Scapula: Also called the shoulder blade, it is a flat triangular bone, a pair of which form the back part of the shoulder girdle.Rotator Cuff: The musculotendinous sheath formed by the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, and teres minor muscles. These help stabilize the head of the HUMERUS in the glenoid fossa and allow for rotation of the SHOULDER JOINT about its longitudinal axis.Tendon Injuries: Injuries to the fibrous cords of connective tissue which attach muscles to bones or other structures.Shoulder Joint: The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.Tendinopathy: Clinical syndrome describing overuse tendon injuries characterized by a combination of PAIN, diffuse or localized swelling, and impaired performance. Distinguishing tendinosis from tendinitis is clinically difficult and can be made only after histopathological examination.Shoulder: Part of the body in humans and primates where the arms connect to the trunk. The shoulder has five joints; ACROMIOCLAVICULAR joint, CORACOCLAVICULAR joint, GLENOHUMERAL joint, scapulathoracic joint, and STERNOCLAVICULAR joint.Tendons: Fibrous bands or cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE at the ends of SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS that serve to attach the MUSCLES to bones and other structures.Rupture: Forcible or traumatic tear or break of an organ or other soft part of the body.Shoulder Impingement Syndrome: Compression of the rotator cuff tendons and subacromial bursa between the humeral head and structures that make up the coracoacromial arch and the humeral tuberosities. This condition is associated with subacromial bursitis and rotator cuff (largely supraspinatus) and bicipital tendon inflammation, with or without degenerative changes in the tendon. Pain that is most severe when the arm is abducted in an arc between 40 and 120 degrees, sometimes associated with tears in the rotator cuff, is the chief symptom. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Syndromes and Eponymic Diseases, 2d ed)Humerus: Bone in humans and primates extending from the SHOULDER JOINT to the ELBOW JOINT.Shoulder Pain: Unilateral or bilateral pain of the shoulder. It is often caused by physical activities such as work or sports participation, but may also be pathologic in origin.Acromion: The lateral extension of the spine of the SCAPULA and the highest point of the SHOULDER.Sprains and Strains: A collective term for muscle and ligament injuries without dislocation or fracture. A sprain is a joint injury in which some of the fibers of a supporting ligament are ruptured but the continuity of the ligament remains intact. A strain is an overstretching or overexertion of some part of the musculature.Glenoid Cavity: A depression in the lateral angle of the scapula that articulates with the head of the HUMERUS.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Thoracic Nerves: The twelve spinal nerves on each side of the thorax. They include eleven INTERCOSTAL NERVES and one subcostal nerve. Both sensory and motor, they supply the muscles and skin of the thoracic and abdominal walls.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Bursa, Synovial: A fluid-filled sac lined with SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE that provides a cushion between bones, tendons and/or muscles around a joint.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Acromioclavicular Joint: The gliding joint formed by the outer extremity of the CLAVICLE and the inner margin of the acromion process of the SCAPULA.Cumulative Trauma Disorders: Harmful and painful condition caused by overuse or overexertion of some part of the musculoskeletal system, often resulting from work-related physical activities. It is characterized by inflammation, pain, or dysfunction of the involved joints, bones, ligaments, and nerves.Arthroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy and surgery of the joint.Rotation: Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Forelimb: A front limb of a quadruped. (The Random House College Dictionary, 1980)Osteochondroma: A cartilage-capped benign tumor that often appears as a stalk on the surface of bone. It is probably a developmental malformation rather than a true neoplasm and is usually found in the metaphysis of the distal femur, proximal tibia, or proximal humerus. Osteochondroma is the most common of benign bone tumors.Ribs: A set of twelve curved bones which connect to the vertebral column posteriorly, and terminate anteriorly as costal cartilage. Together, they form a protective cage around the internal thoracic organs.Musculoskeletal Development: The morphologic and physiological changes of the MUSCLES, bones (BONE AND BONES), and CARTILAGE of the body, i.e., MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, during the prenatal and postnatal stages of development.Replantation: Restoration of an organ or other structure to its original site.Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Bursitis: Inflammation or irritation of a bursa, the fibrous sac that acts as a cushion between moving structures of bones, muscles, tendons or skin.Elastic Modulus: Numerical expression indicating the measure of stiffness in a material. It is defined by the ratio of stress in a unit area of substance to the resulting deformation (strain). This allows the behavior of a material under load (such as bone) to be calculated.Muscular Atrophy: Derangement in size and number of muscle fibers occurring with aging, reduction in blood supply, or following immobilization, prolonged weightlessness, malnutrition, and particularly in denervation.Clavicle: A bone on the ventral side of the shoulder girdle, which in humans is commonly called the collar bone.Tenotomy: Surgical division of a tendon for relief of a deformity that is caused by congenital or acquired shortening of a muscle (Stedman, 27th ed). Tenotomy is performed in order to lengthen a muscle that has developed improperly, or become shortened and is resistant to stretching.Suture Anchors: Implants used in arthroscopic surgery and other orthopedic procedures to attach soft tissue to bone. One end of a suture is tied to soft tissue and the other end to the implant. The anchors are made of a variety of materials including titanium, stainless steel, or absorbable polymers.Arthroplasty, Replacement: Partial or total replacement of a joint.Microscopy, Acoustic: A scientific tool based on ULTRASONOGRAPHY and used not only for the observation of microstructure in metalwork but also in living tissue. In biomedical application, the acoustic propagation speed in normal and abnormal tissues can be quantified to distinguish their tissue elasticity and other properties.Tendon Transfer: Surgical procedure by which a tendon is incised at its insertion and placed at an anatomical site distant from the original insertion. The tendon remains attached at the point of origin and takes over the function of a muscle inactivated by trauma or disease.Scandentia: An order of the class MAMMALS that consists of one family, TUPAIIDAE (tree shrews), 5 genera (one of which is TUPAIA), and 16 species. Their recent distribution is from India to the Philippines, southern China to Java, Borneo, Sumatra, Bali, and other islands in those regions.Brachial Plexus: The large network of nerve fibers which distributes the innervation of the upper extremity. The brachial plexus extends from the neck into the axilla. In humans, the nerves of the plexus usually originate from the lower cervical and the first thoracic spinal cord segments (C5-C8 and T1), but variations are not uncommon.Brachial Plexus Neuropathies: Diseases of the cervical (and first thoracic) roots, nerve trunks, cords, and peripheral nerve components of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS. Clinical manifestations include regional pain, PARESTHESIA; MUSCLE WEAKNESS, and decreased sensation (HYPESTHESIA) in the upper extremity. These disorders may be associated with trauma (including BIRTH INJURIES); THORACIC OUTLET SYNDROME; NEOPLASMS; NEURITIS; RADIOTHERAPY; and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1351-2)Myelography: X-ray visualization of the spinal cord following injection of contrast medium into the spinal arachnoid space.Nerve Transfer: Surgical reinnervation of a denervated peripheral target using a healthy donor nerve and/or its proximal stump. The direct connection is usually made to a healthy postlesional distal portion of a non-functioning nerve or implanted directly into denervated muscle or insensitive skin. Nerve sprouts will grow from the transferred nerve into the denervated elements and establish contact between them and the neurons that formerly controlled another area.Birth Injuries: Mechanical or anoxic trauma incurred by the infant during labor or delivery.Paralysis, Obstetric: Paralysis of an infant resulting from injury received at birth. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Meningocele: A congenital or acquired protrusion of the meninges, unaccompanied by neural tissue, through a bony defect in the skull or vertebral column.Dictionaries, MedicalDictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Crowdsourcing: Social media model for enabling public involvement and recruitment in participation. Use of social media to collect feedback and recruit volunteer subjects.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.
The human scapula Supraspinatous fossa shown in red. Supraspinatous fossa shown in red. Supraspinatus muscle Scapula Clinically ... The supraspinatous fossa (supraspinatus fossa, supraspinous fossa) of the posterior aspect of the scapula is smaller than the ... Supraspinatus muscle originates from the supraspinatous fossa. Distal attachment of the levator scapulae muscle is also on the ... Its medial two-thirds give origin to the Supraspinatus. The fossa can be exposed by the removal of skin and the superficial ...
The supraspinatus also originates on the spine of the scapula. It inserts on the greater tubercle of the humerus, and assists ... It connects the scapula and the two bones of the lower arm, the radius and ulna, and consists of three sections. The humeral ... At the shoulder, the head of the humerus articulates with the glenoid fossa of the scapula. More distally, at the elbow, the ... The four muscles of supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor and subscapularis form a musculo-ligamentous girdle called the ...
Left scapula. Glenoid cavity shown in red. Animation. Glenoid cavity shown in red. Glenoid fossa of right side. Anterior view ... The rotator cuff also reinforces this joint more specifically with the supraspinatus tendon to hold the head of the humerus in ... The glenoid cavity or glenoid fossa of scapula is a part of the shoulder. It is a shallow, pyriform articular surface, which is ... The place on the scapula where it articulated with the humerus (upper bone of the forelimb) is called the glenoid. The glenoid ...
The Supraspinatus begins below the trapezius and ends at the point of the shoulder; it maintains the shoulder in extension. The ... The deltoid begins at the scapula and ends at the humerus. The deltoid flexes the shoulder joint, and will load the shoulder if ... This muscle moves the head from side to side, pulls the scapula forward, raises it in collection, and swings the foreleg ... The Rhomboideus begins at the Nuchal ligament and ends at the scapula. It lifts the shoulder and forehand, and pulls the ...
... some fibers eventually attached to the scapula and evolved into the supraspinatus, the infraspinatus, and parts of the ... It attaches medially to the infraspinous fossa of the scapula and laterally to the middle facet of the greater tubercle of the ... The fibers converge to a tendon, which glides over the lateral border of the spine of the scapula, and, passing across the ... When the arm is fixed, it abducts the inferior angle of the scapula. Its synergists are teres minor and the deltoid. The ...
Origin on scapula. Attachment on humerus. Function. Innervation Supraspinatus muscle. supraspinous fossa. superior[2] facet of ... The supraspinatus muscle spreads out in a horizontal band to insert on the superior facet of the greater tubercle of the ... The subscapularis muscle origin is divided from the remainder of the rotator cuff origins as it is deep to the scapula. ... They hold the head of the humerus in the small and shallow glenoid fossa of the scapula. The glenohumeral joint has been ...
Chimpanzee scapulas also possess a considerably larger supraspinous fossa, allowing for a larger supraspinatus muscle. Through ... While this slightly closes the angle between the clavicle and the scapula, it also widens the shoulder. The scapula can be ... scapula, and coracoid. Some mammalian species (such as the dog and the horse) have only the scapula. The pectoral girdles are ... When the scapula is moved medially it lies in a frontal plane with the glenoid cavity facing directly laterally. At this ...
It travels close to the bone, running between the scapula and the supraspinatus muscle, to which it supplies branches. It then ... The artery then enters the supraspinatous fossa of the scapula. ... belly of the omohyoid to the superior border of the scapula. It ... descends behind the neck of the scapula, through the great scapular notch and under cover of the inferior transverse ligament, ...
... teres minor and supraspinatus . These muscles attach to the surface of the scapula and are responsible for the internal and ... levator scapulae, and rhomboid muscles and attach to the medial, superior, and inferior borders of the scapula. Each of these ... infraglenoid tubercle of the scapula, and spine of the scapula. These muscles are responsible for several actions of the ... The scapula plays an important role in shoulder impingement syndrome. It is a wide, flat bone lying on the posterior thoracic ...
... scapula) to the arm providing motion and stability. The most commonly affected tendon is that of the supraspinatus muscle. ... Fractures of the scapula sometimes occur through the coracoid process A shoulder fracture that occurs after a major injury is ... Arm movement is further facilitated by the ability of the scapula itself to slide along the rib cage. The capsule is a soft ... Doctors treat a dislocation by putting the head of the humerus back into the joint socket (glenoid fossa) of the scapula - a ...
Bones and their significant points for muscle attachment: Scapula: Spine of the Scapula, Supraglenoid Tubercle, Glenoid Cavity ... Supraspinatus: originates on the supraspinous fossa and inserts on the greater tubercle of the humerus. It acts to extend and ... Omotransversarius: originates on the spine of the scapula and inserts on the wing of the atlas. Its function is to advance the ... Its function is to support the trunk and depress the scapula. It is innervated by the ventral branches of the cervical spinal ...
The supraspinatus muscle spreads out in a horizontal band to insert on the superior and middle facets of the greater tubercle. ... These muscles arise from the scapula and connect to the head of the humerus, forming a cuff at the shoulder joint. They hold ... The infraspinatus and supraspinatus tests have a specificity of 80% to 90%. A common cause of shoulder pain in rotator cuff ... The supraspinatus is most commonly involved in a rotator cuff tear. The rotator cuff muscles are important in shoulder ...
It is responsible for the innervation of some of the muscles that attach on the scapula, namely the supraspinatus and ... It then passes beneath the supraspinatus, and curves around the lateral border of the spine of the scapula through spinogleniod ... It then runs along the superior border of the scapula, passes through the suprascapular notch inferior to the superior ... Supraspinatus muscle Infraspinatus muscle (through the spinoglenoid notch) Acromioclavicular joint Glenohumeral joint In the ...
They work together to tilt the Scapula to a position that makes the glenoid cavity point superiorly, enabling the last degrees ... Other contributing muscles include the Supraspinatus muscle and biceps brachii muscle caput longum. The rotator cuff is also ...
On the other hand, to achieve pure flexion at the joint the deltoid and supraspinatus must cancel the adduction component and ... The shoulder girdle or pectoral girdle, composed of the clavicle and the scapula, connects the upper limb to the axial skeleton ... The first 10° is performed entirely by the supraspinatus, but beyond that fibres of the much stronger deltoid are in position ... The acromioclavicular joint, the joint between the acromion process on the scapula and the clavicle, is similarly strengthened ...
The scapulohumeral muscles are a group of seven muscles that connect the humerus to the scapula. They are amongst the muscles ... infraspinatus muscle subscapularis muscle supraspinatus muscle teres minor muscle teres major muscle Other muscles that attach ...
... brain or above the spine of scapula: supraspinatus muscle supraspinatous fascia supraspinatous fossa supraspinous ligament. ...
The intrinsic muscles of the scapula include the muscles of the rotator cuff-the subscapularis, teres minor, supraspinatus, and ... The name scapula might be related that due to existence of the spine of the scapula a concavity exist in the scapula. Otherwise ... In anatomy, the scapula (plural scapulae or scapulas; also known as shoulder blade or wing bone) is the bone that connects the ... In classical Latin scapula is only used in its plural scapulae. Although some sources mention that scapulae is used to refer ...
In the UK, the standard projections of the shoulder are AP and Lateral Scapula or Axillary Projection.[14] ... The osseous margins of the coraco-acromial arch and hence the supraspinatus outlet canal. ... lateral contour of the shoulder should be positioned in front of the film in a way that the longitudinal axis of the scapula ...
The supraspinatus muscle arises from the supraspinous fossa, a shallow depression in the body of the scapula above its spine. ... The spine of the scapula separates the supraspinatus muscle from the infraspinatus muscle, which originates below the spine. ... The supraspinatus (plural supraspinati) is a relatively small muscle of the upper back that runs from the supraspinatous fossa ... Before surgery, Supraspinatus Tendonitis should be ruled out as the cause of pain. Position of the supraspinatus muscle (shown ...
... and gives origin to part of the supraspinatus. Its inferior surface forms part of the infraspinatous fossa, gives origin to a ... Posterior surface of scapula. Root of spine is not labeled. But visible at center right. Left scapula. Posterior view. Root of ... Left scapula seen from behind (spine shown in red). Position of spine (shown in red). Animation. Left scapula seen from behind ... Left scapula. lateral view (spine labeled at upper right). Left scapula. Lateral view (spine shown in red) Surface anatomy of ...
They are responsible for downward rotation of the scapula with the levator scapulae, as well as adduction of the scapula. ... The muscles of the rotator cuff are supraspinatus, subscapularis, infraspinatus, and teres minor. The cuff adheres to the ... This muscle aids in respiration, medially rotates the scapula, protracts the scapula, and also draws the scapula inferiorly. ... "In terms of comparative anatomy the human scapula represents two bones that have become fused together; the (dorsal) scapula ...
Normally, this artery has a small branch which passes laterally to the supraspinatus fossa of the scapula, and in a third of ... The fibers concerned with the cranial displacement of the scapula became the levator scapulae. Position of levator scapulae ... As the Latin name suggests, its main function is to lift the scapula. The levator scapulae originates from the posterior ... When the spine is fixed, levator scapulae elevates the scapula and rotates its inferior angle medially. It often works in ...
The shoulder joint is a ball and socket joint between the scapula and the humerus. However the socket of the glenoid cavity of ... The supraspinatus, infraspinatus and teres minor muscles aid in abduction and external rotation of the shoulder, while the ... This range can be compromised by anything that changes the position of the scapula. This could be an imbalance in parts of the ... The movement of the scapula across the rib cage in relation to the humerus is known as the scapulohumeral rhythm, and this ...
Helps raise the scapula and move the limb forward. Pectoral muscles: there are 4 pectorals, and they all function in adduction ... and inserts into the dorsal side of the supraspinatus muscle. Rectus capitis dorsalis major and rectus capitis dorsalis minor: ... Trapezius: originates along the dorsal side of the neck near the poll, inserts on the spine of the scapula. Includes the ... Triceps brachii: has three heads which originate and insert into separate places: the caudal side of the scapula and into the ...
The intrinsic muscles of the scapula include the muscles of the rotator cuff-the subscapularis, teres minor, supraspinatus, and ... In anatomy, the scapula (plural scapulae or scapulas[1]), also known as shoulder bone, shoulder blade, wing bone or blade bone ... Scapula/ScapulaeEdit. The name scapula as synonym of shoulder blade is of Latin origin.[16] It is commonly used in medical ... The lateral angle of the scapula or glenoid angle also known as the head of the scapula is the thickest part of the scapula. It ...
The snapping scapula syndrome is caused by either osseous lesions or scapulothoracic bursitis and can be difficult to recognize ... The scapulothoracic articulation is a sliding junction between the deep aspect of the scapula and thoracic rib cage at the ... to discuss the anatomy of the scapulothoracic articulation with an emphasis on the pathology associated with snapping scapula ... The scapula has a total of 17 muscular attachments (Table 1). The scapulohumeral muscles include the supraspinatus, ...
Abduction of scapula. Suprascapular (C5). Supraspinatus Infraspinatus. Abduction of shoulder External rotation of shoulder. ... while dorsal scapular nerve deficit will affect the stabilization of the scapula. ...
A Scapula Fracture is a break in the shoulder blade. It is quite a rare injury which occurs from a direct impact, most often in ... Supraspinatus Rupture. The supraspinatus muscle runs along the top of the shoulder blade and inserts at the top of the arm, or ... Scapula fracture or broken shoulder blade is caused by either a direct impact to the scapula from a blunt object or from a fall ... A scapula fracture is a break in the shoulder blade bone at the back of the shoulder. This is a relatively uncommon injury, ...
Definition of supraspinatus (muscle). Provided by Stedmans medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes medical terms and ... supraspinous fossa of scapula; insertion, greater tuberosity of humerus; action, initiates abduction of arm; its tonic ... supraspinatus (muscle). Definition: intrinsic (scapulohumeral) muscle of shoulder joint, the tendon of which contributes to the ...
Can you name the Features of the scapula? Test your knowledge on this science quiz to see how you do and compare your score to ... Border of scapula situated superior to supraspinatus. The ligament which traverses this gap becomes ossified in old age. ... Science Quiz / Features of the scapula. Random Science or Anatomy Quiz QUIZ: Can you name the Features of the scapula?. by ...
The intrinsic muscles of the scapula include the muscles of the rotator cuff-the subscapularis, teres minor, supraspinatus, and ... In anatomy, the scapula (plural scapulae or scapulas[1]), also known as shoulder bone, shoulder blade, wing bone or blade bone ... Scapula/ScapulaeEdit. The name scapula as synonym of shoulder blade is of Latin origin.[16] It is commonly used in medical ... The lateral angle of the scapula or glenoid angle also known as the head of the scapula is the thickest part of the scapula. It ...
Study Scapula and general arm flashcards from Rodney Dreier ... Scapula and general arm Flashcards Preview PT Anatomy Unit 1 , ... Supraspinatus. Infraspinatus. Subscapularis. Teres minor. Connects the Scapula to the Humerus.. Rotator cuff provides stability ... Scapula rotates up and down. Rotation is determined by the glenoid fossa. ... What ligaments reside at the acromioclavicular joint in order to anchor the scapula to the clavicle?. ...
Calcific Tendinitis: Prolonged inflammation of the supraspinatus tendon, with resulting calcification.. ELBOW: *Tennis Elbow: ... It hurts upon movement of scapula.. *Bicipital Tendinitis (Impingement Syndrome): Inflammation of the tendon of the ... This is due to degeneration in the subacromial bursa, resulting in friction between the supraspinatus muscle and acromial ...
Supraspinatus- Medial attachment. supraspinuous fossa of scapula. Supraspinatus- lateral attachment. superior facet on the ... distal end of the clavicle, acromion process of scapula, spine of scapula. ... long head- supraclenoid tubercle of scapula, short head- corocoid process of scapula. ... Supraspinatus- function. abduction of the arm at the shoulder. Only effective during the first 80 degrees (approx.) of ...
Supraspinatus. supraspinous fossa of scapula. superior facet on greater tubercule of humerus. initiates abduction of arm, acts ... medial border & superior surface of coracoid process of scapula. stabilization of scapula (draws scapula inferiorly & ... protracts & rotates scapula. long thoracic nerve (C5-7). Deltoid. lateral third of clavicle, acromion, spine of scapula. ... short head: tip of coracoid process of scapula; long head: supraglenoid tubercle of scapula. tuberosity of radius & fascia of ...
Supraspinatus O: supraspinosus fossa of scapula. I: greater tubercle of humerus. N: suprascapular n. ... O: long head- infraglenoid tubercle of scapula, lateral and medial heads. I: olecranon of ulna. N: radial n. ... O: lateral border of scapula. I: greater tubercle of humerus. N: axillary n.. ... O: subscapular fossa of scapula. I: lesser tubercle of humerus. N: sub scapular n. ...
... supraspinatus explanation free. What is supraspinatus? Meaning of supraspinatus medical term. What does supraspinatus mean? ... Looking for online definition of supraspinatus in the Medical Dictionary? ... supraspinous fossa of scapula; insertion, greater tuberosity of humerus; action, initiates abduction of arm; its tonic ... Synonym(s): musculus supraspinatus [TA], supraspinous muscle. supraspinatus. [so̅o̅′prə·spī·nā′tus] Etymology: L, supra, above ...
The human scapula Supraspinatous fossa shown in red. Supraspinatous fossa shown in red. Supraspinatus muscle Scapula Clinically ... The supraspinatous fossa (supraspinatus fossa, supraspinous fossa) of the posterior aspect of the scapula is smaller than the ... Supraspinatus muscle originates from the supraspinatous fossa. Distal attachment of the levator scapulae muscle is also on the ... Its medial two-thirds give origin to the Supraspinatus. The fossa can be exposed by the removal of skin and the superficial ...
O-Upper two-thirds of lateral border of the scapula. I-same as supraspinatus & infraspinatus A-same as infraspinatus. You would ... O-Supraspinous fossa of the scapula. I- Greater tubercle of the humerus. A-Abduct the shoulder, stabalize head of humerous. 2. ... O-Subscapular fossa of the scapula. I- Lesser tubercle of the humerus. A-Medially rotate the shoulder, stabalize the head of ... O-Infraspinous fossa of scapula. I-same as superspinatus. A-Laterally rotates shoulder, adducts shoulder,stabilize the head of ...
Humerus - upper arm Glenoid cavity (scapula) Articular cartilage - hyaline protects *Acromation of scapula - clavicle Coracoid ... Supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, subscapularis ,/li,,/ul,,ul,,li,Encircle the joint & fuse with articular capsule ,/ ... scapula (head of humerous with glenoid cavity of scapula) ,/li,,/ul,,/ul,,ul,,ul,,li,distal end: ulna and radius at elbow joint ... Scapula (posterior) Function brace that holds scapula and arms to provide mobility for upper limbs Location attach to sternum ( ...
The intrinsic muscles of the scapula include the muscles of the rotator cuff-the subscapularis, teres minor, supraspinatus, and ... The name scapula might be related that due to existence of the spine of the scapula a concavity exist in the scapula. Otherwise ... In anatomy, the scapula (plural scapulae or scapulas; also known as shoulder blade or wing bone) is the bone that connects the ... In classical Latin scapula is only used in its plural scapulae. Although some sources mention that scapulae is used to refer ...
... its medial two-thirds give origin to the Supraspinatus. ... Figure 2 : Left scapula. Dorsal surface. Costal. The costal or ... ar:لوح الكتف ca:Omòplat de:Scapula eo:Skapolo gl:Omoplata id:Tulang belikat it:Scapola he:עצם השכם la:Scapula lt:Mentė hu: ... The posterior surface of the scapula is divided by a bony projection, the spina scapulae (opposite to the fossa subscapularis) ... SUNY Labs 10:st-0301 - "Joints of the Upper Extremity: Scapula. Sources. This article was originally based on an entry from a ...
At the craniomedial border of the scapula, at the origin of the supraspinatus ...
Note severe wasting of the right infraspinatus and deltoid and winging of the scapula. ...
Scapula - The shoulder blade; a flat and nearly triangular-shaped bone, which articulates with the clavicle anteriorly. ... Supraspinatus - A small muscle that extends from the supraspinous scapular fossa, with an attachment point atop the greater ... Shoulder blade - See scapula.. Subacromial bursa (subdeltoid bursa) - The large bursa lying between the acromion and the ... Teres minor - A muscle that extends medially from the lateral edge of the scapula, with an attachment point at the inferior ...
Coracoid process of scapula 3 . Position of facet on greater tubercle of humerus for tendon of supraspinatus muscle ... Relations of supraspinatus, infraspinatus and tres minor muscles to shoulder joint, superior view. For permissions information ... Relations of supraspinatus, infraspinatus and tres minor muscles to shoulder joint, superior view. ... The approximate positions of the insertions of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and teres minor muscles into the greater ...
supraspinatus muscle. Shoulder muscle. Origin: medial supraspinous fossa of scapula. Insertion: greater tubercle of humerus. ... Insertion: vertebral edge of scapula. Nerve: dorsal scapular (C4-C5). Action: pulls scapulae toward each other. ... Nerve: long thoracic (C5-C7). Action: pulls scapula forward (anterior) and laterally (abduction), rotates scapula upward. ... Action: elevates, retracts, and rotates scapula. See: face and headfor illus.. triangular muscle. A flat muscle with a broad ...
angle of scapula; - lower segments, together w/ serratius anterior clamp scapula to chest wal so that it cannot rotate or slip ... rhomboid minor is transferred to supraspinatus fossa; - replaces middle portion of trapezius; - rhomboid major is transferred ... rotation of scapula so glenoid cavity faces superior; - when acting with the other sections of trapezius it adducts scapula; - ... levator scapulae and rhomboids are identified; - each of these muscles are detatched from medial aspect of scapulae (along with ...
The shoulder joint model includes the clavicle, humerus, and scapula. Muscles depicted include the infraspinatus, subscapularis ... supraspinatus, and teres major and minor. Eight ligaments and tendons are also shown. This model allows manipulation of the ...
It arises from the supraspinatus fossa to eventually inserts on the greater tubercle of the humerus. Click to read more. ... Supraspinatus is a small muscle of the upper arm. Its one of the four muscles that make up the rotator cuff. ... Attachments of Supraspinatus :Origin & Insertion. Origin: (proximal attachments). a. Supraspinous fossa of the scapula. ... Supraspinatus Muscle. Supraspinatus is a small muscle of the upper arm. Its one of the four muscles that make up the rotator ...
  • Throughout the entire movement, the GH joint is externally rotated, and the scapula will drive the GH joint movement by superiorly rotating as the arms are extended above the head. (returnofkings.com)
  • The most medial border of the scapula (vertebral border) is approximately 5 cm from the vertebral column, although this distance varies depending on scapular protraction and retraction (Figures 1 and 2 ). (hindawi.com)
  • It also provides sensory innervation to both the glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints, the coracohumeral ligament, the subacromial bursa and the scapula. (usra.ca)