Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.
Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.
Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.
Individuals enrolled in a school of pharmacy or a formal educational program leading to a degree in pharmacy.
Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.
The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.
Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program in the health occupations.
The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.
A course of study offered by an educational institution.
The educational process of instructing.
Health services for college and university students usually provided by the educational institution.
Use for articles concerning dental education in general.
Formal instruction, learning, or training in the preparation, dispensing, and proper utilization of drugs in the field of medicine.
Instructional use of examples or cases to teach using problem-solving skills and critical thinking.
The biological science concerned with the life-supporting properties, functions, and processes of living organisms or their parts.
Use for general articles concerning medical education.
Undergraduate education programs for second- , third- , and fourth-year students in health sciences in which the students receive clinical training and experience in teaching hospitals or affiliated health centers.
Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.
Selection of a type of occupation or profession.
The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
A self-learning technique, usually online, involving interaction of the student with programmed instructional materials.
Educational institutions.
Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.
The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.
An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.
Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.
Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.
Individuals enrolled in a preparatory course for medical school.
Systematic identification, development, organization, or utilization of educational resources and the management of these processes. It is occasionally used also in a more limited sense to describe the use of equipment-oriented techniques or audiovisual aids in educational settings. (Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, December 1993, p132)
Practical experience in medical and health-related services that occurs as part of an educational program wherein the professionally-trained student works outside the academic environment under the supervision of an established professional in the particular field.
One of the BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE DISCIPLINES concerned with the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of animals, plants, and microorganisms.
Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.
Individuals who leave school, secondary or college, prior to completion of specified curriculum requirements.
Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.
Requirements for the selection of students for admission to academic institutions.
A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.
Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).
Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.
Success in bringing an effort to the desired end; the degree or level of success attained in some specified area (esp. scholastic) or in general.
The use of persons coached to feign symptoms or conditions of real diseases in a life-like manner in order to teach or evaluate medical personnel.
The psychological relations between the dentist and patient.
Use for general articles concerning nursing education.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
Education via communication media (correspondence, radio, television, computer networks) with little or no in-person face-to-face contact between students and teachers. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1997)
The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.
Use for general articles concerning veterinary medical education.
Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.
Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.
A four-year program in nursing education in a college or university leading to a B.S.N. (Bachelor of Science in Nursing). Graduates are eligible for state examination for licensure as RN (Registered Nurse).
The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.
Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
Persons trained in an accredited school or dental college and licensed by the state in which they reside to provide dental prophylaxis under the direction of a licensed dentist.
The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.
Educational programs for pharmacists who have a bachelor's degree or a Doctor of Pharmacy degree entering a specific field of pharmacy. They may lead to an advanced degree.
The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.
Educational programs designed to ensure that students attain prespecified levels of competence in a given field or training activity. Emphasis is on achievement or specified objectives.
Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of pharmacy.
The exchange of students or professional personnel between countries done under the auspices of an organization for the purpose of further education.
That phase of clinical dentistry concerned with the restoration of parts of existing teeth that are defective through disease, trauma, or abnormal development, to the state of normal function, health, and esthetics, including preventive, diagnostic, biological, mechanical, and therapeutic techniques, as well as material and instrument science and application. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 2d ed, p237)
Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.
Financial support for training including both student stipends and loans and training grants to institutions.
The practice of dentistry concerned with preventive as well as diagnostic and treatment programs in a circumscribed population.
Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.
Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.
The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.
Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.
A dental specialty concerned with the restoration and maintenance of oral function by the replacement of missing TEETH and related structures by artificial devices or DENTAL PROSTHESES.
The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.
The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.
The teaching or training of those individuals with hearing disability or impairment.
A mechanism of communication within a system in that the input signal generates an output response which returns to influence the continued activity or productivity of that system.
The procedures through which a group approaches, attacks, and solves a common problem.
The adopting or performing the role of another significant individual in order to gain insight into the behavior of that person.
Preparatory education meeting the requirements for admission to medical school.
A dental specialty concerned with the maintenance of the dental pulp in a state of health and the treatment of the pulp cavity (pulp chamber and pulp canal).
The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).
A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.
Systematic efforts to assist individuals in selecting an occupation or suitable employment on the basis of aptitude, education, etc.
The body of truths or facts accumulated in the course of time, the cumulated sum of information, its volume and nature, in any civilization, period, or country.
Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)
Formal education and training in preparation for the practice of a profession.
Created 7 April 1992 as a result of the division of Yugoslavia.
Facilities where dental care is provided to patients.
Any observable response or action of an adolescent.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
A medical discipline that is based on the philosophy that all body systems are interrelated and dependent upon one another for good health. This philosophy, developed in 1874 by Dr. Andrew Taylor Still, recognizes the concept of "wellness" and the importance of treating illness within the context of the whole body. Special attention is placed on the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM.
Appraisal of one's own personal qualities or traits.
Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.
Educational programs structured in such a manner that the participating professionals, physicians, or students develop an increased awareness of their performance, usually on the basis of self-evaluation questionnaires.
Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.
The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.
Familiarity and comfort in using computers efficiently.
Manikins are life-sized, anatomically correct models used in medical training to simulate human anatomy and procedures.
The study of the structure of various TISSUES of organisms on a microscopic level.
Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.
Books used in the study of a subject that contain a systematic presentation of the principles and vocabulary of a subject.
The process of choosing employees for specific types of employment. The concept includes recruitment.
An acute brain syndrome which results from the excessive ingestion of ETHANOL or ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.
The branch of psychology concerned with psychological aspects of teaching and the formal learning process in school.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.
Auditory and visual instructional materials.
Schools which offer training in the area of health.
Primarily non-verbal tests designed to predict an individual's future learning ability or performance.
The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.
Various branches of dental practice limited to specialized areas.
A learning situation involving more than one alternative from which a selection is made in order to attain a specific goal.
An individual's objective and insightful awareness of the feelings and behavior of another person. It should be distinguished from sympathy, which is usually nonobjective and noncritical. It includes caring, which is the demonstration of an awareness of and a concern for the good of others. (From Bioethics Thesaurus, 1992)
Transmission of live or pre-recorded audio or video content via connection or download from the INTERNET.
Providing for the full range of dental health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and rehabilitation of patients.
Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.
Violation of laws, regulations, or professional standards.
Cultural and linguistic competence is a set of congruent behaviors, attitudes, and policies that come together in a system, agency, or among professionals that enables effective work in cross-cultural situations. Competence implies the capacity to function effectively as an individual and an organization within the context of the cultural beliefs, behaviors, and needs presented by consumers and their communities.
The process by which individuals internalize standards of right and wrong conduct.
Specialized instruction for students deviating from the expected norm.
All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.
Materials, frequently computer applications, that combine some or all of text, sound, graphics, animation, and video into integrated packages. (Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1994)
A geographic location which has insufficient health resources (manpower and/or facilities) to meet the medical needs of the resident population.
The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the dentist, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the dentist in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.
Skills and strategies, unrelated to the traits a test is intended to measure, that may increase test takers' scores -- may include the effects of coaching or experience in taking tests. (ERIC Thesaurus)
The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.
The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.
The practice of compounding and dispensing medicinal preparations.
Total pharmaceutical services provided by qualified PHARMACISTS. In addition to the preparation and distribution of medical products, they may include consultative services provided to agencies and institutions which do not have a qualified pharmacist.
The individual's experience of a sense of fulfillment of a need or want and the quality or state of being satisfied.
Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.
Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.
A subgroup having special characteristics within a larger group, often bound together by special ties which distinguish it from the larger group.
The expected function of a member of a particular profession.
A parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarch in southeast Asia, consisting of 11 states (West Malaysia) on the Malay Peninsula and two states (East Malaysia) on the island of BORNEO. It is also called the Federation of Malaysia. Its capital is Kuala Lumpur. Before 1963 it was the Union of Malaya. It reorganized in 1948 as the Federation of Malaya, becoming independent from British Malaya in 1957 and becoming Malaysia in 1963 as a federation of Malaya, Sabah, Sarawak, and Singapore (which seceded in 1965). The form Malay- probably derives from the Tamil malay, mountain, with reference to its geography. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p715 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p329)
Test designed to identify students suitable for admission into a graduate or undergraduate curriculum.
A person's view of himself.
The practice of dentistry concerned with the dental problems of children, proper maintenance, and treatment. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.
Advanced programs of training to meet certain professional requirements in fields other than medicine or dentistry, e.g., pharmacology, nutrition, nursing, etc.
Passing off as one's own the work of another without credit.
The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)
Any enhancement of a motivated behavior in which individuals do the same thing with some degree of mutual stimulation and consequent coordination.
Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.
Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.
Interactions between health personnel and patients.
Education of the individual who markedly deviates intellectually, physically, socially, or emotionally from those considered to be normal, thus requiring special instruction.
The branch of pharmacology that deals directly with the effectiveness and safety of drugs in humans.
A principle that learning is facilitated when the learner receives immediate evaluation of learning performance. The concept also hypothesizes that learning is facilitated when the learner is promptly informed whether a response is correct, and, if incorrect, of the direction of error.
Brazil is a country in South America known for its high rates of infectious diseases such as dengue fever, Zika virus, and chikungunya, as well as its successful vaccination programs.
Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.
A branch of medicine concerned with the total health of the individual within the home environment and in the community, and with the application of comprehensive care to the prevention and treatment of illness in the entire community.
Persons with any degree of loss of hearing that has an impact on their activities of daily living or that requires special assistance or intervention.
Behavioral or attitudinal compliance with recognized social patterns or standards.
Illinois is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the pancreas, which can lead to severe abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting.
A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.
Programs of study which span the traditional boundaries of academic scholarship.
Kansas is not a term commonly used in the medical field.
The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.
The total of dental diagnostic, preventive, and restorative services provided to meet the needs of a patient (from Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982).
The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.
Recording of visual and sometimes sound signals on magnetic tape.
Disorders related to substance abuse.
Preparatory education meeting the requirements for admission to dental school.
Those persons legally qualified by education and training to engage in the practice of pharmacy.
The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a nursing school.
Performance, usually in school work, poorer than that predicted from aptitude and/or intelligence testing.
The branch of science concerned with the means and consequences of transmission and generation of the components of biological inheritance. (Stedman, 26th ed)
Drinking an excessive amount of ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES in a short period of time.
The ability to generate new ideas or images.
Text editing and storage functions using computer software.
Reading in the medical field refers to the process of interpreting and understanding written medical information, such as patient charts, medical literature, and research studies.
Systems where the input data enter the computer directly from the point of origin (usually a terminal or workstation) and/or in which output data are transmitted directly to that terminal point of origin. (Sippl, Computer Dictionary, 4th ed)
Educational programs for dental graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic dental sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced dental degree.
Nebraska is a neurological disorder characterized by a lack of muscle tone and weakness, often accompanied by intellectual disability and other symptoms.
Most frequently refers to the integration of a physically or mentally disabled child into the regular class of normal peers and provision of the appropriately determined educational program.
Investigations into the problems of integrating research findings into nursing curricula, developing problem solving skills, finding approaches to clinical teaching, determining the level of practice by graduates from different basic preparations, etc.
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
Analysis of word concepts by the association of polar adjectives, e.g., good-bad, with the concept, father. The adjectives are usually scaled in 7 steps. The subject's placement of the concept on the adjectival scale indicates the connotative meaning of the concept.
Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.
A mechanism of information stimulus and response that may control subsequent behavior, cognition, perception, or performance. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)
The humanities in the medical field refer to the study of human values, ethics, and the social and cultural context of healthcare.
Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.
The ability to acquire general or special types of knowledge or skill.
Dental care for patients with chronic diseases. These diseases include chronic cardiovascular, endocrinologic, hematologic, immunologic, neoplastic, and renal diseases. The concept does not include dental care for the mentally or physically disabled which is DENTAL CARE FOR DISABLED.
Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.
A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.
The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.
The services rendered by members of the health profession and non-professionals under their supervision.
An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.
Sexual activities of humans.
Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of nursing.
Cognitive mechanism based on expectations or beliefs about one's ability to perform actions necessary to produce a given effect. It is also a theoretical component of behavior change in various therapeutic treatments. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)
Individuals licensed to practice DENTISTRY.
The granting of a license to practice medicine.
The interactions between physician and patient.
A dental specialty concerned with the prevention and correction of dental and oral anomalies (malocclusion).
Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.
The attitude and behavior associated with an individual using the computer.
An optical disk storage system for computers on which data can be read or from which data can be retrieved but not entered or modified. A CD-ROM unit is almost identical to the compact disk playback device for home use.
Acquired or learned responses which are regularly manifested.
A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.

Resource utilization and work or school loss reported by patients with diabetes: experience in diabetes training programs. (1/4235)

Diabetes exerts a major economic impact on healthcare in the United States both in terms of direct and indirect costs. Diabetes management and education programs designed to assist patients in achieving more optimal glycemic control represent a potential mechanism for reducing the morbidity and costs associated with diabetes. The relationship between HbA1c and patient hospitalizations and between HbA1c and days lost from work or school related to diabetes within the past year were evaluated. A cohort of 2359 patients with diabetes (188 type I, 2171 type II) referred to a comprehensive diabetes self-management training program was included in the analyses. Overall, 350 (14.8%) patients reported hospitalization, and 212 (9.0%) reported days lost from work or school. Patients with type I diabetes reported more hospitalizations (26.1% vs 13.9% and days lost (19.2% vs 8.1%) than type II patients. For the hospitalization outcome, the multivariate analyses indicated that younger age, the number of co-morbidities, and the duration of diabetes exerted a greater influence on the reported numbers of hospitalization than glycemic control. For the days lost outcome, the multivariate analyses indicated that there was a marginally significant association between patients with poor glycemic control and reported work or school loss related to diabetes (odds ratio = 1.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-2.2). These data suggest that interventions that improve glycemic control may decrease indirect costs related to diabetes.  (+info)

Health promotion: perceptions of Project 2000 educated nurses. (2/4235)

The new approach to pre-registration nursing education in the UK (Project 2000) has an overt health focus as well as a specific remit to prepare nurses for a role as promoters of health. Data reported in this paper illuminate Project 2000 students' understanding of the concepts of health promotion and health education, and indicate the extent to which qualified nurses who have completed this new Project 2000 programme perceive themselves to be prepared for a health promotion role. Findings indicate that students are confused about the terms health education and health promotion, although most feel there is a distinction between the two. Students' descriptions emphasize individualistic approaches, and lifestyle and behaviour changes. Many recognize that health promotion should have a broader application and demonstrate a sophisticated grasp of the philosophy underpinning the promotion of health through their general perceptions of nursing. This understanding is not labelled health education or health promotion, but is embedded in their articulation of concepts such as holism, patient-centred care and enhancing independence. Paradoxically, both students and Project 2000 qualified nurses (diplomates) illustrate a clear grasp of the more complex issues surrounding the concept of health promotion while remaining confused by the terminology and its relationship to practice.  (+info)

Further analysis of the separate and interactive effects of methylphenidate and common classroom contingencies. (3/4235)

We evaluated separate and interactive effects between common classroom contingencies and methylphenidate (MPH) on disruptive and off-task behaviors for 4 children with a diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Analogue conditions consisting of contingent teacher reprimands, brief time-out, no interaction, and alone were conducted in a multielement design. Medication status (MPH or placebo) was alternated across days in a superordinate multielement design. Results indicate that (a) the behavioral effects of MPH were influenced by one or more of the analogue conditions for each participant, and (b) time-out was associated with zero or near-zero levels of both disruptive and off-task behavior for 3 of the 4 participants during MPH and placebo conditions. Implications for the clinical effectiveness of MPH and possible behavioral mechanisms of action of MPH in applied settings are discussed.  (+info)

HIV stress in primary school teachers in Zambia. (4/4235)

A study was made of stress factors experienced by primary school teachers in Zambia after they had attended a course on stress management and counselling skills. Their pupils were significantly affected by poverty, death and illness of parents, fellow-pupils and teachers, teenage sex and pregnancy, violence in the home and, among girls, low self-esteem. The HIV epidemic had a major bearing on these factors, and there were wide-ranging effects on the teachers' own lives. Despite the training they had been given, many teachers felt that they could not adequately counsel their pupils on these matters. The teachers were in need of continuing support and training to enable them to cope with this aspect of their work.  (+info)

Tobacco use among middle and high school students--Florida, 1998 and 1999. (5/4235)

Tobacco use is the single leading preventable cause of death in the United States, and an estimated $2 billion is spent annually in Florida to treat disease caused by smoking. Florida appropriated $23 million in fiscal year 1997 and $70 million in fiscal year 1998 to fund the Florida Pilot Program on Tobacco Control to prevent and reduce tobacco use among Florida youth. To determine the prevalence of cigarette, cigar, and smokeless tobacco (i.e., chewing tobacco and snuff) use among Florida middle and high school students in public schools, the Florida Department of Health conducted the Florida Youth Tobacco Survey (FYTS) in February 1998 and February 1999. The purpose of these surveys was to establish baseline parameters and monitor the progress of the pilot program, which began in April 1998. This report summarizes advance data from the surveys, which indicate that, from 1998 to 1999, the percentage of Florida public middle and high school students who smoked cigarettes decreased significantly and that the percentage of middle school students who smoked cigars and used smokeless tobacco products decreased significantly.  (+info)

Drinking and driving among US high school seniors, 1984-1997. (6/4235)

OBJECTIVES: This article reports the prevalence of, and trends in, driving after drinking and riding in a car with a driver who has been drinking among American high school seniors, based on data from more than a decade (1984-1997) of annual national surveys. METHODS: Logistic regressions were used to assess the effects of demographic factors (gender, region of country, population density, parental education, and race/ethnicity) and selected "lifestyle" factors (religious commitment, high school grades, truancy, illicit drug use, evenings out per week, and miles driven per week). RESULTS: Rates of adolescent driving after drinking and riding with a driver who had been drinking declined significantly from the mid-1980s to the early or mid-1990s, but the declines have not continued in recent years. Rates of driving or riding after drinking were higher among high school seniors who are male. White, living in the western and northeastern regions of the United States, and living in rural areas. Truancy, number of evenings out, and illicit drug use all related significantly positively with the dependent variables, whereas grade point average and religious commitment had a negative relationship. Miles driven per week related positively to driving after drinking.  (+info)

Changes at the high end of risk in cigarette smoking among US high school seniors, 1976-1995. (7/4235)

OBJECTIVES: This study identified high school seniors at low, moderate and high risk for cigarette use to examine changes in the prevalence of daily smoking within risk groups from 1976 to 1995. METHODS: Data were taken from the Monitoring the Future Projects national surveys of high school seniors. Risk classification was based on grade point average, truancy, nights out per week, and religious commitment. Logistic regression models were used to estimate trends for all seniors and separately for White (n = 244,221), African American (n = 41,005), and Hispanic (n = 18,457) made and female subgroups. RESULTS: Risk group distribution (low = 45%, moderate = 30%, high = 25%) changed little over time. Between 1976 and 1990, greater absolute declines in smoking occurred among high-risk students (17 percentage points) than among low-risk students (6 percentage points). Particularly large declines occurred among high-risk African Americans and Hispanics. Smoking increased in all risk groups in the 1990s. CONCLUSIONS: Among high school seniors, a large part of the overall change in smoking occurred among high-risk youth. Policies and programs to reduce smoking among youth must have broad appeal, especially to those at the higher end of the risk spectrum.  (+info)

Darryl, a cartoon-based measure of cardinal posttraumatic stress symptoms in school-age children. (8/4235)

OBJECTIVES: This report examines the reliability and validity of Darryl, a cartoon-based measure of the cardinal symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). METHODS: We measured exposure to community violence through the reports of children and their parents and then administered Darryl to a sample of 110 children aged 7 to 9 residing in urban neighborhoods with high crime rates. RESULTS: Darryl's reliability is excellent overall and is acceptable for the reexperiencing, avoidance, and arousal subscales, considered separately. Child reports of exposure to community violence were significantly associated with child reports of PTSD symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Darryl possesses acceptable psychometric properties in a sample of children with frequent exposure to community violence.  (+info)

In the medical field, a curriculum refers to a comprehensive plan or program of study that outlines the knowledge, skills, and experiences that medical students are expected to acquire during their education. The curriculum typically includes a combination of classroom instruction, laboratory work, clinical rotations, and other learning activities designed to prepare students for their future careers as healthcare professionals. The curriculum for medical students typically covers a wide range of topics, including anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, pathology, microbiology, medical ethics, and clinical skills. Medical schools may also offer electives or specialized tracks that allow students to focus on specific areas of interest, such as pediatrics, surgery, or public health. The curriculum is typically developed and maintained by a team of educators, administrators, and healthcare professionals, and is subject to ongoing review and revision to ensure that it remains current and relevant to the evolving needs of the medical field.

A clinical clerkship is a period of time during medical school where students are placed in a clinical setting, such as a hospital or clinic, to gain hands-on experience working with patients under the supervision of licensed physicians. During a clinical clerkship, students are typically responsible for performing physical exams, taking medical histories, ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests, and developing treatment plans for patients. The goal of a clinical clerkship is to provide students with the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills they have learned in the classroom to real-world patient care situations, and to help them develop the critical thinking and decision-making skills necessary to become competent and compassionate physicians.

In the medical field, a career choice refers to the decision made by an individual to pursue a specific career path within the medical profession. This decision is typically based on a variety of factors, including personal interests, skills, and values, as well as the potential for job satisfaction, financial stability, and professional growth. Some common career choices in the medical field include becoming a doctor, nurse, physician assistant, pharmacist, or medical researcher. Each of these careers requires a different level of education and training, as well as different job responsibilities and work environments. Choosing a career in the medical field can be a complex and challenging process, as it involves making important decisions about education, training, and career advancement. It is important for individuals considering a career in medicine to carefully research their options and consider their personal goals and interests before making a decision.

Clinical competence in the medical field refers to the ability of a healthcare professional to provide safe, effective, and ethical patient care. It encompasses a range of skills, knowledge, and attitudes that are necessary for the delivery of high-quality healthcare services. Clinical competence includes both technical skills, such as the ability to perform medical procedures and interpret diagnostic tests, as well as non-technical skills, such as communication, teamwork, and decision-making. It also involves an understanding of the latest medical research and best practices, as well as an ability to apply this knowledge to individual patients in a compassionate and ethical manner. Clinical competence is typically evaluated through a combination of formal assessments, such as board exams and performance evaluations, as well as informal assessments, such as patient feedback and peer review. Healthcare professionals are expected to continuously improve their clinical competence through ongoing education and training, as well as self-reflection and self-assessment.

Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) in the medical field refers to the use of computer technology to provide educational materials and interactive learning experiences to medical students, residents, and practitioners. CAI can take many forms, including online courses, simulations, virtual reality, and multimedia presentations. CAI in the medical field is designed to enhance the learning experience by providing personalized instruction, immediate feedback, and opportunities for practice and repetition. It can also help medical professionals keep up-to-date with the latest medical knowledge and techniques, as well as improve their skills in areas such as diagnosis, treatment planning, and patient communication. CAI in the medical field can be used for a variety of purposes, including medical education, continuing medical education, and professional development. It can also be used to support patient care by providing medical professionals with access to up-to-date information and decision-making tools.

In the medical field, attitude refers to a person's disposition or inclination towards a particular situation, person, or issue. It encompasses a person's beliefs, values, and emotions towards a particular topic or issue, and can influence their behavior and decision-making. For example, a healthcare provider's attitude towards a particular patient or medical condition can impact their approach to treatment and care. A positive attitude can lead to more effective communication, better patient outcomes, and improved patient satisfaction. On the other hand, a negative attitude can lead to poor patient outcomes, decreased patient satisfaction, and even medical malpractice. In addition, attitude can also refer to a person's overall disposition towards their own health and well-being. A positive attitude towards health and wellness can lead to healthier behaviors and better health outcomes, while a negative attitude can lead to unhealthy behaviors and poor health outcomes. Overall, attitude plays a significant role in the medical field, and healthcare providers are encouraged to cultivate positive attitudes towards their patients, their work, and their own health and well-being.

In the medical field, biology is the study of living organisms and their interactions with each other and the environment. It encompasses a wide range of topics, including genetics, cell biology, microbiology, immunology, physiology, and ecology, among others. Medical biology is a subfield of biology that focuses specifically on the application of biological principles to the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases. Medical biologists use a variety of techniques and tools, such as molecular biology, biochemistry, and cell culture, to study the underlying mechanisms of diseases and develop new treatments. Medical biologists work in a variety of settings, including research laboratories, hospitals, and pharmaceutical companies. They may also work in public health organizations or government agencies, where they help to develop policies and regulations related to biotechnology and public health.

The attitude of health personnel refers to the beliefs, values, and emotions that healthcare providers bring to their work with patients. It encompasses their approach to patient care, their level of empathy and compassion, their communication skills, and their overall demeanor towards patients and colleagues. A positive attitude of health personnel is essential for providing high-quality patient care. It can help to build trust and rapport with patients, improve communication and collaboration with colleagues, and enhance the overall patient experience. On the other hand, a negative attitude can have a detrimental effect on patient care, leading to misunderstandings, conflicts, and poor outcomes. Healthcare providers are trained to develop a positive attitude towards their work and their patients. This includes cultivating empathy, compassion, and respect for patients, as well as developing effective communication and interpersonal skills. Additionally, healthcare organizations may provide training and support to help staff maintain a positive attitude and cope with the challenges of working in the healthcare field.

Anatomy is the branch of science that deals with the study of the structure and organization of living organisms, including their cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems. In the medical field, anatomy is a fundamental subject that provides the foundation for understanding the structure and function of the human body. Medical anatomy is concerned with the detailed study of the human body, including its external and internal structures, their relationships to each other, and their functions. It is divided into several subfields, including gross anatomy, which deals with the study of the external and internal structures of the body, and microscopic anatomy, which focuses on the study of cells and tissues at the microscopic level. Medical students are required to study anatomy as part of their medical education, as it is essential for understanding the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and injuries. Knowledge of anatomy is also important for surgeons, radiologists, and other medical professionals who need to interpret medical images and perform surgical procedures.

In the medical field, achievement typically refers to the successful completion of a medical task or goal, such as diagnosing and treating a disease, performing a surgical procedure, or developing a new medical treatment or technology. Achievements in medicine can also include advancements in medical research, improvements in patient outcomes, and recognition for outstanding contributions to the field. Medical professionals strive to achieve excellence in their work in order to provide the best possible care for their patients and advance the field of medicine as a whole.

Cross-sectional studies are a type of observational research design used in the medical field to examine the prevalence or distribution of a particular health outcome or risk factor in a population at a specific point in time. In a cross-sectional study, data is collected from a sample of individuals who are all measured at the same time, rather than following them over time. Cross-sectional studies are useful for identifying associations between health outcomes and risk factors, but they cannot establish causality. For example, a cross-sectional study may find that people who smoke are more likely to have lung cancer than non-smokers, but it cannot determine whether smoking causes lung cancer or if people with lung cancer are more likely to smoke. Cross-sectional studies are often used in public health research to estimate the prevalence of diseases or conditions in a population, to identify risk factors for certain health outcomes, and to compare the health status of different groups of people. They can also be used to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions or to identify potential risk factors for disease outbreaks.

In the medical field, data collection refers to the process of gathering and organizing information about patients, their health conditions, and their medical treatments. This information is typically collected through various methods, such as medical history interviews, physical exams, diagnostic tests, and medical records. The purpose of data collection in medicine is to provide a comprehensive understanding of a patient's health status and to inform medical decision-making. This information can be used to diagnose and treat medical conditions, monitor the effectiveness of treatments, and identify potential health risks. Data collection in medicine is typically carried out by healthcare professionals, such as doctors, nurses, and medical researchers. The data collected may include demographic information, medical history, physical examination findings, laboratory test results, and imaging studies. This information is often stored in electronic health records (EHRs) for easy access and analysis. Overall, data collection is a critical component of medical practice, as it enables healthcare professionals to provide personalized and effective care to their patients.

Competency-Based Education (CBE) is an approach to medical education that focuses on the development of specific skills and knowledge that are essential for a healthcare provider to practice safely and effectively. In the medical field, CBE is often used to describe a curriculum that is designed to ensure that medical students and residents have the necessary competencies to provide high-quality patient care. In CBE, students and residents are assessed on their ability to perform specific tasks and demonstrate knowledge and skills related to patient care. This assessment is typically done through a combination of direct observation, self-assessment, and feedback from instructors and peers. The goal of CBE is to ensure that medical students and residents are able to apply their knowledge and skills in real-world clinical settings and provide safe, effective, and compassionate care to patients. CBE is often used in conjunction with other educational approaches, such as problem-based learning and case-based learning, to provide a comprehensive and effective medical education. It is also used to help medical schools and residency programs adapt to changing healthcare needs and ensure that their graduates are prepared to practice in a rapidly evolving field.

Community dentistry is a branch of dentistry that focuses on the prevention and treatment of oral diseases and conditions in populations, rather than individuals. It involves working with communities to promote oral health and provide dental care to people who may not have access to traditional dental services. Community dentists work with a variety of stakeholders, including public health officials, government agencies, non-profit organizations, and community members, to develop and implement programs and initiatives that promote oral health and address the oral health needs of specific populations. This may include providing dental screenings, education and outreach programs, and dental care services in schools, community centers, and other public settings. Community dentistry also involves conducting research to better understand the oral health needs of different populations and to develop effective strategies for preventing and treating oral diseases and conditions. By working together with communities, community dentists can help to improve oral health outcomes and reduce the burden of oral disease in populations.

In the medical field, "alcohol drinking" refers to the consumption of alcoholic beverages, such as beer, wine, and spirits. The term is often used to describe the frequency, amount, and duration of alcohol consumption, as well as any potential negative health effects that may result from it. Alcohol drinking is a common social activity and is legal in many countries, but excessive or binge drinking can lead to a range of health problems, including liver disease, high blood pressure, heart disease, certain types of cancer, and mental health issues such as depression and anxiety. In medical settings, alcohol drinking is often assessed as part of a patient's medical history and can be used to inform treatment decisions and recommendations for lifestyle changes.

In the medical field, communication refers to the process of exchanging information between healthcare providers and patients, as well as among healthcare providers themselves. Effective communication is essential for providing high-quality healthcare and ensuring that patients receive the best possible care. Medical communication involves not only verbal communication but also nonverbal communication, such as body language and facial expressions. It also includes written communication, such as medical records and discharge summaries. Effective medical communication involves active listening, clear and concise speaking, and the ability to ask questions and provide feedback. It also involves the use of appropriate medical terminology and the ability to explain complex medical concepts in a way that is easily understood by patients. In addition to patient-provider communication, medical communication also includes communication among healthcare providers, such as between physicians, nurses, and other members of the healthcare team. Effective communication among healthcare providers is essential for ensuring that patients receive coordinated and consistent care.

Cultural diversity in the medical field refers to the recognition and appreciation of the differences in culture, ethnicity, language, religion, and other social factors that may affect a patient's health and healthcare experiences. It recognizes that cultural beliefs, values, and practices can influence a patient's health behaviors, attitudes towards healthcare, and interactions with healthcare providers. Cultural diversity in healthcare is important because it helps healthcare providers to provide more effective and culturally competent care. It involves understanding and respecting the cultural beliefs and practices of patients, and adapting healthcare services to meet their unique needs and preferences. This can include providing interpreter services, using culturally appropriate language and communication styles, and involving patients and their families in decision-making about their care. Cultural diversity in healthcare also helps to reduce health disparities and improve health outcomes for patients from diverse backgrounds. By recognizing and addressing the impact of cultural factors on health, healthcare providers can help to ensure that all patients receive high-quality, culturally competent care that meets their individual needs and preferences.

Croatia is a country located in Southeast Europe. It is not directly related to the medical field, but Croatia has a developed healthcare system with a network of hospitals, clinics, and medical centers. The country has a relatively low infant mortality rate and a high life expectancy. Croatia is also known for its medical tourism industry, with many people traveling to the country for medical procedures and treatments.

In the medical field, adolescent behavior refers to the patterns of behavior and attitudes exhibited by individuals during the adolescent stage of development, typically between the ages of 10 and 19 years. This stage is characterized by significant physical, cognitive, and emotional changes, and as a result, adolescents may exhibit a range of behaviors that are different from those of children or adults. Adolescent behavior can include a variety of behaviors, such as risk-taking, experimenting with substances, seeking independence, and forming romantic relationships. These behaviors can be influenced by a variety of factors, including peer pressure, family dynamics, cultural norms, and individual personality traits. In the medical field, understanding adolescent behavior is important for healthcare providers who work with adolescents, as it can help them to identify potential health risks and provide appropriate interventions. For example, healthcare providers may need to educate adolescents about the risks associated with substance use or encourage them to make healthy lifestyle choices. Additionally, healthcare providers may need to provide support and guidance to adolescents who are struggling with emotional or behavioral issues, such as depression or anxiety.

In the medical field, computer literacy refers to the ability of healthcare professionals to effectively use computers and related technologies to perform their job duties. This includes the ability to use software applications such as electronic health records (EHRs), medical imaging software, and other specialized software used in healthcare. Computer literacy in the medical field is essential for several reasons. Firstly, it enables healthcare professionals to access and manage patient information quickly and efficiently, which can improve patient care and outcomes. Secondly, it allows for more accurate and efficient documentation, which can reduce errors and improve the overall quality of care. Finally, computer literacy can also help healthcare professionals to stay up-to-date with the latest medical research and best practices, which can improve their knowledge and skills. Overall, computer literacy is an important skill for healthcare professionals to have in today's digital age, and it is essential for providing high-quality care to patients.

Alcoholic intoxication is a state of physical and mental impairment caused by the consumption of excessive amounts of alcohol. It is characterized by a range of symptoms, including slurred speech, impaired judgment, loss of coordination, and altered consciousness. In severe cases, alcoholic intoxication can lead to coma, respiratory failure, and even death. It is a common problem in many societies and can have serious social, economic, and health consequences. Treatment typically involves supportive care, such as hydration and monitoring for complications, as well as addressing any underlying issues that may have contributed to the intoxication.

In the medical field, audiovisual aids refer to any technology or equipment used to enhance the delivery of medical information to patients, healthcare professionals, and other stakeholders. These aids can include a wide range of devices and tools, such as: 1. Videos: Medical videos can be used to demonstrate surgical procedures, explain medical conditions, or provide educational content to patients. 2. Audio recordings: Audio recordings can be used to provide patients with information about their medical condition, medication instructions, or other important details. 3. Interactive software: Interactive software can be used to help patients understand complex medical concepts, track their progress, or manage their health. 4. Projectors and screens: Projectors and screens can be used to display medical images, videos, or other visual aids to patients and healthcare professionals. 5. Virtual reality: Virtual reality technology can be used to simulate medical procedures, provide immersive educational experiences, or help patients manage pain and anxiety. Overall, audiovisual aids can be a valuable tool in the medical field, helping to improve patient education, enhance communication between healthcare professionals, and promote better health outcomes.

Aptitude tests are assessments designed to measure an individual's natural abilities or potential to perform certain tasks or duties. In the medical field, aptitude tests are often used to evaluate a candidate's cognitive abilities, problem-solving skills, and other traits that are important for success in a medical career. These tests may include a variety of different types of assessments, such as: 1. Verbal reasoning tests: These tests measure a candidate's ability to understand and interpret written information, including medical texts and reports. 2. Numerical reasoning tests: These tests measure a candidate's ability to work with numbers and perform calculations, which is important for tasks such as interpreting medical data and making diagnoses. 3. Spatial reasoning tests: These tests measure a candidate's ability to visualize and manipulate objects in three dimensions, which is important for tasks such as surgical procedures. 4. Personality tests: These tests measure a candidate's personality traits and characteristics, such as their level of empathy, communication skills, and ability to work well under pressure. 5. Medical knowledge tests: These tests measure a candidate's understanding of medical concepts and terminology, as well as their ability to apply this knowledge to real-world situations. Overall, aptitude tests are an important tool for evaluating candidates for medical careers and ensuring that they have the skills and abilities needed to succeed in this challenging and demanding field.

Comprehensive dental care refers to a range of dental services that are designed to promote oral health and prevent dental problems. This type of care typically includes routine check-ups, cleanings, and x-rays, as well as more advanced procedures such as fillings, root canals, and extractions. Comprehensive dental care also includes preventive measures such as fluoride treatments, sealants, and oral hygiene education to help patients maintain good oral health and avoid dental problems. In addition, comprehensive dental care may include cosmetic procedures such as teeth whitening and veneers to improve the appearance of a patient's smile. Overall, comprehensive dental care is focused on providing patients with a wide range of services to promote oral health and prevent dental problems, as well as to address any existing dental issues that may arise.

Cultural competency in the medical field refers to the ability of healthcare providers to understand, respect, and effectively communicate with patients from diverse cultural backgrounds. It involves recognizing and appreciating the unique cultural beliefs, values, and practices of patients, and using this knowledge to provide care that is sensitive to their needs and preferences. Cultural competency in healthcare requires healthcare providers to have an understanding of the cultural beliefs and practices of their patients, including their language, dietary restrictions, religious beliefs, and traditional healing practices. It also involves being able to communicate effectively with patients from diverse cultural backgrounds, using appropriate language and terminology, and being sensitive to cultural differences in communication styles and preferences. Cultural competency is important in healthcare because it can help to improve patient outcomes, reduce healthcare disparities, and enhance patient satisfaction. By providing culturally competent care, healthcare providers can build trust and rapport with their patients, which can lead to better health outcomes and improved patient satisfaction.

Biological science disciplines in the medical field refer to the various branches of biology that are used to study living organisms and their interactions with the environment. These disciplines include: 1. Anatomy: The study of the structure and organization of living organisms, including their cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems. 2. Physiology: The study of the functions of living organisms, including their metabolism, growth, and reproduction. 3. Biochemistry: The study of the chemical processes that occur within living organisms, including the structure and function of biomolecules such as proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. 4. Microbiology: The study of microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoa, and their interactions with other organisms and the environment. 5. Immunology: The study of the immune system and how it defends the body against infection and disease. 6. Genetics: The study of the heredity of traits and the variation of organisms, including the structure and function of genes and chromosomes. 7. Evolutionary biology: The study of the processes that have led to the diversity of life on Earth, including natural selection and genetic drift. These disciplines are used in the medical field to understand the underlying mechanisms of disease and to develop new treatments and therapies. For example, knowledge of genetics can be used to develop personalized medicine, while knowledge of immunology can be used to develop vaccines and immunotherapies.

In the medical field, comprehension refers to the ability to understand and interpret medical information and instructions. This includes the ability to comprehend the diagnosis, treatment plan, and any potential risks or complications associated with a medical condition or procedure. Comprehension is an important aspect of patient education and is essential for patients to make informed decisions about their health and treatment options. It is often assessed through patient interviews and questionnaires to ensure that patients have a clear understanding of their medical condition and treatment plan.

In the medical field, the term "College Admission Test" typically refers to the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). The MCAT is a standardized test that is required for admission to most medical schools in the United States and Canada. It assesses a student's knowledge of science, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills, as well as their ability to apply that knowledge to real-world situations. The MCAT consists of four sections: Biological and Biochemical Foundations of Living Systems, Chemical and Physical Foundations of Biological Systems, Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior, and Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills. The test is typically taken by students in their third year of undergraduate studies, although some students may take it earlier or later.

In the medical field, cooperative behavior refers to the willingness and ability of healthcare providers, patients, and other stakeholders to work together towards a common goal of providing high-quality healthcare. This includes communication, collaboration, and teamwork among healthcare professionals, as well as patients' active participation in their own care. Cooperative behavior is essential in healthcare because it can lead to better outcomes, improved patient satisfaction, and reduced healthcare costs. For example, when healthcare providers work together to coordinate care, they can avoid duplication of services and ensure that patients receive the most appropriate treatment. When patients are actively involved in their care, they are more likely to adhere to treatment plans and have better health outcomes. In addition, cooperative behavior is important in promoting a culture of safety in healthcare. When healthcare providers work together to identify and address safety risks, they can prevent errors and adverse events, which can harm patients and lead to legal and financial consequences. Overall, cooperative behavior is a critical component of high-quality healthcare, and healthcare providers should strive to foster a culture of collaboration and teamwork in their practice.

In the medical field, "Brazil" typically refers to the country located in South America. Brazil is the largest country in both South America and Latin America, and it is known for its diverse population, rich culture, and natural resources. In terms of healthcare, Brazil has a publicly funded healthcare system called the Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde, or SUS). The SUS provides free or low-cost healthcare services to all Brazilian citizens and residents, including primary care, hospitalization, and specialized medical care. Brazil has also made significant strides in public health, particularly in the areas of infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and dengue fever. The country has implemented widespread vaccination programs and has made efforts to improve access to healthcare services in underserved areas. However, Brazil still faces significant challenges in the healthcare sector, including a shortage of healthcare professionals, inadequate infrastructure, and disparities in access to healthcare services between different regions and socioeconomic groups.

Community Medicine, also known as Public Health Medicine, is a branch of medicine that focuses on the health of communities and populations as a whole, rather than on the health of individuals. It involves the study of the distribution and determinants of health and disease in populations, as well as the development and implementation of strategies to improve health and prevent disease at the community level. Community Medicine encompasses a wide range of activities, including epidemiology, health promotion, disease prevention, health education, health policy, and health services research. It is concerned with the health of all members of a community, including children, adults, and the elderly, as well as with the health of specific population groups, such as the poor, the homeless, and the disabled. Community Medicine is an interdisciplinary field that draws on knowledge and skills from a variety of disciplines, including medicine, public health, sociology, economics, anthropology, and environmental science. It is an important part of the healthcare system, as it helps to identify and address the underlying social, economic, and environmental factors that contribute to health disparities and poor health outcomes in communities.

Dental care refers to the maintenance and treatment of the teeth and gums to promote oral health and prevent or treat dental problems. It includes regular check-ups, cleaning, and fluoride treatments to prevent tooth decay and gum disease. Dental care also involves the diagnosis and treatment of oral health problems such as cavities, gum disease, toothaches, and oral infections. In some cases, dental care may also involve the placement of dental implants, bridges, crowns, or dentures to restore or replace missing teeth. Overall, dental care is an essential part of maintaining good overall health and well-being.

Substance-related disorders are a group of mental health conditions that are caused by the use of drugs or alcohol. These disorders can range from mild to severe and can have a significant impact on a person's life. Substance-related disorders are diagnosed when a person's use of drugs or alcohol causes problems in their daily life, such as problems at work or school, problems with relationships, or legal problems. Substance-related disorders can also lead to physical health problems, such as liver damage or heart disease. Treatment for substance-related disorders typically involves a combination of behavioral therapy and medication.

Binge drinking is a pattern of drinking that involves consuming a large amount of alcohol in a short period of time. In the medical field, binge drinking is typically defined as consuming four or more drinks for women, and five or more drinks for men, in a single occasion. This pattern of drinking can lead to a range of negative health consequences, including alcohol poisoning, liver damage, heart disease, and certain types of cancer. It can also increase the risk of accidents, injuries, and risky behaviors such as unprotected sex and driving under the influence.

In the medical field, creativity refers to the ability to generate new and innovative ideas, approaches, and solutions to problems related to healthcare, medical research, and patient care. It involves the ability to think outside the box, to see things from different perspectives, and to come up with novel solutions to complex medical challenges. Creativity is essential in the medical field because it allows healthcare professionals to develop new treatments, diagnostic tools, and medical technologies that can improve patient outcomes and advance medical knowledge. It also enables healthcare providers to design more effective and efficient healthcare systems, improve patient experiences, and develop new ways to prevent and manage diseases. In addition to its practical applications, creativity is also important in medical education and training, where it can help students and healthcare professionals develop critical thinking skills, problem-solving abilities, and a willingness to take risks and try new things.

Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) is a statistical method used to compare the means of three or more groups. In the medical field, ANOVA can be used to compare the effectiveness of different treatments, interventions, or medications on a particular outcome or variable of interest. For example, a researcher may want to compare the effectiveness of three different medications for treating a particular disease. They could use ANOVA to compare the mean response (e.g., improvement in symptoms) between the three groups of patients who received each medication. If the results show a significant difference between the groups, it would suggest that one medication is more effective than the others. ANOVA can also be used to compare the means of different groups of patients based on a categorical variable, such as age, gender, or race. For example, a researcher may want to compare the mean blood pressure of patients in different age groups. They could use ANOVA to compare the mean blood pressure between the different age groups and determine if there are significant differences. Overall, ANOVA is a powerful statistical tool that can be used to compare the means of different groups in the medical field, helping researchers to identify which treatments or interventions are most effective and to better understand the factors that influence health outcomes.

In the medical field, aptitude refers to an individual's natural ability or inclination towards a particular task or profession. It is a measure of a person's potential to learn and perform well in a specific area of medicine, such as surgery, pediatrics, or research. Aptitude is often assessed through various tests and evaluations, including cognitive assessments, personality tests, and skills assessments. These tests are designed to identify an individual's strengths and weaknesses in areas such as critical thinking, problem-solving, communication, and decision-making. In the medical field, having a strong aptitude for a particular area of medicine is important because it can help individuals to excel in their chosen profession and provide the best possible care to their patients. However, it is important to note that aptitude is not the only factor that determines success in medicine, and other factors such as education, training, and experience also play a crucial role.

Dental care for chronically ill refers to the specialized dental care provided to individuals who have chronic medical conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, and others. These individuals may have unique dental needs due to the impact of their chronic illness on their overall health and may require specialized dental care to manage their oral health and prevent complications. Dental care for chronically ill may involve regular dental check-ups, more frequent cleanings, and the use of specialized dental equipment and techniques to manage the individual's oral health. The dentist may also work closely with the individual's primary care physician to coordinate their overall care and manage any potential interactions between their medications and dental treatments. In addition to routine dental care, individuals with chronic illnesses may also require specialized dental procedures such as gum disease treatment, tooth extractions, and dental implants to manage their oral health and prevent complications. It is important for individuals with chronic illnesses to receive regular dental care to maintain their oral health and prevent potential complications that can impact their overall health and well-being.

In the medical field, "attitude to health" refers to an individual's beliefs, values, and behaviors related to their health and well-being. It encompasses their perceptions of their own health status, their motivation to engage in healthy behaviors, their willingness to seek medical care, and their attitudes towards illness and disease. An individual's attitude to health can have a significant impact on their health outcomes. For example, a positive attitude towards health can motivate individuals to adopt healthy behaviors, such as regular exercise and a healthy diet, and to seek medical care when needed. On the other hand, a negative attitude towards health can lead to unhealthy behaviors and a reluctance to seek medical care, which can contribute to poor health outcomes. In medical practice, healthcare providers often assess an individual's attitude to health as part of their overall assessment of their health status. This can help healthcare providers to identify any barriers to healthy behaviors or medical care and to develop tailored interventions to support positive health behaviors and outcomes.

In the medical field, "Canada" typically refers to the country located in North America, bordered by the United States to the south and the Arctic Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, and Pacific Ocean to the north, east, and west, respectively. Canada is the second-largest country in the world by land area and has a diverse population of over 38 million people. In the context of healthcare, Canada has a publicly funded healthcare system known as Medicare, which provides universal coverage for medically necessary hospital and physician services to all Canadian citizens and permanent residents. However, there are also private healthcare options available in Canada, and some Canadians may choose to seek medical treatment outside of the country. Canada is also home to a number of world-renowned medical research institutions and universities, including the University of Toronto, McGill University, and the University of British Columbia, which conduct cutting-edge research in fields such as genetics, immunology, and neuroscience.

In the medical field, "Attitude to Computers" refers to an individual's overall perspective or disposition towards the use of computers in healthcare settings. This attitude can encompass a range of beliefs and feelings, including positive or negative attitudes towards the technology itself, as well as attitudes towards the potential benefits and drawbacks of using computers in healthcare. For example, an individual with a positive attitude towards computers in healthcare may believe that they can improve patient care and outcomes, increase efficiency and productivity, and enhance communication between healthcare providers. On the other hand, an individual with a negative attitude towards computers in healthcare may be skeptical of the technology's reliability, concerned about data privacy and security, or resistant to change. Understanding an individual's attitude towards computers in healthcare can be important for healthcare providers and organizations, as it can influence their willingness to adopt and use new technologies, as well as their ability to effectively integrate computers into their workflows and patient care processes.

CD-ROM stands for Compact Disc Read-Only Memory. It is a digital optical disc that can store large amounts of data, including text, images, audio, and video. In the medical field, CD-ROMs are often used to distribute medical information, such as patient records, medical textbooks, and research studies. They can also be used to store medical images, such as X-rays and MRI scans, which can be easily accessed and shared among healthcare professionals. CD-ROMs are a convenient and cost-effective way to store and distribute medical information, and they are widely used in hospitals, clinics, and medical research institutions.

In the medical field, the chi-square distribution is a statistical tool used to analyze the relationship between two categorical variables. It is often used in medical research to determine whether there is a significant association between two variables, such as the presence of a disease and a particular risk factor. The chi-square distribution is a probability distribution that describes the sum of the squared differences between the observed and expected frequencies of a categorical variable. It is commonly used in hypothesis testing to determine whether the observed frequencies of a categorical variable differ significantly from the expected frequencies. In medical research, the chi-square test is often used to analyze the relationship between two categorical variables, such as the presence of a disease and a particular risk factor. For example, a researcher may want to determine whether there is a significant association between smoking and lung cancer. To do this, the researcher would collect data on the smoking habits of a group of people and their incidence of lung cancer. The chi-square test would then be used to determine whether the observed frequencies of lung cancer among smokers differ significantly from the expected frequencies based on the overall incidence of lung cancer in the population. Overall, the chi-square distribution is a valuable tool in medical research for analyzing the relationship between categorical variables and determining whether observed frequencies differ significantly from expected frequencies.

In the medical field, deception refers to the act of intentionally misleading or providing false information to a patient or healthcare provider. This can occur in various ways, such as hiding the true nature or severity of a medical condition, providing false reassurance, or manipulating test results. Deception in the medical field can have serious consequences, as it can lead to misdiagnosis, inappropriate treatment, and harm to the patient's health. It is generally considered unethical and can result in disciplinary action for healthcare providers who engage in such behavior. However, there may be situations where deception is considered acceptable or necessary, such as in cases where withholding information is necessary to protect the patient's autonomy or to prevent harm. In these cases, healthcare providers must carefully weigh the potential benefits and risks of deception and ensure that it is done in the best interests of the patient.

In the medical field, "Australia" typically refers to the country located in the southern hemisphere, which is known for its unique flora and fauna, as well as its diverse population and healthcare system. Australia has a well-developed healthcare system that is publicly funded through a combination of taxes and government subsidies. The country has a universal healthcare system known as Medicare, which provides free or low-cost medical services to all citizens and permanent residents. In addition to its public healthcare system, Australia also has a thriving private healthcare sector, which includes hospitals, clinics, and specialist medical practices. Many Australians also have private health insurance, which can provide additional coverage for medical services that are not covered by Medicare. Overall, the medical field in Australia is highly advanced and well-regarded, with a strong emphasis on research, innovation, and patient-centered care.

In the medical field, "China" typically refers to the People's Republic of China, which is a country located in East Asia. China has a large and diverse population, and its healthcare system is one of the largest in the world. The country has made significant progress in improving access to healthcare and reducing mortality rates in recent years. In terms of medical research and development, China has become an important player in the global biomedical community. The country has a growing number of research institutions and has made significant investments in medical research and development. China is also home to a large and diverse population, which provides a rich source of data for medical research. Overall, "China" in the medical field typically refers to the country's healthcare system, medical research and development, and its role in the global biomedical community.

In the medical field, awareness refers to a person's level of consciousness or their ability to perceive and respond to their environment. It is a measure of how much a person is aware of their surroundings, their own body, and their thoughts and feelings. There are several levels of awareness, ranging from full consciousness to unconsciousness. Full consciousness refers to a state in which a person is fully aware of their surroundings and can respond to stimuli. Partial consciousness, also known as altered consciousness, refers to a state in which a person is aware of some aspects of their environment but not others. Unconsciousness refers to a state in which a person is not aware of their surroundings or their own body. In medical settings, awareness is an important factor in determining the appropriate level of care and treatment for a patient. For example, a patient who is fully conscious may be able to provide information about their medical history and symptoms, which can help healthcare providers make informed decisions about their care. In contrast, a patient who is unconscious may require more intensive monitoring and treatment to ensure their safety and well-being.

In the medical field, "California" typically refers to the state of California in the United States, which is known for its diverse population, large number of healthcare facilities, and cutting-edge medical research and technology. California is home to some of the top medical schools and research institutions in the country, and is a major center for medical innovation and development. Medical professionals and researchers in California are often at the forefront of new medical discoveries and treatments, and the state is known for its high standards of medical care and attention to patient needs.

Blogging in the medical field refers to the practice of creating and publishing content on a regular basis on a blog or website related to medical topics. Medical bloggers typically write about a variety of topics related to healthcare, including medical research, patient experiences, health news, and medical treatments. Medical blogging can be a useful tool for healthcare professionals, patients, and the general public to stay informed about the latest medical developments and to share information and experiences. Medical bloggers may also use their blogs to provide educational resources, offer advice and support to patients, and engage with their audience through comments and social media. However, it is important to note that medical blogging should not be used as a substitute for professional medical advice. Medical bloggers should always disclose their qualifications and any conflicts of interest, and readers should seek medical advice from a qualified healthcare professional for any medical concerns.

Computer User Training in the medical field refers to the process of educating and training medical professionals, such as doctors, nurses, and other healthcare providers, on how to effectively use computer systems and software in their work. This training may include topics such as electronic health records (EHRs), medical imaging software, clinical decision support systems, and other medical-related computer applications. The goal of computer user training in the medical field is to ensure that healthcare providers are able to use technology efficiently and effectively to improve patient care and outcomes. This training may be provided through in-person classes, online courses, or other forms of instruction, and may be tailored to the specific needs and requirements of different medical specialties and practices.

In the medical field, "Computers, Handheld" refers to portable electronic devices that are designed to perform various computing tasks, such as data entry, communication, and decision support, in a mobile or remote setting. These devices are typically small, lightweight, and easy to carry, making them ideal for use in healthcare environments where mobility and accessibility are important. Handheld computers in healthcare can be used for a variety of purposes, including patient record keeping, medication management, clinical decision support, and telemedicine. They can also be used to collect and analyze data, such as vital signs and laboratory results, and to communicate with other healthcare professionals and systems. Some examples of handheld computers used in healthcare include smartphones, tablets, and specialized devices designed specifically for medical use, such as electronic medical record (EMR) systems and point-of-care diagnostic devices. These devices can help healthcare professionals to improve patient care, reduce errors, and increase efficiency in their work.

In the medical field, culture refers to the collection of microorganisms (such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites) that grow on a specific culture medium. The culture medium provides the nutrients and conditions necessary for the microorganisms to thrive and multiply. The process of growing a culture involves taking a sample of a patient's body fluid, tissue, or other bodily substance and placing it on a culture medium. The culture medium is then incubated in a controlled environment to allow the microorganisms to grow and multiply. The resulting colonies of microorganisms can be identified and analyzed to determine the type and number of microorganisms present. Cultures are an important tool in the diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. They can help identify the specific microorganisms causing an infection, which can guide the selection of appropriate antibiotics or other treatments. Cultures can also be used to monitor the effectiveness of treatment and detect the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of microorganisms.

In the medical field, counseling refers to the provision of emotional support, guidance, and advice to individuals who are dealing with various mental health issues, physical health problems, or life challenges. Counseling can take many forms, including individual therapy, group therapy, couples therapy, family therapy, and more. It can be provided by a variety of healthcare professionals, including psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, and licensed counselors. The goal of counseling is to help individuals develop coping strategies, improve their mental and emotional well-being, and make positive changes in their lives. This may involve exploring underlying issues, setting goals, and developing a plan of action to achieve those goals. Counseling can be beneficial for individuals dealing with a wide range of issues, including anxiety, depression, stress, relationship problems, addiction, trauma, and more. It can also be helpful for individuals who are seeking to make positive changes in their lives, such as quitting smoking, losing weight, or improving their overall health and well-being.

In the medical field, Community-Institutional Relations (CIR) refers to the interactions and relationships between healthcare institutions and the communities they serve. These relationships are critical for ensuring that healthcare services are accessible, culturally appropriate, and responsive to the needs of the community. CIR involves a range of activities, including community outreach and engagement, partnership building, and collaboration with community-based organizations. Healthcare institutions may work with community leaders, advocacy groups, and other stakeholders to identify community health needs, develop and implement health promotion programs, and address health disparities. Effective CIR requires a deep understanding of the cultural, social, and economic factors that influence health outcomes in the community. It also requires a commitment to involving community members in the planning and delivery of healthcare services, and to being accountable to the community for the quality and effectiveness of those services. Overall, CIR is an essential component of healthcare delivery in today's complex and diverse healthcare landscape, and is critical for ensuring that healthcare institutions are able to provide high-quality, culturally competent care that meets the needs of the communities they serve.

Alcohol-related disorders refer to a group of medical conditions that are caused or exacerbated by excessive or prolonged alcohol consumption. These disorders can affect various parts of the body and can range from mild to severe. Some common alcohol-related disorders include: 1. Alcohol use disorder (AUD): A chronic and often relapsing brain disorder characterized by a strong desire or craving to drink alcohol despite negative consequences. 2. Alcohol dependence: A severe form of AUD that involves a physical and psychological dependence on alcohol. 3. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD): A group of birth defects that occur when a pregnant woman drinks alcohol, which can cause physical, behavioral, and cognitive problems in the child. 4. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome: A group of symptoms that occur when a person who has been drinking heavily suddenly stops drinking. 5. Cirrhosis of the liver: A serious liver disease that can be caused by long-term heavy drinking. 6. Pancreatitis: A condition in which the pancreas becomes inflamed and can be caused by excessive alcohol consumption. 7. Heart disease: A group of conditions that affect the heart, including high blood pressure, heart attack, and stroke, which can be caused by excessive alcohol consumption. 8. Cancer: Excessive alcohol consumption can increase the risk of certain types of cancer, including liver, breast, and colon cancer. Treatment for alcohol-related disorders typically involves a combination of behavioral therapy, medication, and support groups. It is important to seek medical attention if you or someone you know is struggling with alcohol-related disorders.

Consumer satisfaction in the medical field refers to the level of satisfaction that patients feel with the healthcare services they receive. It encompasses a range of factors, including the quality of care, the accessibility of services, the friendliness and professionalism of healthcare providers, the comfort and cleanliness of the healthcare facility, and the overall experience of the patient. Consumer satisfaction is an important metric for healthcare providers and organizations, as it can impact patient loyalty, patient retention, and patient referrals. It can also influence the reputation of the healthcare provider and the organization, as well as their ability to attract new patients. To measure consumer satisfaction in the medical field, healthcare providers and organizations often use surveys and other forms of feedback to gather information from patients about their experiences. This information can then be used to identify areas for improvement and to make changes that can enhance the overall quality of care and the patient experience.

In the medical field, "art" typically refers to the use of creative techniques and skills to improve patient care and outcomes. This can include a variety of artistic practices, such as music therapy, art therapy, and creative writing therapy. Music therapy involves the use of music to promote physical, emotional, cognitive, and social well-being. It can be used to help patients manage pain, reduce anxiety and depression, improve communication and social skills, and enhance overall quality of life. Art therapy involves the use of art materials and creative processes to help patients express themselves and explore their emotions and experiences. It can be used to help patients cope with a variety of mental health conditions, including anxiety, depression, trauma, and addiction. Creative writing therapy involves the use of writing as a tool for self-expression and personal growth. It can be used to help patients explore their thoughts and feelings, process traumatic experiences, and develop new coping strategies. Overall, the use of art in the medical field is an increasingly recognized and valued approach to patient care, as it can help patients to better understand and manage their health and well-being.

In the medical field, "choice behavior" refers to the decisions that individuals make regarding their health and healthcare. These decisions can include whether or not to seek medical treatment, what type of treatment to receive, and how to manage their health and prevent illness. Choice behavior is influenced by a variety of factors, including an individual's personal beliefs and values, their level of health literacy, their access to healthcare resources, and the advice and recommendations of healthcare providers. It is important for healthcare providers to understand and consider these factors when working with patients to make informed decisions about their health and healthcare. Choice behavior can also have an impact on the overall health of a population. For example, if individuals make poor choices about their health, such as smoking or not getting regular exercise, this can contribute to the development of chronic diseases and other health problems. On the other hand, if individuals make healthy choices, such as eating a balanced diet and getting regular exercise, this can help to prevent illness and improve overall health outcomes.

Deafness is a medical condition characterized by a partial or complete inability to hear sounds. It can be caused by a variety of factors, including genetic mutations, exposure to loud noises, infections, and aging. In the medical field, deafness is typically classified into two main types: conductive deafness and sensorineural deafness. Conductive deafness occurs when there is a problem with the outer or middle ear that prevents sound waves from reaching the inner ear. Sensorineural deafness, on the other hand, occurs when there is damage to the inner ear or the auditory nerve that transmits sound signals to the brain. Deafness can have a significant impact on a person's quality of life, affecting their ability to communicate, socialize, and participate in daily activities. Treatment options for deafness depend on the underlying cause and severity of the condition. In some cases, hearing aids or cochlear implants may be used to improve hearing, while in other cases, surgery or other medical interventions may be necessary to address the underlying cause of the deafness.

Bioethical issues are moral and ethical questions that arise in the field of medicine and healthcare. These issues involve the use of medical technology, the allocation of healthcare resources, the rights and autonomy of patients, and the responsibilities of healthcare providers. Bioethical issues can also involve questions about the ethical implications of medical research, the use of genetic testing and genetic engineering, and the end-of-life care of patients. Bioethicists are professionals who study and analyze these issues, and they work to develop ethical guidelines and principles to guide medical practice and research.

Career mobility in the medical field refers to the ability of a healthcare professional to move up the career ladder or switch to a different area of specialization within the medical field. This can include transitioning from a lower-level position, such as a medical assistant, to a higher-level position, such as a physician, or switching from one area of medicine, such as pediatrics, to another, such as cardiology. Career mobility in the medical field can be influenced by a variety of factors, including education and training, work experience, networking, and personal and professional goals. For example, a physician who wants to specialize in a particular area of medicine may need to complete additional training and certification programs, while a medical assistant who wants to advance to a higher-level position may need to gain more experience and develop additional skills. Overall, career mobility in the medical field can provide healthcare professionals with opportunities to grow and develop their careers, as well as to pursue their interests and passions within the field.

Biomedical research is a field of study that involves the use of scientific methods to investigate the biological and medical aspects of health and disease. It encompasses a wide range of research areas, including genetics, biochemistry, physiology, pharmacology, immunology, neuroscience, and many others. The goal of biomedical research is to improve our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of health and disease, and to develop new treatments, therapies, and diagnostic tools. This research is typically conducted in academic and research institutions, as well as in pharmaceutical and biotech companies. Biomedical research can be basic or applied. Basic research aims to increase our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern health and disease, while applied research focuses on developing practical applications of this knowledge, such as new drugs, medical devices, or diagnostic tests. Overall, biomedical research plays a critical role in advancing medical knowledge and improving patient outcomes.

Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena refers to the changes that occur in the body of adolescents as they grow and develop, particularly in relation to nutrition. These changes are influenced by hormonal changes, physical activity, and other factors, and can affect nutrient requirements, metabolism, and body composition. Some examples of adolescent nutritional physiological phenomena include changes in appetite, growth spurts, and the development of body fat. Understanding these phenomena is important for ensuring that adolescents receive adequate nutrition to support their growth and development.

In the medical field, "age factors" refer to the effects of aging on the body and its various systems. As people age, their bodies undergo a variety of changes that can impact their health and well-being. These changes can include: 1. Decreased immune function: As people age, their immune system becomes less effective at fighting off infections and diseases. 2. Changes in metabolism: Aging can cause changes in the way the body processes food and uses energy, which can lead to weight gain, insulin resistance, and other metabolic disorders. 3. Cardiovascular changes: Aging can lead to changes in the heart and blood vessels, including increased risk of heart disease, stroke, and high blood pressure. 4. Cognitive changes: Aging can affect memory, attention, and other cognitive functions, which can lead to conditions such as dementia and Alzheimer's disease. 5. Joint and bone changes: Aging can cause changes in the joints and bones, including decreased bone density and increased risk of osteoporosis and arthritis. 6. Skin changes: Aging can cause changes in the skin, including wrinkles, age spots, and decreased elasticity. 7. Hormonal changes: Aging can cause changes in hormone levels, including decreased estrogen in women and decreased testosterone in men, which can lead to a variety of health issues. Overall, age factors play a significant role in the development of many health conditions and can impact a person's quality of life. It is important for individuals to be aware of these changes and to take steps to maintain their health and well-being as they age.

Adolescent psychology is a branch of psychology that focuses on the psychological development of individuals between the ages of 10 and 19. During this stage of life, adolescents undergo significant physical, emotional, and cognitive changes, and they are also faced with a variety of social and environmental challenges. Adolescent psychology seeks to understand the unique psychological characteristics of this age group, including their emotional and behavioral patterns, their cognitive development, and their social relationships. It also aims to identify the factors that influence adolescent development, such as family dynamics, peer relationships, and cultural and societal influences. By studying adolescent psychology, healthcare professionals can better understand the needs and challenges of this population and develop effective interventions to promote healthy development and prevent mental health problems.

Clinical medicine is a branch of medicine that deals with the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases in humans. It involves the application of medical knowledge and skills to diagnose and manage illnesses and injuries in patients. Clinical medicine encompasses a wide range of specialties, including internal medicine, pediatrics, surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, and many others. The primary goal of clinical medicine is to improve the health and well-being of patients by providing effective and compassionate care.

Biochemistry is the study of the chemical processes that occur within living organisms, including the structure, function, and interactions of biomolecules such as proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. In the medical field, biochemistry plays a critical role in understanding the underlying mechanisms of various diseases and disorders, as well as in developing new treatments and therapies. For example, biochemists may study the metabolic pathways involved in cancer, the role of specific enzymes in neurological disorders, or the mechanisms of drug action and resistance. They may also develop diagnostic tests based on biomarkers, which are measurable indicators of disease or health status. Overall, biochemistry is a fundamental discipline that provides insights into the complex processes that govern life and health.

Community pharmacy services refer to the services provided by pharmacists in community pharmacies, which are typically located in retail settings such as supermarkets, grocery stores, and drugstores. These services include the dispensing of prescription medications, providing medication therapy management, offering health screenings and vaccinations, and providing advice and counseling on medication use and other health-related topics. Community pharmacists are trained to provide a wide range of services to help patients manage their medications and improve their health outcomes. They work closely with other healthcare professionals, such as physicians and nurses, to ensure that patients receive the most appropriate and effective care possible. Some specific examples of community pharmacy services include: * Dispensing medications: Pharmacists prepare and dispense medications as prescribed by a healthcare provider. * Medication therapy management: Pharmacists review patients' medication regimens to ensure that they are taking the right medications, at the right doses, and at the right times. * Health screenings and vaccinations: Pharmacists may offer health screenings, such as blood pressure checks and cholesterol tests, and administer vaccinations, such as flu shots and pneumonia shots. * Medication advice and counseling: Pharmacists provide advice and counseling to patients on how to take their medications safely and effectively, as well as on any potential side effects or interactions with other medications. * Disease state management: Pharmacists may work with patients who have chronic conditions, such as diabetes or high blood pressure, to help them manage their conditions and improve their health outcomes. Overall, community pharmacy services play an important role in helping patients manage their medications and improve their health outcomes.

"Catha" is not a commonly used term in the medical field. It is possible that you may be referring to "Cannabis" or "Marijuana," which is a psychoactive drug that is used for medicinal and recreational purposes. Cannabis contains various chemicals, including THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) and CBD (cannabidiol), which can have a range of effects on the body and mind. THC is the psychoactive component of cannabis that is responsible for the "high" feeling associated with marijuana use. CBD, on the other hand, is non-psychoactive and has been studied for its potential therapeutic benefits, including pain relief, anti-inflammatory effects, and anxiety reduction. Cannabis is used to treat a variety of medical conditions, including chronic pain, nausea, and muscle spasms. However, its use is controversial, and its legal status varies widely depending on the country and state.

Learning disorders are a group of conditions that affect a person's ability to acquire, process, store, and retrieve information. These disorders can affect various aspects of learning, such as reading, writing, spelling, math, and language. Learning disorders are not caused by a lack of intelligence or motivation, but rather by neurological or developmental differences that affect the way the brain processes information. They can be diagnosed in children and adults and can range from mild to severe. Some common types of learning disorders include: 1. Dyslexia: A disorder that affects a person's ability to read and spell. 2. Dysgraphia: A disorder that affects a person's ability to write legibly. 3. Dyscalculia: A disorder that affects a person's ability to understand and perform mathematical calculations. 4. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): A disorder that affects a person's ability to focus and pay attention. 5. Auditory Processing Disorder (APD): A disorder that affects a person's ability to process and understand auditory information. Learning disorders can be diagnosed through a combination of standardized tests, evaluations by educational and medical professionals, and observation of a person's behavior and academic performance. Treatment for learning disorders typically involves a multi-disciplinary approach that may include special education, therapy, and medication.

Dental care for the aged refers to the specialized dental care provided to older adults, typically those over the age of 65. This type of care is important because older adults are at a higher risk for developing dental problems, such as tooth decay, gum disease, and oral cancer, due to changes in their oral health and overall health as they age. Dental care for the aged may include regular dental check-ups, cleanings, and x-rays to monitor the health of the teeth and gums. It may also include the treatment of existing dental problems, such as fillings, crowns, and dentures, as well as the management of chronic conditions, such as diabetes and heart disease, which can affect oral health. In addition to traditional dental care, dental care for the aged may also include specialized services, such as oral cancer screenings, nutritional counseling, and assistance with daily oral hygiene tasks, to help older adults maintain good oral health and overall well-being.

Postcoital contraception, also known as emergency contraception, refers to methods used to prevent pregnancy after sexual intercourse has already occurred. These methods are typically used when regular contraception methods have been forgotten or when contraceptive failure has occurred. There are two main types of postcoital contraception: emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) and intrauterine devices (IUDs). ECPs are taken within 72 hours of unprotected sex and work by preventing or delaying ovulation, thickening cervical mucus to prevent sperm from reaching the egg, or preventing fertilization by interfering with the implantation of a fertilized egg in the uterus. IUDs are inserted into the uterus within 5 days of unprotected sex and work by preventing fertilization by interfering with sperm movement and preventing a fertilized egg from implanting in the uterus. Postcoital contraception is not a substitute for regular contraception and should only be used as a backup method in cases of emergency. It is important to note that postcoital contraception is not 100% effective and may not prevent pregnancy in all cases.

Decision making in the medical field refers to the process of making choices and determining the best course of action for a patient's health and well-being. This process involves considering various factors such as the patient's medical history, current condition, personal preferences, and available treatment options. Medical decision making can be complex and involve multiple stakeholders, including healthcare providers, patients, and their families. It often requires a thorough understanding of medical knowledge, as well as the ability to communicate effectively with patients and their families. In the medical field, decision making can involve a range of decisions, from routine clinical decisions such as selecting the appropriate medication or treatment plan, to more complex decisions such as determining the best course of action for a patient with a life-threatening illness or injury. Ultimately, the goal of medical decision making is to provide the best possible care for the patient, while also respecting their autonomy and ensuring that their values and preferences are taken into account.

Dental care for disabled refers to the specialized dental care provided to individuals with disabilities. These individuals may have physical, cognitive, or emotional disabilities that make it difficult for them to receive routine dental care or to communicate their dental needs effectively. Dental care for disabled may include a range of services, such as oral hygiene instruction, preventive care, restorative care, and endodontic treatment. These services may be provided in a variety of settings, including dental offices, hospitals, and nursing homes. The goal of dental care for disabled is to ensure that individuals with disabilities receive the necessary dental care to maintain good oral health and overall health.

In the medical field, cross-cultural comparison refers to the study of how different cultures perceive, understand, and approach health and illness. This involves comparing and contrasting the beliefs, practices, and attitudes towards health and illness across different cultural groups. Cross-cultural comparison is important in healthcare because it helps healthcare providers to understand the cultural context of their patients and to provide culturally sensitive care. It also helps to identify and address health disparities that may be related to cultural differences. For example, cross-cultural comparison may reveal that certain cultural groups have different beliefs about the causes of illness, different attitudes towards seeking medical care, and different practices for managing health and illness. This information can be used to develop culturally appropriate interventions and treatments that are more likely to be effective for patients from different cultural backgrounds.

The Behavioral Sciences in the medical field refers to the study of human behavior, emotions, and mental processes in relation to health and illness. It encompasses a wide range of disciplines, including psychology, sociology, anthropology, economics, and political science, among others. The Behavioral Sciences in medicine seeks to understand how individual and social factors influence health behaviors, health outcomes, and the delivery of healthcare services. It also explores the role of culture, environment, and social determinants of health in shaping health behaviors and outcomes. The application of Behavioral Sciences in medicine can help healthcare providers develop more effective interventions to prevent and treat diseases, improve patient outcomes, and enhance the overall quality of care. It can also help policymakers design and implement evidence-based policies and programs to promote health equity and improve population health.

In the medical field, altruism refers to the selfless concern for the well-being of others, particularly in the context of healthcare. It involves putting the needs and interests of others before one's own, and taking actions that benefit others without expecting anything in return. Altruism is an important value in healthcare because it promotes the provision of high-quality care to all patients, regardless of their social status, race, or ability to pay. Healthcare providers who practice altruism are committed to improving the health and well-being of their patients, even if it means sacrificing their own time, energy, or resources. In addition to promoting high-quality care, altruism can also help to build trust and rapport between healthcare providers and their patients. When patients perceive that their healthcare providers are acting in their best interests, they are more likely to feel comfortable and confident in their care, which can lead to better health outcomes. Overall, altruism is an essential component of the healthcare profession, as it helps to ensure that patients receive the best possible care and that healthcare providers are motivated to act in the best interests of their patients.

In the medical field, awards and prizes are typically given to recognize outstanding achievements, contributions, or innovations in the field of medicine. These awards and prizes can be given by professional organizations, academic institutions, government agencies, or other entities. Some examples of awards and prizes in the medical field include the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, which is awarded annually to individuals who have made significant contributions to the understanding of biological processes or human physiology; the Lasker Award, which recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions to medical research or public health; and the MacArthur Fellowship, which is awarded to individuals who have shown exceptional creativity in their work and the potential to continue to do so in the future. Other awards and prizes in the medical field may recognize excellence in clinical practice, teaching, or research. For example, the American Medical Association's Physician of the Year Award recognizes a physician who has demonstrated outstanding leadership, service, and dedication to the medical profession and the community. The National Institutes of Health's Director's Pioneer Award recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions to the development of new approaches to understanding human biology and disease.

Allied Health Personnel (AHPs) are healthcare professionals who provide a wide range of services to support the delivery of healthcare. They are not medical doctors, but they play a critical role in the healthcare system by providing specialized services that complement the work of physicians and other healthcare providers. AHPs include professionals such as nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, dietitians, pharmacists, medical laboratory technologists, radiologic technologists, respiratory therapists, and many others. They work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, schools, and private practices. AHPs are trained to provide specialized care in their respective fields, and they work closely with physicians and other healthcare providers to ensure that patients receive comprehensive and coordinated care. They may also be involved in research, education, and advocacy to advance the field of healthcare and improve patient outcomes.

In the medical field, body image refers to an individual's perception and attitude towards their physical appearance. It encompasses how a person feels about their body, including their shape, size, and overall appearance. Body image can be influenced by a variety of factors, including genetics, culture, media, and personal experiences. Positive body image is when an individual feels comfortable and satisfied with their physical appearance, while negative body image is when an individual has a poor opinion of their body and may experience feelings of shame, embarrassment, or low self-esteem. Negative body image can lead to a range of mental health issues, including eating disorders, depression, and anxiety. In the medical field, body image is an important consideration in the treatment of a variety of conditions, including eating disorders, obesity, and skin conditions. Medical professionals may work with patients to develop strategies for improving their body image, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy, diet and exercise counseling, and support groups.

In the medical field, bullying is defined as repeated and intentional behavior that is meant to harm, intimidate, or humiliate another person. This behavior can take many forms, including physical, verbal, and emotional abuse. Bullying can occur in a variety of settings, including schools, workplaces, and healthcare facilities. Bullying in the medical field can take many forms, including: 1. Verbal abuse: This includes name-calling, insults, and derogatory comments. 2. Physical abuse: This includes hitting, pushing, or other forms of physical violence. 3. Emotional abuse: This includes intimidation, manipulation, and threats. 4. Social exclusion: This includes isolating a person from others or excluding them from social activities. Bullying can have serious negative effects on a person's physical and mental health. It can lead to anxiety, depression, and other mental health problems, as well as physical injuries. In the medical field, bullying can also lead to decreased job satisfaction, decreased productivity, and increased turnover rates.

Cohort studies are a type of observational study in the medical field that involves following a group of individuals (a cohort) over time to identify the incidence of a particular disease or health outcome. The individuals in the cohort are typically selected based on a common characteristic, such as age, gender, or exposure to a particular risk factor. During the study, researchers collect data on the health and lifestyle of the cohort members, and then compare the incidence of the disease or health outcome between different subgroups within the cohort. This can help researchers identify risk factors or protective factors associated with the disease or outcome. Cohort studies are useful for studying the long-term effects of exposure to a particular risk factor, such as smoking or air pollution, on the development of a disease. They can also be used to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions or treatments for a particular disease. One of the main advantages of cohort studies is that they can provide strong evidence of causality, as the exposure and outcome are measured over a long period of time and in the same group of individuals. However, they can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, and may be subject to biases if the cohort is not representative of the general population.

In the medical field, "Adaptation, Psychological" refers to the process by which individuals adjust to and cope with stressors, trauma, and other challenging life events. This can involve a range of psychological mechanisms, such as cognitive restructuring, emotional regulation, and social support seeking. Psychological adaptation can be influenced by a variety of factors, including an individual's personality traits, coping skills, social support network, and access to resources. It is an important aspect of mental health and well-being, as individuals who are able to effectively adapt to stressors are more likely to experience positive outcomes and maintain good mental health over time. Psychological adaptation can also be studied in the context of specific populations, such as refugees, military personnel, and individuals with chronic illnesses, to better understand the unique challenges they face and develop effective interventions to support their adaptation.

Patients studied want their physicians to be highly professional and expert clinicians and show humaneness and support, but their first priority is for the physician to respect their autonomy.
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NIMH trainee Frances Johnson offers advice to students interested in scientific research. ... there are programs for high school students, college students. I recommend that anybody just go on the website, find something ... Home , News & Events , Multimedia , Video and Audio from 2018 , Frances Advice to Students. ...
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PhD Title: Coupling fluid and kinetic codes for laser-driven inertial fusion energy simulations PhD Supervisor: Tony Arber. About me: Prior to arriving at the University of Warwick, I undertook an integrated masters (MEng) in chemical engineering with energy engineering at Heriot-Watt University, graduating with first class honours. I finished my undergraduate winning The Watt Club Medal for obtaining the highest academic average in my year, and the Gordon Butters Memorial Prize for excellence in research in the field of particle technology. My masters research project was conducted under the supervision of Dr Ali Ozel and concerned development of constitutive relations for simulation of gas-solid flows with tribocharging at industrial scale, with a particular focus on fluidised bed reactors. I am now enjoying the new challenge of the HetSys CDT and looking forward to contributing to the exciting field of nuclear fusion research.. Publications: Angus, A., Yahia, L.A.A., Maione, R., Khala, M., ...
There are many different ways of defining "success" when it comes to helping our 2YC students be successful. For some ... Engage Students in Research. Other Resources. Perspectives on Supporting Student Success. This collection of essays was shared ... Support the Whole Student. The number and diversity of students attaining a degree in geoscience has not kept pace with the ... SAGE 2YC , Support 2YC Students. Support 2YC Students. There are many different ways of defining success when it comes to ...
Documents concerning the masters thesis for students of the Master 120 in European Studies (EURO2MS/G) - Masters thesis ...
Future Students Future Students Home Honors Program Overview Steps to Apply Accepted Checklist Scholarships Frequently Asked ... The Honors College offers programs for freshmen, transfer students, current UMSL students, and everyone in between. The Honors ... Current Students Majors and Degrees Faculty and Staff Apply Now Request Info Give Visit Campus Campus Calendar Course Schedule ... These include a student-published book of creative works (Bellerive), an annual art show (Celebrating the Arts), a full social ...
... Science Day for Students at NIH is an annual event that aims to inspire the next ... Science Day for Students at NIH 2021 was held virtually on April 19, 2021, from 10 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., ET. ... TEACHERS - We recommend treating this event like a virtual field trip to allow for the students to experience the full program ... The event capacity is limited to 300 participants from partner schools, including high school students and teachers.. ...
... broad spectrum of disciplines for individuals at career stages ranging from high school students, graduate students, scientists ... Brings PhD graduate students to the NIH Intramural Research Program for dissertation research. Participants enjoy the academic ... Enables promising predoctoral students with potential to develop into a productive, independent research scientists, to obtain ... Supports short-term research training often during the summer for students in health professional schools in focused, often ...
UAlberta Student Services. The University offers a number of services to all students. Advocacy from graduate student leaders ... The Graduate Student Ombudsperson can be reached at [email protected]. The Student OmbudService office is located in 2-702 ... Graduate Student Ombudsperson The GSA advocated to the University for a full-time Graduate Student Ombudsperson to assist ... The Graduate Student Ombudsperson at the Office of the Student Ombuds can help identify solutions to problems many graduate ...
Postgraduate Students. Mon 18 Sep. Tue 19 Sep. Students Studying at the SCNU Joint Institute. Online Registration Opens. ... Student Channel. * Infohub Opening Hours Mon - Thu. 09:00 - 17:00. Fri. 10:00 - 17:00. Sat - Sun. Closed. Email: infohub@abdn. ... Undergraduate Students (Except MBChB, BDS and Gateway to Medicine). Online Registration Opens. MyCurriculum Opens. ... Students Studying at the Universitys Campus in Qatar. Online Registration Opens. MyCurriculum Opens. ...
... - Download as a PDF or view online for free ... 5 inspirational quotes for students.pdf. *1. . 5 INSPIRATIONAL QUOTES FOR STUDENTS ... 5 inspirational quotes for students.pdf. May. 31, 2023•0. likes•44. views ...
College students optimistic about govt: survey. (Xinhua). Updated: 2004-06-04 09:06 ... College students are considered the most active part of society and, in some extent, their state of mind tells the state of the ... The survey shows that most college students in China are in good and healthy state of mind and they have a strong impetus to ... Most Chinese college students agree with the governments policies and are optimistic about Chinas future, says a bysurvey ...
Admitted Students. Admitted Students. Congratulations on your admission to the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukees Graduate ... student loans and on-campus employment) available specifically for graduate students can be found at UWMs One Stop. ... Attend New Graduate Student Orientation. Orientation is designed to serve as a general overview of topics related to graduate ... The Panther Shop is located on the main floor of the UWM Student Union and sells all of your UWM apparel. Apparel is also ...
Student Service Centre. The SSZ is the central service facility for all prospective students, applicants and current students ... In most cases, students decide at the beginning of their studies whether they want to register for an elective subject. ... By re-enrolling, students declare their intention to continue studying at our university in the following semester. Re- ... When you enrol, you will be given login information for your student email account. Please use this email address for all ...
Engineering students reach second place in global competition Five students from Loughborough Universitys Department of ... The Loughborough students aircraft, codenamed HEGAAsus was designed in collaboration with students from Virginia Polytechnic ... Online Reporting Student Services Report an incident Health and Safety IT service request IT Services FM service request ... The students at Loughborough also hosted a visit for their American teammates just before Easter; this visit helped the team to ...
BGSU Honors Students of Color seeks to equip our multicultural students with the confidence, skills, and tools to successfully ... BGSU Honors Students of Color seeks to equip our multicultural students with the confidence, skills, and tools to successfully ... We hope to foster a healthy and safe space for our students of color to develop the skills to become the best versions of ...
Camp staff paired each new student with a chosen student from Taft. Many of these buddy students were selected because they ... and student behavior was out of control. Under her leadership, student achievement increased significantly and Taft became ... Students play team-building games at Tafts Tiger Pride summer camp.. .css-1y8dxzd{margin-top:24px;margin-bottom:24px;width:100 ... Tafts student body is 73 percent low-income, and when Williamson arrived at the school 10 years ago test scores were low, ...
For Students*For Faculty/Staff*For Travelers*Travel Health Alerts*Travel Registration ... Schedule a Travel Medical Consult: SDSU Student Health Services provides these services to help you plan a safe and healthy ...
New Student Move-In Tuesday, August 29, 2023: Students studying in the U.S. on an F-1 or J-1 visa can arrive at their dorm ... Wednesday, August 30, 2023: Domestic students can arrive at their dorm beginning at 9 a.m. Students must arrive and check in at ... Welcome New Students!. We are thrilled that you have chosen to continue your education at Bryn Mawr! This website contains ... beginning at 9 a.m. Students must arrive and check in at their dorm no later than 1 p.m. Please note that arrival to Bryn Mawr ...
International Students. International students have numerous opportunities to participate in campus life, including Clubs and ... Additional resources for International Students are listed below. For International Students who would like to participate in ... Our international students will also have opportunities to embark on heritage and cultural learning journeys with the I&I team ... These interactive sessions allow our international students to experience the unique Singaporean culture with our U.n.I Friends ...
Learn about Student Organizations at the OHSU School of Nursing ... Black Student Nurses Umoja - The Black Student Nurses Umoja ( ... Student Organizations Ashland Campus Student Nurses Association Ashland- Ashland campus affiliate of the National Student ... Like the Student Nurses Association of Klamath Falls on Facebook. Nursing Students without Borders - a student run organization ... Like the Student Nurses Association Ashland on Facebook. Nursing Students without Borders - a student run organization ...
Attention Admitted Students. Wondering whats next? Dont worry, weve got you covered. Visit the admitted student site for ...
For students, these opportunities include scholarships, internships, the Material Advantage program and the Steel to Students ... Steel to Students offers increased exposure to AIST programming, from local member chapter events to specialty training ... Built on continual technical evolution and a worldwide network, the steel industry offers students and faculty many exciting ... and offers a growing number of programs to help students and faculty become further involved in the iron and steel industry. ...
  • The Honors College has a 14:1 student-to-faculty ratio which creates an interactive and personalized classroom experience. (umsl.edu)
  • Students in the Honors College participate in a senior capstone course where they work one-on-one with a faculty member to prepare resumes, cover letters, graduate school applications, personal statements, mock interviews, and anything else they may need for their next step. (umsl.edu)
  • Even though you likely have a personal email account, your UWM email will be key for communicating with faculty, university staff and other students about assignments, dates and important deadlines. (uwm.edu)
  • The group is responsible for organizing functions, engaging students, and acting as a liaison between students and faculty. (ohsu.edu)
  • NSEI strives to foster great faculty-student relationships within the framework of excellent scholarship and advancing health equity in the community. (ohsu.edu)
  • The AIST Foundation awards more than US$700,000 annually in scholarships and grants, and offers a growing number of programs to help students and faculty become further involved in the iron and steel industry. (aist.org)
  • Built on continual technical evolution and a worldwide network, the steel industry offers students and faculty many exciting opportunities. (aist.org)
  • Thousands of alumni have raised their hands to help fellow Terriers on BU Connects , a platform exclusively for Boston University alumni, students, faculty, and staff that brings Terriers together for personal and professional networking on a global scale. (bu.edu)
  • BUILD awards differ from other NIH-funded training grants in that they aim to achieve simultaneous impact at the student, faculty, and institutional levels. (nih.gov)
  • Advocacy from graduate student leaders throughout the years has also yielded a range of graduate-specific services to address the unique needs of this population. (ualberta.ca)
  • The GSA advocated to the University for a full-time Graduate Student Ombudsperson to assist students with concerns related to their academic programs. (ualberta.ca)
  • The Graduate Student Ombudsperson at the Office of the Student Ombuds can help identify solutions to problems many graduate students may face outside of the realm of the Graduate Student Assistantship Collective Agreement . (ualberta.ca)
  • Orientation is designed to serve as a general overview of topics related to graduate student life at UWM. (uwm.edu)
  • The Graduate School's orientation is different from any new graduate student orientation that may be offered by your academic program. (uwm.edu)
  • Sidney Louie, a graduate student in the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa Library and Information Science Program, is the 2021 recipient of the Donald Peterson Student Travel Award given by the Society of American Archivists (SAA). (hawaii.edu)
  • The NIAID Office of Research Training and Development is celebrating the contributions of our predoctoral fellows (graduate students) during Graduate Student and Professional Student Appreciation Week from Monday, April 5 through Friday, April 9, 2021. (nih.gov)
  • Under this new policy, the maximum amount awarded by the NIH for the support of a graduate student supported on a research grant or a cooperative agreement is tied to the zero level National Research Service Award (NRSA) stipend in effect at the time the grant award is issued. (nih.gov)
  • With encouragement from the OMB, the NIH developed guidelines to establish the maximum award for graduate student compensation in 1995 ( https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/not95-141.html ). (nih.gov)
  • NIH will not request nor accept budgets for those applications using a modular budget format solely for the purpose of reviewing graduate student compensation. (nih.gov)
  • Grantees are reminded that when submitting detailed budgets that request support for a graduate student, actual institutional-based compensation should be requested and information justifying the requested compensation level should be provided. (nih.gov)
  • Science Day for Students at NIH 2021 was held virtually on April 19, 2021, from 10 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. (nih.gov)
  • A belated congratulations to our student, Jade Sunouchi, for receiving the 2021 HLA Student Scholarship! (hawaii.edu)
  • Documents concerning the master's thesis for students of the Master 120 in European Studies (EURO2MS/G) - Master's thesis guidelines 2022-2023 - List of EURO supervisors and. (uclouvain.be)
  • Tuesday, August 29, 2023: Students studying in the U.S. on an F-1 or J-1 visa can arrive at their dorm beginning at 9 a.m. (brynmawr.edu)
  • Wednesday, August 30, 2023: Domestic students can arrive at their dorm beginning at 9 a.m. (brynmawr.edu)
  • Latinx Student Nurses Group - To promote, support and provide mentorship to the Latinx/Hispanic student community, both current and aspiring, through storytelling, resource sharing, cultural celebrations and peer support. (ohsu.edu)
  • The group advocated for increased funding for STEM programs in K-12 education, particularly programs that expose students to career opportunities and include meaningful mentorship within schools in racially and ethnically diverse communities. (nih.gov)
  • The need for increased mentorship opportunities was also identified for college and university students. (nih.gov)
  • Participants suggested that large research institutions provide students with culturally responsive and supportive mentorship opportunities to facilitate retention of racial and ethnic minority students. (nih.gov)
  • This program offers hands-on training and mentorship to students from underrepresented groups in vision research. (nih.gov)
  • For students, these opportunities include membership in AIST and access to student chapters , internships and scholarships . (aist.org)
  • Participants identified paid internships as opportunities to provide students with professional development, skill-building, and income to support their overall education. (nih.gov)
  • Jade is studying to become an academic librarian and serves as an officer for the student chapter of ALA. HLA awards one $1,000 student scholarship annually, with one year free membership to HLA. (hawaii.edu)
  • Enhances the integrated research and clinical training of promising predoctoral students, who are matriculated in a combined MD/PhD who intend careers as physician-scientists. (nih.gov)
  • Enhances the diversity of the health-related research workforce by supporting the research training of predoctoral students from population groups that have been shown to be underrepresented in the biomedical, behavioral, or clinical research workforce. (nih.gov)
  • Enables promising predoctoral students with potential to develop into a productive, independent research scientists, to obtain mentored research training while conducting dissertation research. (nih.gov)
  • Supports outstanding graduate students from diverse backgrounds, including those from groups underrepresented in biomedical, clinical, behavioral and social sciences, over the transition from predoctoral to postdoctoral research training. (nih.gov)
  • The purpose of the NIH Blueprint Diversity Specialized Predoctoral to Postdoctoral Advancement in Neuroscience (D-SPAN) Award is to support a defined pathway across career stages for outstanding graduate students from diverse backgrounds, including those from groups underrepresented in biomedical and behavioral sciences. (nih.gov)
  • And you can come here without having a plan -- you know, "I'm going to go for a PhD, I'm going to go to medical school" -- there are programs for high school students, college students. (nih.gov)
  • There are a number of pedagogical approaches and strategies that can help all your students be successful in your courses and programs. (carleton.edu)
  • The Honors College offers programs for freshmen, transfer students, current UMSL students, and everyone in between. (umsl.edu)
  • These include a student-published book of creative works ( Bellerive ), an annual art show ( Celebrating the Arts ), a full social calendar and service events ( PLHCSA ), a satirical newspaper ( Brain Stew ), living and learning communities for residential students, and two mentoring programs ( SMART and FYE ). (umsl.edu)
  • Black Student Nurses Umoja - The Black Student Nurses Umoja (BSNU) of OHSU mission is to provide community for Black and African American diaspora identified students within the OHSU School of Nursing undergraduate and graduate programs. (ohsu.edu)
  • View photos from AIST student programs. (aist.org)
  • The award supports students and recent graduates from graduate archival programs within North America to attend SAA's Annual Meeting. (hawaii.edu)
  • NIDDK and NIH offer many programs for high school and undergraduate students to gain experience in biomedical research. (nih.gov)
  • The programs highlighted on this page focus on increasing the participation of students from backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical research on a national basis, including individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds, individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups, and individuals with disabilities. (nih.gov)
  • To see a complete listing of programs available for students at the NIH campus in Bethesda, Maryland, visit the NIDDK Training and Employment page . (nih.gov)
  • Additionally, NIDDK supports programs at research institutions around the country offering opportunities for students. (nih.gov)
  • Participants indicated and underscored that such support is of particular importance for college students transitioning from Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) or Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to graduate programs at R1 institutions (doctoral universities with very high research activity). (nih.gov)
  • The goals of PREP are to increase the number of baccalaureates from underrepresented groups who go on to Ph.D. degree programs, and also to enhance the diversity of students in awardee institutions' Ph.D. programs. (nih.gov)
  • BUILD awards are designed to implement and study innovative approaches to engaging and retaining students from diverse backgrounds in biomedical research, potentially helping them on the pathway to become future contributors to the NIH-funded research enterprise. (nih.gov)
  • Student scientists from disadvantaged backgrounds can get scholarship support and paid research training from NIH- as well as paid employment and further training after graduation. (nih.gov)
  • The Pierre Laclede Honors College is a small college with a liberal arts atmosphere inside a large public university--so students get the best of both worlds. (umsl.edu)
  • The Honors College also offers students renewable scholarship funding in addition to what has already been offered to them by UMSL and other outside sources. (umsl.edu)
  • The Honors College not only provides students with an excellent liberal arts education, it also prepares them for life beyond the classroom. (umsl.edu)
  • BGSU Honors Students of Color seeks to equip our multicultural students with the confidence, skills, and tools to successfully navigate their experience not only in the Honors College but at BGSU. (bgsu.edu)
  • As students matriculate into college, there is a need to address financial barriers (e.g., the cost of college or university attendance) that have a disproportionate impact on racial and ethnic minority students. (nih.gov)
  • York has close to 2,500 residence spaces available for students in ten different undergraduate residence buildings at York's Keele and Glendon Campuses. (yorku.ca)
  • The annual competition for the Undergraduate Team Aircraft Design - organised by the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) - challenged undergraduate students from across the globe to design a hybrid aircraft for the general aviation market. (lboro.ac.uk)
  • STEP-UP offers hands-on summer research experience at institutions around the country for high school and undergraduate students. (nih.gov)
  • This program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to do independent research in an NIH laboratory in Bethesda, Maryland, or Phoenix, Arizona. (nih.gov)
  • Science Day for Students at NIH is an annual event that aims to inspire the next generation of biomedical researchers and clinicians by engaging students from partnering schools in activities and panels with top scientists and health professionals at NIH. (nih.gov)
  • Encourages the success and development of students pursuing a future as physician-scientists in basic and translational biomedical research. (nih.gov)
  • The purposes of the virtual listening session were to listen and learn about perspectives and experiences related to racial and ethnic equity in the biomedical research enterprise, with an emphasis on students and trainees. (nih.gov)
  • Among students and graduate trainees, there was agreement that implicit bias toward racial and ethnic minority persons is also prevalent and has adverse impacts on the overall experience and likelihood of pursuing careers in biomedical science. (nih.gov)
  • The goal is to increase the nation's pool of students from underrepresented groups by preparing them to continue their training and career advancement in biomedical research. (nih.gov)
  • 2) an underrepresented minority student, i.e., belonging to a particular ethnic or racial group that has been determined by our institution to be underrepresented in biomedical or behavioral research in the U.S. OPTIONAL. (nih.gov)
  • A 6 week full time summer internship that gives students an opportunity for shadowing, community engagement, didactic sessions, mentoring, and more. (ou.edu)
  • Students in Dr. Wertheimer's LIS 650 Management of Libraries and Information Centers class this spring completed service projects in the local community to practice their managerial skills. (hawaii.edu)
  • This provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to serve as well-rounded specialty or primary care physicians, while learning a special skill set to improve the health of entire communities. (ou.edu)
  • Training and career development opportunities at the NHLBI in Bethesda, Maryland cover a broad spectrum of disciplines for individuals at career stages ranging from high school students, graduate students, scientists, clinicians, and healthcare professionals. (nih.gov)
  • Information about costs of tuition and fees, as well as funding (assistantships, fellowships, scholarship portal, travel awards, student loans and on-campus employment) available specifically for graduate students can be found at UWM's One Stop . (uwm.edu)
  • The SNA is interested in personal growth, professional development, student advocacy and further advancement of leadership skills. (ohsu.edu)
  • The Panther Shop is located on the main floor of the UWM Student Union and sells all of your UWM apparel. (uwm.edu)
  • Other times, it involves helping students develop academic skills that were missing from their previous schooling. (carleton.edu)
  • Writing Resources, part of the Academic Success Centre , provides a range of academic assistance to students, including specialized free and premium programming for graduate students. (ualberta.ca)
  • The event agenda includes an information fair with campus resources and organizations, breakout sessions, a panel discussion with current graduate students and concurrent sessions on topics related to academic success. (uwm.edu)
  • The OU-TU School of Communtiy medicine also offers a Physician Assistant Program that enables students to become competent, caring health care providers. (ou.edu)
  • You can re-apply to live in residence in your upper years as long as you meet the eligibility criteria-students must continuously be enrolled in full-time degree program, have no behavioural infractions while living in or visiting York residence, and have no outstanding debt to the University. (yorku.ca)
  • TEACHERS - We recommend treating this event like a virtual field trip to allow for the students to experience the full program. (nih.gov)
  • Brings PhD graduate students to the NIH Intramural Research Program for dissertation research. (nih.gov)
  • They offer a variety of resources, ranging from individual counseling to employer information sessions and the International Student Work Study Program. (ualberta.ca)
  • Nursing Students for Equity and Inclusion (NSEI) strives to enhance the nursing education experience by honoring all stakeholders' views as integral to program success. (ohsu.edu)
  • The Steel to Students program offers increased exposure to AIST programming such as Member Chapter events, and attending Technology Training conferences by offering training and travel funds . (aist.org)
  • Find him a mentoring or tutoring program, in which he assists and befriends younger students who need help with their schoolwork. (healthychildren.org)
  • The program of the conference consists of 30-minute talks by graduate students and two mini-courses that will be delivered by two invited speakers. (k-state.edu)
  • Why Students Become Neurologists - Medscape - Jul 12, 2019. (medscape.com)
  • SCM Information Sessions are held regularly on our campus and open to all prospective students. (ou.edu)
  • SCM representatives visit local colleges and universities throught the year to share information and talk to prospective students. (ou.edu)
  • Current college students can get involved with the OU-TU School of Community Medicine in several ways. (ou.edu)
  • Most Chinese college students agree with the government's policies and are optimistic about China's future, says a bysurvey released the Ministry of Education Wednesday. (chinadaily.com.cn)
  • The survey shows that most college students in China are in good and healthy state of mind and they have a strong impetus to pursue better development. (chinadaily.com.cn)
  • Most of the college students surveyed agreed that the present state leaders are trustworthy and resolute in making decisions. (chinadaily.com.cn)
  • Apart from self-development, college students are much concerned about issues of the country's development, including corruption, conflicts brought by imbalanced regional economic development, employment and rural development. (chinadaily.com.cn)
  • Ninety-six percent of the students agree with the concept of coordinated and sustainable development, proposed by the Communist Party of China last year, and 95 percent of the college students are optimistic about the promotion of China's status in the international community. (chinadaily.com.cn)
  • College students are considered the most active part of society and, in some extent, their state of mind tells the state of the society. (chinadaily.com.cn)
  • This is the 13th survey conducted by the Ministry of Education on college students' state of mind. (chinadaily.com.cn)
  • Help future students by supporting Bryn Mawr College. (brynmawr.edu)
  • Close living quarters, shared restrooms, and a lot of social activities make a college student more likely to catch the flu. (medlineplus.gov)
  • This article will give you information about the flu and college students. (medlineplus.gov)
  • A college student with the flu will most often have a fever of 100°F (37.8°C) or higher, and a sore throat or a cough. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Most college students do not need to see a provider when they have mild flu symptoms. (medlineplus.gov)
  • This year we were fortunate to have 4 trainees, 3 of whom are Latina, 1 who's economically disadvantaged, 1 who's living with disability, and 1 who's a first-generation college bound student. (cancer.org)
  • Through the National Institutes of Health (NIH), we offer exciting opportunities to students in high school, college, graduate school, and medical or dental school. (nih.gov)
  • Online degree students/alumni are welcome to use all available premium resources , including VMock (resume feedback), Big Interview (interview practice), Career Shift (job search tracking), and much more. (bu.edu)
  • In addition, there are several kinds of FELLOWSHIPS available only to graduate students. (uwm.edu)
  • These competitive fellowships offer tuition remission and grant a stipend while allowing students to focus on their studies and complete their degree in a timely manner. (uwm.edu)
  • These guidelines apply to graduate students at the grantee institution who are supported by NIH research grants and cooperative agreements and not to individuals supported by NRSA training grants and fellowships. (nih.gov)
  • International students have numerous opportunities to participate in campus life, including Clubs and Societies , Community Engagement , Sports and Residential Education . (ntu.edu.sg)
  • Student Nurses Association Ashland - Ashland campus affiliate of the National Student Nurses Association (NSNA). (ohsu.edu)
  • Student Nurses Association of Klamath Falls - Klamath Falls campus affiliate of the National Student Nurses Association (NSNA). (ohsu.edu)
  • With the exception of individual appointments and employer on-campus interviews, these students are eligible to use all CCD resources, events, and services. (bu.edu)
  • These interactive sessions allow our international students to experience the unique Singaporean culture with our U.n.I Friends. (ntu.edu.sg)
  • These briefings would include information on the administration of student passes and insurance, tuition grant obligations, and support from NTU Careers & Attachment Office. (ntu.edu.sg)
  • This page is intended to provide you with your next steps and to highlight quick, easy access to key resources for newly admitted graduate students. (uwm.edu)
  • Additional resources for International Students are listed below. (ntu.edu.sg)
  • The Center for Career Development and BU Virtual are working together to support online degree students/alumni and to provide access to career resources. (bu.edu)
  • The University offers a number of services to all students. (ualberta.ca)
  • The Loughborough students' aircraft, codenamed 'HEGAAsus' was designed in collaboration with students from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. (lboro.ac.uk)
  • In addition to these opportunities, the Inclusion & Integration (I&I) team curates a range of meaningful activities for students to expand their social network and community of friends, as well as learn about university life and Singapore. (ntu.edu.sg)
  • During February 2016-January 2017, a total of 110 staff and 40,000 students (domestic and international) in cases of varicella were diagnosed at the university hospital. (cdc.gov)
  • NIDCR provides funds to institutions across the country to train PhD students who wish to pursue careers in oral health research. (nih.gov)
  • His abstract follows: Instructional librarianship in public post-secondary institutions requires that librarians be responsive to a diversity of paradigms and student needs, including Indigenous contexts. (hawaii.edu)
  • Our international students will also have opportunities to embark on heritage and cultural learning journeys with the I&I team and their local peers. (ntu.edu.sg)
  • The SNA is dedicated to assisting student with career development and leadership opportunities. (ohsu.edu)
  • Students should contact the training director at the particular institution(s) they are interested in to inquire about available opportunities. (nih.gov)
  • This two-phase award will facilitate completion of the doctoral dissertation and transition of talented graduate students to strong neuroscience research postdoctoral positions, and will provide career development opportunities relevant to their long-term career goal of becoming independent neuroscience researchers. (nih.gov)
  • This collection of essays was shared by participants in the 2013 workshop Supporting Student Success in Geoscience at Two-year Colleges , describing what activities they are currently employing to support geoscience student success in two-year colleges. (carleton.edu)
  • The event capacity is limited to 300 participants from partner schools, including high school students and teachers. (nih.gov)
  • Nevertheless, the entry-level postdoctoral NRSA stipend provides a useful benchmark for an award amount that approximates a reasonable rate of compensation for graduate students. (nih.gov)
  • BACKGROUND In 1994, the Department of Health and Human Services Inspector General reported that three of the four universities reviewed where using Federal research grant funds to compensate graduate students at rates above amounts paid to first-year postdoctoral employees performing comparable work ( http://oig.hhs.gov/oas/reports/region1/19404002.pdf ). (nih.gov)
  • Since postdoctoral employees were considered to have more experience and training than comparable graduate students in this study, the excess compensation for students was considered unreasonable. (nih.gov)
  • First year students coming directly out of an Ontario high school are guaranteed a space in residence for the next Fall if they apply by June 1. (yorku.ca)
  • First year students coming from outside Ontario (within Canada or Internationally) are guaranteed a space in residence for the next Fall if they apply by May 1. (yorku.ca)
  • First-year students should experience living in a traditional dorm-style residence with a roommate. (yorku.ca)
  • Suite-style residence is a preferred choice for upper-year students who may like to share amenities and cook and clean for themselves. (yorku.ca)
  • Yes, our residence population consists of a great blend of first and upper year students. (yorku.ca)
  • The team of ten included five Part D students from the department, who undertook the international collaboration as part of their final year group design module. (lboro.ac.uk)
  • With fewer than 45 days remaining in the 2007-08 school year, a small team began taking action to welcome the refugee students. (ascd.org)
  • National Institutes of Health INTRODUCTION This notice establishes a new policy related to the level of compensation for graduate students supported by funds from National Institutes of Health (NIH) research grants and cooperative agreements. (nih.gov)
  • Consistent with cost principles for educational institutions described in Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-21 at section J.41.b ( http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/circulars/a021/a021.html ), the compensation of graduate students supported by research grants must be reasonable. (nih.gov)
  • These operating principles associated with the compensation of students performing necessary work on NIH funded research projects are described in detail in the NIH Grants Policy Statement at https://grants.nih.gov/grants/policy/nihgps_2001/part_iia_4.htm . (nih.gov)
  • Online degree students/alumni are welcome to attend most events through the Center for Career Development. (bu.edu)
  • NIH staff will review the compensation requested for graduate students on competing and cooperative agreement applications for which a detailed budget is submitted. (nih.gov)
  • Helping students chart out a pathway into a rewarding career requires knowledge about the careers available, the needed qualifications, and the learning experiences that will provide them with the necessary expertise. (carleton.edu)
  • Students requiring any assistance should contact our friendly Registration Support Service. (abdn.ac.uk)
  • Provides support to students pursuing a PhD, DDS/DMD, PhD or other combined dual-doctoral degree(s). (nih.gov)
  • Provides support to students who have identified a dissertation project and an appropriate dissertation director in an area of research supported by NIDCR as described in the Institutes Strategic Plan. (nih.gov)
  • Begin by watching our Newly Admitted Graduate Students video and then follow the steps below. (uwm.edu)
  • Newly arrived immigrant students have brought dramatic changes to schools like Taft in many urban areas, but Taft's transformation was sudden. (ascd.org)
  • We are looking for students who are close to completing a degree in the field of economics, chemistry, or engineering with exceptional grades, with relevant prior work experience in an international business consultancy or in a similar environment. (basf.com)
  • The summer before school opened, these 58 new students had attended Tiger Pride Summer Camp, a two-week nonacademic team-building experience designed to develop a sense of belonging and introduce students to the traditions of their new school. (ascd.org)
  • Pre-graduation briefings are organised annually to prepare our international students for their journey after graduation. (ntu.edu.sg)
  • Nursing Students without Borders - a student run organization committed to addressing local and international health disparities, while expanding the perspective of the individual nursing student. (ohsu.edu)
  • Check your student health center's website for more information. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Ask your student health center, provider, pharmacy, or your place of work if they offer the flu vaccine. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Students who are being readmitted to study should wait until they receive an email from their Registry Officer before accessing MyCurriculum. (abdn.ac.uk)
  • We hope to foster a healthy and safe space for our students of color to develop the skills to become the best versions of themselves. (bgsu.edu)