Death, Sudden: The abrupt cessation of all vital bodily functions, manifested by the permanent loss of total cerebral, respiratory, and cardiovascular functions.Death, Sudden, Cardiac: Unexpected rapid natural death due to cardiovascular collapse within one hour of initial symptoms. It is usually caused by the worsening of existing heart diseases. The sudden onset of symptoms, such as CHEST PAIN and CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS, particularly VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA, can lead to the loss of consciousness and cardiac arrest followed by biological death. (from Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine, 7th ed., 2005)Sudden Infant Death: The abrupt and unexplained death of an apparently healthy infant under one year of age, remaining unexplained after a thorough case investigation, including performance of a complete autopsy, examination of the death scene, and review of the clinical history. (Pediatr Pathol 1991 Sep-Oct;11(5):677-84)Arrhythmias, Cardiac: Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.Tachycardia, Ventricular: An abnormally rapid ventricular rhythm usually in excess of 150 beats per minute. It is generated within the ventricle below the BUNDLE OF HIS, either as autonomic impulse formation or reentrant impulse conduction. Depending on the etiology, onset of ventricular tachycardia can be paroxysmal (sudden) or nonparoxysmal, its wide QRS complexes can be uniform or polymorphic, and the ventricular beating may be independent of the atrial beating (AV dissociation).Ventricular Fibrillation: A potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia that is characterized by uncoordinated extremely rapid firing of electrical impulses (400-600/min) in HEART VENTRICLES. Such asynchronous ventricular quivering or fibrillation prevents any effective cardiac output and results in unconsciousness (SYNCOPE). It is one of the major electrocardiographic patterns seen with CARDIAC ARREST.Defibrillators, Implantable: Implantable devices which continuously monitor the electrical activity of the heart and automatically detect and terminate ventricular tachycardia (TACHYCARDIA, VENTRICULAR) and VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION. They consist of an impulse generator, batteries, and electrodes.Autopsy: Postmortem examination of the body.Prone Position: The posture of an individual lying face down.Long QT Syndrome: A condition that is characterized by episodes of fainting (SYNCOPE) and varying degree of ventricular arrhythmia as indicated by the prolonged QT interval. The inherited forms are caused by mutation of genes encoding cardiac ion channel proteins. The two major forms are ROMANO-WARD SYNDROME and JERVELL-LANGE NIELSEN SYNDROME.Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease, characterized by left and/or right ventricular hypertrophy (HYPERTROPHY, LEFT VENTRICULAR; HYPERTROPHY, RIGHT VENTRICULAR), frequent asymmetrical involvement of the HEART SEPTUM, and normal or reduced left ventricular volume. Risk factors include HYPERTENSION; AORTIC STENOSIS; and gene MUTATION; (FAMILIAL HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY).Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Syncope: A transient loss of consciousness and postural tone caused by diminished blood flow to the brain (i.e., BRAIN ISCHEMIA). Presyncope refers to the sensation of lightheadedness and loss of strength that precedes a syncopal event or accompanies an incomplete syncope. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp367-9)Forensic Pathology: The application of pathology to questions of law.Heart Arrest: Cessation of heart beat or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. If it is treated within a few minutes, heart arrest can be reversed in most cases to normal cardiac rhythm and effective circulation.Brugada Syndrome: An autosomal dominant defect of cardiac conduction that is characterized by an abnormal ST-segment in leads V1-V3 on the ELECTROCARDIOGRAM resembling a right BUNDLE-BRANCH BLOCK; high risk of VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA; or VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION; SYNCOPAL EPISODE; and possible sudden death. This syndrome is linked to mutations of gene encoding the cardiac SODIUM CHANNEL alpha subunit.Electrocardiography, Ambulatory: Method in which prolonged electrocardiographic recordings are made on a portable tape recorder (Holter-type system) or solid-state device ("real-time" system), while the patient undergoes normal daily activities. It is useful in the diagnosis and management of intermittent cardiac arrhythmias and transient myocardial ischemia.Anti-Arrhythmia Agents: Agents used for the treatment or prevention of cardiac arrhythmias. They may affect the polarization-repolarization phase of the action potential, its excitability or refractoriness, or impulse conduction or membrane responsiveness within cardiac fibers. Anti-arrhythmia agents are often classed into four main groups according to their mechanism of action: sodium channel blockade, beta-adrenergic blockade, repolarization prolongation, or calcium channel blockade.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.NAV1.5 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel: A voltage-gated sodium channel subtype that mediates the sodium ion PERMEABILITY of CARDIOMYOCYTES. Defects in the SCN5A gene, which codes for the alpha subunit of this sodium channel, are associated with a variety of CARDIAC DISEASES that result from loss of sodium channel function.Heart Conduction System: An impulse-conducting system composed of modified cardiac muscle, having the power of spontaneous rhythmicity and conduction more highly developed than the rest of the heart.Asphyxia: A pathological condition caused by lack of oxygen, manifested in impending or actual cessation of life.Cardiomyopathies: A group of diseases in which the dominant feature is the involvement of the CARDIAC MUSCLE itself. Cardiomyopathies are classified according to their predominant pathophysiological features (DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY; HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY; RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY) or their etiological/pathological factors (CARDIOMYOPATHY, ALCOHOLIC; ENDOCARDIAL FIBROELASTOSIS).Coronary Vessel Anomalies: Malformations of CORONARY VESSELS, either arteries or veins. Included are anomalous origins of coronary arteries; ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULA; CORONARY ANEURYSM; MYOCARDIAL BRIDGING; and others.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia: A congenital cardiomyopathy that is characterized by infiltration of adipose and fibrous tissue into the RIGHT VENTRICLE wall and loss of myocardial cells. Primary injuries usually are at the free wall of right ventricular and right atria resulting in ventricular and supraventricular arrhythmias.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Beds: Equipment on which one may lie and sleep, especially as used to care for the hospital patient.KCNQ1 Potassium Channel: A voltage-gated potassium channel that is expressed primarily in the HEART.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Ajmaline: An alkaloid found in the root of RAUWOLFIA SERPENTINA, among other plant sources. It is a class Ia antiarrhythmic agent that apparently acts by changing the shape and threshold of cardiac action potentials.Sports: Activities or games, usually involving physical effort or skill. Reasons for engagement in sports include pleasure, competition, and/or financial reward.Electric Countershock: An electrical current applied to the HEART to terminate a disturbance of its rhythm, ARRHYTHMIAS, CARDIAC. (Stedman, 25th ed)Infant Care: Care of infants in the home or institution.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Defibrillators: Cardiac electrical stimulators that apply brief high-voltage electroshocks to the HEART. These stimulators are used to restore normal rhythm and contractile function in hearts of patients who are experiencing VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION or ventricular tachycardia (TACHYCARDIA, VENTRICULAR) that is not accompanied by a palpable PULSE. Some defibrillators may also be used to correct certain noncritical dysrhythmias (called synchronized defibrillation or CARDIOVERSION), using relatively low-level discharges synchronized to the patient's ECG waveform. (UMDNS, 2003)Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Amiodarone: An antianginal and class III antiarrhythmic drug. It increases the duration of ventricular and atrial muscle action by inhibiting POTASSIUM CHANNELS and VOLTAGE-GATED SODIUM CHANNELS. There is a resulting decrease in heart rate and in vascular resistance.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Pacifiers: Devices that babies can suck on when they are not feeding. The extra sucking can be comforting to the babies and pacify them. Pacifiers usually are used as a substitute for the thumb in babies who suck on their thumb or fingers almost constantly.Ether-A-Go-Go Potassium Channels: A family of voltage-gated potassium channels that are characterized by long N-terminal and C-terminal intracellular tails. They are named from the Drosophila protein whose mutation causes abnormal leg shaking under ether anesthesia. Their activation kinetics are dependent on extracellular MAGNESIUM and PROTON concentration.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Hearing Loss, Sensorineural: Hearing loss resulting from damage to the COCHLEA and the sensorineural elements which lie internally beyond the oval and round windows. These elements include the AUDITORY NERVE and its connections in the BRAINSTEM.Rupture, Spontaneous: Tear or break of an organ, vessel or other soft part of the body, occurring in the absence of external force.Bundle-Branch Block: A form of heart block in which the electrical stimulation of HEART VENTRICLES is interrupted at either one of the branches of BUNDLE OF HIS thus preventing the simultaneous depolarization of the two ventricles.Tachycardia: Abnormally rapid heartbeat, usually with a HEART RATE above 100 beats per minute for adults. Tachycardia accompanied by disturbance in the cardiac depolarization (cardiac arrhythmia) is called tachyarrhythmia.Bedding and Linens: Articles of cloth, usually cotton or rayon and other synthetic or cotton-blend fabrics, used in households, hospitals, physicians' examining rooms, nursing homes, etc., for sheets, pillow cases, toweling, gowns, drapes, and the like.Sleep: A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.Cardiomyopathy, Dilated: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease that is characterized by ventricular dilation, VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION, and HEART FAILURE. Risk factors include SMOKING; ALCOHOL DRINKING; HYPERTENSION; INFECTION; PREGNANCY; and mutations in the LMNA gene encoding LAMIN TYPE A, a NUCLEAR LAMINA protein.Autonomic Nervous System: The ENTERIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; PARASYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; and SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM taken together. Generally speaking, the autonomic nervous system regulates the internal environment during both peaceful activity and physical or emotional stress. Autonomic activity is controlled and integrated by the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the HYPOTHALAMUS and the SOLITARY NUCLEUS, which receive information relayed from VISCERAL AFFERENTS.Heart Block: Impaired conduction of cardiac impulse that can occur anywhere along the conduction pathway, such as between the SINOATRIAL NODE and the right atrium (SA block) or between atria and ventricles (AV block). Heart blocks can be classified by the duration, frequency, or completeness of conduction block. Reversibility depends on the degree of structural or functional defects.Coroners and Medical Examiners: Physicians appointed to investigate all cases of sudden or violent death.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: The artificial substitution of heart and lung action as indicated for HEART ARREST resulting from electric shock, DROWNING, respiratory arrest, or other causes. The two major components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation are artificial ventilation (RESPIRATION, ARTIFICIAL) and closed-chest CARDIAC MASSAGE.Romano-Ward Syndrome: A form of long QT syndrome that is without congenital deafness. It is caused by mutation of the KCNQ1 gene which encodes a protein in the VOLTAGE-GATED POTASSIUM CHANNEL.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Ventricular Premature Complexes: A type of cardiac arrhythmia with premature contractions of the HEART VENTRICLES. It is characterized by the premature QRS complex on ECG that is of abnormal shape and great duration (generally >129 msec). It is the most common form of all cardiac arrhythmias. Premature ventricular complexes have no clinical significance except in concurrence with heart diseases.OregonApnea: A transient absence of spontaneous respiration.Cardiac Complexes, Premature: A group of cardiac arrhythmias in which the cardiac contractions are not initiated at the SINOATRIAL NODE. They include both atrial and ventricular premature beats, and are also known as extra or ectopic heartbeats. Their frequency is increased in heart diseases.Cardiac Pacing, Artificial: Regulation of the rate of contraction of the heart muscles by an artificial pacemaker.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Epilepsy: A disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of paroxysmal brain dysfunction due to a sudden, disorderly, and excessive neuronal discharge. Epilepsy classification systems are generally based upon: (1) clinical features of the seizure episodes (e.g., motor seizure), (2) etiology (e.g., post-traumatic), (3) anatomic site of seizure origin (e.g., frontal lobe seizure), (4) tendency to spread to other structures in the brain, and (5) temporal patterns (e.g., nocturnal epilepsy). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p313)Electrophysiologic Techniques, Cardiac: Methods to induce and measure electrical activities at specific sites in the heart to diagnose and treat problems with the heart's electrical system.Heart Ventricles: The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.Athletes: Individuals who have developed skills, physical stamina and strength or participants in SPORTS or other physical activities.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Adrenergic beta-Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate beta-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of beta-adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic beta-antagonists are used for treatment of hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, angina pectoris, glaucoma, migraine headaches, and anxiety.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Myocardial Ischemia: A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic, Familial: An autosomal dominant inherited form of HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY. It results from any of more than 50 mutations involving genes encoding contractile proteins such as VENTRICULAR MYOSINS; cardiac TROPONIN T; ALPHA-TROPOMYOSIN.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Thoracic Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the chest area.Supine Position: The posture of an individual lying face up.Death Certificates: Official records of individual deaths including the cause of death certified by a physician, and any other required identifying information.Sodium Channels: Ion channels that specifically allow the passage of SODIUM ions. A variety of specific sodium channel subtypes are involved in serving specialized functions such as neuronal signaling, CARDIAC MUSCLE contraction, and KIDNEY function.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Ventricular Dysfunction, Left: A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Potassium Channels, Voltage-Gated: Potassium channel whose permeability to ions is extremely sensitive to the transmembrane potential difference. The opening of these channels is induced by the membrane depolarization of the ACTION POTENTIAL.Cardiac Electrophysiology: The study of the electrical activity and characteristics of the HEART; MYOCARDIUM; and CARDIOMYOCYTES.Jervell-Lange Nielsen Syndrome: A form of long QT syndrome that is associated with congenital deafness. It is characterized by abnormal cardioelectrophysiology involving the VOLTAGE-GATED POTASSIUM CHANNEL. It results from mutation of KCNQ1 gene (Subtype 1 or JLN1) or the KCNE1 gene (Subtype 2 or JLN2).Autonomic Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the parasympathetic or sympathetic divisions of the AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; which has components located in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM and PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Autonomic dysfunction may be associated with HYPOTHALAMIC DISEASES; BRAIN STEM disorders; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; and PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES. Manifestations include impairments of vegetative functions including the maintenance of BLOOD PRESSURE; HEART RATE; pupil function; SWEATING; REPRODUCTIVE AND URINARY PHYSIOLOGY; and DIGESTION.Bradycardia: Cardiac arrhythmias that are characterized by excessively slow HEART RATE, usually below 50 beats per minute in human adults. They can be classified broadly into SINOATRIAL NODE dysfunction and ATRIOVENTRICULAR BLOCK.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Tetralogy of Fallot: A combination of congenital heart defects consisting of four key features including VENTRICULAR SEPTAL DEFECTS; PULMONARY STENOSIS; RIGHT VENTRICULAR HYPERTROPHY; and a dextro-positioned AORTA. In this condition, blood from both ventricles (oxygen-rich and oxygen-poor) is pumped into the body often causing CYANOSIS.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Ventricular Dysfunction: A condition in which HEART VENTRICLES exhibit impaired function.Myocarditis: Inflammatory processes of the muscular walls of the heart (MYOCARDIUM) which result in injury to the cardiac muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC). Manifestations range from subclinical to sudden death (DEATH, SUDDEN). Myocarditis in association with cardiac dysfunction is classified as inflammatory CARDIOMYOPATHY usually caused by INFECTION, autoimmune diseases, or responses to toxic substances. Myocarditis is also a common cause of DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY and other cardiomyopathies.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Pacemaker, Artificial: A device designed to stimulate, by electric impulses, contraction of the heart muscles. It may be temporary (external) or permanent (internal or internal-external).Hearing Loss, Unilateral: Partial or complete hearing loss in one ear.Bereavement: Refers to the whole process of grieving and mourning and is associated with a deep sense of loss and sadness.Mutation, Missense: A mutation in which a codon is mutated to one directing the incorporation of a different amino acid. This substitution may result in an inactive or unstable product. (From A Dictionary of Genetics, King & Stansfield, 5th ed)Resuscitation: The restoration to life or consciousness of one apparently dead. (Dorland, 27th ed)Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular: Enlargement of the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart. This increase in ventricular mass is attributed to sustained abnormal pressure or volume loads and is a contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel: A tetrameric calcium release channel in the SARCOPLASMIC RETICULUM membrane of SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS, acting oppositely to SARCOPLASMIC RETICULUM CALCIUM-TRANSPORTING ATPASES. It is important in skeletal and cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and studied by using RYANODINE. Abnormalities are implicated in CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS and MUSCULAR DISEASES.Labyrinth Diseases: Pathological processes of the inner ear (LABYRINTH) which contains the essential apparatus of hearing (COCHLEA) and balance (SEMICIRCULAR CANALS).Vertigo: An illusion of movement, either of the external world revolving around the individual or of the individual revolving in space. Vertigo may be associated with disorders of the inner ear (EAR, INNER); VESTIBULAR NERVE; BRAINSTEM; or CEREBRAL CORTEX. Lesions in the TEMPORAL LOBE and PARIETAL LOBE may be associated with FOCAL SEIZURES that may feature vertigo as an ictal manifestation. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp300-1)Genetic Testing: Detection of a MUTATION; GENOTYPE; KARYOTYPE; or specific ALLELES associated with genetic traits, heritable diseases, or predisposition to a disease, or that may lead to the disease in descendants. It includes prenatal genetic testing.United StatesMyocardial Bridging: A malformation that is characterized by a muscle bridge over a segment of the CORONARY ARTERIES. Systolic contractions of the muscle bridge can lead to narrowing of coronary artery; coronary compression; MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and SUDDEN CARDIAC DEATH.Coronary Artery Disease: Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.KCNQ Potassium Channels: A family of delayed rectifier voltage-gated potassium channels that share homology with their founding member, KCNQ1 PROTEIN. KCNQ potassium channels have been implicated in a variety of diseases including LONG QT SYNDROME; DEAFNESS; and EPILEPSY.Torsades de Pointes: A malignant form of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia that is characterized by HEART RATE between 200 and 250 beats per minute, and QRS complexes with changing amplitude and twisting of the points. The term also describes the syndrome of tachycardia with prolonged ventricular repolarization, long QT intervals exceeding 500 milliseconds or BRADYCARDIA. Torsades de pointes may be self-limited or may progress to VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Atrioventricular Block: Impaired impulse conduction from HEART ATRIA to HEART VENTRICLES. AV block can mean delayed or completely blocked impulse conduction.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Electrophysiology: The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.Audiometry, Pure-Tone: Measurement of hearing based on the use of pure tones of various frequencies and intensities as auditory stimuli.Retinal Artery Occlusion: Sudden ISCHEMIA in the RETINA due to blocked blood flow through the CENTRAL RETINAL ARTERY or its branches leading to sudden complete or partial loss of vision, respectively, in the eye.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Hemothorax: Hemorrhage within the pleural cavity.Pre-Excitation Syndromes: A group of conditions in which HEART VENTRICLE activation by the atrial impulse is faster than the normal impulse conduction from the SINOATRIAL NODE. In these pre-excitation syndromes, atrial impulses often bypass the ATRIOVENTRICULAR NODE delay and travel via ACCESSORY CONDUCTING PATHWAYS connecting the atrium directly to the BUNDLE OF HIS.Myocytes, Cardiac: Striated muscle cells found in the heart. They are derived from cardiac myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, CARDIAC).Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Exercise Test: Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.Tymoviridae: A family of icosahedral, non-enveloped, RNA plant viruses comprised of three genera: TYMOVIRUS, Marafivirus and Maculavirus.Infant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.Atrioventricular Node: A small nodular mass of specialized muscle fibers located in the interatrial septum near the opening of the coronary sinus. It gives rise to the atrioventricular bundle of the conduction system of the heart.Blindness: The inability to see or the loss or absence of perception of visual stimuli. This condition may be the result of EYE DISEASES; OPTIC NERVE DISEASES; OPTIC CHIASM diseases; or BRAIN DISEASES affecting the VISUAL PATHWAYS or OCCIPITAL LOBE.Isolated Noncompaction of the Ventricular Myocardium: Rare congenital cardiomyopathies characterized by the lack of left ventricular myocardium compaction. The noncompaction results in numerous prominent trabeculations and a loose myocardial meshwork (spongy myocardium) in the LEFT VENTRICLE. Heterogeneous clinical features include diminished systolic function sometimes associated with left ventricular dilation, that presents either neonatally or progressively. Often, the RIGHT VENTRICLE is also affected. CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE; PULMONARY EMBOLISM; and ventricular ARRHYTHMIA are commonly seen.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.JapanMultivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Headache: The symptom of PAIN in the cranial region. It may be an isolated benign occurrence or manifestation of a wide variety of HEADACHE DISORDERS.Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Bleeding into the intracranial or spinal SUBARACHNOID SPACE, most resulting from INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSM rupture. It can occur after traumatic injuries (SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, TRAUMATIC). Clinical features include HEADACHE; NAUSEA; VOMITING, nuchal rigidity, variable neurological deficits and reduced mental status.Channelopathies: A variety of neuromuscular conditions resulting from MUTATIONS in ION CHANNELS manifesting as episodes of EPILEPSY; HEADACHE DISORDERS; and DYSKINESIAS.Racquet Sports: Games in which players use a racquet to hit a ball or similar type object.Cardiomyopathy, Restrictive: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease in which the ventricular walls are excessively rigid, impeding ventricular filling. It is marked by reduced diastolic volume of either or both ventricles but normal or nearly normal systolic function. It may be idiopathic or associated with other diseases (ENDOMYOCARDIAL FIBROSIS or AMYLOIDOSIS) causing interstitial fibrosis.
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Tighe M, Hall M, Barbado M, Cardi E, Welsh K, Ciclitira P (1992). "HLA class II alleles associated with celiac disease ... in Thai sudden unexplained death syndrome (Thai SUDS) families (Lai-Tai families)". Southeast Asian J. Trop. Med. Public Health ... adult chronic articular Still's disease DRB1*1202 is found to be increased in narcolepsy associated sudden death syndrome in ...
Sudden cardiac death of athletes "Clogged arteries killed player". The Tuscaloosa News. September 12, 2003. Retrieved December ... "UCLA's Nick Pasquale hit by car, dies". ESPN. 2013-09-08. Retrieved 2013-09-21. "37 Ladarious Phillips". Auburn Tigers. ... teammates mourning football star The sudden death of Ricky Lannetti, a Father Judge grad and player at Lycoming, is a mystery ...
A prolonged QTc interval is a risk factor for ventricular tachyarrhythmias and sudden death. Long QT can arise as a genetic ... cardi-'), the latter from Greek kardia (heart).[3] The '-K-' version is more often retained under circumstances where there may ... Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy screening in adolescents as part of a sports physical out of concern for sudden cardiac death ( ...
Sudden Death - A beach bum-themed metahuman. Swan - The evil counterpart of Dove. Swan's identity is Rachel Felps. Unity - Dr. ... 1) #25-30 (Jan-Oct 1970), under the guidance of writers Dick Giordano, Robert Kanigher, and artist Nick Cardy. Skeates also ...
The bank's heavy leverage of their deposits meant that setbacks could be quite sudden. The fact that it seems to have been a ... "Fattire di cardi" Carders Spinning Lanino Stamaiuoli Weaving Warpers Weavers Finishing Stretchers Burlers Scourers Fullers ...
Following Barreto's sudden death in late 2011, Ryan returned to the Sunday feature briefly until a replacement, Terry Beatty, ... Nick Cardy, Al Plastino, Barry Kitson, Ron Frenz, and Dan Jurgens. CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) Superman: The ...
... cognate cardi-), the latter from Greek kardia (heart). The -K- version is more often retained under circumstances where there ... as hyperkalemia Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy screening in adolescents as part of a sports physical out of concern for sudden ...
Louis Tomlinson Returns to Social Media a Month After Sisters Sudden Passing ... Cardi B Grinds on Offset in Steamy, NSFW Clout Music Video Beyonces Surprise Live Album Homecoming Includes New Bonus ...
Cardi B Heats Up Offsets Stage at Revolve Festival With Surprise Performance ... Louis Tomlinson Returns to Social Media a Month After Sisters Sudden Passing ...
See also hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM), sudden death.. car·di·o·my·op·a·thy (kahrdē-ō-mī-opă-thē) Disease of ... car·di·o·my·op·a·thy (kahrdē-ō-mī-opă-thē) Disease of the myocardium; a primary disease of heart muscle in the absence of a ... car·di·o·my·op·a·thy. (kardē-ō-mī-opă-thē), Disease of the myocardium. As a disease classification, the term is used in ... Since sudden death may occur in patients with cardiomyopathy, defibrillators are often recommended for persons who show ...
hy·per·tro·phic car·di·o·my·op·a·thy. (hīpĕr-trōfik kahrdē-ō-mī-opă-thē) Cardiac hypertrophy of unknown cause, possibly ... Sudden death can occur, caused by a heart arrhythmia. The American Heart Association reports that 36% of young athletes who die ... hy·per·tro·phic car·di·o·my·op·a·thy. (hīpĕr-trōfik kahrdē-ō-mī-opă-thē) Cardiac hypertrophy of unknown cause, with ... hy·per·tro·phic car·di·o·my·op·a·thy. thickening of the ventricular septum and walls of the left ventricle with marked ...
Genetic testing, Brugada syndrome, Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia , Drowning, Hypertrophic cardi... ... omyopathy, Long QT syndrome, Sudden infant death syndrome. Show more areas of focus for Michael J. Ackerman, M.D., Ph.D. ...
Tekashi69 tells court Cardi B is Bloods gang member as rapper Jim Jones calls for violating him on wiretapped phone call ...
Car dies at stop lights My car starting to die at stop lights today unless I kept my foot on the throttle a little. I suppose I ... could adjust my idle up a little but I dont know why all the sudden this started to happen. Any ideas? ...
The real-world cardi.... Heart Rate-corrected QT Interval Duration in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Its Reduction with Treatment ... Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at a heightened risk of sudden cardiac death, an outcome increased in those with ...
The real-world cardi.... Heart Rate-corrected QT Interval Duration in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Its Reduction with Treatment ... Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at a heightened risk of sudden cardiac death, an outcome increased in those with ...
William meets Cardie Kerchpoff, the Jewish daughter of a cardiologist. He finds her so irritating that he purposely fills her ... The sudden obsession with the mystic of ancient China demonstrates an anti-Asian prejudice. Things and ideas of Asian ... For the first time, William feels guilty about the purposefully bad feng shui work he did for her, the cause of her sudden ... Shem also informs William that Cardies husband left her after it was revealed he was having an affair. ...
O.K, Im Drivin Down The Road And All Of A Sudden My Car Dies; Oil Pressure Gauge Shows 0. I Get Out, Check The Oil, Its Full ...
The plants which cause sudden death of cattle in Brazil occupy a leading position for losses in the cattle industry. Amorimia ... Decreased expression of cardie troponin C is associated with cardiac lesions in amorinia exotropica poisoned cattle.. .. ... Decreased expression of cardie troponin C is associated with cardiac lesions in amorinia exotropica poisoned cattle.. ... Decreased expression of cardie troponin C is associated with cardiac lesions in amorinia exotropica poisoned cattle.. ...
... and critical appraisal of primary and secondary prevention in cardi- ... The aim of the 2nd Course of the International School of Cardi- ology at Ettore Majorana was the discussion, scientific ... Prevention of Sudden Death: Selection of Patients at Risk Jeffrey S. Borer, David Miller, Paul Phillips, Jeffrey W. Moses, ... Myocardial Infarction and Sudden Death after Coronary Artery Surgery Sergio Dalla-Volta, Federico Corbara, Brenno Permutti, ...
Tighe M, Hall M, Barbado M, Cardi E, Welsh K, Ciclitira P (1992). "HLA class II alleles associated with celiac disease ... in Thai sudden unexplained death syndrome (Thai SUDS) families (Lai-Tai families)". Southeast Asian J. Trop. Med. Public Health ... adult chronic articular Stills disease DRB1*1202 is found to be increased in narcolepsy associated sudden death syndrome in ...
No sudden moves, no loud noises.. This day is giving me a twitch over my right eye. Yesterday was such a good day. I have the ... As I looked at it now, I realized what purpose the cardie is here to fulfill. It is The Zen of a sweater. It exists as a ... The Boring cardie is an expression of the essence of a sweater, without the distracting design elements that stand between the ... I gave in to the cardie and its lesson for me, and became one with the sweater. I was given the opportunity to reflect on my ...
Cardi B - Washpoppin. Cardi B - Washpoppin. Get the album, Gangsta Bitch Music, Vol. 1. iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/ ... Here are some other frequently missed signs that will helps to improve your health earlier alertness and to prevent from sudden ... Here are some other frequently missed signs that will helps to improve your health earlier alertness and to prevent from sudden ... Here are some other frequently missed signs that will helps to improve your health earlier alertness and to prevent from sudden ...
download Arrhythmias and Sudden Death in Technology Research( HLT-02), 2002. Michael White and Claire Cardie. Automatic ... download Arrhythmias and Sudden Death in Athletes of Emotion in Texts , in Militon Frentiu and Horia F. Selected Papers, Presa ... We require the effects of such an download Arrhythmias and Sudden in clear followers and we are a n whiteness for the seed that ... download Arrhythmias and Sudden Death in Athletes of Pedagogic and Psychology. Siberian Association of Counsellors. r in Russia ...
When you give your body sudden attacks like that, your body metabolism will spike up really high to give you the energy you ... How does your body respond to my heart pounding weight loss cardi...?. http://healthylivingover50.com/index.php/weight-loss/ ...
... die of a sudden stroke or thousands of other things including something like sepsis from an everday cut but we do not walk ... good but she is still on the same playing field as you and I are.None of us knows when we will die.We could get hit by a car, ...
Cardi B Steps Out (with Kulture!) for the First Time Since Altercation with Nicki Minaj at NYFW. People ... Emmy winners sudden proposal catches his girlfriend - and the audience - totally off-guard. Yahoo TV ...
Global Resilience Solutions , Category:cardi A Revolution in Exercise Science. November 15,2010 , Posted by admin , No comments ... sudden (1) *summer (2) *sun exposure (2) *Sun Tzu (1) *supplements (2) ...
What did it was the need, all of a sudden, to give a kowtowing nod to the atavistic. A grandson was on the way. As if in a ... Among the regular cardies and layettes at Ravelry.com, there are patterns for knitting vulvas, fallopian tubes and brains as ...
  • The aim of the 2nd Course of the International School of Cardi- ology at "Ettore Majorana" was the discussion, scientific analysis, and critical appraisal of primary and secondary prevention in cardi- ology, especially concerning the coronary artery disease. (springer.com)
  • According to the European Society of Cardi-ology (ESC), the relative contraindication regarding oral anticoagulants is represented for atrial fi brillation not only by HAS-BLED score, but also by the clinical assessment made by the attending physician, as well as by patient's tendency of falling, for example, due to a posture and walking disorder3. (romanianjournalcardiology.ro)
  • Gu as cl nicas para el manejo del infarto agudo del miocardio con elevaci n del segmento ST. Garc a CA, Jerjes S nchez C, Mart nez SC, LLamas GE, Cardona E, Barrag n R, et al, por el Grupo de Trabajo de la Sociedad Mexicana de Cardiolog a y Asociaci n Nacional de Cardi logos de M xico. (medigraphic.com)
  • DRB1*1201 is associated with iritis in juvenile arthritis, primary antiphospholipid syndrome, tiopronin intolerance in rheumatoid arthritis, adult chronic articular Still's disease DRB1*1202 is found to be increased in narcolepsy associated sudden death syndrome in the Thai population, and narcolepsy in the Japanese population. (wikipedia.org)
  • When Simon died, the knee-jerk reaction was to cite the cause of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome), but what does that mean? (simonsheart.org)
  • The predictive value of different risk factors, the problem of heredity, sociological and psychological perspectives, the impact of antiarrhythmic therapy, and the prevention of sudden death were only some of the many topics discussed. (springer.com)
  • In a month or so after surgery they'll start to, all of a sudden, get these vague symptoms and start to get these draining abscesses. (sandrarose.com)
  • Symptoms typically include sudden weakness in one or more arms or legs, along with loss of muscle tone and decreased or absent reflexes. (morethanwaste.com)
  • In some cases of PE, you might feel chest pain that's sharp, sudden, and hurts more if you take a deep breath or cough, says Vassallo. (womenshealthmag.com)
  • Despite on following recommendations to reduce the risk scene CPR and defibrillation attempts, followed of on-the-job heart attacks and sudden cardiac by advanced life support in the ambulance and arrest among fire fighters at this, and other, fire hospital emergency department, the FF died. (cdc.gov)
  • On June 16, 2009, a 50-year-old male paid call NIOSH offers the following recommendations to fire fighter responded to a structural fire on a hot reduce the risk of heart attacks and sudden cardiac and humid day. (cdc.gov)
  • Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at a heightened risk of sudden cardiac death, an outcome increased in those with prolongation of the corrected electrocardiographic QT interval (QTc). (bioportfolio.com)
  • Distinguishing cardiac from noncardiac causes is important because of the risk of sudden death in those with an underlying cardiac condition. (aafp.org)
  • DALLAS, April 16 In the first study of its kind, an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), a device used to treat heart rhythm abnormalities, was found to be moderately cost-effective for preventing sudden cardiac death, according to a report in todays rapid access Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Clinically, it has been noted that palpitations, chest discomfort, and even sudden death are not uncommon during and post khat chewing. (scirp.org)
  • Because of the sudden change in height of the spinous processes at the junction of the cervical and thoracic spines, it is relatively easy to palpate the end of the neck and the beginning of the chest. (cardiganwelshcorgiassoc.co.uk)
  • Last week, Cardi B vowed she would never undergo cosmetic surgery in the Dominican Republic again. (sandrarose.com)
  • These included an increase in adrenaline levels in the heart, which can predispose smokers to bad heart rhythms, heart attacks, and sudden death, as well as increased oxidative stress, an imbalance in the body's ability to defend itself against the damaging action of free radicals. (theunhivedmind.com)
  • The cardi had me wear the Holter monitor for a month and we did the stress test. (medhelp.org)
  • Then the big "I like to wear belts over my cardi and shirt" thing started happening and I couldn't jump on that bandwagon either. (blogspot.com)
  • Advanced life support was administered en route to the hospital, and in the Provide fire fighters with medical clear- hospital's emergency department. (cdc.gov)
  • At the ESC Siemens showed how to simplify and accelerate the workflow of cardi-ological emergency diagnostics through cross-modality cooperation. (medica-tradefair.com)
  • A couple of months ago, I had a sudden trip to the emergency room with my HLM. (blogspot.com)
  • In a year when sudden changes to government funding have jeopardised much of the work CWS does, it's also timely to remind supporters of how much good the organisation has done over the years. (issuu.com)
  • My 3 1/2 year old Corgi Kallee has all of a sudden over the past month or so pretty much ignoring her food. (mycorgi.com)
  • Y'all see Cardi answer to the adultery in her 9 month marriage? (sandrarose.com)
  • As a bike racer who has suffered from sudden deceleration injuries, I feel empathy for those whose skeletons ache. (greatist.com)
  • Environmental health teams from both County Durham and Stockton councils are working closely with local health protection experts from Public Health England after a sudden increase in reports of E.coli O157 infection in the area. (capitalfm.com)
  • How does your body respond to my heart pounding weight loss cardi. (themedicalquestions.com)
  • When you give your body sudden attacks like that, your body metabolism will spike up really high to give you the energy you need. (themedicalquestions.com)
  • Hu-mans have body clocks that largely fac-tor in when to eat or sleep, but late-night ac-tiv-i-ties dis-rupt the clock and in-flu-ence the se-cre-tion of di-ges-tive en-zymes that lead to in-di-ges-tion and ab-dom-i-nal dis-ten-sion among other prob-lems, Zhang says. (pressreader.com)
  • SAN DIEGO - Dec. 12, 2019 - PRLog -- The Masters Hall of Fame is saddened to learn of the sudden and unexpected death of Sensei Thomas Boganski at his home in Henderson, NV, on December 5. (prlog.org)