding a certificate in general surgery. INTERVENTION: Two mailings of the survey: the first in December 1996, the second to nonrespondents in February 1997. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Surgeons' preference of hernia repair technique for specified indications. This was analysed according to practice setting and geographic location. MAIN RESULTS: Based on 706 completed questionnaires, the preferred techniques for repair of primary inguinal hernias were as follows: 23% Bassini, 20% mesh plug, 16% Lichtenstein, 15% laparoscopic, 11% Shouldice and 11% McVay. Preference for laparoscopic repair increased to 34% for recurrent hernias and 35% for bilateral hernias. The Atlantic provinces had the lowest preference rates for laparoscopic repair and the highest rates for the mesh plug technique. CONCLUSIONS: Most surgeons select the type of repair on the basis of the clinical scenario. Large variations in practice exist between provinces.  (+info)

Comparison of laparoscopic vs open modified Shouldice technique in inguinal hernia repair. (4/566)

Inguinal hernia repair has been a common procedure performed by general surgeons. Recently, a newly developed approach has been introduced using the pre-peritoneal laparoscopic repair. The laparoscopic approach allows patients to recover faster, with less pain, however, a disadvantage is the higher cost. We conducted a retrospective study of inguinal hernia repairs performed by one surgeon at the same institution, comparing the laparoscopic technique to the modified Shouldice procedure with regard to surgical time, postoperative recovery time, charge, and time to return to work and to activities. Patients undergoing laparoscopic hernia repairs were able to return to work and to activities sooner than patients undergoing the modified Shouldice procedure. The results obtained in this study showed a higher charge for the laparoscopic procedure, with longer surgical and recovery room time. The more rapid return to work and activities may outweigh the higher charge and longer surgical and recovery room time.  (+info)

Mesh-and-glue technique to prevent leakage of cerebrospinal fluid after implantation of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene dura substitute--technical note. (5/566)

Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) can be used as a dura substitute but is associated with leakage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) through the suture line. Fibrin glue alone may not prevent this problem. This new method for sealing the suture line in ePTFE membrane uses an absorbable polyglycoic acid mesh soaked with fibrinogen fluid placed on the suture line. Thrombin fluid is then slowly applied to the wet mesh, forming a large fibrin membrane reinforced by the mesh over the suture line. Only one of 33 patients in whom this technique was used had CSF leakage, whereas 12 of 59 patients in whom a dural defect was closed with ePTFE alone showed postoperative subcutaneous CSF collection (p < 0.05). Our clinical experiences clearly show the efficacy of the mesh-and-glue technique to prevent CSF leakage after artificial dural substitution. Mesh and glue can provide an adequate repair for small dural defect. The mesh-and-glue technique may also be used for arachnoid sealing in spinal surgery.  (+info)

Transcatheter closure of secundum atrial septal defects with the new self-centering Amplatzer Septal Occluder. (6/566)

AIMS: The study was set up to find out whether a new self-centering prosthesis for transcatheter closure of secundum atrial septal defects could overcome the disadvantages of previously described devices. METHODS AND RESULTS: Fifty-two consecutive patients with a significant atrial septal defect were considered for transcatheter closure with the Amplatzer Septal Occluder. The device, made of a Nitinol and polyester fabric mesh, provides a different approach to defect occlusion by stenting the atrial septal defect up to a stretched diameter of 26 mm. Three infants whose large defects were demonstrated on a transthoracic echocardiogram were excluded from transcatheter treatment. On transoesophageal echocardiography, 49 defects ranged from 6-26 mm, in one adult the defect measured 28 mm and this patient was excluded from attempted transcatheter closure. At cardiac catheterization in five further patients, devices were not implanted, in two because the stretched diameter exceeded 26 mm and in three the device was withdrawn because it was unstable or compromised the mitral valve. Thus, device closure was performed in 43 patients. At follow-up after 3 months the complete closure rate was 97%. CONCLUSION: The self-centering Amplatzer Septal Occluder is very efficient and user-friendly and offers interventional closure in 83% of an unselected group of patients presented with an atrial septal defect.  (+info)

Laparoscopic mesh versus open preperitoneal mesh versus conventional technique for inguinal hernia repair: a randomized multicenter trial (SCUR Hernia Repair Study). (7/566)

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of the laparoscopic technique in hernia repair regarding time to full recovery and return to work, complications, recurrence rate, and economic aspects. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Several studies have shown advantages in terms of less pain and faster recovery after laparoscopic hernia repair, whereas others have not, and the cost-effectiveness has been questioned. The laparoscopic technique must be thoroughly compared with the open procedures before its true place in hernia surgery can be defined. METHODS: Six hundred thirteen male patients aged 40 to 75 years were randomized to the conventional procedure, preperitoneal mesh placed by the open technique, or laparoscopic preperitoneal mesh (TAPP). Follow-up was after 7 days, 8 weeks, and 1 year. RESULTS: Of 613 patients undergoing surgery, 604 (98.5%) were followed for 1 year. Patients who underwent TAPP gained full recovery after 18.4 days, compared with 24.2 days for open mesh (p < 0.001) and 26.4 days for the conventional procedure (p < 0.001). Patients who underwent TAPP returned to work after 14.7 days, compared with 17.7 days for open mesh (p = 0.05) and 17.9 days for the conventional procedure (p = 0.04). They also had significantly less restriction in physical activities after 7 days. The TAPP procedure was more expensive, mainly as a result of longer surgical time and equipment costs, even after compensation for earlier return to work. Complications were more common in the TAPP group, with a varying pattern between the groups. Four recurrences in the conventional, 11 in the open mesh, and 4 in the TAPP group were recorded after 1 year (p = n.s.). CONCLUSION: The laparoscopic technique results in both shorter time to full recovery and shorter time to return to work, at the price of substantially increased costs.  (+info)

The use of titanium surgical mesh-bone graft composite in the anterior thoracic or lumbar spine after complete or partial corpectomy. (8/566)

Various conditions such as fracture, dislocation, tumor, or infection adversely affect the vertebral body and lead to instability. Restoration of a stable anterior column is essential for normal spinal biomechanics. Various biological and mechanical spacers have been used to reconstruct the anterior column after corpectomy. In this retrospective review, the authors evaluated clinical charts and radiographs of 13 patients receiving titanium surgical mesh (TSM)-bone graft composite to reconstruct the anterior spinal column in the thoracic or lumbar region. The objective of this review was to evaluate the stability and efficacy of the TSM-bone graft composite in the anterior spine after a complete or partial corpectomy. Sixteen patients with involvement of the thoracic or lumbar vertebral column after trauma, tumor, or infection underwent partial or complete corpectomy. In all patients the anterior defect was reconstructed using a TSM-bone graft composite. Three patients died within 12 months postoperatively due to primary malignant process. Thirteen of 16 patient charts and radiographs were evaluated for anterior fusion status, settling of the TSM-bone graft composite, and hardware failure. No pseudoarthroses were noted. Evidence of solid anterior fusion was noted in all patients. The average settling of the TSM-bone graft construct was 3 mm. All patients presenting with only pain and no neurological symptoms (n = 9) experienced early pain relief. For patients presenting with neurological symptoms (n = 4), the recovery was complete in three and partial in one. No patient was made neurologically worse, and there were no vascular injuries intra- or postoperatively. The study suggests that TSM-bone graft composite offers excellent biomechanical stability in the immediate postoperative period, permitting progressive maturation of the fusion mass.  (+info)

  • The research report labeled Global Surgical Mesh Market 2017 presents the penetrating study of Surgical Mesh market globally, concentrating on complete analysis of the present and past historical details of Surgical Mesh market. (medgadget.com)
  • The Global Hernia Mesh Repair Devices Market is poised to reach USD 4.5 billion by 2024, from USD 3.8 billion in 2016 growing at a CAGR of 2.1% in the forecast period 2017 to 2024. (wordpress.com)
  • Ethicon initiated a voluntary recall of the mesh product in May 2016 and the FDA later recalled the product in all healthcare faculties. (gpwlaw.com)
  • Austin, TX ( Law Firm Newswire ) November 23, 2016 - The vaginal mesh kit fiasco is now making headlines around the world thanks to two dedicated Texas trial attorneys, Steve and Amber Mostyn of Mostyn Law, who took their surgical mesh research to Scotland's Parliament. (top40lawfirms.com)
  • What most patients don't realize is that the mesh is made up of polypropylene and has the ability to oxidize and degrade directly into human tissue and throughout the entire body. (mtmp.com)
  • Many of today's modern hernia meshes are constructed of polypropylene (brand names include PROLENE® and Marlex®, for example)-basically a monofilament (plastic or resin) suture. (minnesotapersonalinjury.com)
  • This includes specialised scans to look in detail at mesh cases, and links with urologists and general surgeons if additional expertise is required for surgical management. (adhb.govt.nz)
  • In short, Judge Carol Higbee, who is presiding over the consolidated In re Pelvic Mesh/Gynecare Litigation in New Jersey state court, denied Ethicon and Johnson & Johnson's motion to keep a number of "product and regulatory related" documents confidential. (litigationandtrial.com)
  • The complications that Australian women are suffering include the mesh or tape eroding through, and into, surrounding tissue and organs, as well as incontinence, infection and chronic pain," Shine Lawyers Special Counsel Rebecca Jancauskas said last month, ahead of the case going to court. (shine.com.au)
  • Using a synthetic mesh, the weak tissue is "patched" and prevents the hernia from continually pushing through the weak spot. (gpwlaw.com)
  • Since the mesh helps to "bridge the gap" on the opening, rather than pulling the tissue together, fewer sutures are needed and pain for the patient is greatly reduced. (gpwlaw.com)
  • Mesh is made of synthetic materials or animal tissue. (pbmattorneys.com)
  • Surgical mesh is either synthetic, or derived from animal tissue. (simmonsfirm.com)
  • Hernia Mesh is a medical device that's implanted within the body by a surgeon-designed to patch or repair an area of the body where fatty tissue, an internal organ or intestine has bulged through a hole or weakness in the surrounding muscle or connective tissue. (minnesotapersonalinjury.com)
  • For certain applications, the mesh is coated with a fatty acid, cellulose or collagen to prevent adhesion or the forming of scar tissue that can fuse the mesh with the intestines or other organs. (minnesotapersonalinjury.com)
  • This occurs when an organ or tissue bulges through or reopens a past surgical incision. (minnesotapersonalinjury.com)
  • There are many factors that contribute to the development of a hernia such as age: a previous surgical incision, an injury, or a condition present at birth. (gpwlaw.com)
  • Through the extended first umbilical incision, the rectus diastasis was closed using the open method, and the caudal part of the mesh was sutured directly to the fascia at the same time. (springeropen.com)
  • An incisional hernia is caused when structures inside the abdomen push through a surgical incision that has not completely healed. (freeadvice.com)
  • The fascial defect was detected precisely through the laparoscopy, and non-absorbable mesh was placed through a 12-mm trocar. (springeropen.com)
  • The TIGR Matrix Surgical Mesh manufactured by Novus Scientific. (freeadvice.com)