Osteotomy: The surgical cutting of a bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)Osteotomy, Le Fort: Transverse sectioning and repositioning of the maxilla. There are three types: Le Fort I osteotomy for maxillary advancement or the treatment of maxillary fractures; Le Fort II osteotomy for the treatment of maxillary fractures; Le Fort III osteotomy for the treatment of maxillary fractures with fracture of one or more facial bones. Le Fort III is often used also to correct craniofacial dysostosis and related facial abnormalities. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p1203 & p662)Joint Deformities, Acquired: Deformities acquired after birth as the result of injury or disease. The joint deformity is often associated with rheumatoid arthritis and leprosy.Hip Dislocation, Congenital: Congenital dislocation of the hip generally includes subluxation of the femoral head, acetabular dysplasia, and complete dislocation of the femoral head from the true acetabulum. This condition occurs in approximately 1 in 1000 live births and is more common in females than in males.Fractures, Malunited: Union of the fragments of a fractured bone in a faulty or abnormal position. If two bones parallel to one another unite by osseous tissue, the result is a crossunion. (From Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 4th ed)Hallux Valgus: Lateral displacement of the great toe (HALLUX), producing deformity of the first METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT with callous, bursa, or bunion formation over the bony prominence.Tibia: The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.Osteotomy, Sagittal Split Ramus: Sagittal sectioning and repositioning of the ramus of the MANDIBLE to correct a mandibular retrusion, MALOCCLUSION, ANGLE CLASS III; and PROGNATHISM. The oblique sectioning line consists of multiple cuts horizontal and vertical to the mandibular ramus.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Metatarsal Bones: The five long bones of the METATARSUS, articulating with the TARSAL BONES proximally and the PHALANGES OF TOES distally.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Acetabulum: The part of the pelvis that comprises the pelvic socket where the head of FEMUR joins to form HIP JOINT (acetabulofemoral joint).Pelvic Bones: Bones that constitute each half of the pelvic girdle in VERTEBRATES, formed by fusion of the ILIUM; ISCHIUM; and PUBIC BONE.Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease: A particular type of FEMUR HEAD NECROSIS occurring in children, mainly male, with a course of four years or so.Bone Plates: Implantable fracture fixation devices attached to bone fragments with screws to bridge the fracture gap and shield the fracture site from stress as bone heals. (UMDNS, 1999)Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Hip Dislocation: Displacement of the femur bone from its normal position at the HIP JOINT.Maxillary Osteotomy: Surgery of the upper jaw bone usually performed to correct upper and lower jaw misalignment.Jaw Fixation Techniques: The stable placement of surgically induced fractures of the mandible or maxilla through the use of elastics, wire ligatures, arch bars, or other splints. It is used often in the cosmetic surgery of retrognathism and prognathism. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p636)Bone Lengthening: Increase in the longest dimension of a bone to correct anatomical deficiencies, congenital, traumatic, or as a result of disease. The lengthening is not restricted to long bones. The usual surgical methods are internal fixation and distraction.Bone Malalignment: Displacement of bones out of line in relation to joints. It may be congenital or traumatic in origin.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Bone Diseases, DevelopmentalKyphosis: Deformities of the SPINE characterized by an exaggerated convexity of the vertebral column. The forward bending of the thoracic region usually is more than 40 degrees. This deformity sometimes is called round back or hunchback.Metatarsus: The part of the foot between the tarsa and the TOES.Arthroplasty: Surgical reconstruction of a joint to relieve pain or restore motion.Mandibular Osteotomy: Intraoral OSTEOTOMY of the lower jaw usually performed in order to correct MALOCCLUSION.Ulna: The inner and longer bone of the FOREARM.Femur Head: The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)Fracture Healing: The physiological restoration of bone tissue and function after a fracture. It includes BONY CALLUS formation and normal replacement of bone tissue.Femur Head Necrosis: Aseptic or avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The major types are idiopathic (primary), as a complication of fractures or dislocations, and LEGG-CALVE-PERTHES DISEASE.Leg Length Inequality: A condition in which one of a pair of legs fails to grow as long as the other, which could result from injury or surgery.Bone Screws: Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Osteogenesis, Distraction: Bone lengthening by gradual mechanical distraction. An external fixation device produces the distraction across the bone plate. The technique was originally applied to long bones but in recent years the method has been adapted for use with mandibular implants in maxillofacial surgery.Osteoarthritis, Hip: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the hip joint which usually appears in late middle or old age. It is characterized by growth or maturational disturbances in the femoral neck and head, as well as acetabular dysplasia. A dominant symptom is pain on weight-bearing or motion.Internal Fixators: Internal devices used in osteosynthesis to hold the position of the fracture in proper alignment. By applying the principles of biomedical engineering, the surgeon uses metal plates, nails, rods, etc., for the correction of skeletal defects.Bariatric Surgery: Surgical procedures aimed at affecting metabolism and producing major WEIGHT REDUCTION in patients with MORBID OBESITY.External Fixators: External devices which hold wires or pins that are placed through one or both cortices of bone in order to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment. These devices allow easy access to wounds, adjustment during the course of healing, and more functional use of the limbs involved.Surgery, Computer-Assisted: Surgical procedures conducted with the aid of computers. This is most frequently used in orthopedic and laparoscopic surgery for implant placement and instrument guidance. Image-guided surgery interactively combines prior CT scans or MRI images with real-time video.Epiphyses, SlippedPiezosurgery: The use of HIGH-ENERGY SHOCK WAVES, in the frequency range of 20-30 kHz, to cut through mineralized tissue.Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Joint Instability: Lack of stability of a joint or joint prosthesis. Factors involved are intra-articular disease and integrity of extra-articular structures such as joint capsule, ligaments, and muscles.Orthognathic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed to repair or correct the skeletal anomalies of the jaw and its associated dental and facial structures (e.g. CLEFT PALATE).Bone Wires: Steel wires, often threaded through the skin, soft tissues, and bone, used to fix broken bones. Kirschner wires or apparatus also includes the application of traction to the healing bones through the wires.Fibula: The bone of the lower leg lateral to and smaller than the tibia. In proportion to its length, it is the most slender of the long bones.Fracture Fixation, Internal: The use of internal devices (metal plates, nails, rods, etc.) to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment.General Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.Metatarsophalangeal Joint: The articulation between a metatarsal bone (METATARSAL BONES) and a phalanx.Tarsal Bones: The seven bones which form the tarsus - namely, CALCANEUS; TALUS; cuboid, navicular, and the internal, middle, and external cuneiforms.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Osteoarthritis, Knee: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the knee joint consisting of three large categories: conditions that block normal synchronous movement, conditions that produce abnormal pathways of motion, and conditions that cause stress concentration resulting in changes to articular cartilage. (Crenshaw, Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics, 8th ed, p2019)Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Thoracic Surgery: A surgical specialty concerned with diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the heart, lungs, and esophagus. Two major types of thoracic surgery are classified as pulmonary and cardiovascular.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Osteochondritis: Inflammation of a bone and its overlaying CARTILAGE.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Forefoot, Human: The forepart of the foot including the metatarsals and the TOES.Humeral FracturesPostoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Pubic Bone: A bone that forms the lower and anterior part of each side of the hip bone.Elbow Joint: A hinge joint connecting the FOREARM to the ARM.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Ilizarov Technique: A bone fixation technique using an external fixator (FIXATORS, EXTERNAL) for lengthening limbs, correcting pseudarthroses and other deformities, and assisting the healing of otherwise hopeless traumatic or pathological fractures and infections, such as chronic osteomyelitis. The method was devised by the Russian orthopedic surgeon Gavriil Abramovich Ilizarov (1921-1992). (From Bull Hosp Jt Dis 1992 Summer;52(1):1)Humerus: Bone in humans and primates extending from the SHOULDER JOINT to the ELBOW JOINT.Tibial FracturesOral Surgical Procedures: Surgical procedures used to treat disease, injuries, and defects of the oral and maxillofacial region.Bony Callus: The bony deposit formed between and around the broken ends of BONE FRACTURES during normal healing.Femoral Fractures: Fractures of the femur.Orthopedic Fixation Devices: Devices which are used in the treatment of orthopedic injuries and diseases.Radius: The outer shorter of the two bones of the FOREARM, lying parallel to the ULNA and partially revolving around it.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Foot Deformities, Acquired: Distortion or disfigurement of the foot, or a part of the foot, acquired through disease or injury after birth.Hallux: The innermost digit of the foot in PRIMATES.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee: Replacement of the knee joint.Ischium: One of three bones that make up the coxal bone of the pelvic girdle. In tetrapods, it is the part of the pelvis that projects backward on the ventral side, and in primates, it bears the weight of the sitting animal.Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.Surgery, Plastic: The branch of surgery concerned with restoration, reconstruction, or improvement of defective, damaged, or missing structures.Torsion Abnormality: An abnormal twisting or rotation of a bodily part or member on its axis.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Traction: The pull on a limb or a part thereof. Skin traction (indirect traction) is applied by using a bandage to pull on the skin and fascia where light traction is required. Skeletal traction (direct traction), however, uses pins or wires inserted through bone and is attached to weights, pulleys, and ropes. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed)Thoracic Vertebrae: A group of twelve VERTEBRAE connected to the ribs that support the upper trunk region.Fractures, Ununited: A fracture in which union fails to occur, the ends of the bone becoming rounded and eburnated, and a false joint occurs. (Stedman, 25th ed)Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Intra-Articular Fractures: Fractures of the articular surface of a bone.Clubfoot: A deformed foot in which the foot is plantarflexed, inverted and adducted.Jaw Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the jaw.Osteoarthritis: A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.Rotation: Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Metacarpal Bones: The five cylindrical bones of the METACARPUS, articulating with the CARPAL BONES proximally and the PHALANGES OF FINGERS distally.Maxilla: One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Prognathism: A condition marked by abnormal protrusion of the mandible. (Dorland, 27th ed)
  • Even though a patient is stubborn to have double jaw surgery, an exact diagnosis should be made, based on the condition of teeth and bone and the reason for deformity, and the most effective way of treatment for the patient should be chosen. (idhospital.com)
  • Methods: Thirty-nine patients (42 wrists) with idiopathic ulnar impaction syndrome were treated with either ulnar shortening osteotomy or arthroscopic wafer resection. (elsevier.com)
  • If you are considering double jaw surgery to overcome the drawback on your overdeveloping chin, you had better check out whether you are eligible for BSSO. (idhospital.com)
  • Dr. Park advises that "Patients can worry that BSSO has less aesthetic effect than orthognathic surgery, but according to patients' condition, sufficiently natural improvement can be expected only by BSSO. (idhospital.com)
  • If a plastic surgery specialist who comprehensively understand numerous surgeries and have abundant clinical experiences performs BSSO, the most satisfying result can be achieved through the least invasive surgery. (idhospital.com)
  • However, there are many reasons that people hesitate to undergo double jaw surgery, such as feeling great burden on cutting both upper and lower jaws which occupy the lower half of the face, expensive surgery cost, or long recovery period. (idhospital.com)
  • In addition to plastic surgeons, we have dentists, dermatologists, ENT doctors, Physician, and anesthetists in order to improve the result of surgeries as well as the function and aesthetic aspects of body parts on which surgeries are performed. (idhospital.com)
  • Dr. Sang Hoon Park, plastic surgery specialist at ID Hospital, mentioned that "Many patients visit the hospital after watching dramatic makeovers through corrective jaw surgery via the mass media or the Internet, but orthognathic surgery is not appropriate for everyone. (idhospital.com)
  • Results: Patients in the RCC group were older, exhibited greater positive ulnar variance, and demonstrated a significantly higher mean pain score before surgery. (elsevier.com)
  • The RCC progressively reversed after ulnar shortening osteotomy, and this reversal of radiographic changes correlated with clinical improvements. (elsevier.com)
  • The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors associated with the occurrence of RCC in idiopathic ulnar impaction syndrome and to determine the efficacy of ulnar shortening osteotomy on patient outcome and RCC. (elsevier.com)
  • ID Hospital Korea is a very renowned plastic surgery hospital in Korea with more than 30 medical specialists. (idhospital.com)
  • Jason B. T. Lim and James S. Huntley, "Revisional Surgery for Hallux Valgus with Serial Osteotomies at Two Levels," TheScientificWorldJOURNAL , vol. 11, pp. 657-661, 2011. (hindawi.com)
  • The main findings of this study were that after surgical correction for hallux valgus, patients who underwent scarf osteotomy had a gait pattern similar to that of their non-operated foot in terms of forefoot propulsive forces (Fz3, Iy2), whereas those who underwent arthrodesis of the first MTP joint had not. (nih.gov)
  • Doctors use osteotomy if destruction of the knee cartilage mainly affects a single disc of cartilage: the disc (meniscus) either on the inner part or on the outer part of the knee joint. (cigna.com)
  • Whenever possible, we use minimally invasive techniques to restore your hip or knee joint, which offer smaller incisions and shorter recovery time following surgery. (muhealth.org)
  • During this surgery, metal and plastic implants replace the entire knee joint. (muhealth.org)
  • The Nano bimaxillary osteotomy™ of View Plastic Surgery Clinic upgrades the professional expertise of bimaxillary surgery through rich experience and long term research by medical specialists, and is the 4th generation bimaxillary surgery which improves technologies and maximizes the aesthetic effects with unique technique and enhanced safety. (kmhglobal.com)
  • View Plastic Surgery Clinic's 'Nano bimaxillary osteotomy™' applies the occlusal plane rotation to form a slimmer facial line and natural look with beautiful dentition. (kmhglobal.com)
  • Ramieri A, Miscusi M, Polli FM, Raco A, Costanzo G (2016) Non-Posterior Subtraction Osteotomy Surgery to Restore Lumbar Lordosis in the Hidden Sagittal Imbalance of the Adult Degenerative Spine. (omicsonline.org)
  • In these cases, spinal osteotomies must be performed to restore balance in both the sagittal and the coronal planes. (medgadget.com)
  • For this purpose, they utilized a powerful ultrasonic device with tissue-selective cutting characteristics that was originally developed for spinal osteotomies and nerve decompression (BoneScalpel™ by Misonix Inc., Farmingdale, NY, USA). (pocketdentistry.com)
  • Originally developed for neurosurgical nerve decompression and spinal osteotomies, this device promises to combine the benefits of previous piezoelectric devices with improved ergonomics and cutting efficiency. (pocketdentistry.com)
  • Arthroscopy will actually help to buy some time before any of these other surgeries are planned. (ndtv.com)
  • The biggest potential threat of oral maxillofacial surgery is any bacterial infection such as ones that travel from the blood stream to the heart, which can ultimately result in death. (wikipedia.org)
  • He was the Chair of Dentistry and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University of Graz, Austria from 1947 to 1971. (wikipedia.org)
  • After a period of 3 years of general surgery training under the tutelage of von Eiselsberg, he entered dentistry and oral and maxillofacial surgery under the tutelage of his uncle Hans Pichler. (wikipedia.org)
  • Current Therapy In Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Journal of Maxillofacial Surgery. (wikipedia.org)