Mitral Valve: The valve between the left atrium and left ventricle of the heart.Mitral Valve Prolapse: Abnormal protrusion or billowing of one or both of the leaflets of MITRAL VALVE into the LEFT ATRIUM during SYSTOLE. This allows the backflow of blood into left atrium leading to MITRAL VALVE INSUFFICIENCY; SYSTOLIC MURMURS; or CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIA.Mitral Valve Insufficiency: Backflow of blood from the LEFT VENTRICLE into the LEFT ATRIUM due to imperfect closure of the MITRAL VALVE. This can lead to mitral valve regurgitation.Mitral Valve Stenosis: Narrowing of the passage through the MITRAL VALVE due to FIBROSIS, and CALCINOSIS in the leaflets and chordal areas. This elevates the left atrial pressure which, in turn, raises pulmonary venous and capillary pressure leading to bouts of DYSPNEA and TACHYCARDIA during physical exertion. RHEUMATIC FEVER is its primary cause.Aortic Valve: The valve between the left ventricle and the ascending aorta which prevents backflow into the left ventricle.Mitral Valve Annuloplasty: A type of heart valve surgery that involves the repair, replacement, or reconstruction of the annulus of the MITRAL VALVE. It includes shortening the circumference of the annulus to improve valve closing capacity and reinforcing the annulus as a step in more complex valve repairs.Heart Valve Diseases: Pathological conditions involving any of the various HEART VALVES and the associated structures (PAPILLARY MUSCLES and CHORDAE TENDINEAE).Chordae Tendineae: The tendinous cords that connect each cusp of the two atrioventricular HEART VALVES to appropriate PAPILLARY MUSCLES in the HEART VENTRICLES, preventing the valves from reversing themselves when the ventricles contract.Aortic Valve Stenosis: A pathological constriction that can occur above (supravalvular stenosis), below (subvalvular stenosis), or at the AORTIC VALVE. It is characterized by restricted outflow from the LEFT VENTRICLE into the AORTA.Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of synthetic material to repair injured or diseased heart valves.Tricuspid Valve: The valve consisting of three cusps situated between the right atrium and right ventricle of the heart.Heart Valve Prosthesis: A device that substitutes for a heart valve. It may be composed of biological material (BIOPROSTHESIS) and/or synthetic material.Aortic Valve Insufficiency: Pathological condition characterized by the backflow of blood from the ASCENDING AORTA back into the LEFT VENTRICLE, leading to regurgitation. It is caused by diseases of the AORTIC VALVE or its surrounding tissue (aortic root).Bioprosthesis: Prosthesis, usually heart valve, composed of biological material and whose durability depends upon the stability of the material after pretreatment, rather than regeneration by host cell ingrowth. Durability is achieved 1, mechanically by the interposition of a cloth, usually polytetrafluoroethylene, between the host and the graft, and 2, chemically by stabilization of the tissue by intermolecular linking, usually with glutaraldehyde, after removal of antigenic components, or the use of reconstituted and restructured biopolymers.Pulmonary Valve: A valve situated at the entrance to the pulmonary trunk from the right ventricle.Echocardiography, Transesophageal: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues using a transducer placed in the esophagus.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Rheumatic Heart Disease: Cardiac manifestation of systemic rheumatological conditions, such as RHEUMATIC FEVER. Rheumatic heart disease can involve any part the heart, most often the HEART VALVES and the ENDOCARDIUM.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Echocardiography, Three-Dimensional: Echocardiography amplified by the addition of depth to the conventional two-dimensional ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY visualizing only the length and width of the heart. Three-dimensional ultrasound imaging was first described in 1961 but its application to echocardiography did not take place until 1974. (Mayo Clin Proc 1993;68:221-40)Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Cardiac Valve Annuloplasty: A type of heart valve surgery that involves the repair, replacement, or reconstruction of the annuli of HEART VALVES. It includes shortening the circumference of the annulus to improve valve closing capacity and reinforcing the annulus as a step in more complex valve repairs.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Phonocardiography: Graphic registration of the heart sounds picked up as vibrations and transformed by a piezoelectric crystal microphone into a varying electrical output according to the stresses imposed by the sound waves. The electrical output is amplified by a stethograph amplifier and recorded by a device incorporated into the electrocardiograph or by a multichannel recording machine.Endocarditis, Bacterial: Inflammation of the ENDOCARDIUM caused by BACTERIA that entered the bloodstream. The strains of bacteria vary with predisposing factors, such as CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS; HEART VALVE DISEASES; HEART VALVE PROSTHESIS IMPLANTATION; or intravenous drug use.Endocarditis: Inflammation of the inner lining of the heart (ENDOCARDIUM), the continuous membrane lining the four chambers and HEART VALVES. It is often caused by microorganisms including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and rickettsiae. Left untreated, endocarditis can damage heart valves and become life-threatening.Tricuspid Valve Insufficiency: Backflow of blood from the RIGHT VENTRICLE into the RIGHT ATRIUM due to imperfect closure of the TRICUSPID VALVE.Echocardiography, Doppler, Color: Echocardiography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image.Venous Valves: Flaps within the VEINS that allow the blood to flow only in one direction. They are usually in the medium size veins that carry blood to the heart against gravity.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Heart Auscultation: Act of listening for sounds within the heart.Echocardiography, Doppler: Measurement of intracardiac blood flow using an M-mode and/or two-dimensional (2-D) echocardiogram while simultaneously recording the spectrum of the audible Doppler signal (e.g., velocity, direction, amplitude, intensity, timing) reflected from the moving column of red blood cells.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Prolapse: The protrusion of an organ or part of an organ into a natural or artificial orifice.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Myxoma: A benign neoplasm derived from connective tissue, consisting chiefly of polyhedral and stellate cells that are loosely embedded in a soft mucoid matrix, thereby resembling primitive mesenchymal tissue. It occurs frequently intramuscularly where it may be mistaken for a sarcoma. It appears also in the jaws and the skin. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the aorta (or femoral artery) via an oxygenator thus bypassing both the heart and lungs.Thoracic Surgery: A surgical specialty concerned with diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the heart, lungs, and esophagus. Two major types of thoracic surgery are classified as pulmonary and cardiovascular.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Heart Atria: The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.Papillary Muscles: Conical muscular projections from the walls of the cardiac ventricles, attached to the cusps of the atrioventricular valves by the chordae tendineae.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Heart Rupture: Disease-related laceration or tearing of tissues of the heart, including the free-wall MYOCARDIUM; HEART SEPTUM; PAPILLARY MUSCLES; CHORDAE TENDINEAE; and any of the HEART VALVES. Pathological rupture usually results from myocardial infarction (HEART RUPTURE, POST-INFARCTION).Thoracotomy: Surgical incision into the chest wall.Heart Neoplasms: Tumors in any part of the heart. They include primary cardiac tumors and metastatic tumors to the heart. Their interference with normal cardiac functions can cause a wide variety of symptoms including HEART FAILURE; CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS; or EMBOLISM.Heart Ventricles: The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Heart Defects, Congenital: Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.Calcinosis: Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Kinetocardiography: The graphic recording of chest wall movement due to cardiac impulses.Heart Murmurs: Heart sounds caused by vibrations resulting from the flow of blood through the heart. Heart murmurs can be examined by HEART AUSCULTATION, and analyzed by their intensity (6 grades), duration, timing (systolic, diastolic, or continuous), location, transmission, and quality (musical, vibratory, blowing, etc).Bariatric Surgery: Surgical procedures aimed at affecting metabolism and producing major WEIGHT REDUCTION in patients with MORBID OBESITY.Balloon Valvuloplasty: Widening of a stenosed HEART VALVE by the insertion of a balloon CATHETER into the valve and inflation of the balloon.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Pulmonary Valve Stenosis: The pathologic narrowing of the orifice of the PULMONARY VALVE. This lesion restricts blood outflow from the RIGHT VENTRICLE to the PULMONARY ARTERY. When the trileaflet valve is fused into an imperforate membrane, the blockage is complete.Heart Valves: Flaps of tissue that prevent regurgitation of BLOOD from the HEART VENTRICLES to the HEART ATRIA or from the PULMONARY ARTERIES or AORTA to the ventricles.Sternotomy: Making an incision in the STERNUM.Cardiovascular Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart or blood vessels.Ventricular Outflow Obstruction: Occlusion of the outflow tract in either the LEFT VENTRICLE or the RIGHT VENTRICLE of the heart. This may result from CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS, predisposing heart diseases, complications of surgery, or HEART NEOPLASMS.Atrial Fibrillation: Abnormal cardiac rhythm that is characterized by rapid, uncoordinated firing of electrical impulses in the upper chambers of the heart (HEART ATRIA). In such case, blood cannot be effectively pumped into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES). It is caused by abnormal impulse generation.Ventricular Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.General Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.Marfan Syndrome: An autosomal dominant disorder of CONNECTIVE TISSUE with abnormal features in the heart, the eye, and the skeleton. Cardiovascular manifestations include MITRAL VALVE PROLAPSE, dilation of the AORTA, and aortic dissection. Other features include lens displacement (ectopia lentis), disproportioned long limbs and enlarged DURA MATER (dural ectasia). Marfan syndrome is associated with mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin, a major element of extracellular microfibrils of connective tissue.Heart Sounds: The sounds heard over the cardiac region produced by the functioning of the heart. There are four distinct sounds: the first occurs at the beginning of SYSTOLE and is heard as a "lubb" sound; the second is produced by the closing of the AORTIC VALVE and PULMONARY VALVE and is heard as a "dupp" sound; the third is produced by vibrations of the ventricular walls when suddenly distended by the rush of blood from the HEART ATRIA; and the fourth is produced by atrial contraction and ventricular filling.Surgical Instruments: Hand-held tools or implements used by health professionals for the performance of surgical tasks.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Thromboembolism: Obstruction of a blood vessel (embolism) by a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the blood stream.Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Heart Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the heart.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease, characterized by left and/or right ventricular hypertrophy (HYPERTROPHY, LEFT VENTRICULAR; HYPERTROPHY, RIGHT VENTRICULAR), frequent asymmetrical involvement of the HEART SEPTUM, and normal or reduced left ventricular volume. Risk factors include HYPERTENSION; AORTIC STENOSIS; and gene MUTATION; (FAMILIAL HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY).Sternum: A long, narrow, and flat bone commonly known as BREASTBONE occurring in the midsection of the anterior thoracic segment or chest region, which stabilizes the rib cage and serves as the point of origin for several muscles that move the arms, head, and neck.Angiocardiography: Radiography of the heart and great vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Pericardium: A conical fibro-serous sac surrounding the HEART and the roots of the great vessels (AORTA; VENAE CAVAE; PULMONARY ARTERY). Pericardium consists of two sacs: the outer fibrous pericardium and the inner serous pericardium. The latter consists of an outer parietal layer facing the fibrous pericardium, and an inner visceral layer (epicardium) resting next to the heart, and a pericardial cavity between these two layers.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Surgery, Computer-Assisted: Surgical procedures conducted with the aid of computers. This is most frequently used in orthopedic and laparoscopic surgery for implant placement and instrument guidance. Image-guided surgery interactively combines prior CT scans or MRI images with real-time video.Models, Cardiovascular: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.Endocardial Cushion Defects: A spectrum of septal defects involving the ATRIAL SEPTUM; VENTRICULAR SEPTUM; and the atrioventricular valves (TRICUSPID VALVE; BICUSPID VALVE). These defects are due to incomplete growth and fusion of the ENDOCARDIAL CUSHIONS which are important in the formation of two atrioventricular canals, site of future atrioventricular valves.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Rupture, Spontaneous: Tear or break of an organ, vessel or other soft part of the body, occurring in the absence of external force.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Heart Septum: This structure includes the thin muscular atrial septum between the two HEART ATRIA, and the thick muscular ventricular septum between the two HEART VENTRICLES.Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted: Endoscopic surgery of the pleural cavity performed with visualization via video transmission.Device Removal: Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Heart Aneurysm: A localized bulging or dilatation in the muscle wall of a heart (MYOCARDIUM), usually in the LEFT VENTRICLE. Blood-filled aneurysms are dangerous because they may burst. Fibrous aneurysms interfere with the heart function through the loss of contractility. True aneurysm is bound by the vessel wall or cardiac wall. False aneurysms are HEMATOMA caused by myocardial rupture.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Intraoperative Care: Patient care procedures performed during the operation that are ancillary to the actual surgery. It includes monitoring, fluid therapy, medication, transfusion, anesthesia, radiography, and laboratory tests.Heart Septal Defects, Ventricular: Developmental abnormalities in any portion of the VENTRICULAR SEPTUM resulting in abnormal communications between the two lower chambers of the heart. Classification of ventricular septal defects is based on location of the communication, such as perimembranous, inlet, outlet (infundibular), central muscular, marginal muscular, or apical muscular defect.Diastole: Post-systolic relaxation of the HEART, especially the HEART VENTRICLES.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Heart Septal Defects, Atrial: Developmental abnormalities in any portion of the ATRIAL SEPTUM resulting in abnormal communications between the two upper chambers of the heart. Classification of atrial septal defects is based on location of the communication and types of incomplete fusion of atrial septa with the ENDOCARDIAL CUSHIONS in the fetal heart. They include ostium primum, ostium secundum, sinus venosus, and coronary sinus defects.Systole: Period of contraction of the HEART, especially of the HEART VENTRICLES.Ventricular Dysfunction, Left: A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.Fibroma: A benign tumor of fibrous or fully developed connective tissue.Cineradiography: Motion picture study of successive images appearing on a fluoroscopic screen.Embolism: Blocking of a blood vessel by an embolus which can be a blood clot or other undissolved material in the blood stream.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Video-Assisted Surgery: Endoscopic surgical procedures performed with visualization via video transmission. When real-time video is combined interactively with prior CT scans or MRI images, this is called image-guided surgery (see SURGERY, COMPUTER-ASSISTED).Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Lutembacher Syndrome: A condition characterized by a combination of OSTIUM SECUNDUM ATRIAL SEPTAL DEFECT and an acquired MITRAL VALVE STENOSIS.Endocardial Fibroelastosis: A condition characterized by the thickening of ENDOCARDIUM due to proliferation of fibrous and elastic tissue, usually in the left ventricle leading to impaired cardiac function (CARDIOMYOPATHY, RESTRICTIVE). It is most commonly seen in young children and rarely in adults. It is often associated with congenital heart anomalies (HEART DEFECTS CONGENITAL;) INFECTION; or gene mutation. Defects in the tafazzin protein, encoded by TAZ gene, result in a form of autosomal dominant familial endocardial fibroelastosis.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Atrial Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the LEFT ATRIUM.Heart Septal Defects: Abnormalities in any part of the HEART SEPTUM resulting in abnormal communication between the left and the right chambers of the heart. The abnormal blood flow inside the heart may be caused by defects in the ATRIAL SEPTUM, the VENTRICULAR SEPTUM, or both.Surgery, Plastic: The branch of surgery concerned with restoration, reconstruction, or improvement of defective, damaged, or missing structures.Hospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.Monitoring, Intraoperative: The constant checking on the state or condition of a patient during the course of a surgical operation (e.g., checking of vital signs).Intraoperative Period: The period during a surgical operation.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Aortic Aneurysm: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.Ileocecal Valve: The valve, at the junction of the CECUM with the COLON, that guards the opening where the ILEUM enters the LARGE INTESTINE.Tricuspid Valve Prolapse: Abnormal protrusion of one or more of the leaflets of TRICUSPID VALVE into the RIGHT ATRIUM during SYSTOLE. This allows the backflow of blood into right atrium leading to TRICUSPID VALVE INSUFFICIENCY; SYSTOLIC MURMURS. Its most common cause is not primary valve abnormality but rather the dilation of the RIGHT VENTRICLE and the tricuspid annulus.Prosthesis-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).Surgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Anemia, Hemolytic: A condition of inadequate circulating red blood cells (ANEMIA) or insufficient HEMOGLOBIN due to premature destruction of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES).Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Preoperative Period: The period before a surgical operation.Prostheses and Implants: Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Heart Arrest, Induced: A procedure to stop the contraction of MYOCARDIUM during HEART SURGERY. It is usually achieved with the use of chemicals (CARDIOPLEGIC SOLUTIONS) or cold temperature (such as chilled perfusate).Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Cataract Extraction: The removal of a cataractous CRYSTALLINE LENS from the eye.Myocardial Contraction: Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.Pulmonary Veins: The veins that return the oxygenated blood from the lungs to the left atrium of the heart.Anticoagulants: Agents that prevent clotting.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Catheter Ablation: Removal of tissue with electrical current delivered via electrodes positioned at the distal end of a catheter. Energy sources are commonly direct current (DC-shock) or alternating current at radiofrequencies (usually 750 kHz). The technique is used most often to ablate the AV junction and/or accessory pathways in order to interrupt AV conduction and produce AV block in the treatment of various tachyarrhythmias.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Surgery, Oral: A dental specialty concerned with the diagnosis and surgical treatment of disease, injuries, and defects of the human oral and maxillofacial region.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Myocardial Ischemia: A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).Cryosurgery: The use of freezing as a special surgical technique to destroy or excise tissue.Cardiomyopathies: A group of diseases in which the dominant feature is the involvement of the CARDIAC MUSCLE itself. Cardiomyopathies are classified according to their predominant pathophysiological features (DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY; HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY; RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY) or their etiological/pathological factors (CARDIOMYOPATHY, ALCOHOLIC; ENDOCARDIAL FIBROELASTOSIS).Atrial Appendage: Ear-shaped appendage of either atrium of the heart. (Dorland, 28th ed)Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Elastic Tissue: Connective tissue comprised chiefly of elastic fibers. Elastic fibers have two components: ELASTIN and MICROFIBRILS.Observer Variation: The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).Benchmarking: Method of measuring performance against established standards of best practice.Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and a cardiovascular disease. The disease may precede or follow FERTILIZATION and it may or may not have a deleterious effect on the pregnant woman or FETUS.
"Mitral valve replacement in idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome". Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 51 (6): 1007-9. doi:10.1016/ ...
Some patients will also need their mitral valve replaced. This can be done during the same surgery. Myxomas may come back if ... it can block blood flow through the mitral valve and cause symptoms of mitral stenosis or mitral regurgitation. This may ... Arrhythmias Pulmonary edema Peripheral emboli Spread (metastasis) of the tumor Blockage of the mitral heart valve Stroke ... The tumor is derived from multipotential mesenchymal cells and may cause a ball valve-type obstruction. About 75% of myxomas ...
Mitral valve finger knife for use during open-heart surgery; small aortic valve dilator for use during open-heart surgery; high ... uniform bubble oxygenator for use during open-heart surgery; hydraulic gastrointestinal biopsy instrument; ... machine to test fatigue in artificial heart valves; Teflon tracheotomy plug to aid patients with paralytic polio. Although ...
Starr "helped invent the world's first durable artificial mitral valve". He is "credited with being a co-inventor of the ... He then went on to do his internship at Johns Hopkins Hospital and his residency in general and thoracic surgery at the ... 53-68 A.M.Matthews, The development of the Starr-Edwards heart valve, Tex Heart Inst J. 1998; 25(4): 282-293 Surgeon Albert ... Albert Starr (New York, 1 June 1926), is a noted American cardiovascular surgeon and pioneer, inventor of the Starr heart valve ...
Zhang Y, Ma L (2017). "Repeated Prosthetic Mitral Valve Thrombosis in Fluke Infection Induced Hypereosinophilic Syndrome". The ... Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 103 (3): e259-e260. doi:10.1016/j.athoracsur.2016.08.106. PMID 28219563. Oketch-Rabah HA, Roe AL, ... and involvement of the mitral and/or tricuspid valves. However, in acute necrotizing eosinophilic myocarditis, echocardiography ... Parasitic infestations often cause significant heart valve disease along with myocarditis and the disorder in this setting is ...
High-risk mitral valve surgery: perioperative hemodynamic optimization with nesiritide (BNP). Ann Thorac Surg 2005; 80:502-506 ...
In 1956, Swarthout was diagnosed with a mitral heart valve problem. She eventually decided to undergo open heart surgery; she ...
"Analysis of risk factors involved in reoperation for mitral and tricuspid valve disease". The Journal of thoracic and ... In mid 1971, Dr Mufti returned to the Leeds General Infirmary, where he joined, as a research fellow, the Cardiac Surgery Unit ... Chapter on Hydatid Disease, in Tropical Surgery, ed. Lumley & Kamel, Westminster publications, London, 2004. Mary DS, Bartek IT ... Kamel, Refaat; Lumley, John Stuart Penton (2004). Textbook of tropical surgery. Westminster. "قراء د. محمد محمد المفتي - الصفحة ...
The left atrial appendage can serve as an approach for mitral valve surgery. The left atrial appendage can be seen on a ... In patients with atrial fibrillation, mitral valve disease, and other conditions, blood clots have a tendency to form in the ... Guhathakurta S, Kurian VM, Manmohan G, Cherian KM (2004). "Mitral valve reoperation through the left atrial appendage in a ... through the mitral valve) for pumping out through the aorta for systemic circulation. The right atrium and right ventricle are ...
Ross D.N. (1967). "Replacement of aortic and mitral valves with a pulmonary autograft". Lancet. 2: 956. doi:10.1016/s0140-6736( ... History of cardiac surgery, in Cohn L., ed. Cardiac Surgery in the Adult. New York: McGraw-Hill: 3-28. Archived 15 April 2012 ... He has said that his interest had lain "particularly with the valves-especially the aortic valve-but, in general, anything that ... Working initially in Bristol he focused on chest and oesophageal surgery, and then began to include early cardiac surgery, such ...
Braunwald, NS (September 1989). "It will work: the first successful mitral valve replacement". The Annals of thoracic surgery. ... Braunwald designed and fabricated experimental artificial mitral valve prostheses, implanting them in dogs at the National ... She then developed a cloth-covered mechanical valve (the Braunwald-Cutter valve), which was implanted into thousands of ... for mitral valve replacement, surgical treatment of chronic thromboembolic disease, and pioneering techniques for the use of ...
Baker scientists have developed a One-Hour mitral valve (the heart's largest valve) repair device. It is implanted in a one- ... scleroderma and surgery. The research on surgery lead to the development of cardiac surgery at the Alfred Hospital. In the ... The mitral valve controls the blood flow from the lungs back into the left side of the heart, to be pumped back out through the ... This valve often leaks in patients with heart failure, so-called mitral regurgitation. When the heart enlarges, which is a ...
In 2008, he underwent robot-assisted open heart surgery to repair a leaking mitral valve. He has successfully recovered from ...
These procedures can be performed together with coronary artery bypass surgery or mitral valve repair. If heart failure ensues ... with or without repair or replacement of the mitral valve. Although several studies showed benefits from this surgery, studies ... coronary artery bypass surgery and left ventricle remodeling surgery in heart failure patients. Results are expected to be ... "Pioneers of heart surgery". NOVA Online: Cut to the heart. Retrieved 2007-11-07. Franco-Cereceda A, McCarthy PM, Blackstone EH ...
TEE is very useful during many cardiac surgical procedures (e.g., mitral valve repair). It is actually an essential monitoring ... It helps to detect and quantify the disease preoperatively as well as to assess the results of surgery immediately after the ... In adults, several structures can be evaluated and imaged better with the TEE, including the aorta, pulmonary artery, valves of ... "Esophageal stents for iatrogenic esophageal perforations during cardiac surgery". Ann. Thorac. Surg. 84 (3): 1034-6. doi: ...
The patient was a 12-year-old girl with rheumatic mitral stenosis who underwent mitral valve repair. This surgery was hailed as ... Surgery, the American Journal of Surgery, and the British Journal of Surgery. He was a founder of the American Board of Surgery ... Surgical repair for mitral valve stenosis was not reattempted until 1945. Cutler left Harvard Medical School in 1924 to become ... He was also the co-author of the 1939 book The Atlas of Surgery with Robert M. Zollinger. The book remained a standard surgery ...
... videos of Mitral Valve Repair Surgery The Mitral Valve Question, U.S. News & World Report Surgical Techniques at Edwards ... Adams is a recognized leader in the field of heart valve surgery and mitral valve reconstruction. As director of Mount Sinai ... Investigation of Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation Outcomes Related to Mitral Valve Repair Novel Mitral Valve Repair Strategies ... Adams' clinical interests include all aspects of heart valve surgery, with a special emphasis on mitral valve reconstruction. ...
"Tricuspid regurgitation and right ventricular function after mitral valve surgery with or without concomitant tricuspid valve ... "BestBets: Should the tricuspid valve be replaced with a mechanical or biological valve?". www.bestbets.org. Retrieved 2015-12- ... Is survival better with valve repair?". Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular surgery. Retrieved 15 December 2015. Rogers, ... Regurgitation may be due to a structural change of components of the tricuspid valve apparatus, a lesion can be primary ( ...
He has special expertise in complex valvular surgery, including mitral repair and endoscopic mitral valve surgery. He has ... "W. Randolph Chitwood Jr., M.D". Mitral Valve Surgery. Retrieved 13 December 2010. "W. Randolph Chitwood, Jr., MD, FACS, FRCS". ... He serves the editorial boards of the Annals of Thoracic Surgery, the Journal of Cardiac Surgery, the Journal of Heart Valve ... He has been the principal investigator of the FDA robotic mitral valve trials that led to approval for this use in the United ...
... mitral valvuloplasty, which enables the opening of narrowed heart valves, without the need for open heart surgery, with a ... both on pump and off pump surgery, aortic surgery, valve replacement and repair and endovascular aortic stent procedure. The ... mitral valve replacement surgery on two patients. http://www.lufkindailynews.com/hp/content/business/stories/2007/12/23/ ... LHINC provides cardiac surgery in adult patients including coronary artery bypass surgery, ...
... pulmonary valve and recently the mitral valve Percutaneous valve repair An alternative to open heart surgery, percutaneous ... Percutaneous valve replacement An alternative to open heart surgery, percutaneous valve replacement is the replacement of a ... Valvuloplasty It is the dilation of narrowed cardiac valves (usually mitral, aortic, or pulmonary). Congenital heart defect ... valve repair is performed on the mitral valve using the MONARC system or MitraClip system Coronary thrombectomy Coronary ...
The Mitral Valve and tricuspid valve - these valves are formed by the proper division of an early common valve being separated ... and instead of there being two valves there is one common valve. Surgery is usually conducted in-between the 3rd and 6th month ... In the partial form, openings between the left and right atria and improper formation of the mitral valve exist. In the ... There are valves in place that inhibit back-flow between these chambers. This defect is developed because of the improper ...
On April 4, 2017, Appleman-Jurman went into hospice after a failed surgery to repair a leaking mitral valve. She was found ...
... , MD is an American surgeon who specializes in complex heart surgery, especially mitral and aortic valve ... general surgery, organ transplantation, plastic and reconstructive surgery, pediatric surgery, breast surgery and cancer care. ... the CTSN Mitral-Valve Repair versus Replacement for Severe Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation. N Engl J Med. 2014; Jan 2; 370(1):23- ... This work led to Food and Drug Administration approval for selective cardiac robotic procedures including mitral valve repair ...
The valve is designed to replace a patient's diseased native aortic valve without traditional open-heart surgery and while the ... After just two years, the first Starr-Edwards mitral valve was designed, developed, tested, and successfully placed in a ... a patient's valve. The Edwards SAPIEN family of heart valves are delivered via a procedure called transcatheter aortic valve ... utilizing either bioprosthetic tissue valves or mechanical valves. Edwards products include tissue replacement heart valves, ...
The typical method of treatment is through surgery such as aortic valve reconstruction surgery (AVRS) and aortic valve ... Congenital quadricuspid aortic valve associated with aortic insufficiency and mitral regurgitation. Journal of Cardiothoracic ... Quadricuspid aortic valve. A quadricuspid aortic valve (QAV) is a rare congenital heart defect characterized by the presence of ... a b Tutarel, O. (2004). The quadricuspid aortic valve: a comprehensive review. The Journal of Heart Valve Disease, 13(4), 534- ...
... it can block blood flow through the mitral valve and cause symptoms of mitral stenosis. This may require emergency surgery to ... Some patients will also need their mitral valve replaced. This can be done during the same surgery. ... Blockage of the mitral heart valve When to Contact a Medical Professional. Call your health care provider if you have symptoms ... Myxomas may come back if surgery did not remove all of the tumor cells. ...
Valve surgery. *Heart valve repair: May be preferable, as keeping your own tissue may be better than replacing a heart valve. ... Heart valve repair of the mitral valve is now possible using percutaneous (through the skin) treatments in certain cases. ... including mechanical and tissue valves (pig or cow tissue). Learn more about heart valve disease and heart valve surgery ... This is most commonly performed in cases of mitral valve regurgitation (leakage) but may be possible in other situations, as ...
Mitral valve surgery is used to repair or replace the mitral valve in your heart. ... Mitral valve surgery is used to repair or replace the mitral valve in your heart. ... If your mitral valve is too damaged to be repaired, you will need a new valve. This is called replacement surgery. Your surgeon ... You may need open-heart valve surgery for these reasons:. *Changes in your mitral valve are causing major heart symptoms, such ...
This will allow more rapid publication than the alternative cardiac surgery tomes. This entry ... Fast systematic review of small areas of cardiac surgery including up-to-date information. ... Part of the Monographs in Cardiac Surgery Series - Introducing basic science into the cardiac operating room. ... Mitral Valve Surgery presents a detailed background of the mitral valve, its pathology, evaluation, repair and replacement from ...
Mitral valve surgery is surgery to either repair or replace the mitral valve in your heart. ... Mitral valve surgery is surgery to either repair or replace the mitral valve in your heart. ... You may need surgery on your mitral valve if:. *The mitral valve is hardened (calcified). This prevents blood from moving ... You may need surgery if your mitral valve does not work properly because:. *You have mitral regurgitation -- When a mitral ...
... including information on getting an MRI scan and other post-surgery concerns. ... Find answers to common questions concerning mitral valve repair surgery, ... WHAT ARE THE COMPLICATIONS WITH HEART VALVE REPAIR SURGERY?. Complications, sometimes leading to repeated surgery or even death ... and possible complications associated with heart valve repair surgery.. CAN I HAVE AN X-RAY AFTER HEART VALVE REPLACEMENT?. All ...
... including information on getting an MRI scan and other post-surgery concerns. ... Find answers to common questions concerning aortic and mitral valve replacement surgery, ... Surgical Heart Valve Repair and Replacement Aortic and Mitral Valve Replacement FAQ ... Will my new valve need special care?. Let your other doctors and your dentist know youve had heart valve surgery. Ask whether ...
Materials & Methods: Thirty patients undergoing mitral valve replacement were randomly exposed to an oxygen fraction of 0.7 ( ... free radicals can be reduced thus facilitating myocardial recovery during weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass and after surgery ... "Oxygen Concentration during Reperfusion in Mitral Valve Surgery," World Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery, Vol. 3 No. 7, 2013, ... Materials & Methods: Thirty patients undergoing mitral valve replacement were randomly exposed to an oxygen fraction of 0.7 ( ...
... particularly for valve regurgitation, replacement is still a viable option for some patients, and Maimonides cardiothoracic ... While a well performed mitral valve repair is viewed as superior to replacement, ... Mitral Valve Repair and Replacement Surgery. Mitral Valve Replacement For many years, valve replacement with artificial or ... Mitral Valve Repair. Many types of diseases are amenable to mitral valve repair. Mitral valve repair is the preferred approach ...
... Surgery Overview. Mitral valve replacement surgery may be needed for mitral valve ... valve usually is the preferred surgery for a mitral valve problem. When the mitral valve is seriously damaged, heart valve ... Mitral Valve Regurgitation. For acute mitral valve regurgitation, surgery is done immediately to replace or repair the valve. ... Mitral Valve Regurgitation: Repair or Replace the Valve?. Mitral Valve Stenosis: Repair or Replace the Valve?. Before you have ...
Mitral Valve Repair Surgery. Call (718) 283-7364 for an appointment with a Structural Heart specialist or request an ... In the past, it was standard practice to replace the mitral valve with a mechanical or natural tissue valve. ... restoring the valves normal function. Since blood clots rarely occur after mitral valve repair, patients who undergo this ... When the mitral valve is severely damaged and requires surgical intervention, the most important decision for patients and ...
... have similar outcomes as patients undergoing conventional surgery and also ... Patients undergoing minimally invasive mitral valve repair or replacement (mini-MVR) ... Cardiovascular Health Heart Disease Surgery Local - Illinois Embargoed Feed - hidden KEYWORDS. Mitral Valve mitral valve ... MVR is a common treatment for mitral valve disease, including mitral stenosis (when the valve doesnt allow enough blood flow) ...
... with mitral valve disease are symptomatic with shortness of breath and a limited activity level prior to mitral valve surgery. ... Greater than 6 months post-mechanical or bioprosthetic mitral valve replacement or mitral valve repair (quadrangular resection ... Symptomatic Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension After Mitral Valve Surgery: Pilot, Screening Study. Brief Summary Most patients ... Scientific reports on the evaluation of patients with PH after mitral valve surgery are almost nonexistent from the modern era ...
How Many Valves Does The Heart Have?. The heart has 4 valves. The mitral and tricuspid valves control blood flow between the ... How Is Minimal Incision Valve Surgery Performed?. Minimal incision valve surgery does not require a large incision, or cutting ... How Long Does It Take To Recover From Minimal Incision Valve Surgery?. Patients who have minimal incision valve surgery ... Minimal incision valve surgery has a faster recovery and return to normal activity compared to conventional surgery. Recovery ...
For the Mitral valve, we forget that the Mitral valve is a left sided structure and the Left Atrium is a posterior structure. ... When one does the procedure through the left side, the Mitral valve is closer to the surgeon and the surgery can be ... It was a very good discussion on minimally invasive Mitral valve surgery. Everyone is talking about a right sided mini ... Minimally Invasive Mitral Valve Surgery: The Evidence. May 2018. doi:10.25373/ctsnet.6304523. ...
J Heart Valve Dis. 2005;14(6):709-714.. *Ryan WH, Brinkman WT, Dewey TM, Mack MJ, Prince SL, Herbert MA. Mitral valve surgery: ... Mitral valve surgery using the classical heartport technique. ... Port Access and Minithoracotomy Mitral Valve Surgery Tuesday, ... Port Access and Minithoracotomy Mitral Valve Surgery. January 2018. doi:10.25373/ctsnet.5809932. ... Surgery Without Visible Scars: The Right Lateral Access for Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Surgery ...
Mitral valve disease is when it does not open or close properly, leaving you with severe symptoms. ... The mitral valve is a key valve in you circulatory system. ... What is mitral valve disease?. The mitral valve controls the ... Mitral Valve Surgery. This page will give you information about mitral valve surgery. If you have any questions, you should ask ... Mitral valve disease can cause pain, shortness of breath and eventually death. Mitral valve surgery can relieve your pain, ...
... in primary mitral valve surgery,8-11 we extended the application of this technique to mitral and tricuspid valve surgery after ... Surgery for Valvular Heart Disease. Endoscopic Mitral and Tricuspid Valve Surgery After Previous Cardiac Surgery. Filip P. ... Minimal invasive surgery has become a routine technique for primary mitral and tricuspid valve surgery.8-12 Based on our own ... Video-assisted Port-Access mitral valve surgery: from debut to routine surgery. Will trocar Port-Access cardiac surgery ...
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Mitral valve surgery - minimally invasive. Definition. Mitral valve surgery is surgery to either repair or replace the mitral ... You may need surgery if your mitral valve does not work properly because:. *You have mitral regurgitation: When a mitral valve ... open mitral valve surgery, requires a larger cut.. Alternative Names. Mitral valve repair - right mini-thoracotomy; Mitral ... You may need surgery on your mitral valve if:. *The mitral valve is hardened (calcified). This prevents blood from moving ...
Ischemic mitral valve regurgitation.. American Association For Thoracic Surgery Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation Consensus ... Department of Cardiac Surgery, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY.. 5. Department of Cardiac Surgery, University of ... Division of Cardiovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pa.. 4 ... Division of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.. 3. ...
... both the mitral valve procedure and the tricuspid valve repair procedure are well established surgeries and are regularly ... Evaluating the Benefit of Concurrent Tricuspid Valve Repair During Mitral Surgery. The safety and scientific validity of this ... Evaluating the Benefit of Concurrent Tricuspid Valve Repair During Mitral Surgery Brief Summary The purpose of the research is ... Evaluating the Benefit of Concurrent Tricuspid Valve Repair During Mitral Surgery Official Title ICMJE ...
The method is value in comparing different operative procedures and in following up patients after mitral valve surgery. ... In order to investigate the functional effects of mitral valve surgery, echocardiograms showing left ventricular dimension were ... recorded and digitised in 14 normal subjects and 129 patients after mitral valve surgery. Measurements were made of peak rate ... Results after mitral valve repair in 30 cases were not significantly different from normal (14-4 +/- 5-0 cm/s, 170 +/- 50 ms). ...
Patients will undergo mitral valve surgery and tricuspid valve annuloplasty.. Procedure: TV Annuloplasty TV Annuloplasty will ... both the mitral valve procedure and the tricuspid valve repair procedure are well established surgeries and are regularly ... Evaluating the Benefit of Concurrent Tricuspid Valve Repair During Mitral Surgery. The safety and scientific validity of this ... Participants will undergo mitral valve surgery alone.. Procedure: MVS MVS will be performed using standard surgical techniques ...
Elizabeth Healthcare offers advanced minimally invasive techniques, a MitraClip device and conventional open heart surgery. ... Minimally Invasive Mitral Valve Surgery. Our leading mitral valve surgeon has performed nearly 400 minimally invasive mitral ... many people with mitral valve disease may require heart valve surgery to repair or replace a mitral valve. ... Mitral Valve Surgery Treatments. Medications and healthy lifestyle changes often can improve symptoms of mitral valve disease, ...
  • This backward squirt of flow through an incompetent valve results in an abnormal heart sound called a heart murmur. (uk.net)
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