General Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.Orthopedics: A surgical specialty which utilizes medical, surgical, and physical methods to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the skeletal system, its articulations, and associated structures.Specialties, Surgical: Various branches of surgical practice limited to specialized areas.Thoracic Surgery: A surgical specialty concerned with diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the heart, lungs, and esophagus. Two major types of thoracic surgery are classified as pulmonary and cardiovascular.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Learning Curve: The course of learning of an individual or a group. It is a measure of performance plotted over time.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Surgery, Plastic: The branch of surgery concerned with restoration, reconstruction, or improvement of defective, damaged, or missing structures.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Surgery, Oral: A dental specialty concerned with the diagnosis and surgical treatment of disease, injuries, and defects of the human oral and maxillofacial region.Operating Rooms: Facilities equipped for performing surgery.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Gloves, Surgical: Gloves, usually rubber, worn by surgeons, examining physicians, dentists, and other health personnel for the mutual protection of personnel and patient.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Consultants: Individuals referred to for expert or professional advice or services.Surgery, Computer-Assisted: Surgical procedures conducted with the aid of computers. This is most frequently used in orthopedic and laparoscopic surgery for implant placement and instrument guidance. Image-guided surgery interactively combines prior CT scans or MRI images with real-time video.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Surgery Department, Hospital: Hospital department which administers all departmental functions and the provision of surgical diagnostic and therapeutic services.Colorectal Surgery: A surgical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of disorders and abnormalities of the COLON; RECTUM; and ANAL CANAL.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Neurosurgery: A surgical specialty concerned with the treatment of diseases and disorders of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral and sympathetic nervous system.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Urology: A surgical specialty concerned with the study, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases of the urinary tract in both sexes, and the genital tract in the male. Common urological problems include urinary obstruction, URINARY INCONTINENCE, infections, and UROGENITAL NEOPLASMS.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Otolaryngology: A surgical specialty concerned with the study and treatment of disorders of the ear, nose, and throat.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Surgical Equipment: Nonexpendable apparatus used during surgical procedures. They are differentiated from SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, usually hand-held and used in the immediate operative field.Robotics: The application of electronic, computerized control systems to mechanical devices designed to perform human functions. Formerly restricted to industry, but nowadays applied to artificial organs controlled by bionic (bioelectronic) devices, like automated insulin pumps and other prostheses.Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Thoracic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the thoracic organs, most commonly the lungs and the heart.Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic: Excision of the gallbladder through an abdominal incision using a laparoscope.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Traumatology: The medical specialty which deals with WOUNDS and INJURIES as well as resulting disability and disorders from physical traumas.Radiology, Interventional: Subspecialty of radiology that combines organ system radiography, catheter techniques and sectional imaging.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Surgical Instruments: Hand-held tools or implements used by health professionals for the performance of surgical tasks.Barber Surgeons: In the late Middle Ages barbers who also let blood, sold unguents, pulled teeth, applied cups, and gave enemas. They generally had the right to practice surgery. By the 18th century barbers continued to practice minor surgery and dentistry and many famous surgeons acquired their skill in the shops of barbers. (From Castiglioni, A History of Medicine, 2d ed, pp402, 568, 658)Intraoperative Care: Patient care procedures performed during the operation that are ancillary to the actual surgery. It includes monitoring, fluid therapy, medication, transfusion, anesthesia, radiography, and laboratory tests.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Health Facility Size: The physical space or dimensions of a facility. Size may be indicated by bed capacity.Rats, Mutant Strains: Rats bearing mutant genes which are phenotypically expressed in the animals.Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Laparoscopes: ENDOSCOPES for examining the abdominal and pelvic organs in the peritoneal cavity.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Medical Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of medical care.Hernia, Inguinal: An abdominal hernia with an external bulge in the GROIN region. It can be classified by the location of herniation. Indirect inguinal hernias occur through the internal inguinal ring. Direct inguinal hernias occur through defects in the ABDOMINAL WALL (transversalis fascia) in Hesselbach's triangle. The former type is commonly seen in children and young adults; the latter in adults.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee: Replacement of the knee joint.Mammaplasty: Surgical reconstruction of the breast including both augmentation and reduction.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Sutures: Materials used in closing a surgical or traumatic wound. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Intraoperative Period: The period during a surgical operation.Fellowships and Scholarships: Stipends or grants-in-aid granted by foundations or institutions to individuals for study.Great BritainUnited StatesSurgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Education, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Hospitals, High-Volume: Hospitals with a much higher than average utilization by physicians and a large number of procedures.Ontario: A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)Surgical Flaps: Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.Microsurgery: The performance of surgical procedures with the aid of a microscope.Surgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.Ambulatory Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on an outpatient basis. It may be hospital-based or performed in an office or surgicenter.Credentialing: The recognition of professional or technical competence through registration, certification, licensure, admission to association membership, the award of a diploma or degree, etc.Gynecologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the female genitalia.Physician Impairment: The physician's inability to practice medicine with reasonable skill and safety to the patient due to the physician's disability. Common causes include alcohol and drug abuse, mental illness, physical disability, and senility.Hospitals, Low-Volume: Hospitals with a much lower than average utilization by physicians and smaller number of procedures.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient: The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens from health professional or health care worker to patients. It includes transmission via direct or indirect exposure to bacterial, fungal, parasitic, or viral agents.Gynecology: A medical-surgical specialty concerned with the physiology and disorders primarily of the female genital tract, as well as female endocrinology and reproductive physiology.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Mastectomy: Surgical procedure to remove one or both breasts.Anesthesiology: A specialty concerned with the study of anesthetics and anesthesia.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Needlestick Injuries: Penetrating stab wounds caused by needles. They are of special concern to health care workers since such injuries put them at risk for developing infectious disease.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.EnglandEndoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Endarterectomy, Carotid: The excision of the thickened, atheromatous tunica intima of a carotid artery.Appendectomy: Surgical removal of the vermiform appendix. (Dorland, 28th ed)Ophthalmology: A surgical specialty concerned with the structure and function of the eye and the medical and surgical treatment of its defects and diseases.Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Arthroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy and surgery of the joint.Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Anesthesia, Local: A blocking of nerve conduction to a specific area by an injection of an anesthetic agent.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Hospitals, District: Government-controlled hospitals which represent the major health facility for a designated geographic area.Operative Time: The duration of a surgical procedure in hours and minutes.Endocrine Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on any endocrine gland.Prostatectomy: Complete or partial surgical removal of the prostate. Three primary approaches are commonly employed: suprapubic - removal through an incision above the pubis and through the urinary bladder; retropubic - as for suprapubic but without entering the urinary bladder; and transurethral (TRANSURETHRAL RESECTION OF PROSTATE).Laparotomy: Incision into the side of the abdomen between the ribs and pelvis.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the eye or any of its parts.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Arthroplasty, Replacement: Partial or total replacement of a joint.Dissection: The separation and isolation of tissues for surgical purposes, or for the analysis or study of their structures.Surgical Mesh: Any woven or knit material of open texture used in surgery for the repair, reconstruction, or substitution of tissue. The mesh is usually a synthetic fabric made of various polymers. It is occasionally made of metal.Academic Medical Centers: Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Spinal DiseasesBlood Loss, Surgical: Loss of blood during a surgical procedure.Esthetics: The branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of the beautiful. It includes beauty, esthetic experience, esthetic judgment, esthetic aspects of medicine, etc.Hip Prosthesis: Replacement for a hip joint.Monitoring, Intraoperative: The constant checking on the state or condition of a patient during the course of a surgical operation (e.g., checking of vital signs).Cataract Extraction: The removal of a cataractous CRYSTALLINE LENS from the eye.Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Certification: Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.Colonic Diseases: Pathological processes in the COLON region of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE).Bone Screws: Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.Colectomy: Excision of a portion of the colon or of the whole colon. (Dorland, 28th ed)Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Knee Prosthesis: Replacement for a knee joint.Urologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the urinary tract or its parts in the male or female. For surgery of the male genitalia, UROLOGIC SURGICAL PROCEDURES, MALE is available.Hospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional: The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens from patients to health professionals or health care workers. It includes transmission via direct or indirect exposure to bacterial, fungal, parasitic, or viral agents.Military Medicine: The practice of medicine as applied to special circumstances associated with military operations.Video-Assisted Surgery: Endoscopic surgical procedures performed with visualization via video transmission. When real-time video is combined interactively with prior CT scans or MRI images, this is called image-guided surgery (see SURGERY, COMPUTER-ASSISTED).Cardiology: The study of the heart, its physiology, and its functions.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Malpractice: Failure of a professional person, a physician or lawyer, to render proper services through reprehensible ignorance or negligence or through criminal intent, especially when injury or loss follows. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Spinal Fusion: Operative immobilization or ankylosis of two or more vertebrae by fusion of the vertebral bodies with a short bone graft or often with diskectomy or laminectomy. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p236; Dorland, 28th ed)Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Trauma Centers: Specialized hospital facilities which provide diagnostic and therapeutic services for trauma patients.Hemostasis, Surgical: Control of bleeding during or after surgery.Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Cholecystectomy: Surgical removal of the GALLBLADDER.Mastectomy, Segmental: Removal of only enough breast tissue to ensure that the margins of the resected surgical specimen are free of tumor.Orthopedic Equipment: Nonexpendable items used in the performance of orthopedic surgery and related therapy. They are differentiated from ORTHOTIC DEVICES, apparatus used to prevent or correct deformities in patients.Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Gastroenterology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of the physiology and diseases of the digestive system and related structures (esophagus, liver, gallbladder, and pancreas).History, 15th Century: Time period from 1401 through 1500 of the common era.History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.Fracture Fixation, Internal: The use of internal devices (metal plates, nails, rods, etc.) to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment.Wounds, Penetrating: Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.Surgery, Veterinary: A board-certified specialty of VETERINARY MEDICINE, requiring at least four years of special education, training, and practice of veterinary surgery after graduation from veterinary school. In the written, oral, and practical examinations candidates may choose either large or small animal surgery. (From AVMA Directory, 43d ed, p278)Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Medical Oncology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of neoplasms.Osteotomy: The surgical cutting of a bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)Observer Variation: The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).Fascia: Layers of connective tissue of variable thickness. The superficial fascia is found immediately below the skin; the deep fascia invests MUSCLES, nerves, and other organs.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.History, Medieval: The period of history from the year 500 through 1450 of the common era.Phacoemulsification: A procedure for removal of the crystalline lens in cataract surgery in which an anterior capsulectomy is performed by means of a needle inserted through a small incision at the temporal limbus, allowing the lens contents to fall through the dilated pupil into the anterior chamber where they are broken up by the use of ultrasound and aspirated out of the eye through the incision. (Cline, et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed & In Focus 1993;1(1):1)Thyroidectomy: Surgical removal of the thyroid gland. (Dorland, 28th ed)Fracture Fixation: The use of metallic devices inserted into or through bone to hold a fracture in a set position and alignment while it heals.Arthroplasty: Surgical reconstruction of a joint to relieve pain or restore motion.Databases as Topic: Organized collections of computer records, standardized in format and content, that are stored in any of a variety of computer-readable modes. They are the basic sets of data from which computer-readable files are created. (from ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Operating Room Information Systems: Information systems, usually computer-assisted, designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information for planning, organizing, directing, and controlling administrative activities associated with the provision and utilization of operating room services and facilities.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Urologic Surgical Procedures, Male: Surgery performed on the male genitalia.Prosthesis Fitting: The fitting and adjusting of artificial parts of the body. (From Stedman's, 26th ed)IrelandHospitals, General: Large hospitals with a resident medical staff which provides continuous care to maternity, surgical and medical patients.Surgical Stapling: A technique of closing incisions and wounds, or of joining and connecting tissues, in which staples are used as sutures.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Time and Motion Studies: The observation and analysis of movements in a task with an emphasis on the amount of time required to perform the task.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Surgical Wound Dehiscence: Pathologic process consisting of a partial or complete disruption of the layers of a surgical wound.Emergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Appendicitis: Acute inflammation of the APPENDIX. Acute appendicitis is classified as simple, gangrenous, or perforated.Pneumonectomy: The excision of lung tissue including partial or total lung lobectomy.Podiatry: A specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of foot disorders and injuries and anatomic defects of the foot.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Rectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the RECTUM.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Diskectomy: Excision, in part or whole, of an INTERVERTEBRAL DISC. The most common indication is disk displacement or herniation. In addition to standard surgical removal, it can be performed by percutaneous diskectomy (DISKECTOMY, PERCUTANEOUS) or by laparoscopic diskectomy, the former being the more common.Colostomy: The surgical construction of an opening between the colon and the surface of the body.Hospitals, Teaching: Hospitals engaged in educational and research programs, as well as providing medical care to the patients.Perioperative Care: Interventions to provide care prior to, during, and immediately after surgery.Herniorrhaphy: Surgical procedures undertaken to repair abnormal openings through which tissue or parts of organs can protrude or are already protruding.
Eisenberg, Ted; Eisenberg, Joyne K. (2012). The Scoop on Breasts: A Plastic Surgeon Busts the Myths. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ... Even medical studies have attested to the difficulty of getting a correct fit.[28] Research by plastic surgeons has suggested ... who have difficulty calculating a correct cup size may be able to find a correct fit using a method adopted by plastic surgeons ...
Samuel Sharp FRS (1709-1778) was an English surgeon and author. As a surgeon at Guy's Hospital, from 1733 to 1757, was ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Samuel Sharp (surgeon).. *^ John Kirkup, "Samuel Sharp and the 'Operations Of Surgery,' ... He was elected surgeon to Guy's Hospital on 9 August 1733, the year in which Cheselden published his 'Osteographia,' (or ... He was admitted a freeman of the Barber-Surgeons' Company on 7 March 1731, obtained his diploma on 4 April 1732, and on 6 June ...
... and surgeon. Around the world, the combined term "physician and surgeon" is used to describe either a general ... It was not until 1540 that he granted the Company of Barber-Surgeons (ancestor of the Royal College of Surgeons) its separate ... This original use, as distinct from surgeon, is common in most of the world including the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth ... This term is at least nine hundred years old in English: physicians and surgeons were once members of separate professions, and ...
Life as a ship's surgeon[edit]. After qualifying, Rivers sought to follow his ambition and join the army but was not passed fit ... a surgeon at the London Hospital where they both worked.[8] Since 1901, the pair had been forming a systematic study of nerve ... a young Army surgeon. His plan was formed: he would study medicine and apply for training in the Army Medical Department, later ... he became house surgeon at the Chichester Infirmary (1887-9) and, although he enjoyed the town and the company of his ...
He became assistant surgeon to the Bellevue Hospital in 1880, and surgeon-in-chief of the Roosevelt Hospital in 1888. Here he ... He graduated in the arts from Harvard College in 1866, and qualified in medicine at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of ... The honorary fellowship was awarded to the 36 most well known surgeons of the time. ... William J. Syms Operating Theater of Charles McBurney (surgeon) at Roosevelt Hospital ...
Surgeon-Oculist/Surgeon-Oculist to the Queen[edit]. *5 August 1952: Sir Stewart Duke-Elder, KCVO, DSc, PhD, MD, LLD, FRCS, FACS ... Surgeon-Gynaecologist/Surgeon-Gynaecologist to the Queen[edit]. *5 August 1952: Sir William Gilliatt, KCVO, MD, MS, FRCP, FRCS ... 11.2.3 Surgeon-Apothecary to the Household at Balmoral. *11.2.4 Surgeon-Apothecary to the Household at the Palace of ... Surgeon-Apothecary to the Household at the Palace of Holyroodhouse[edit]. Surgeon-Apothecaries/Apothecaries to HM Household at ...
2001 - Office of the Surgeon General[edit]. In 2001, the Surgeon General of the United States, David Satcher M.D. Ph.D., placed ... the Surgeon General of the United States, David Satcher M.D. Ph.D., placed the D.A.R.E. program in the category of "Ineffective ... "Youth Violence Epidemic Not Over, Surgeon General Warns". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2019-07-29 - via ...
At the beginning of the 20th century, Surgeon General Walter Wyman requested to put San Francisco's Chinatown under quarantine ...
Famous surgeons. References[edit]. Gialanella, Donna. "Victor Parsonnet:." Music from the Heart Cardiac surgeon gives his life ... "A Surgeon's Heart Beats to Music and Medicine." New Jersey Jewish News. New Jersey Jewish News, 2011. Web. 1 Mar. 2014. ,http ... Victor Parsonnet, MD, Professor Emeritus, (born August 29, 1924) is an American cardiac surgeon who contributed significantly ... Parsonnet was the first surgeon in New Jersey to implant a permanent pacemaker (1961) and to complete a heart transplant (1985 ...
"American College of Surgeons. Retrieved 11 January 2016.. *^ a b c d e f g "Dr. Nicholas Senn - the Man". Edgewater Historical ... After 1893, he was attending surgeon at the Presbyterian Hospital and surgeon-in-chief of Saint Joseph's Hospital,[4] as well ... Sometime during his career, he was also Surgeon General of the National Guard of Illinois and Wisconsin,[2][6] and founded the ... In 1884, he was appointed as Professor of Surgery at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Chicago.[2][4] ...
The Emergency Trauma Center is certified by the American College of Surgeons as a Level II trauma center. The center has 38 ... The heart center is staffed by cardiologists, surgeons, and nurses and includes technology such as a 64-slice CT scanner and ... The Coborn Cancer Center is a Comprehensive Community Cancer Program certified by the American College of Surgeons that ... The department has 18 operating rooms, over 100 surgeons, and performs 14,000 operations a year. Inpatient and outpatient ...
"2 - High Altitude Respiratory Physiology". USAF Flight Surgeon's Guide. USAF School of Aerospace Medicine. Archived from the ...
"Royal College of Surgeons. Retrieved 9 February 2016.. *^ "Aspergilloma". Medical Dictionary. TheFreeDictionary.. ...
24-hour in-house coverage by general surgeons, and prompt availability of care in specialties such as orthopedic surgery, ...
"Congress of Neurological Surgeons. Retrieved 2009-12-07.. CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link). ... Worked as Walter Freeman's surgeon contributing to the popularization of Lobotomy in The United States. ... who needed the collaboration of a trained surgeon in order to practice the leucotomy, a technique pioneered by the Portuguese ... was a trained neurosurgeon and adamantly believed lobotomy should only be performed by a proper surgeon. He insisted that ...
"Street named for surgeon". Otago Daily Times.. *^ Incat ferries bound for Denmark & Sydney Harbour The Mercury 21 April 2017 ...
American College of Surgeons (2008). Atls, Advanced Trauma Life Support Program for Doctors. Amer College of Surgeons. ISBN 978 ... R Adams Cowley is credited with promoting this concept, first in his capacity as a military surgeon and later as head of the ...
The hand surgery field is also practiced by orthopedic surgeons and general surgeons. Scar tissue formation after surgery can ... Plastic surgeons use microsurgery to transfer tissue for coverage of a defect when no local tissue is available. Free flaps of ... In 1818, German surgeon Carl Ferdinand von Graefe published his major work entitled Rhinoplastik. Von Graefe modified the ... In the United States, plastic surgeons are board certified by American Board of Plastic Surgery.[17] Subdisciplines of plastic ...
Mustafa Topchubashov : general surgeon. 1944[edit]. Laureates for this year were officially announced in 1946.[4] ...
Devalia HL, Layer GT (April 2009). "Current concepts in gynaecomastia". Surgeon. 7 (2): 114-19. doi:10.1016/s1479-666x(09)80026 ... According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, breast reduction surgeries to correct gynecomastia are becoming ...
Surgeon. Institutions. Jefferson Davis County Hospital. Baylor College of Medicine. University of Kansas Medical Center Saint ... Last week Houston surgeon Paul Harrington, MD, was winning converts to a new and happier method."[5] ... Following the war Harrington moved to Texas and worked as a surgeon at Jefferson Davis County Hospital in Houston. During the ... Paul Randall Harrington (September 27, 1911 - November 29, 1980) was an American orthopaedic surgeon. He is best known as the ...
Dallas Plastic Surgeon Dr. Rod Rohrich Honored Among the Top Plastic Surgeons in the United States by Peers in Castle ... Rod J. Rohrich, F.A.C.S. is a Dallas-based plastic surgeon, author and educator.[1] He is the editor-in-chief of the journal ... "Plastic surgeons often miss patients' mental disorders".. *^ Schnurman, Mitchell (October 23, 2010). "A Dallas hospital has ... In 2003 he was elected president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons for the year 2004.[8] ...
"American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Retrieved 2017-08-07.. *^ a b c d e f g h i j k l De Cuypere, G.; TSjoen, G.; Beerten, R ... People with HIV or hepatitis C may have difficulty finding a surgeon able to perform successful surgery. Many surgeons operate ... Surgeons commonly stipulate the latter regardless of the type of operation. Potential future advances[edit]. See also: ... "American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Retrieved 2017-08-07.. *^ "About ASPS". ...
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. February 2005. Osteochondral Grafting of Articular Cartilage Injury at eMedicine. ...
American Association of Orthopedic Surgeons. Archived from the original on 30 May 2010. Retrieved 30 May 2010.. ...
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Erb's Palsy (Brachial Plexus Birth Injury). Retrieved January 15, 2009, from [4]. ... American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Ingrown Toenail. Retrieved January 15, 2009, from [7]. ...
Suppression of Surgeons Bacterial Hand Flora during Surgical Procedures with a New Antimicrobial Surgical Glove ... Conclusions: A new antimicrobial surgical glove suppressed surgeons hand flora during operative procedures. In the event of a ... Suppression of Surgeons Bacterial Hand Flora during Surgical Procedures with a New Antimicrobial Surgical Glove. Surgical ... 25 pairs of gloves were retrieved from 14 surgeons who donned them randomly on their dominant or non-dominant hand. The number ...
ACS Faculty Research Fellowships awarded to five surgeons. ACS Faculty Research Fellowships awarded to five surgeons. By ACS ... Home › Scholarships › ACS Faculty Research Fellowships awarded to five surgeons. Read the Interactive PDF issue ... These fellowships are offered to surgeons who are embarking on a career in general surgery or a surgical specialty and carry ... The two-year Franklin H. Martin, MD, FACS, Faculty Research Fellowship of the American College of Surgeons honors the Colleges ...
Expert Oral Surgeons Collaborate with General Practice Dentists. November 13, 2013 at 1:01 PM. Expert oral surgeons: oral & ... General dentists can easily refer patients to oral and maxillofacial surgeons. *Oral surgeons can begin with an evaluation and ... are safer and more successful in the hands of oral surgeon experts known as oral & maxillofacial surgeons. ... the shortage of oral and maxillofacial surgeons is particularly critical with only 0.03 oral and maxillofacial surgeons ...
Practitioners are called otolaryngologists-head and neck surgeons, or sometimes otorhinolaryngologists (ORL). The commonly used ... Practitioners are called otolaryngologists-head and neck surgeons, or sometimes otorhinolaryngologists (ORL). The commonly used ...
... he was a skilled and innovative surgeon and a prolific teacher and mentor; he was a builder and a dreamer, envisioning ...
The resident will also gain experience as primary surgeon in the common otolaryngology surgeries, such as tracheostomy, ...
American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgeons Foot Surgery. American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgeons Reconstructive Rearfoot and ... Wagoner M, Van J, Nolan, C, Creech C, Cornell R, Meyr A. "Can Foot & Ankle Surgeons Accurately Estimate Patient Body Mass Index ...
Access the complete 2014 Surgeon Generals Report, consumer booklet, fact sheets, videos, and other resources addressing new ... Order 2014 Surgeon Generals Report documents from our Publications Catalog. In the Publications Catalog, type in 2014 SGR in ... Surgeon Generals Reports on Smoking and Tobacco Useplus icon *2020 SGR-Smoking Cessation ... Lets Make the Next Generation Tobacco-Free: Your Guide to the 50th Anniversary Surgeon Generals Report on Smoking and Health ...
Prison Surgeons. Br Med J 1891; 2 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.2.1607.869-a (Published 17 October 1891) Cite this as: Br ...
Civil Surgeon Letter: Changes to TB Testing Requirements (PDF, 52 KB). Civil Surgeon Seminars. *Immigration Medical Exam and ... The civil surgeon ceases to practice medicine; * The civil surgeon ceases to perform immigration medical examinations in the ... Related to civil surgeon designation. Current and newly approved civil surgeons will receive a designated email box address ... How to Become a Civil Surgeon. If you are interested in becoming a civil surgeon, you must apply using Form I-910, Application ...
Santini M., Fiorelli A. (2018) Surgery: Recommendations for Surgeons. In: Franco R., Zito Marino F., Giordano A. (eds) The ... and surgeons experience. For mass with invasiveness of adjacent structures, a preoperative diagnosis obtained with ...
The Congress of Neurological Surgeons exists to enhance health and improve lives worldwide through the advancement of education ... The Congress of Neurological Surgeons exists to enhance health and improve lives worldwide through the advancement of education ...
Surgeons might want to steer clear of alcohol the night before operating, according to a new report that shows a hangover fuels ... The surgeons also performed worse the day after their night out compared with before, with an increase in errors of about half ... That turned out to be fortunate, because both the surgeons and those students who had been drunk did worse than when they were ... To measure the degree of that impairment, the researchers invited eight surgeons and 16 students out for a night on the town. ...
Because she is herself a surgeon, she stopped herself from calling her own surgeon  every hour just after the operation to ... More appropriately, what happens when plastic and cosmetic surgeons are also plastic surgery patients? Do they tell surgeons ... Because the surgeons at that center know what it s like to be a plastic surgery patient, they designed some post-op handouts ... When cosmetic surgeons have plastic surgery for facial and body enhancements, do they somehow think a nip here and a tuck there ...
Samuel Sharp FRS (1709-1778) was an English surgeon and author. As a surgeon at Guys Hospital, from 1733 to 1757, was ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Samuel Sharp (surgeon).. *^ John Kirkup, "Samuel Sharp and the Operations Of Surgery, ... He was elected surgeon to Guys Hospital on 9 August 1733, the year in which Cheselden published his Osteographia, (or ... He was admitted a freeman of the Barber-Surgeons Company on 7 March 1731, obtained his diploma on 4 April 1732, and on 6 June ...
He became assistant surgeon to the Bellevue Hospital in 1880, and surgeon-in-chief of the Roosevelt Hospital in 1888. Here he ... He graduated in the arts from Harvard College in 1866, and qualified in medicine at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of ... The honorary fellowship was awarded to the 36 most well known surgeons of the time. ... William J. Syms Operating Theater of Charles McBurney (surgeon) at Roosevelt Hospital ...
... a Christian organization is educating surgeons who stay around despite little pay or prestige -- sometimes despite real danger. ... In countries where many are performing surgery without any formal training, a Christian organization is educating surgeons who ... to a meeting of missionary surgeons in Brackenhurst, Kenya. The vision was to post a U.S. board-certified surgeon at a ... The need for surgeons in sub-Saharan Africa is so profound that its genuinely difficult to comprehend. "I was born by C- ...
Choosing a surgeon. It is important to choose a surgeon who is qualified and accredited by a professional board, such as the ... Choose a reputable surgeon and checking their credentials.. *After obtaining the surgeons opinion, make your own decisions, ... Surgeons do not recommend rhinoplasty until the patient is at least 15 years old, to allow for full growth of the cartilage and ... A surgeon may refer a patient for counseling before surgery if they believe there is an underlying problem that cannot be ...
Subject: Eye surgeons Category: Health , Conditions and Diseases Asked by: knowitall22-ga List Price: $10.00. Posted: 25 Feb ... Subject: Re: Eye surgeons Answered By: clouseau-ga on 26 Feb 2003 08:31 PST Rated:. ... I trust my research has provided you with the best choice for cataract surgeons in the Chicago area. If a link above should ... You are fortunate that, perhaps the number one rated surgeon is right in your area! His name is Manus Kraff, and is ...
Indian Surgeons Remove Massive Brain Tumor. An Indian woman is recovering well after a surgery to remove the massive tumor. ...
Role of the Civil Surgeon. Civil surgeons must follow specific identification procedures, prescribed by the U.S. Department of ... The civil surgeon is also responsible for reporting the results of all the required tests and consultations on the prescribed ... The civil surgeon is not responsible for determining whether an applicant is actually eligible to adjust their status; that ... The civil surgeon is responsible for the entire examination, including chest radiographs, when required, and necessary ...
Three leading spinal surgeons are joining NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, effective July 1. Drs. Larry Lenke, ... Three leading spinal surgeons are joining NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, effective July 1. Drs. Larry Lenke, Daniel Riew and ... William Levine, orthopedic surgeon-in-chief at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center and chair of the ... The surgeons will establish a state-of-the-art comprehensive spinal surgery hospital in northern Manhattan. ...
Surgeons operate on patients to treat injuries, such... ... Physicians and surgeons diagnose and treat injuries and ... Surgeons operate on patients to treat injuries, such as broken bones; diseases, such as cancerous tumors; and deformities, such ... Surgeons operate on patients to treat injuries, such as broken bones; diseases, such as cancerous tumors; and deformities, such ... 2010 median pay: $166,400 What they do: Physicians and surgeons diagnose and treat injuries and illnesses in patients. ...
... and fear it may contribute to the projected shortage of surgeons in coming years. ... According to GENERAL SURGEONS. * Tonsillectomy in Children Clinical Practice Guidelines (2019) * Surgeries to Help Newborns ... Surgeons and medical interventionalists are at high risk for work-related musculoskeletal disorders, with rates comparable to ... Such problems can cause some surgeons to cut back on procedures, take time off from work for rehabilitation or surgery, and ...
Two surgeons say they were pushed to resign after they told Childrens Hospital a colleague was incompetent. The hospital says ... WOWT reported that in Cincinnati, Azizkhan was one of the supervisors of surgeon Atiq Durrani, MD, and that last month an Ohio ... Two of those 10 surgeons filed suit this month against the hospital, its CEO, Richard Azizkhan, MD, and a neurosurgeon they ... "Complete shock that my boys surgeons are no longer there," the NBC affiliate reported one mother saying. "I mean, what is ...
  • Complicated dental procedures like third molar impactions, maxillofacial fractures and implants certainly require the expert technical knowhow of oral and maxillofacial surgeons. (oralsurgeonhouston.com)
  • To utilize their skills fully, almost all oral and maxillofacial surgeons work at hospitals as they require medical and surgical facilities like OTs, surgical support staff, anesthesiologists, emergency medical equipment and materials. (oralsurgeonhouston.com)
  • While almost all dentists can do some oral surgery procedures - many cosmetic dentistry procedures as well as dental extractions (including wisdom teeth), dental implants, root canals and a range of other procedures - are safer and more successful in the hands of oral surgeon experts known as oral & maxillofacial surgeons . (oralsurgeonhouston.com)
  • Oral and maxillofacial surgeons do not always need to spend post-operative time on each patient after the oral reconstructive surgery procedure as general dentists can often complete critical aftercare or follow-up procedures (like suture removal wound debridement, irrigation, etc. (oralsurgeonhouston.com)
  • General dentists usually examine and diagnose patients and then refer them to oral and maxillofacial surgeons for complicated surgical procedures. (oralsurgeonhouston.com)
  • In the near future, oral & maxillofacial surgeons and general dentists working together could turn out to be the most profitable and efficient treatment protocol for patients and dentists as well. (oralsurgeonhouston.com)
  • A general dentist will evaluate and treat simple surgical procedures or call in oral and maxillofacial surgeons to treat the complicated cases. (oralsurgeonhouston.com)
  • According the U.S. Senate Committee on Health Education Labor & Pensions, there is a shortage of trained oral and maxillofacial surgeons . (oralsurgeonhouston.com)
  • In fact, the shortage of oral and maxillofacial surgeons is particularly critical with only 0.03 oral and maxillofacial surgeons available for about every 100,000 people. (oralsurgeonhouston.com)
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