Dextrans: A group of glucose polymers made by certain bacteria. Dextrans are used therapeutically as plasma volume expanders and anticoagulants. They are also commonly used in biological experimentation and in industry for a wide variety of purposes.Sucrose: A nonreducing disaccharide composed of GLUCOSE and FRUCTOSE linked via their anomeric carbons. It is obtained commercially from SUGARCANE, sugar beet (BETA VULGARIS), and other plants and used extensively as a food and a sweetener.Dextran Sulfate: Long-chain polymer of glucose containing 17-20% sulfur. It has been used as an anticoagulant and also has been shown to inhibit the binding of HIV-1 to CD4-POSITIVE T-LYMPHOCYTES. It is commonly used as both an experimental and clinical laboratory reagent and has been investigated for use as an antiviral agent, in the treatment of hypolipidemia, and for the prevention of free radical damage, among other applications.Dietary Sucrose: Sucrose present in the diet. It is added to food and drinks as a sweetener.Iron-Dextran Complex: A complex of ferric oxyhydroxide with dextrans of 5000 to 7000 daltons in a viscous solution containing 50 mg/ml of iron. It is supplied as a parenteral preparation and is used as a hematinic. (Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1292)Colitis: Inflammation of the COLON section of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE), usually with symptoms such as DIARRHEA (often with blood and mucus), ABDOMINAL PAIN, and FEVER.Centrifugation, Density Gradient: Separation of particles according to density by employing a gradient of varying densities. At equilibrium each particle settles in the gradient at a point equal to its density. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Glucosyltransferases: Enzymes that catalyze the transfer of glucose from a nucleoside diphosphate glucose to an acceptor molecule which is frequently another carbohydrate. EC 2.4.1.-.DextranaseSweetening Agents: Substances that sweeten food, beverages, medications, etc., such as sugar, saccharine or other low-calorie synthetic products. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Fructose: A monosaccharide in sweet fruits and honey that is soluble in water, alcohol, or ether. It is used as a preservative and an intravenous infusion in parenteral feeding.beta-Fructofuranosidase: A glycoside hydrolase found primarily in PLANTS and YEASTS. It has specificity for beta-D-fructofuranosides such as SUCROSE.Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate: Fluorescent probe capable of being conjugated to tissue and proteins. It is used as a label in fluorescent antibody staining procedures as well as protein- and amino acid-binding techniques.DEAE-Dextran: Used as a support for ion-exchange chromatography.Taste: The ability to detect chemicals through gustatory receptors in the mouth, including those on the TONGUE; the PALATE; the PHARYNX; and the EPIGLOTTIS.Glucaric Acid: A sugar acid derived from D-glucose in which both the aldehydic carbon atom and the carbon atom bearing the primary hydroxyl group are oxidized to carboxylic acid groups.Starch: Any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula (C6-H10-O5)n, composed of a long-chain polymer of glucose in the form of amylose and amylopectin. It is the chief storage form of energy reserve (carbohydrates) in plants.Isomaltose: A disaccharide consisting of two glucose units in an alpha (1-6) glycosidic linkage.Streptococcus mutans: A polysaccharide-producing species of STREPTOCOCCUS isolated from human dental plaque.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Carbohydrate Metabolism: Cellular processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of CARBOHYDRATES.Colon: The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between the CECUM and the RECTUM. It includes the ASCENDING COLON; the TRANSVERSE COLON; the DESCENDING COLON; and the SIGMOID COLON.Leuconostoc: A genus of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic bacteria whose growth is dependent on the presence of a fermentable carbohydrate. It is nonpathogenic to plants and animals, including humans.SucraseFructans: Polysaccharides composed of D-fructose units.Glucans: Polysaccharides composed of repeating glucose units. They can consist of branched or unbranched chains in any linkages.Food Preferences: The selection of one food over another.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Cell Fractionation: Techniques to partition various components of the cell into SUBCELLULAR FRACTIONS.Dietary Carbohydrates: Carbohydrates present in food comprising digestible sugars and starches and indigestible cellulose and other dietary fibers. The former are the major source of energy. The sugars are in beet and cane sugar, fruits, honey, sweet corn, corn syrup, milk and milk products, etc.; the starches are in cereal grains, legumes (FABACEAE), tubers, etc. (From Claudio & Lagua, Nutrition and Diet Therapy Dictionary, 3d ed, p32, p277)Permeability: Property of membranes and other structures to permit passage of light, heat, gases, liquids, metabolites, and mineral ions.Osmotic Pressure: The pressure required to prevent the passage of solvent through a semipermeable membrane that separates a pure solvent from a solution of the solvent and solute or that separates different concentrations of a solution. It is proportional to the osmolality of the solution.Cariogenic Agents: Substances that promote DENTAL CARIES.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Intestinal Mucosa: Lining of the INTESTINES, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. In the SMALL INTESTINE, the mucosa is characterized by a series of folds and abundance of absorptive cells (ENTEROCYTES) with MICROVILLI.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Maltose: A dextrodisaccharide from malt and starch. It is used as a sweetening agent and fermentable intermediate in brewing. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Sodium Chloride: A ubiquitous sodium salt that is commonly used to season food.Raffinose: A trisaccharide occurring in Australian manna (from Eucalyptus spp, Myrtaceae) and in cottonseed meal.Capillary Permeability: The property of blood capillary ENDOTHELIUM that allows for the selective exchange of substances between the blood and surrounding tissues and through membranous barriers such as the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER; BLOOD-AQUEOUS BARRIER; BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER; BLOOD-NERVE BARRIER; BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER; and BLOOD-TESTIS BARRIER. Small lipid-soluble molecules such as carbon dioxide and oxygen move freely by diffusion. Water and water-soluble molecules cannot pass through the endothelial walls and are dependent on microscopic pores. These pores show narrow areas (TIGHT JUNCTIONS) which may limit large molecule movement.Osmolar Concentration: The concentration of osmotically active particles in solution expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per liter of solution. Osmolality is expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per kilogram of solvent.Glucose: A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.Hypertonic Solutions: Solutions that have a greater osmotic pressure than a reference solution such as blood, plasma, or interstitial fluid.Osmosis: Tendency of fluids (e.g., water) to move from the less concentrated to the more concentrated side of a semipermeable membrane.Mice, Inbred C57BLDisease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Ferric Compounds: Inorganic or organic compounds containing trivalent iron.Plasma Substitutes: Any liquid used to replace blood plasma, usually a saline solution, often with serum albumins, dextrans or other preparations. These substances do not enhance the oxygen- carrying capacity of blood, but merely replace the volume. They are also used to treat dehydration.Glycoside HydrolasesCarbohydrates: The largest class of organic compounds, including STARCH; GLYCOGEN; CELLULOSE; POLYSACCHARIDES; and simple MONOSACCHARIDES. Carbohydrates are composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen in a ratio of Cn(H2O)n.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Ficoll: A sucrose polymer of high molecular weight.Laryngeal Edema: Abnormal accumulation of fluid in tissues of any part of the LARYNX, commonly associated with laryngeal injuries and allergic reactions.Fluorescent Dyes: Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.PolysaccharidesLaryngismus: A disorder in which the adductor muscles of the VOCAL CORDS exhibit increased activity leading to laryngeal spasm. Laryngismus causes closure of the VOCAL FOLDS and airflow obstruction during inspiration.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Inulin: A starch found in the tubers and roots of many plants. Since it is hydrolyzable to FRUCTOSE, it is classified as a fructosan. It has been used in physiologic investigation for determination of the rate of glomerular function.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Fluoresceins: A family of spiro(isobenzofuran-1(3H),9'-(9H)xanthen)-3-one derivatives. These are used as dyes, as indicators for various metals, and as fluorescent labels in immunoassays.Phloem: Plant tissue that carries nutrients, especially sucrose, by turgor pressure. Movement is bidirectional, in contrast to XYLEM where it is only upward. Phloem originates and grows outwards from meristematic cells (MERISTEM) in the vascular cambium. P-proteins, a type of LECTINS, are characteristically found in phloem.Hemodilution: Reduction of blood viscosity usually by the addition of cell free solutions. Used clinically (1) in states of impaired microcirculation, (2) for replacement of intraoperative blood loss without homologous blood transfusion, and (3) in cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Streptococcus: A genus of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria whose organisms occur in pairs or chains. No endospores are produced. Many species exist as commensals or parasites on man or animals with some being highly pathogenic. A few species are saprophytes and occur in the natural environment.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Cell Membrane Permeability: A quality of cell membranes which permits the passage of solvents and solutes into and out of cells.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Fructokinases: A class of enzymes that catalyzes the phosphorylation of fructose in the presence of ATP. EC 2.7.1.-.Cryoprotective Agents: Substances that provide protection against the harmful effects of freezing temperatures.Heparin: A highly acidic mucopolysaccharide formed of equal parts of sulfated D-glucosamine and D-glucuronic acid with sulfaminic bridges. The molecular weight ranges from six to twenty thousand. Heparin occurs in and is obtained from liver, lung, mast cells, etc., of vertebrates. Its function is unknown, but it is used to prevent blood clotting in vivo and vitro, in the form of many different salts.Erythrocyte Aggregation: The formation of clumps of RED BLOOD CELLS under low or non-flow conditions, resulting from the attraction forces between the red blood cells. The cells adhere to each other in rouleaux aggregates. Slight mechanical force, such as occurs in the circulation, is enough to disperse these aggregates. Stronger or weaker than normal aggregation may result from a variety of effects in the ERYTHROCYTE MEMBRANE or in BLOOD PLASMA. The degree of aggregation is affected by ERYTHROCYTE DEFORMABILITY, erythrocyte membrane sialylation, masking of negative surface charge by plasma proteins, etc. BLOOD VISCOSITY and the ERYTHROCYTE SEDIMENTATION RATE are affected by the amount of erythrocyte aggregation and are parameters used to measure the aggregation.Pinocytosis: The engulfing of liquids by cells by a process of invagination and closure of the cell membrane to form fluid-filled vacuoles.Disaccharides: Oligosaccharides containing two monosaccharide units linked by a glycosidic bond.Viscosity: The resistance that a gaseous or liquid system offers to flow when it is subjected to shear stress. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)TrehaloseMannitol: A diuretic and renal diagnostic aid related to sorbitol. It has little significant energy value as it is largely eliminated from the body before any metabolism can take place. It can be used to treat oliguria associated with kidney failure or other manifestations of inadequate renal function and has been used for determination of glomerular filtration rate. Mannitol is also commonly used as a research tool in cell biological studies, usually to control osmolarity.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Solubility: The ability of a substance to be dissolved, i.e. to form a solution with another substance. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Taste Threshold: The minimum concentration at which taste sensitivity to a particular substance or food can be perceived.DextrinsQuinine: An alkaloid derived from the bark of the cinchona tree. It is used as an antimalarial drug, and is the active ingredient in extracts of the cinchona that have been used for that purpose since before 1633. Quinine is also a mild antipyretic and analgesic and has been used in common cold preparations for that purpose. It was used commonly and as a bitter and flavoring agent, and is still useful for the treatment of babesiosis. Quinine is also useful in some muscular disorders, especially nocturnal leg cramps and myotonia congenita, because of its direct effects on muscle membrane and sodium channels. The mechanisms of its antimalarial effects are not well understood.Diffusion: The tendency of a gas or solute to pass from a point of higher pressure or concentration to a point of lower pressure or concentration and to distribute itself throughout the available space. Diffusion, especially FACILITATED DIFFUSION, is a major mechanism of BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT.
Injectable forms include iron dextran and iron sucrose. They work by providing the iron needed for making red blood cells. Iron ... This has included dextrans, sucrose, carboxymaltose and more recently Isomaltoside 1000.[citation needed] One formulation of ... and the much safer low molecular iron dextrans (tradenames including Cosmofer and Infed). Iron sucrose (trade names including ... It is in complex with gluconate, dextran, carbonyl iron, and other salts. Ascorbic acid, vitamin C, increases the absorption of ...
Responsible exogenous solutes include sucrose-containing IVIg, mannitol, dextran, contrast dye, and hydroxyethyl starch. ...
Stacey, M.; Youd, F. R. (November 1938). "A note on the dextran produced from sucrose by Betacoccus arabinosaceous haemolyticus ... Lactobacillus brevis has been identified as the species responsible for the production of the polysaccharide (dextran) that ...
Infection-promoting activity of levan and dextran as a function of degree of polymerization. Synthesis of sucrose and other ... Synthesis of sucrose and other beta-D-fructofuranosyl adolases by levansucrase. Hestrin, S., Feingold, D. S. and Avigad, G. J. ... "Infection-promoting activity of levan and dextran as a function of degree of polymerization". Br J Exp Pathol. 35: 107-11. PMC ... An enzymic synthesis of a sucrose analog: α-D-xylopyranosyl-β-fructofuranoside. Avigad, G., Feingold, D. S. and Hestrin, S. ...
All species within this genus are heterofermentative and are able to produce dextran from sucrose. They are generally slime- ...
Combine them in the picture shown to the right and you have sucrose, one of the more common sugar products around. A chain of ... Such polysaccharides include pectin, dextran, agar, and xanthan. Sugar content is commonly measured in degrees brix. The term ... the most common known human carbohydrate is Sucrose[citation needed]. The simplest version of a carbohydrate is a ...
The polymer dextran is one prominent example of a very useful polymer. It is produced at commercial scale for uses in ... Both sucrose breakdown and glucan synthesis occur in the same active site. The first step is carried out through a ... If S. mutans can no longer break down sucrose and synthesize glucan, calcium phosphate is not degraded and bacteria cannot ... First it cleaves a glycosidic bond to split sucrose. Products of the reaction are the constituent monosaccharides glucose and ...
S.mutans adheres to the biofilm on the tooth by converting sucrose into an extremely adhesive substance called dextran ... Sucrose, although a bound glucose and fructose unit, is in fact more cariogenic than a mixture of equal parts of glucose and ... Bacteria in a person's mouth convert glucose, fructose, and most commonly sucrose (table sugar) into acids such as lactic acid ... Experiments on rats have shown that a high-sucrose, cariogenic diet "significantly suppresses the rate of fluid motion" in ...
When grown in sucrose solution, it converts the sugar to dextrans having mostly alpha 1,6 linkages, but 1,2, 1,3, and 1,4 ...
... is the only dietary sugar that can be converted to sticky glucans (dextran-like polysaccharides) by extracellular ... A 25 °Bx sucrose solution has 25 grams of sucrose per 100 grams of liquid; or, to put it another way, 25 grams of sucrose sugar ... Sucrose intolerance[edit]. Main article: sucrose intolerance. UN dietary recommendation[edit]. In 2015, the World Health ... Sucrose is a disaccharide made up of 50% glucose and 50% fructose and has a glycemic index of 65.[54] Sucrose is digested ...
Unlike previous generations of IV iron supplements, this drug does not contain dextran. The drug consists of ferric hydroxide ... Iron sucrose (brand name Venofer) is an intravenously administered iron product indicated in the treatment of iron deficiency ... "Iron Sucrose (Intravenous Route)". Mayo Clinic. Retrieved 22 January 2016. Jerry Yee, Anatole Besarab (2002). "In-Depth Review ... Iron sucrose: The oldest iron therapy becomes new". American Journal of Kidney Diseases. 40: 1111-1121. doi:10.1053/ajkd. ...
... is now synthesized from sucrose by certain lactic acid bacteria, the best-known being Leuconostoc mesenteroides and ... Resource on dextran properties and structure of dextran polymers Dextrans at the US National Library of Medicine Medical ... Dextran has also been used in bead form to aid in bioreactor applications. Dextran has been used in immobilization in ... Dextrans are available in multiple molecular weights ranging from 3,000 Da to 2,000,000 Da. The larger dextrans (>60,000 Da) ...
When combined in the way that the image to the right depicts, sucrose, one of the more common sugar products found in plants, ... Such polysaccharides include pectin, dextran, agar, and xanthan. Sugar content is commonly measured in degrees brix. ... the most common known human carbohydrate is Sucrose[citation needed]. The simplest version of a carbohydrate is a ...
... deae-dextran MeSH D09.698.365.272.300 --- dextran sulfate MeSH D09.698.365.272.400 --- iron-dextran complex MeSH D09.698. ... sucrose MeSH D09.698.629.305.770.200 --- dietary sucrose MeSH D09.698.629.305.770.850 --- sucralfate MeSH D09.698.629.305.880 ...
Sucrose alpha-glucosidase EC 3.2.1.49: a-N-acetylgalactosaminidase EC 3.2.1.50: α-N-acetylglucosaminidase EC 3.2.1.51: a-L- ... branched-dextran exo-1,2-a-glucosidase EC 3.2.1.116: glucan 1,4-a-maltotriohydrolase EC 3.2.1.117: amygdalin b-glucosidase EC ... dextran 1,6-a-isomaltotriosidase EC 3.2.1.96: mannosyl-glycoprotein endo-b-N-acetylglucosaminidase EC 3.2.1.97: glycopeptide a- ... sucrose-phosphatase EC 3.1.3.25: inositol-phosphate phosphatase EC 3.1.3.26: 4-phytase EC 3.1.3.27: ...
Dextran Dextrin DNA Dopamine Enzyme Ephedrine Epinephrine - C9H13NO3 Erucic acid - CH3(CH2)7CH=CH(CH2)11COOH Erythritol ... particle Somatostatin Sorbic acid Sphingosine Squalene Staurosporin Stearic acid Sterigmatocystin Sterol Strychnine Sucrose ( ...
Sucrose is simply hydrolyzed into an invert sugar syrup, which contains about 50% fructose. In both cases, the syrups are ... Mannitol increases blood glucose to a lesser extent than sucrose (thus having a relatively low glycemic index[16]) so is used ... Mannitol is commonly produced via the hydrogenation of fructose, which is formed from either starch or sucrose (common table ... sugar). Although starch is a cheaper source than sucrose, the transformation of starch is much more complicated. Eventually, it ...
Iron sucrose. *Sodium ferric gluconate complex. Blood substitutes and. perfusion solutions (B05). *Dextran ...
... dextran content and fibre content. The laboratory was originally a part of the Division of Soil Science and Agricultural ... enhancement of sucrose content, bioethanol production and management of post harvest losses. The Division of Agricultural ...
Siúcrós Sucrose (sugar). *Siúcraí Sugars (in general). *superoxide. T[cuir in eagar , athraigh foinse]. *T2 Toxin ... Deastrán Dextran. *Deislin Dextrin. *Aigéad núicléasach dí-ocsairiobós Deoxyribose nucleic acid. *Dopaimín Dopamine ...
... and dextran using the Bradford method". Analytical Biochemistry: Methods in the Biological Sciences. 395 (1): 108-110. Ninfa, ... potassium or even carbohydrates like sucrose, that may be present in protein samples. An exception of note is elevated ...
FOS can also be synthesized by enzymes of the fungus Aspergillus niger acting on sucrose. GOS is naturally found in soybeans ...
Sucrose (table sugar, cane sugar, beet sugar, or saccharose) Glucose. Fructose. α(1→2)β ... Three common examples are sucrose, lactose,[2] and maltose. Disaccharides are one of the four chemical groupings of ... Sucrose and trehalose are examples of non-reducing disaccharides because their glycosidic bond is between their respective ... Sucrose, a disaccharide formed from condensation of a molecule of glucose and a molecule of fructose ...
Garot (1850) "De la matière colorante rouge des rhubarbes exotiques et indigènes et de son application (comme matière colorante) aux arts et à la pharmacie" (On the red coloring material of exotic and indigenous rhubarb and on its application (as a coloring material) in the arts and in pharmacy), Journal de Pharmacie et de Chimie, 3rd series, 17 : 5-19. Erythrose is named on p. 10: "Celui que je propose, sans y attacher toutefois la moindre importance, est celui d'érythrose, du verbe grec 'ερυθραινω, rougir (1)." (The one [i.e., name] that I propose, without attaching any importance to it, is that of erythrose, from the Greek verb ερυθραινω, to redden (1).) ...
Many molecules that are considered to be "dietary fiber" are so because humans lack the necessary enzymes to split the glycosidic bond and they reach the large intestine. Many foods contain varying types of dietary fibers, all of which contribute to health in different ways. Dietary fibers make three primary contributions: bulking, viscosity and fermentation.[49] Different fibers have different effects, suggesting that a variety of dietary fibers contribute to overall health. Some fibers contribute through one primary mechanism. For instance, cellulose and wheat bran provide excellent bulking effects, but are minimally fermented. Alternatively, many dietary fibers can contribute to health through more than one of these mechanisms. For instance, psyllium provides bulking as well as viscosity. Bulking fibers can be soluble (i.e., psyllium) or insoluble (i.e., cellulose and hemicellulose). They absorb water and can significantly increase stool weight and regularity. Most bulking fibers are not ...
Glucose/Glucan: Glycogen · Starch (Amylose, Amylopectin) · Cellulose · Dextrin/Dextran · Beta-glucan (Zymosan, Lentinan, ... Sucrose · Lactose · Maltose · Trehalose · Turanose · Cellobiose. Trisaccharides. Raffinose · Melezitose · Maltotriose. ...
All species within this genus are heterofermentative and are able to produce dextran from sucrose. They are generally slime- ...
... the production of dextran from date extract and sucrose as carbon sources by the bacterium Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B512 ... In comparison to blue dextran (Mw≈2000 Da), dextran molecular weight was reduced (Mw2000 KDa). Flow behavior indices of dextran ... revealing the shear thinning nature of the produced dextran. Furthermore, dependence of apparent viscosity on concentration was ... In comparison to blue dextran (Mw≈2000 Da), dextran molecular weight was reduced (Mw2000 KDa). Flow behavior indices of dextran ...
Distinct regulation of sucrose: sucrose-1-fructosyltransferase (1-SST) and sucrose: fructan-6-fructosyltransferase (6-SFT), the ... Determination of easily hydrolyzable fructose units in dextran preparations. Wise, C; Dimler, R; Davis, H; Rist, C ... Molecular characterization of sucrose: sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase and sucrose: fructan 6-fructosyltransferase associated ... Isolation and characterisation of a sucrose: sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase gene from perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) ...
Comparison of Dextran-costed Charcoal and Sucrose Denalty Gradient Analyses of Estrogen and Progesterone Receptons in Human ... Comparison of Dextran-costed Charcoal and Sucrose Denalty Gradient Analyses of Estrogen and Progesterone Receptons in Human ... Comparison of Dextran-costed Charcoal and Sucrose Denalty Gradient Analyses of Estrogen and Progesterone Receptons in Human ... Comparison of Dextran-costed Charcoal and Sucrose Denalty Gradient Analyses of Estrogen and Progesterone Receptons in Human ...
... containing 100 mg iron sucrose or iron dextran (system A) or 1000 mg iron sucrose (system B). Both in vitro systems utilized a ... Determination of iron sucrose (Venofer) or iron dextran (DexFerrum) removal by hemodialysis: an in-vitrostudy. Manley, Harold J ... Iron sucrose and iron dextran dialysate concentration was below the lower limits of assay (, 2 ppm) for system A. Dialysate ... Therefore, iron sucrose and iron dextran are not dialyzed by HE or HF dialysis membranes irrespective of UFR. ...
Iron Dextran, Ferric Carboxymaltose), By Application (Chronic Kidney Disease, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Cancer), and Segment ... 5.5.1 Iron Sucrose Market 5.5.1.1 Iron Sucrose Market, 2015 to 2026 (USD Million) 5.5.2 Iron Dextran Market 5.5.2.1 Iron ... 31 Iron sucrose market size & forecasts and trend analysis, 2015 to 2026 (USD Million) Fig. 32 Iron dextran market size & ... Intravenous Iron Drugs Market Size, Share & Trends Analysis Report By Product (Iron Sucrose, Iron Dextran, Ferric ...
Reported rates of adverse effects from iron dextran in Europe and North America over a 6-year period were much higher than for ... Iron sucrose. 14.0. 7.8. *Only low-molecular-weight (LMW) iron dextran has been sold in Europe since 2005. For North America, ... In addition, the difference in AE rates for iron dextran might reflect the higher use of high-molecular-weight iron dextran in ... iron sucrose (0.65 to 1.9 million DEq), and iron dextran, which has only been in a low-molecular-weight formulation since 2005 ...
... iron sucrose vs. iron dextran. Compare user review scores, and side effect occurrence rates for similar drugs side-by-side. ...
Production of Viscous Dextran-Containing Whey-Sucrose Broths by Leuconostoc mesenteroides ATCC 14935: Viscous broths were ... Production of Viscous Dextran-Containing Whey-Sucrose Broths by Leuconostoc mesenteroides ATCC 14935. Authors * Robert D. ... Viscous broths were produced by growing Leuconostoc mesenteroides on a medium containing whey supplemented with sucrose. When ...
A new polarimeric method for the analysis of dextran and sucrose. Singleton, V., Bucke, C., Horn, J. and Adlard, M. 2001. A new ... westminsterresearch.westminster.ac.uk/item/942x6/a-new-polarimeric-method-for-the-analysis-of-dextran-and-sucrose ... polarimeric method for the analysis of dextran and sucrose. International Sugar Journal. 103 (1230), pp. 251-254. ...
DEXTRAN. LACTATE. SUCROSE. Dextrose. DEHYDROGENASE. SULFITE. DIAMINE. Lactic Acid. THIAMINE. Dianisidine. LACTOSE. TREHALOSE. ...
Iron Dextran Complex; Iron Isomaltoside; Iron Sucrose. Monitor therapy ...
Iron Dextran Complex; Iron Isomaltoside; Iron Sucrose. Consider therapy modification ...
... dextran; hemi, hemicelluloses; inul, inulin; N-glyc, N-glycans; N-/O-glyc, N-/O-glycans; pect, pectin; sucr, sucrose; and tre, ...
... sucrose; dextran; any protein solution, e.g. bovine serum albumin (BSA); iodinated low molecular weight compounds such as ... Dextrans, polysaccharides, e.g. agarose, cellulose, Sepharose, Sephadex, etc., or combinations thereof. The carrier particles ... 6-triiodobenzoic acid and a nonionic polymer consisting of sucrose and epichlorohydrin); any sugar solution, e.g. ...
sucrose. dextran. α-cyclodextrin. α-cyclodextrin. β-cyclodextrin. content (mass %). 0.3. 0.3. 0.3. 0.3. 0.3. ... In the same manner as in Example 1 except that sucrose (manufactured by Wako Pure Chemical Industries, Ltd., 3.0 g) (content ... In the same manner as in Example 1 except that dextran (manufactured by Wako Pure Chemical Industries, Ltd., 3.0 g) (content ... Examples of the aforementioned polysaccharides include dextran, glycogen, amylose, amylopectin, heparin, agarose and the like. ...
The all-event reporting rates for iron dextran, sodium ferric gluconate, and iron sucrose were 29.2, 10.5, and 4.2 reports per ... The ASPs of iron sucrose and ferric gluconate are comparable. Both of these drugs have higher ASPs than the iron dextrans. ... G. Faich and J. Strobos, "Sodium ferric gluconate complex in sucrose: safer intravenous iron therapy than iron dextrans," ... J. Critchley, "Adverse events associated with intravenous iron infusion (low molecular weight iron dextran and iron sucrose): a ...
Polyethylene glycol may be used (even apart from its use in derivatizing the protein or analog). Dextrans, such as cyclodextran ... Carriers include carbohydrates such as trehalose, mannitol, xylitol, sucrose, lactose, and sorbitol. Other ingredients for use ... Formulations for nasal delivery include those with dextran or cyclodextran. Delivery via transport across other mucus membranes ... These diluents could include carbohydrates, especially mannitol, α-lactose, anhydrous lactose, cellulose, sucrose, modified ...
2010 venofer-iron-sucrose-342162 Drugs Drugs iron sucrose * 2010 infed-iron-dextran-complex-342173 Drugs ... Safety and efficacy of total-dose infusion of low molecular weight iron dextran for iron deficiency anemia in patients with ...
dextran, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, from sucrose .... * Free-living bacterium (biology) Other articles where Free-living ...
The remaining a(1--,3) linkages account for the branching of dextran. Dextran has long and hydrophilic spacer arms that ... Raffinose family of oligosaccharides (RFOs) are alpha-galactosyl derivatives of sucrose, and the most common are the ... Dextran is a high molecular weight polymer of anhydroglucose. It is composed of approximately 95% alpha-D-(1--,6) linkages. ...
0.5% Dextran Sulfate 2.91. 0.5% Sucrose Octasulfate. 0.60. 1.0% Sucrose Octasulfate. 0.17. 0.5% Chondroitin Sulfate A. 0.70. ... Exemplary sulfated polysaccharides include heparin, heparan sulfate, dextran sulfate, sucrose octasulfate, sulfated β- ... dextran, lactose, sucrose, ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid, and the like. Suitable formulations, known in the art, ( ... dextran sulfate, sucrose octasulfate, sulfated β-cyclodextrin, myo-inositol hexasulfate, polypentosan sulfate, fucoidan, ...
The lyophilized vaccine contains amino acids, dextran, Dulbeccos Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM), sorbitol, and sucrose. DMEM ... ROTARIX also contains dextran, sorbitol, xanthan, and Dulbeccos Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM). The ingredients of DMEM are as ...
Elutriated sucrose gradient purified Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) acquired from the B95-8 cell line were purchased from Advanced ... complex polymeric carbohydrates and derivatives such as dextran, glycogen, etc.. Preferred coating materials include cellobiose ... short chain carbohydrates including glucose, sucrose, cellobiose, nystose, triose, dextrose, trehalose, glucose, lactose, ... sucrose, pyridoxyl-5-phosphate and citrate.. An exemplary preferred method for binding the stabilizing coat to the solid phase ...
Produces dextran from sucrose. *No production of mannitol from sucrose nor ammonia from arginine ...
  • The expression of the majority of genes involved in fructan and starch synthetic pathways were positively correlated with sucrose levels in the leaves of SB lines. (deepdyve.com)
  • High sucrose levels in the mature flag leaf (source organ) were found to be positively associated with WSC and fructan concentrations in both the leaf and stem of SB lines in several field trials. (deepdyve.com)
  • Analysis of Affymetrix expression array data revealed that high leaf sucrose lines grown in abiotic-stress-prone environments had high expression levels of a number of genes in the leaf involved in the sucrose synthetic pathway and photosynthesis, such as Calvin cycle genes, antioxidant genes involved in chloroplast H2O2 removal and genes involved in energy dissipation. (deepdyve.com)
  • The high level of leaf fructans in high leaf sucrose lines is likely attributed to the elevated expression levels of fructan synthetic enzymes, as the mRNA levels of three fructosyltransferase families were consistently correlated with leaf sucrose levels among SB lines. (deepdyve.com)
  • The familiar table sugar is sucrose , a disaccharide. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Insomaltulose is a low glycemic disaccharide from sucrose that is said to be a slow energy source, although studies of its use during exercise show it causes higher glycogen use than conventional sources. (astronutrition.com)
  • 1. A formulation, comprising (i) a vaccinia virus having a titer of at least 10**(6) TCID50 per mg total protein, (ii) a disaccharide, (iii) a pharmaceutically acceptable polymer and (iv) a buffer, wherein the buffer is not a phosphate buffer, wherein the vaccinia virus is a MVA strain or strain Elstree, the disaccharide is sucrose and the polymer is dextran and wherein the formulation further comprises glutamic acid. (epo.org)
  • It is hypothesised that dextrans may form water-soluble complexes with LAs that remain at the site of injection longer than the unbound drug, dextran also alters the pH of the injected LA solution, and this alkalinisation may contribute to the prolongation of action8. (ispub.com)
  • The mechanism of action is unclear, but it is hypothesised that dextrans may form water-soluble complexes with LAs that remain at the site of injection longer than the unbound drug, due to an increase in viscosity with reduced diffusion of the complex7. (ispub.com)
  • 5. A composition of matter according to claim 1 wherein said coating is selected from the group consisting of cellobiose, sucrose, pyridoxyl-5-phosphate and citrate. (google.com)
  • Dextrans have major use in food formulations as stabilizing, emulsifying, texturizing and gelling agent. (ispub.com)
  • Dextran fractions do not appear to be included in the lists of permitted additives (ingredients) for pharmaceutical formulations such as ointments and creams for topical use and tablets and capsules for oral use. (lookchem.com)
  • In particular, the study of sucrose-protein interactions has attracted considerable attention for the importance of sucrose in biochemical science and in the pharmaceutical industry, where it is commonly used as an additive to protein formulations, to protect labile proteins from the harmful effects of high temperature, freezing, and drying [ 4 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Gas production rates were similar among all dextrans tested but were significantly slower than that for inulin. (asm.org)
  • The linear 1-kDa dextran produced lower total gas and shorter time to attain maximal gas production compared to those of the 70-kDa dextran (branched) and inulin. (asm.org)
  • Another agricultural practice that can speed the formation of sugar is the application of chemical ripeners such as glyphosate (perhaps better known as the main ingredient in Roundup herbicide), which stops the plant's vegetative growth and diverts all of its photosynthetic products to sucrose storage. (acs.org)
  • 100 μl of the sample from 10 -4 , 10 -5 , 10 -6 and 10 -7 dilutions of soil samples were spread plated on sugarcane medium composed of filtered sugarcane juice containing sucrose (2%, w/v), peptone (1%, w/v), NaCl (0.1%, w/v), pH 7 . (ispub.com)
  • Those innovations come in areas that include the agricultural practices used to grow sugarcane, the methods to process sucrose, and the technology to convert sugar or leftover portions of the sugarcane plant into high-value goods, including polymers or biofuels. (acs.org)
  • 6 . The suspension formulation of claim 1 , wherein the stabilizers are sucrose and methionine and the buffer is citrate. (google.com.au)
  • When labelled with technetium Tc99m, dextran 75 is intravenously administered as an imaging agent to detect and diagnose conditions in the vascular compartment such as pericardial effusion or ventricular aneurysm. (drugbank.ca)
  • Dextran contains a capsule that binds to the enamel and forms a biofilm that consists of 300-500 bacterial cells. (kenyon.edu)
  • The worldwide market for Dextran is expected to grow at a CAGR of roughly 4.2% over the next five years, will reach 220 million US$ in 2023, from 170 million US$ in 2017, according to a new GIR (Global Info Research) study. (rnrmarketresearch.com)