Unstable isotopes of strontium that decay or disintegrate spontaneously emitting radiation. Sr 80-83, 85, and 89-95 are radioactive strontium isotopes.
An element of the alkaline earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol Sr, atomic number 38, and atomic weight 87.62.
Stable strontium atoms that have the same atomic number as the element strontium, but differ in the atomic weight. Sr-84, 86, 87, and 88 are the stable strontium isotopes.
Isotopes that exhibit radioactivity and undergo radioactive decay. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Unstable isotopes of zinc that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Zn atoms with atomic weights 60-63, 65, 69, 71, and 72 are radioactive zinc isotopes.
Method for assessing flow through a system by injection of a known quantity of radionuclide into the system and monitoring its concentration over time at a specific point in the system. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Thiophenes are aromatic heterocyclic organic compounds containing a five-membered ring with four carbon atoms and one sulfur atom, which are found in various natural substances and synthesized for use in pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals.
Stable calcium atoms that have the same atomic number as the element calcium, but differ in atomic weight. Ca-42-44, 46, and 48 are stable calcium isotopes.
A class of compounds of the type R-M, where a C atom is joined directly to any other element except H, C, N, O, F, Cl, Br, I, or At. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Unstable isotopes of iodine that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. I atoms with atomic weights 117-139, except I 127, are radioactive iodine isotopes.
Unstable isotopes of krypton that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Kr atoms with atomic weights 74-77, 79, 81, 85, and 87-94 are radioactive krypton isotopes.
Unstable isotopes of indium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. In atoms with atomic weights 106-112, 113m, 114, and 116-124 are radioactive indium isotopes.
Unstable isotopes of sodium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Na atoms with atomic weights 20-22 and 24-26 are radioactive sodium isotopes.
The spontaneous transformation of a nuclide into one or more different nuclides, accompanied by either the emission of particles from the nucleus, nuclear capture or ejection of orbital electrons, or fission. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Unstable isotopes of barium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Ba atoms with atomic weights 126-129, 131, 133, and 139-143 are radioactive barium isotopes.
The production of an image obtained by cameras that detect the radioactive emissions of an injected radionuclide as it has distributed differentially throughout tissues in the body. The image obtained from a moving detector is called a scan, while the image obtained from a stationary camera device is called a scintiphotograph.
Unstable isotopes of yttrium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Y atoms with atomic weights 82-88 and 90-96 are radioactive yttrium isotopes.
Unstable isotopes of tin that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Sn atoms with atomic weights 108-111, 113, 120-121, 123 and 125-128 are tin radioisotopes.
Agents that inhibit BONE RESORPTION and/or favor BONE MINERALIZATION and BONE REGENERATION. They are used to heal BONE FRACTURES and to treat METABOLIC BONE DISEASES such as OSTEOPOROSIS.
Unstable isotopes of carbon that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. C atoms with atomic weights 10, 11, and 14-16 are radioactive carbon isotopes.
Unstable isotopes of iron that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Fe atoms with atomic weights 52, 53, 55, and 59-61 are radioactive iron isotopes.
Unstable isotopes of copper that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Cu atoms with atomic weights 58-62, 64, and 66-68 are radioactive copper isotopes.
Unstable isotopes of phosphorus that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. P atoms with atomic weights 28-34 except 31 are radioactive phosphorus isotopes.
High energy POSITRONS or ELECTRONS ejected from a disintegrating atomic nucleus.
Liquid, solid, or gaseous waste resulting from mining of radioactive ore, production of reactor fuel materials, reactor operation, processing of irradiated reactor fuels, and related operations, and from use of radioactive materials in research, industry, and medicine. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)

Relative efficacy of 32P and 89Sr in palliation in skeletal metastases. (1/113)

32p and 89Sr have been shown to produce significant pain relief in patients with skeletal metastases from advanced cancer. Clinically significant pancytopenia has not been reported in doses up to 12 mCi (444 MBq) of either radionuclide. To date, no reports comparing the relative efficacy and toxicity of the two radionuclides in comparable patient populations have been available. Although a cure has not been reported, both treatments have achieved substantial pain relief. However, several studies have used semiquantitative measures such as "slight," "fair," "partial" and "dramatic" responses, which lend themselves to subjective bias. This report examines the responses to treatment with 32P or 89Sr by attempting a quantification of pain relief and quality of life using the patients as their own controls and compares toxicity in terms of hematological parameters. METHODS: Thirty-one patients with skeletal metastases were treated for pain relief with either 32P (16 patients) or 89Sr (15 patients). Inclusion criteria were pain from bone scan-positive sites above a subjective score of 5 of 10 despite analgesic therapy with narcotic or non-narcotic medication, limitation of movement related to the performance of routine daily activity and a predicted life expectancy of at least 4 mo. The patients had not had chemotherapy or radiotherapy during the previous 6 wk and had normal serum creatinine, white cell and platelet counts. 32P was given orally as a 12 mCi dose, and 89Sr was given intravenously as a 4 mCi (148 MBq) dose. The patients were monitored for 4 mo. RESULTS: Complete absence of pain was seen in 7 of 16 patients who were given 32P and in 7 of 15 patients who were given 89Sr. Pain scores fell by at least 50% of the pretreatment score in 14 of 16 patients who were given 32P and 14 of 15 patients who were given 89Sr. Mean duration of pain relief was 9.6 wk with 32P and 10 wk with 89Sr. Analgesic scores fell along with the drop in pain scores. A fall in total white cell, absolute granulocyte and platelet counts occurred in all patients. Subnormal values of white cells and platelets were seen in 5 and 7 patients, respectively, with 32P, and in 0 and 4 patients, respectively, after 89Sr therapy. The decrease in platelet count (but not absolute granulocyte count) was statistically significant when 32P patients were compared with 89Sr patients. However, in no instance did the fall in blood counts require treatment. Absolute granulocyte counts did not fall below 1000 in any patient. There was no significant difference between the two treatments in terms of either efficacy or toxicity. CONCLUSION: No justification has been found in this study for the recommendation of 89Sr over the considerably less expensive oral 32P for the palliation of skeletal pain from metastases of advanced cancer.  (+info)

Bone pain palliation with 85Sr therapy. (2/113)

The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the efficacy of 85Sr in the palliation of metastatic bone pain. 85Sr decays by electron capture with a gamma emission of 514 keV and associated x-ray emissions of 10-15 keV; physical half-life is 64 d. METHODS: Between 1977 and 1992, 119 doses of 85Sr chloride (mean activity 335 MBq [9 mCi]) were intravenously administered to 108 patients with hyperalgic generalized bone metastases from prostatic carcinoma (52 patients), breast carcinoma (41) or other cancers (15). Pain, performance status, blood and urinary excretion values were investigated during follow-up, and survival time was recorded. Strontium bone scans were obtained up to 8 wk after injection to document isotope biodistribution and to estimate absorbed doses. RESULTS: At 12 wk, 72.2% of patients showed significant benefit from treatment, i.e., enhanced quality of life and pain relief; 49.1% became free of pain. These beneficial effects lasted from 1 to 36 mo (mean 4.3 mo). The best symptomatic improvement was seen in patients treated at an early stage of metastatic skeletal disease and in prostate cancer patients. No evidence of a significant dose-response relationship was found in the data analysis. The mean absorbed dose ratio of metastases to marrow was estimated at 8.2. We found no evidence that hematological toxicity was a major problem; however, all patients experienced a reduction in blood counts, especially in platelets. CONCLUSION: Systemic radionuclide therapy using 85Sr is a feasible, effective and well-tolerated palliative treatment in patients with refractory bone pain. We attained at least the same response rate as that reported with bone-seeking beta-emitting radionuclides such as 89Sr. The patients who benefited the most from 85Sr treatment were in an early stage of metastatic disease or had prostate cancer. Our clinical findings could not be linked to either the total injected activity of 85Sr or the estimated absorbed dose delivered to metastases.  (+info)

Variation in oncologic opinion regarding management of metastatic bone pain with systemic radionuclide therapy. (3/113)

The objective of this study was to determine whether there is consistency of opinion regarding the management of metastatic bone disease pain among medical oncologists who are given the option of using systemic radionuclide therapy (89Sr, 153Sm). METHODS: One hundred board-certified medical oncologists were given a brief clinical summary of three patients with metastatic cancer. Management options included oral, parenteral and transdermal delivery forms of opioid analgesics; external beam irradiation; and systemic radionuclide therapy. The oncologists rated, in whole numbers from 1 (most appropriate) to 10 (least appropriate), their opinions on the appropriateness of each proposed intervention for each patient. RESULTS: Systemic radionuclide therapy was perceived consistently as having low appropriateness for palliation of metastatic bony pain compared with opioid analgesics. A slight increase in appropriateness for systemic therapy was indicated for the patient with widespread metastatic disease, who, on the basis of literature reports, was unlikely to benefit from such therapy. The oncologists rated the appropriateness of systemic therapy as low in the patient with limited early disease, in which the literature indicates the greatest benefit will be derived from such intervention. CONCLUSION: Referring oncologists perceive the appropriateness of systemic radionuclide therapy as low. Their perception of its appropriateness increases with extent of disease. As a result, this palliative option is underutilized or used in less-than-optimal disease settings.  (+info)

Nanobacteria: an infectious cause for kidney stone formation. (4/113)

BACKGROUND: Nanobacteria are cytotoxic, sterile-filterable, gram-negative, atypical bacteria detected in bovine and human blood. Nanobacteria produce carbonate apatite on their cell walls. Data on Randall's plaques suggest that apatite may initiate kidney stone formation. We assessed nanobacteria in 72 consecutively collected kidney stones from Finnish patients. METHODS: Nanobacteria and kidney stone units were compared using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Demineralized kidney stones were screened for nanobacteria using a double-staining method and a specific culture method. Isolated nanobacteria were analyzed for mineral formation in vitro with Ca and 85Sr incorporation tests. RESULTS: SEM highlighted the resemblance in size and morphology of nanobacteria and the smallest apatite units in the kidney stones. Nanobacterial antigens could be detected after the demineralization of the stones in 1 N HCl. Nanobacteria were surprisingly resistant to this treatment, and cultures could be established from 93.1% of the stones. Only struvite stones had common bacteria, in addition to the nanobacteria. When the results of all of the assays were combined, 70 of the 72 stones (that is, 97.2%) were nanobacteria positive. Although apatite stones indicated highest nanobacteria antigen signals, the overall nanobacteria positivity did not depend on the stone type. The isolated nanobacteria produced apatite stones in vitro, measured by Ca and 85Sr incorporation. CONCLUSIONS: We propose that kidney stone formation is a nanobacterial disease analogous to Helicobacter pylori infection and peptic ulcer disease. Both diseases are initiated by bacterial infection and subsequently endogenous and dietary factors influence their progression.  (+info)

Biologic mechanisms of 89SrCl2 incorporation into type I collagen during bone mineralization. (5/113)

89SrCl2 is currently used as a palliative treatment for painful osseous metastases associated with an osteoblastic reaction in bone. However, the underlying biologic mechanism by which 89SrCl2 accumulates at these lesions and mediates palliation remains unclear. The aim of this study was therefore to elucidate this mechanism. METHODS: An in vitro cell biologic model, incorporating the MC3T3-E1 murine osteoblast cell line, was established to replicate the process of collagen production and mineralization. Experiments were performed to investigate the cellular association of 89SrCl2 and 45CaCl2 with both MC3T3-E1 cells and the PC-3 human prostate adenocarcinoma cell line. RESULTS: No evidence of intracellular localization of 89SrCl2 or 45CaCl2 was found for either cell line. Localization of radiolabel was seen to be associated with MC3T3-E1 cells but only in cultures that had undergone both differentiation and mineralization. The association of 89SrCl2 was inhibited by the alkaline phosphatase inhibitor levamisole, and extracellular localization of 89SrCl2 was confirmed by microautoradiography. CONCLUSION: 89SrCl2 acts as a calcium mimic and, as such, becomes associated with the collagen matrix produced by the MC3T3-E1 cells during collagen mineralization.  (+info)

Radiographic features of bone in several strains of laboratory mice and of their tumours induced by bone-seeking radionuclides. (6/113)

The natural radiographic appearance of the various bones of the skeleton are described for several strains of laboratory mice. The Harwell substrains of CBA, A and 101 are generally similar and become osteoporotic on ageing. Harwell C57BL have similar, but more delicately chiseled, bones. Harwell C3H mice have bones with stouter cortices and may show osteosclerosis on ageing. CF1 females (donated by Dr M. Finkel) showed osteosclerosis and osteophytic outgrowths when aged. NMRI mice (donated by Dr A. Luz) appeared larger than the pure-strain Harwell mice. In general, mouse bones are simple tubular structures with an ivory cortex and a marrow cavity. Cancellous trabecular bone is scanty, even in vertebrae, flat bones and the metaphyses of long bones. Bone-seeking radionuclides administered to mice lead to skeletal tumours: (a) osteosarcomata, which are commonly radio-opaque to a variable degree owing to calcified tumour bone, but which may be osteolytic, (b) primitive mesenchymal (angio-) sarcomata which are non-osteogenic and osteolytic, (c) fibrosarcomata--which also are osteolytic--and to local or general lymphomata from irradiation of parental cells in bone marrow, but no special radiological features have been found associated with these last-named tumours.  (+info)

Management of advanced prostate cancer. (7/113)

Most cases of advanced carcinoma of the prostate are hormonosensitive. The use of combined androgen blockade (CAB) seems to improve survival and quality of life, but only when combined with chemical castration by luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone analog and without the use of steroidal antiandrogens. After CAB, further hormonal treatments remain efficacious, such as antiandrogen withdrawal followed by estrogens, aromatase inhibitors, and hormone-refractory prostate cancer multiple cytotoxic agents. For painful bone lesions, external beam radiotherapy, biphosphonates, and strontium 89 or samarium 153 provide pain relief. The use of new methods for the evaluation of response and quality of life will allow the rapid identification of effective treatments and permit powered phase III trials.  (+info)

Mechanisms of genetic resistance to Friend virus leukemia. III. Susceptibility of mitogen-responsive lymphocytes mediated by T cells. (8/113)

Friend leukemia virus (FV) suppressed the proliferative responses of spleen, lymph node, marrow, and thymus cell populations to various T- and B-cell mitogens. Cells taken from mice, e.g. BALB/c genetically susceptible to leukemogenesis in vivo were much more susceptible to suppression of mitogenesis in vitro than similar cells from genetically resistant mice, e.g., C57BL/6. Nylon wool-purified splenic T cells from BALB/c and C3H mice lost susceptibility to FV-induced suppression of mitogenesis but became suppressible by addition of 10% unfiltered spleen cell. Thus, FV mediates in vitro suppression of lymphocyte proliferation indirectly by "activating" a suppressor cell. The suppressor cell adhered to nylon wool but not to glass wool or rayon wool columns. Pretreatment of spleen cells with carbonyl iron and a magnet did not abrogate the suppressor cell function. Suppressor cells were not eliminated by treatment with rabbit antimouse immunoglobulin (7S) and complement (C). However, high concentrations of anti-Thy-1 plus C destroyed suppressor cells of the spleen; thymic suppressor cells were much more susceptible to anti-Thy-1 serum. Nude athymic mice were devoid of suppressor cells and their B-cell proliferation was relatively resistant to FV-induced suppression in vitro. The suppressor cells in the thymus (but not in the spleen) were eliminated by treatment of mice with cortisol. Thus, FV appears to mediate its suppressive effect on mitogen-responsive lymphocytes by affecting "T-suppressor cells." Spleen cells from C57BL/6 mice treated with 89Sr to destroy marrow-dependent (M) cells were much more suppressible by FV in virto than normal C57BL/6 spleen cells. However, nylon-filtered spleen cells of 89Sr-treated C57BL/6 mice were resistant to FV-induced suppression in vitro, indicating that the susceptibility of spleen cells from 89Sr-treated B6 mice is also mediated by suppressor cells. Normal B6 splenic T cells were rendered susceptible to FV-induced suppression of mitogenesis by addition of 10% spleen cells from 89Sr-treated B6 mice. Thus, M cells appear to regulate the numbers and/or functions of T-suppressor cells which in turn mediate the immunosuppressive effects of FV in vitro. Neither mitogen-responsive lymphocytes nor T-suppressor cells are genetically resistant or susceptible to FV. The genetic resistance to FV is apparently a function of M cells, both in vitro as well as in vivo.  (+info)

Strontium radioisotopes are radioactive isotopes of the element strontium. Strontium is an alkaline earth metal that is found in nature and has several isotopes, some of which are stable and some of which are radioactive. The radioactive isotopes of strontium, also known as strontium radionuclides, decay and emit radiation in the form of beta particles.

Strontium-89 (^89Sr) and strontium-90 (^90Sr) are two common radioisotopes of strontium that are used in medical applications. Strontium-89 is a pure beta emitter with a half-life of 50.5 days, which makes it useful for the treatment of bone pain associated with metastatic cancer. When administered, strontium-89 is taken up by bones and irradiates the bone tissue, reducing pain and improving quality of life in some patients.

Strontium-90, on the other hand, has a longer half-life of 28.8 years and emits more powerful beta particles than strontium-89. It is used as a component in radioactive waste and in some nuclear weapons, but it is not used in medical applications due to its long half-life and high radiation dose.

It's important to note that exposure to strontium radioisotopes can be harmful to human health, especially if ingested or inhaled. Therefore, handling and disposal of strontium radioisotopes require special precautions and regulations.

Strontium is not a medical term, but it is a chemical element with the symbol Sr and atomic number 38. It is a soft silver-white or yellowish metallic element that is highly reactive chemically. In the medical field, strontium ranelate is a medication used to treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. It works by increasing the formation of new bone and decreasing bone resorption (breakdown).

It is important to note that strontium ranelate has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events, such as heart attack and stroke, so it is not recommended for people with a history of these conditions. Additionally, the use of strontium supplements in high doses can be toxic and should be avoided.

Strontium isotopes are different forms of the element strontium that have different numbers of neutrons in their atomic nuclei. The most common strontium isotopes are Sr-84, Sr-86, Sr-87, and Sr-88, with atomic masses of 83.913, 85.909, 86.909, and 87.905 atomic mass units (amu), respectively.

Strontium-87 is a radioactive isotope that is produced naturally in the Earth's crust through the decay of rubidium-87. The ratio of strontium-87 to strontium-86 can be used as a geological dating tool, as well as a forensic tool for determining the origin of objects or materials.

In medical applications, strontium ranelate, which contains stable strontium isotopes, has been used in the treatment of osteoporosis due to its ability to increase bone density and reduce the risk of fractures. However, its use has been limited due to concerns about potential side effects, including cardiovascular risks.

Radioisotopes, also known as radioactive isotopes or radionuclides, are variants of chemical elements that have unstable nuclei and emit radiation in the form of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, or conversion electrons. These isotopes are formed when an element's nucleus undergoes natural or artificial radioactive decay.

Radioisotopes can be produced through various processes, including nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, and particle bombardment in a cyclotron or other types of particle accelerators. They have a wide range of applications in medicine, industry, agriculture, research, and energy production. In the medical field, radioisotopes are used for diagnostic imaging, radiation therapy, and in the labeling of molecules for research purposes.

It is important to note that handling and using radioisotopes requires proper training, safety measures, and regulatory compliance due to their ionizing radiation properties, which can pose potential health risks if not handled correctly.

Zinc radioisotopes are unstable isotopes or variants of the element zinc that undergo radioactive decay, emitting radiation in the process. These isotopes have a different number of neutrons than the stable isotope of zinc (zinc-64), which contributes to their instability and tendency to decay.

Examples of zinc radioisotopes include zinc-65, zinc-70, and zinc-72. These isotopes are often used in medical research and diagnostic procedures due to their ability to emit gamma rays or positrons, which can be detected using specialized equipment.

Zinc radioisotopes may be used as tracers to study the metabolism and distribution of zinc in the body, or as therapeutic agents to deliver targeted radiation therapy to cancer cells. However, it is important to note that the use of radioisotopes carries potential risks, including exposure to ionizing radiation and the potential for damage to healthy tissues.

The Radioisotope Dilution Technique is a method used in nuclear medicine to measure the volume and flow rate of a particular fluid in the body. It involves introducing a known amount of a radioactive isotope, or radioisotope, into the fluid, such as blood. The isotope mixes with the fluid, and samples are then taken from the fluid at various time points.

By measuring the concentration of the radioisotope in each sample, it is possible to calculate the total volume of the fluid based on the amount of the isotope introduced and the dilution factor. The flow rate can also be calculated by measuring the concentration of the isotope over time and using the formula:

Flow rate = Volume/Time

This technique is commonly used in medical research and clinical settings to measure cardiac output, cerebral blood flow, and renal function, among other applications. It is a safe and reliable method that has been widely used for many years. However, it does require the use of radioactive materials and specialized equipment, so it should only be performed by trained medical professionals in appropriate facilities.

Thiophenes are organic compounds that contain a heterocyclic ring made up of four carbon atoms and one sulfur atom. The structure of thiophene is similar to benzene, with the benzene ring being replaced by a thiophene ring. Thiophenes are aromatic compounds, which means they have a stable, planar ring structure and delocalized electrons.

Thiophenes can be found in various natural sources such as coal tar, crude oil, and some foods like onions and garlic. They also occur in certain medications, dyes, and pesticides. Some thiophene derivatives have been synthesized and studied for their potential therapeutic uses, including anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and antitumor activities.

In the medical field, thiophenes are used in some pharmaceuticals as building blocks to create drugs with various therapeutic effects. For example, tipepidine, a cough suppressant, contains a thiophene ring. Additionally, some anesthetics and antipsychotic medications also contain thiophene moieties.

It is important to note that while thiophenes themselves are not typically considered medical terms, they play a role in the chemistry of various pharmaceuticals and other medical-related compounds.

Calcium isotopes refer to variants of the chemical element calcium (ca) that have different numbers of neutrons in their atomic nuclei, and therefore differ in their atomic masses while having the same number of protons. The most common and stable calcium isotope is Calcium-40, which contains 20 protons and 20 neutrons. However, calcium has several other isotopes, including Calcium-42, Calcium-43, Calcium-44, and Calcium-46 to -52, each with different numbers of neutrons. Some of these isotopes are radioactive and decay over time. The relative abundances of calcium isotopes can vary in different environments and can provide information about geological and biological processes.

Organometallic compounds are a type of chemical compound that contain at least one metal-carbon bond. This means that the metal is directly attached to carbon atom(s) from an organic molecule. These compounds can be synthesized through various methods, and they have found widespread use in industrial and medicinal applications, including catalysis, polymerization, and pharmaceuticals.

It's worth noting that while organometallic compounds contain metal-carbon bonds, not all compounds with metal-carbon bonds are considered organometallic. For example, in classical inorganic chemistry, simple salts of metal carbonyls (M(CO)n) are not typically classified as organometallic, but rather as metal carbonyl complexes. The distinction between these classes of compounds can sometimes be subtle and is a matter of ongoing debate among chemists.

Iodine radioisotopes are radioactive isotopes of the element iodine, which decays and emits radiation in the form of gamma rays. Some commonly used iodine radioisotopes include I-123, I-125, I-131. These radioisotopes have various medical applications such as in diagnostic imaging, therapy for thyroid disorders, and cancer treatment.

For example, I-131 is commonly used to treat hyperthyroidism and differentiated thyroid cancer due to its ability to destroy thyroid tissue. On the other hand, I-123 is often used in nuclear medicine scans of the thyroid gland because it emits gamma rays that can be detected by a gamma camera, allowing for detailed images of the gland's structure and function.

It is important to note that handling and administering radioisotopes require specialized training and safety precautions due to their radiation-emitting properties.

Krypton is a noble gas with the symbol Kr and atomic number 36. It exists in various radioisotopes, which are unstable isotopes of krypton that undergo radioactive decay. A few examples include:

1. Krypton-81: This radioisotope has a half-life of about 2.1 x 10^5 years and decays via electron capture to rubidium-81. It is produced naturally in the atmosphere by cosmic rays.
2. Krypton-83: With a half-life of approximately 85.7 days, this radioisotope decays via beta decay to bromine-83. It can be used in medical imaging for lung ventilation studies.
3. Krypton-85: This radioisotope has a half-life of about 10.7 years and decays via beta decay to rubidium-85. It is produced as a byproduct of nuclear fission and can be found in trace amounts in the atmosphere.
4. Krypton-87: With a half-life of approximately 76.3 minutes, this radioisotope decays via beta decay to rubidium-87. It is not found naturally on Earth but can be produced artificially.

It's important to note that while krypton radioisotopes have medical applications, they are also associated with potential health risks due to their radioactivity. Proper handling and safety precautions must be taken when working with these substances.

Indium radioisotopes refer to specific types of radioactive indium atoms, which are unstable and emit radiation as they decay. Indium is a chemical element with the symbol In and atomic number 49. Its radioisotopes are often used in medical imaging and therapy due to their unique properties.

For instance, one commonly used indium radioisotope is Indium-111 (^111In), which has a half-life of approximately 2.8 days. It emits gamma rays, making it useful for diagnostic imaging techniques such as single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In clinical applications, indium-111 is often attached to specific molecules or antibodies that target particular cells or tissues in the body, allowing medical professionals to monitor biological processes and identify diseases like cancer.

Another example is Indium-113m (^113mIn), which has a half-life of about 99 minutes. It emits low-energy gamma rays and is used as a source for in vivo counting, typically in the form of indium chloride (InCl3) solution. This radioisotope can be used to measure blood flow, ventilation, and other physiological parameters.

It's important to note that handling and using radioisotopes require proper training and safety measures due to their ionizing radiation properties.

Sodium radioisotopes are unstable forms of sodium, an element naturally occurring in the human body, that emit radiation as they decay over time. These isotopes can be used for medical purposes such as imaging and treatment of various diseases. Commonly used sodium radioisotopes include Sodium-22 (^22Na) and Sodium-24 (^24Na).

It's important to note that the use of radioisotopes in medicine should be under the supervision of trained medical professionals, as improper handling or exposure can pose health risks.

Radioactivity is not typically considered within the realm of medical definitions, but since it does have medical applications and implications, here is a brief explanation:

Radioactivity is a natural property of certain elements (referred to as radioisotopes) that emit particles or electromagnetic waves due to changes in their atomic nuclei. This process can occur spontaneously without any external influence, leading to the emission of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, or neutrons. These emissions can penetrate various materials and ionize atoms along their path, which can cause damage to living tissues.

In a medical context, radioactivity is used in both diagnostic and therapeutic settings:

1. Diagnostic applications include imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) scans and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), where radioisotopes are introduced into the body to visualize organ function or detect diseases like cancer.
2. Therapeutic uses involve targeting radioisotopes directly at cancer cells, either through external beam radiation therapy or internal radiotherapy, such as brachytherapy, where a radioactive source is placed near or within the tumor.

While radioactivity has significant medical benefits, it also poses risks due to ionizing radiation exposure. Proper handling and safety measures are essential when working with radioactive materials to minimize potential harm.

Barium radioisotopes are radioactive forms of the element barium, which are used in medical imaging procedures to help diagnose various conditions. The radioisotopes emit gamma rays that can be detected by external devices, allowing doctors to visualize the inside of the body. Barium sulfate is often used as a contrast agent in X-rays and CT scans, but when combined with a radioisotope such as barium-133, barium-198, or barium-207, it can provide more detailed images of specific organs or systems.

For example, barium sulfate mixed with barium-133 may be used in a lung scan to help diagnose pulmonary embolism or other respiratory conditions. Barium-207 is sometimes used in bone scans to detect fractures, tumors, or infections.

It's important to note that the use of radioisotopes carries some risks, including exposure to radiation and potential allergic reactions to the barium compound. However, these risks are generally considered low compared to the benefits of accurate diagnosis and effective treatment.

Radionuclide imaging, also known as nuclear medicine, is a medical imaging technique that uses small amounts of radioactive material, called radionuclides or radiopharmaceuticals, to diagnose and treat various diseases and conditions. The radionuclides are introduced into the body through injection, inhalation, or ingestion and accumulate in specific organs or tissues. A special camera then detects the gamma rays emitted by these radionuclides and converts them into images that provide information about the structure and function of the organ or tissue being studied.

Radionuclide imaging can be used to evaluate a wide range of medical conditions, including heart disease, cancer, neurological disorders, gastrointestinal disorders, and bone diseases. The technique is non-invasive and generally safe, with minimal exposure to radiation. However, it should only be performed by qualified healthcare professionals in accordance with established guidelines and regulations.

Yttrium radioisotopes are radioactive isotopes or variants of the element Yttrium, which is a rare earth metal. These radioisotopes are artificially produced and have unstable nuclei that emit radiation in the form of gamma rays or high-speed particles. Examples of yttrium radioisotopes include Yttrium-90 and Yttrium-86, which are used in medical applications such as radiotherapy for cancer treatment and molecular imaging for diagnostic purposes.

Yttrium-90 is a pure beta emitter with a half-life of 64.1 hours, making it useful for targeted radionuclide therapy. It can be used to treat liver tumors, leukemia, and lymphoma by attaching it to monoclonal antibodies or other targeting agents that selectively bind to cancer cells.

Yttrium-86 is a positron emitter with a half-life of 14.7 hours, making it useful for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. It can be used to label radiopharmaceuticals and track their distribution in the body, providing information on the location and extent of disease.

It is important to note that handling and use of radioisotopes require specialized training and equipment due to their potential radiation hazards.

Tin radioisotopes refer to specific variants of the element tin that have unstable nuclei and emit radiation as they decay towards a more stable state. These isotopes are often produced in nuclear reactors or particle accelerators and can be used in a variety of medical applications, such as:

1. Medical Imaging: Tin-117m, for example, is used as a radiopharmaceutical in medical imaging studies to help diagnose various conditions, including bone disorders and liver diseases.
2. Radiation Therapy: Tin-125 can be used in the treatment of certain types of cancer, such as prostate cancer, through brachytherapy - a type of radiation therapy that involves placing a radioactive source directly into or near the tumor.
3. Radioisotope Production: Tin-106 is used as a parent isotope in the production of other medical radioisotopes, such as iodine-125 and gallium-67.

It's important to note that handling and using radioisotopes requires specialized training and equipment due to their potential radiation hazards.

Bone density conservation agents, also known as anti-resorptive agents or bone-sparing drugs, are a class of medications that help to prevent the loss of bone mass and reduce the risk of fractures. They work by inhibiting the activity of osteoclasts, the cells responsible for breaking down and reabsorbing bone tissue during the natural remodeling process.

Examples of bone density conservation agents include:

1. Bisphosphonates (e.g., alendronate, risedronate, ibandronate, zoledronic acid) - These are the most commonly prescribed class of bone density conservation agents. They bind to hydroxyapatite crystals in bone tissue and inhibit osteoclast activity, thereby reducing bone resorption.
2. Denosumab (Prolia) - This is a monoclonal antibody that targets RANKL (Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-κB Ligand), a key signaling molecule involved in osteoclast differentiation and activation. By inhibiting RANKL, denosumab reduces osteoclast activity and bone resorption.
3. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) (e.g., raloxifene) - These medications act as estrogen agonists or antagonists in different tissues. In bone tissue, SERMs mimic the bone-preserving effects of estrogen by inhibiting osteoclast activity and reducing bone resorption.
4. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) - Estrogen hormone replacement therapy has been shown to preserve bone density in postmenopausal women; however, its use is limited due to increased risks of breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, and thromboembolic events.
5. Calcitonin - This hormone, secreted by the thyroid gland, inhibits osteoclast activity and reduces bone resorption. However, it has largely been replaced by other more effective bone density conservation agents.

These medications are often prescribed for individuals at high risk of fractures due to conditions such as osteoporosis or metabolic disorders that affect bone health. It is essential to follow the recommended dosage and administration guidelines to maximize their benefits while minimizing potential side effects. Regular monitoring of bone density, blood calcium levels, and other relevant parameters is also necessary during treatment with these medications.

Carbon radioisotopes are radioactive isotopes of carbon, which is an naturally occurring chemical element with the atomic number 6. The most common and stable isotope of carbon is carbon-12 (^12C), but there are also several radioactive isotopes, including carbon-11 (^11C), carbon-14 (^14C), and carbon-13 (^13C). These radioisotopes have different numbers of neutrons in their nuclei, which makes them unstable and causes them to emit radiation.

Carbon-11 has a half-life of about 20 minutes and is used in medical imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) scans. It is produced by bombarding nitrogen-14 with protons in a cyclotron.

Carbon-14, also known as radiocarbon, has a half-life of about 5730 years and is used in archaeology and geology to date organic materials. It is produced naturally in the atmosphere by cosmic rays.

Carbon-13 is stable and has a natural abundance of about 1.1% in carbon. It is not radioactive, but it can be used as a tracer in medical research and in the study of metabolic processes.

"Iron radioisotopes" refer to specific forms of the element iron that have unstable nuclei and emit radiation. These isotopes are often used in medical imaging and treatment procedures due to their ability to be detected by specialized equipment. Common iron radioisotopes include Iron-52, Iron-55, Iron-59, and Iron-60. They can be used as tracers to study the distribution, metabolism, or excretion of iron in the body, or for targeted radiation therapy in conditions such as cancer.

Copper radioisotopes are radioactive isotopes or variants of the chemical element copper. These isotopes have an unstable nucleus and emit radiation as they decay over time. Copper has several radioisotopes, including copper-64, copper-67, and copper-60, among others. These radioisotopes are used in various medical applications such as diagnostic imaging, therapy, and research. For example, copper-64 is used in positron emission tomography (PET) scans to help diagnose diseases like cancer, while copper-67 is used in targeted radionuclide therapy for cancer treatment. The use of radioisotopes in medicine requires careful handling and regulation due to their radiation hazards.

Phosphorus radioisotopes are radioactive isotopes or variants of the element phosphorus that emit radiation. Phosphorus has several radioisotopes, with the most common ones being phosphorus-32 (^32P) and phosphorus-33 (^33P). These radioisotopes are used in various medical applications such as cancer treatment and diagnostic procedures.

Phosphorus-32 has a half-life of approximately 14.3 days and emits beta particles, making it useful for treating certain types of cancer, such as leukemia and lymphoma. It can also be used in brachytherapy, a type of radiation therapy that involves placing a radioactive source close to the tumor.

Phosphorus-33 has a shorter half-life of approximately 25.4 days and emits both beta particles and gamma rays. This makes it useful for diagnostic procedures, such as positron emission tomography (PET) scans, where the gamma rays can be detected and used to create images of the body's internal structures.

It is important to note that handling and using radioisotopes requires specialized training and equipment to ensure safety and prevent radiation exposure.

Beta particles, also known as beta rays, are a type of ionizing radiation that consist of high-energy electrons or positrons emitted from the nucleus of certain radioactive isotopes during their decay process. When a neutron in the nucleus decays into a proton, it results in an excess energy state and one electron is ejected from the atom at high speed. This ejected electron is referred to as a beta particle.

Beta particles can have both positive and negative charges, depending on the type of decay process. Negative beta particles (β−) are equivalent to electrons, while positive beta particles (β+) are equivalent to positrons. They possess kinetic energy that varies in range, with higher energies associated with greater penetrating power.

Beta particles can cause ionization and excitation of atoms and molecules they encounter, leading to chemical reactions and potential damage to living tissues. Therefore, appropriate safety measures must be taken when handling materials that emit beta radiation.

Radioactive waste is defined in the medical context as any material that contains radioactive nuclides in sufficient concentrations or for such durations that it is considered a threat to human health and the environment. It includes materials ranging from used hospital supplies, equipment, and substances contaminated with radionuclides, to liquids and gases released during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel.

Radioactive waste can be classified into two main categories:

1. Exempt waste: Waste that does not require long-term management as a radioactive waste due to its low activity and short half-life.
2. Radioactive waste: Waste that requires long-term management as a radioactive waste due to its higher activity or longer half-life, which can pose a threat to human health and the environment for many years.

Radioactive waste management is a critical aspect of nuclear medicine and radiation safety, with regulations in place to ensure proper handling, storage, transportation, and disposal of such materials.

It is used as a heat source in many Russian/Soviet radioisotope thermoelectric generators, usually in the form of strontium ... Strontium-90 (90 Sr ) is a radioactive isotope of strontium produced by nuclear fission, with a half-life of 28.8 years. It ... The radioactive decay of strontium-90 generates a significant amount of heat, 0.95 W/g in the form of pure strontium metal or ... A study of the pond alga Closterium moniliferum using stable strontium found that varying the ratio of barium to strontium in ...
Strontium-90 has also been proposed. While both RHUs and Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) use the decay heat of a ... Nuclear technology portal Nuclear fuel Radioisotope generator Stirling radioisotope generator Radioisotope thermoelectric ... NASA Radioisotope Power Systems website - RHU page Radioisotope heater unit fact sheet from NASA's Cassini mission website ( ... A radioisotope heater unit (RHU) is a small device that provides heat through radioactive decay. They are similar to tiny ...
"Radioisotopes That May Impact Food Resources" (PDF). Epidemiology, Health and Social Services, State of Alaska. Archived from ... Strontium metal burns in air to produce both strontium oxide and strontium nitride, but since it does not react with nitrogen ... While natural strontium (which is mostly the isotope strontium-88) is stable, the synthetic strontium-90 is radioactive and is ... Strontium also bioaccumulates in the body. Despite restrictions on strontium ranelate, strontium is still contained in some ...
Strontium-90 is suitable as a fuel for a radioisotope thermoelectric generator and has been extracted from spent nuclear fuel ... "Radioactivity : Strontium-90". "An Overview of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators". "Food Irradiation". "Waste and Biomass ... However, the need to process the highly reactive metal into the inert perovskite form Strontium titanate reduces the power ... Caesium-137 or Strontium-90, as well as nonradioactive applications as some fission products decay quickly to stable or ...
... magnesium and strontium do not. Beryllium-7, beryllium-10, and calcium-41 are trace radioisotopes; calcium-48 and barium-130 ... Excessive amounts of strontium-90 are toxic due to its radioactivity and strontium-90 mimics calcium (i.e. Behaves as a "bone ... Pure strontium is used in the study of neurotransmitter release in neurons. Radioactive strontium-90 finds some use in RTGs, ... Strontium was eventually isolated in 1808 by Humphry Davy by electrolysis of a mixture of strontium chloride and mercuric oxide ...
Strontium-90 is easily extracted from spent nuclear fuel but must be converted into the perovskite form strontium titanate to ... Radioisotope heater unit Radioisotope rocket and nuclear electric rocket "A nuclear battery the size and thickness of a penny ... An atomic battery, nuclear battery, radioisotope battery or radioisotope generator is a device which uses energy from the decay ... A Stirling radioisotope generator is a Stirling engine driven by the temperature difference produced by a radioisotope. A more ...
The list cites air pollution by particulates, including radioisotopes strontium-90, and caesium-137; the metals nickel, copper ...
Longer-life radioisotopes, typically caesium-137 and strontium-90, present a long-term hazard. Intense beta radiation from the ... Strontium-90 found in worldwide fallout later led to the Partial Test Ban Treaty. The intense radiation in the first seconds ... For example, strontium-90 will have less time to condense and coalesce into larger particles, resulting in greater degree of ... It diffuses easily in the cloud, and undergoes two decays to rubidium-90 and then strontium-90, with half-lives of 33 seconds ...
Strontium-89 is an artificial radioisotope used in treatment of bone cancer; this application utilizes its chemical similarity ... see rubidium-strontium dating). Because strontium has an electron configuration similar to that of calcium, it readily ... Isotopes of strontium, Strontium, Lists of isotopes by element). ... Strontium-90 is a by-product of nuclear fission, present in ... Believed to decay by β+β+ to 84Kr Used in rubidium-strontium dating Fission product Kondev, F. G.; Wang, M.; Huang, W. J.; ...
Radioisotopes such as plutonium-238, curium-242, curium-244 and strontium-90 have been used. Tritium, nickel-63, promethium-147 ... the radioisotope thermoelectric generator. A radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) is a simple electrical generator which ... A radioisotope heater unit (RHU) typically provides about 1 watt of heat each, derived from the decay of a few grams of ... These systems use radioisotopes that produce low energy beta particles or sometimes alpha particles of varying energies. Low ...
Niwa also agreed with Thomas, that mineral supplements cannot guard against strontium, uranium and plutonium radioisotopes. ... He also marketed online, services and a mineral supplement he claimed mitigate the dangers of ingested radioisotopes. Busby ... that Busby advised could mitigate the effects of ingested radioisotopes. Busby obtained a BSc in Chemistry with First Class ... namely an ability to block certain radioisotopes from binding to DNA. However, his document also explains that his supplement ...
Another use is as a carrier of strontium-90 radioisotope in radioisotope thermoelectric generators. John Rumble (June 18, 2018 ... Strontium fluoride, SrF2, also called strontium difluoride and strontium(II) fluoride, is a fluoride of strontium. It is a ... Strontium fluoride is prepared by the action of hydrofluoric acid on strontium carbonate. The solid adopts the fluorite ... Strontium". Archived from the original on 2005-12-14. Mediatopia Ltd. "Strontium Fluoride (SrF2) Optical Material". Crystran.co ...
For example, strontium is commonly used as strontium titanate in RTGs, which increases molar mass by about a factor of 2. ... A radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG, RITEG), sometimes referred to as a radioisotope power system (RPS), is a type of ... Reaction of strontium carbonate with titanium dioxide at high temperature produces the desired strontium titanate plus carbon ... NASA Radioisotope Power Systems website - RTG page NASA JPL briefing, Expanding Frontiers with Radioisotope Power Systems - ...
Several radioisotopes of strontium, for example, are recognized as analogs of calcium and incorporated within Micrococcus ... strontium-90, technetium-99, cerium-144, plutonium-240, americium-241, neptunium-237 and various radioisotopes of thorium and ... Radioisotopes can be transformed directly through changes in valence state by acting as acceptors or by acting as cofactors to ... The radioisotope interact with binding sites of metabolically active cells and is used as terminal electron acceptor in the ...
Of particular interest was strontium-90 in the bones. Infants were the primary focus, as they would have had a full opportunity ... The bones were cremated and the ashes analyzed for radioisotopes. This project was kept secret primarily because it would be a ... The mixtures contained radioactive iron and the researchers were determining how fast the radioisotope crossed into the ... which keeps the remains of people who died with radioisotopes in their body. Three patients at Billings Hospital at the ...
A major use of systemic radioisotope therapy is in the treatment of bone metastasis from cancer. The radioisotopes travel ... Isotopes commonly used in the treatment of bone metastasis are radium-223, strontium-89 and samarium (153Sm) lexidronam. In ... Targeting can also be achieved by attaching the radioisotope to another molecule or antibody to guide it to the target tissue. ... The radioisotopes are delivered through infusion (into the bloodstream) or ingestion. Examples are the infusion of ...
As strontium is water-soluble, the perovskite form strontium titanate is usually employed as it is not water-soluble and has a ... Nickel-63 is a radioisotope of nickel that can be used as an energy source in Radioisotope Piezoelectric Generators. It has a ... Both strontium-89 and strontium-90 are fission products. Tritium is a low-energy beta emitter commonly used as a radiotracer in ... Strontium-89 is a short-lived beta emitter which has been used as a treatment for bone tumors, this is used in palliative care ...
89Sr is an artificial radioisotope used in the treatment of osseous (bony) metastases of bone cancer. In circumstances where ... Strontium-89 (89 Sr ) is a radioactive isotope of strontium produced by nuclear fission, with a half-life of 50.57 days. It ... Strontium-89 has an application in medicine. Strontium-89 was first synthesized in 1937 by D. W. Stewart et al. at the ... and described the therapeutic use of strontium. Strontium belongs to the same periodic family as calcium (alkaline earth metals ...
Just because a radioisotope is released it does not mean it will enter a human and then cause harm. For instance, the migration ... It was found that 12% of the caesium entered the plant, and 20% of the strontium. This paper also reports details of the effect ... Also present within the SIMFUEL was a cubic perovskite phase which is a barium strontium zirconate (BaxSr1−xZrO3). Uranium ... If the radioisotope is tightly bound to the minerals in the soil, then less radioactivity can be absorbed by crops and grass ...
The generator contains the strontium-90 radioisotope, with a heating power of 250W and 1,480 TBq of radioactivity - equivalent ... The Beta-M contains a core made up of strontium-90, which has a half-life of 28.79 years. The service life of these generators ... The three suffered burns and symptoms of acute radiation syndrome as a result of their exposure to the strontium-90 contained ... The core is also known as radioisotope heat source 90 (RHS-90). In its initial state after manufacture, the generator is ...
On August 11, 1966, the US Navy placed a strontium-powered radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) atop Fairway Rock for " ... The United States Navy placed radioisotope thermoelectric generator-powered environmental monitoring equipment on the island ...
Injections of certain radioisotopes, such as strontium-89, phosphorus-32, or samarium-153, also target bone metastases and may ...
These include the beta-emitting strontium-90 sources used as radioisotope thermoelectric generators for beacons in lighthouses ... radium-226 and strontium-90, and even from these it is possible that radium-226 and polonium-210 do not pose a significant ... strontium-90 and cobalt-60, radioactive materials. Officials confirmed the veracity of the report but stated that the public ... of strontium, equivalent to the amount of radioactivity released immediately after the Chernobyl accident (though the total ...
Robinson, R G; Blake, G M; Preston, D F; McEwan, A J; Spicer, J A; Martin, N L; Wegst, A V; Ackery, D M (1989). "Strontium-89: ... For this reason, the metabolism of calcium attracted very early the interest of physicians looking for applying radioisotopes ... His work with strontium-89, a calcium analogue, eventually led to its administration to a terminal patient with osteoblastic ... Pecher filed a patent in May 1941 for the synthesis of strontium-89 and yttrium-86 using cyclotrons and described the use of ...
In 1966 Northwind returned to Fairway Rock and the crew helped install a Strontium-90 Radioisotope thermoelectric generator ( ...
The strontium radioisotopes are very important, as strontium is a calcium mimic which is incorporated in bone growth and ... both native Strontium metal and Strontium oxide react with water by forming soluble Strontium hydroxide). However, the ... Strontium-90 has been used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) in the past because of its relatively high power ... Strontium-90 is a strong beta emitter with a half-life of 28.8 years. Its fission product yield decreases as the mass of the ...
Georgia three lumberjacks discovered two strontium-90 cores from Soviet radioisotope thermoelectric generators. These were of ... The 5-kg 35 kCi (1,300 TBq) strontium-90 sources were found, removed from their shielding, nearby. With their depleted uranium ... 1999 - Kingisepp, Leningrad Oblast, Russia - The radioisotope core of a radio thermal generator was recovered at a bus station ...
... health and safety consequences of decommissioning radioisotope thermal generators (RTGs) in Northwest Russia (PDF), Østerås: ... Strontium titanate is an oxide of strontium and titanium with the chemical formula SrTiO3. At room temperature, it is a ... An electron micrograph of strontium titanate, as artwork entitled "Strontium" at the DeYoung Museum in San Francisco (CS1 ... Beginning c. 1955, large quantities of strontium titanate were manufactured for this sole purpose. Strontium titanate was in ...
Both Strontium and Strontium oxide form soluble Strontium hydroxide and hydrogen upon contact with water, which can be used to ... retrieved 13 April 2020 a radioisotope with a two year half life will retain 0.5^0.5 or over 70% of its power after a year - ... Strontium oxide remains solid below 2,804 K (2,531 °C; 4,588 °F) and if strontium oxide is to be recovered with other liquid ... Strontium, which is present in the form of the particularly troublesome mid-lived fission product 90 Sr is liquid above 1,050 K ...
3H (tritium), the radioisotope of hydrogen, is available at very high specific activities, and compounds with this isotope in ... The chemistry is based upon the interaction of caesium and strontium with poly ethylene oxide (poly ethylene glycol) and a ... A short review of the biochemical properties of a series of key long lived radioisotopes can be read on line. 99Tc in nuclear ... Some early evidence for nuclear fission was the formation of a short-lived radioisotope of barium which was isolated from ...
Letter from A.H. Ward, Acting Director, Radioisotope and Health Physics Unit, University of Ghana at Legon to Dr Wilson, ... Mole, R. H.; Ward, A. H. (1970). "Yttrium-90 in Gonads of Monkeys containing Strontium-90". Nature. 226 (5241): 175. doi: ... Ward, as head of the Radioisotopes and Health Physics Unit at Legon, estimated that Ghana needed approximately sixty "top-level ... The unit also used radioisotopes to track dimethoate in the commercially important cacao trees. In advance of the Gerboise ...
... www.epa.gov/radiation/radionuclide-basics-strontium-90. ... Strontium-90 (Sr-90)plus icon *Radioisotope Brief. *Toxicology ...
Strontium-90 in the U.S. diet : 1982 / by C. S. Klusek. by Klusek, Catherine S , Environmental Measurements Laboratory (U.S.). ...
It is used as a heat source in many Russian/Soviet radioisotope thermoelectric generators, usually in the form of strontium ... Strontium-90 (90 Sr ) is a radioactive isotope of strontium produced by nuclear fission, with a half-life of 28.8 years. It ... The radioactive decay of strontium-90 generates a significant amount of heat, 0.95 W/g in the form of pure strontium metal or ... A study of the pond alga Closterium moniliferum using stable strontium found that varying the ratio of barium to strontium in ...
Strontium-89 Chloride: learn about side effects, dosage, special precautions, and more on MedlinePlus ... Strontium-89 chloride is in a class of drugs known as radioisotopes. It delivers radiation to cancer sites and ultimately ... Before taking strontium-89 chloride,. *tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to strontium-89 chloride or any ... Side effects from strontium-89 chloride are common and include: *increased pain starting 2 to 3 days after treatment and ...
CI: (c) 2006; JID: 0400654; 0 (Oxygen Isotopes); 0 (Strontium Radioisotopes); 0 (Trace Elements); ppublish ... Strontium Radioisotopes/analysis, Tooth/chemistry, Trace Elements/analysis ... Strontium isotope analysis of 25 individuals buried at the Tiwanaku-affiliated Moquegua Valley site of Chen Chen demonstrates ... However, strontium isotope analysis alone cannot distinguish movement between the Tiwanaku- and Chiribaya-affiliated sites in ...
Certain Strontium-Rubidium Radioisotope Infusion Systems, and Components Thereof Including Generators, Inv. 337-TA-1110 Feb ... Strontium Chromate from Austria and France, Invs. 731-TA-1422-1423 (Final) Oct 2019 AD/CVD Import Injury ...
30 million to build radioisotope-powered satellite for U.S. military ... Zenos RPS uses strontium isotope with a novel design that results in a lighter weight heat source. Bernstein said the company ... Were a radioisotope source," he said.. RPS is more akin to a nuclear battery that uses the heat generated by the decay of a ... Rendering of a radioisotope-powered satellite. Credit: Zeno Power Systems WASHINGTON - Zeno Power Systems was awarded a $30 ...
used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and radioisotope heater units as an energy source for spacecraft ... Strontium-90 38. 52. 28.8 y. β−. 546 Fission product. medium-lived fission product; probably most dangerous component of ... "Radioisotopes in Industry". World Nuclear Association.. *. Martin, James (2006). Physics for Radiation Protection: A Handbook. ... most commonly used medical radioisotope, used as a radioactive tracer Iodine-129 53. 76. 15,700,000 y. β−. 194 Cosmogenic. ...
Strontium Chromate Sputtering Target SrCrO4 bulk & research qty manufacturer. Properties, SDS, Applications, Price. Free ... Radioactive isotopes of strontium have been used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and for certain cancer ... Strontium. 38 Sr 87.620000000 Strontium See more Strontium products. Strontium (atomic symbol: Sr, atomic number: 38) is a ... In nature, most strontium is found in celestite (as strontium sulfate) and strontianite (as strontium carbonate). Strontium was ...
Strontium Disc Sr bulk & research qty manufacturer. Properties, SDS, Applications, Price. Free samples program. Term contracts ... Radioactive isotopes of strontium have been used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and for certain cancer ... Strontium. 38 Sr 87.620000000 Strontium See more Strontium products. Strontium (atomic symbol: Sr, atomic number: 38) is a ... In nature, most strontium is found in celestite (as strontium sulfate) and strontianite (as strontium carbonate). Strontium was ...
... and testing of its Z1 strontium-90 heat source. According to Zeno, they have tested the first commercially developed ... ans missionans vision statementmoonnuclear newsradioisotope thermoelectric generatorsatellitesspace travelsteven arndttransit ... Zeno Power, a developer of commercial radioisotope power systems (RPSs), announced on October 26 that it has completed the ... In 1961, the Transit 4A satellite became the first U.S. spacecraft to be powered by a radioisotope thermoelectric generator ( ...
... among other deadly radioisotopes, could result. Like nuclear power, which has peaceful and wartime uses, radioisotopes can ... Like the fuel rods in the reactor core, spent fuel rods must be kept cool or the release of cesium-137 and strontium-90, ... While such rods are spent in terms of their usefulness in the reactor core, they still contain deadly radioisotopes that remain ...
... is a class of newly developed phosphorescent (glow-in-the-dark) pigments which are based on Strontium Oxide Aluminate ... are drastically different from conventional phosphorescent pigments which are either based on Zinc Sulfide or on radioisotopes ...
We also Provide Trading Suppliers & Manufacture for 12060-59-2 Strontium titanate. ... strontium titanate has been used as a strontium-90-containing material in radioisotope thermoelectric generators.. 2. In ... STRONTIUM TITANIUM OXIDE SUBSTRATE;STRONTIUM TITANATE;STRONTIUM (II) TITANATE;titanate, strontium ;Strontium Titanate I; ... Strontium titanate (SrTiO3), an oxide of strontium and titanium, is chosen as the model system for perovskite ceramics because ...
Several things can on rare occasions cause problems for the rubidium-strontium dating method . Radioactive atoms used for ... Every single adultfrinendfinder.de login element has radioisotopes that no longer exist on Earth! ...
A deadly swirl of radio-iodine, radio-cesium, radio-strontium, plutonium, neptunium, americium, euoropium, and a witches brew ... of very short half-life radioisotopes may be released, in any such civilian nuclear power reactor. ...
Some 200 radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) - Soviet-era installations that powered lighthouses and navigation ... beacons on radioactive and poorly secured strontium 90 - littered the shores of the Arctic Ocean and had long since run out ...
Récits dun ChemoStrat Introduction Chemostratigraphy Oxygen Isotopes Carbon Isotopes Radioisotopes Sulfur Isotopes Strontium ...
Dulaiova is also planning to look at other radionuclides such as iodine, strontium and some actinides that were released. ... and ocean processes and spreading patterns of the released radioisotopes, all have good baseline data. ... cesium and other radioisotopes to the environment. ...
... from spent Strontium-82/Rubidium-82 Generators Summary: There is currently a shortage of medical radioisotopes in North America ... This project will allow the supply of the active pharmaceutical ingredient strontium-82. Strontium-82, is used for diagnosis of ... A New Evaluation of Recycling of the Imaging Agent, Strontium-82, from spent Strontium-82/Rubidium-82 Generators Summary: There ... This project will allow the supply of the active pharmaceutical ingredient strontium-82. Strontium-82, is used for diagnosis of ...
It also neutralizes exposure from radio-isotopes. Studies show that the X-irradiation that can damage the body s Kupffer and ... Each of these essential minerals can decontaminate a form of nuclear waste known as Strontium 90. Dr. Linus Pauling recommends ... where it was used to absorb radioactive strontium and cesium 137 from walls and floors. Similarly, the United States nuclear ... calcium supplementation, as it can lower Strontium absorption by up to 90 percent. I recommend using calcium and magnesium ...
Strontium-89 (a radioisotope[rx]).. * Targeted therapy with a monoclonal antibody, such as denosumab[rx]. ...
Yttrium-90 radioisotope as a daughter of Strontium-90 is one of the nuclear fission products and plays an important role in the ... 22. W.Y. Skraba, H. Arino, H.H. Kramer, "A new 90Sr/90Y radioisotope generator," J. Appl. Radio & Isotope. 29, 91 (1978). ... 21. A.T. Rane and K.S. Bhatki "Rapid radiochemical separations of strontium-90-yttrium-90 and calcium-45-scandium-46 on a ... 9. Z. Graheh, I. Eskinja, K. Kosutic, S. Cerjan-Stefanovic, "Isolation of yttrium and strontium from soil samples and rapid ...
International activities have involved 40 countries and have included recovery, replacement, and disposition of radioisotope ... including four large strontium-90 sources (four RTGs containing a total of about 60,000 curies) just prior to the Super Bowl in ... These sources are typically used in practices such as radioisotope thermoelectric generators, irradiators, and radiation ...
The TRAPEZE study compares the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of docetaxel alone or with strontium-89, ... A number of treatments are approved for bone disease, including zoledronic acid (ZA),8,9 denosumab,10 strontium-89 (Sr89),11,12 ... In particular, the development of new treatments for CRPC makes Sr89 less relevant with the advent of better radioisotope ... Strontium-89 did not significantly prolong per protocol the SRE-free interval (HR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.68-1.05; P = 0.13), though ...
Snelling, Isochron Discordances and the Role of Inheritance and Mixing of Radioisotopes in the Mantle and Crust, Radioisotopes ... Hydrothermal Reactions of Strontium and Transuranic Simulator Elements with Clay Minerals, Zeolites, and Shales. Clays and Clay ... Decay constants for radioisotopes typically used in deep-time dating range from 0.0654 × 10-10 yr-1 for 147Sm to 9.85 × 10-10 ... In Radioisotopes and the Age of the Earth: Results of a Young-Earth Creationist Research Initiative. Vardiman, L., A. Snelling ...
Both Strontium and Barium are in the same chemical family as Calcium, and therefore bind to chromosomes as well as being ... Now that we know quite a lot more of what the mechanisms of internal exposure to man-made radioisotopes are likely to be, and ... Now some man-made radioisotopes, those being produced as fission products in nuclear power stations as well as in nuclear ... The main isotopes from Fukushima No.1 that show this second event type of decay are Strontium-90/Yttrium-90, Tellurium-132/ ...
The most important fission produced radionuclides are cesium, strontium, iodine, and thallium. It enters the body through ... It includes the contamination of skin surface, foodstuff, water and gamma radiations from the spread of radioisotopes in the ... 3.3.1 Assessment of in vivo removal efficacy of Spirulina for strontium in mice. The oral administration of strontium chloride ... strontium, barium, cesium or thallium in SGF, SIF and water. The adsorption capacity of Spirulina for cobalt, strontium, barium ...
Radioisotopes are passed through ingestion in the bloodstream. It is mainly used in the treatment of cancer of bone metastasis ... The common isotopes employed for treatment are samarium lexidronam, radium 223 and strontium 89. ... Unsealed source radiotherapy: popularly known as systemic radioisotope therapy is a targeting therapy. The targeting process ...
  • Like the fuel rods in the reactor core, spent fuel rods must be kept cool or the release of cesium-137 and strontium-90, among other deadly radioisotopes, could result. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The radioactive contaminants released during any accident or incident includes cesium-137, strontium-90, iodine-131, cobalt-60, americium-241 etc. (researchsquare.com)
  • Barium-141, Cesium-137, and strontium-90 are produced from the nuclear fission of uranium and plutonium. (researchsquare.com)
  • Strontium-90, cesium-137, zinc-65, manganese-54 and cobalt-60 were detected at greater concentrations and deeper in the ground than would be expected from nuclear fallout or weapons testing from long ago. (healthvermont.org)
  • In the February 26, 2010 set of soil samples, strontium-90 and cesium-137 were measured at much greater concentrations than are found in surface soils in Vermont and around the world. (healthvermont.org)
  • Soils in the areas affected by radioactive fallout showed significantly increased levels of long-lived radioisotopes such as cesium-137 or strontium-90. (hibakusha-worldwide.org)
  • Cesium-137 can cause solid tumors and genetic defects in offspring when inhaled or ingested through food or water, while strontium-90 is a known cause for leukemia. (hibakusha-worldwide.org)
  • The common isotopes employed for treatment are samarium lexidronam, radium 223 and strontium 89. (anavara.com)
  • Common radioactive foods usually get their radioisotopes from the soil, although it's also possible to absorb isotopes with water. (sciencenotes.org)
  • List, data and properties of all known isotopes of Strontium. (chemlin.org)
  • The other known isotopes and nuclear isomers are unstable radioisotopes, of which in particular the anthropogenically produced Sr-90 occasionally escapes into the environment and causes radiation damage. (chemlin.org)
  • The two following tables list the most important data and properties of the Strontium isotopes. (chemlin.org)
  • Further information on the individual Strontium isotopes is listed on separate pages and can be accessed via the link in column 1. (chemlin.org)
  • Strontium has 33 isotopes, 4 of them are stable and naturally occurring. (buyisotope.com)
  • An older rock sample would contain a greater amount of daughter isotopes compared to the parent radioisotope. (allinonehighschool.com)
  • It is used as a heat source in many Russian/Soviet radioisotope thermoelectric generators, usually in the form of strontium titanate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Due to its high melting point and insolubility, strontium titanate has been used as a strontium-90-containing material in radioisotope thermoelectric generators. (lookchem.com)
  • Some 200 radioisotope thermoelectric generators ( RTGs ) - Soviet-era installations that powered lighthouses and navigation beacons on radioactive and poorly secured strontium 90 - littered the shores of the Arctic Ocean and had long since run out their engineered lifespans. (bellona.org)
  • MURMANSK - The Murmansk Region and Norway's northerly Finnmark County will assists and finance the liquidation of 71 radiologically dangerous Radioisotope Thermal Electric Generators (RTGs) used to power military lighthouses for Russia's Baltic Sea. (bellona.org)
  • In the 1960s and '70s, the federal government utilized generators fueled by strontium-90 to power navigational buoys and undersea sensing equipment. (overtoperator.com)
  • Strontium-90 (90 Sr ) is a radioactive isotope of strontium produced by nuclear fission, with a half-life of 28.8 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Strontium-90 has applications in medicine and industry and is an isotope of concern in fallout from nuclear weapons, nuclear weapons testing, and nuclear accidents. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Air Force in the past has used the isotope strontium-90 as a power source but its applications were limited due to its large mass and low efficiency. (spacenews.com)
  • Zeno's RPS uses strontium isotope with a novel design that results in a lighter weight heat source. (spacenews.com)
  • A radionuclide ( radioactive nuclide , radioisotope or radioactive isotope ) is a nuclide that has excess nuclear energy, making it unstable. (wikipedia.org)
  • The terms atomic battery, nuclear battery, tritium battery, and radioisotope generator are used to describe a device that uses energy from the decay of a radioactive isotope to generate electricity. (topicsforseminar.com)
  • The difference between each strontium isotope is based on the number of neutrons in the nucleus. (chemlin.org)
  • The ratio of parent radioisotope to daughter isotope can help scientists determine the age of rocks. (allinonehighschool.com)
  • MaxLume is a class of newly developed phosphorescent (glow-in-the-dark) pigments which are based on Strontium Oxide Aluminate Chemistry. (maxmax.com)
  • 1. Strontium titanium oxide is used in tunable microwave capacitors, flat panel displays, field emission displays, microwave solitons, PTC thermistors and varistors, magnetic field insensitive thermometers, ultralow-temperature scanning microscopes, semiconductive ceramics, pyroelectric far-infrared detectors and in alloy and catalyst applications. (lookchem.com)
  • The radioactive decay of strontium-90 generates a significant amount of heat, 0.95 W/g in the form of pure strontium metal or approximately 0.460 W/g as strontium titanate and is cheaper than the alternative 238Pu. (wikipedia.org)
  • A study of the pond alga Closterium moniliferum using stable strontium found that varying the ratio of barium to strontium in water improved strontium selectivity. (wikipedia.org)
  • The removal efficacy of Spirulina was evaluated for strontium and thallium in mice. (researchsquare.com)
  • The strontium and thallium content in major tissues, urine and faeces were estimated. (researchsquare.com)
  • Spirulina significantly reduced the whole body retention of strontium and thallium and enhanced their excretion through urine and faeces. (researchsquare.com)
  • In conclusion, pulverized Spirulina showed potential adsorption efficiency and may be used as a cost-effective, efficient and non-toxic agent for removal of strontium and thallium from body. (researchsquare.com)
  • The metal ions like mercury, cesium, thallium and strontium have the greatest potential to cause harm on account of their extensive use. (researchsquare.com)
  • A result of the loss of electricity, overheating at the power plant led to significant releases of iodine, cesium and other radioisotopes to the environment. (nsf.gov)
  • Dulaiova is also planning to look at other radionuclides such as iodine, strontium and some actinides that were released. (nsf.gov)
  • Other radioisotopes that could be of long-term concern if released, are strontium and plutonium. (food-safety.com)
  • Strontium-90 has a half life of about 29 years, and plutonium has a much longer half life than that (Pu-238: 88 years, Pu-239: 24100 years, Pu-240: 6564 years). (food-safety.com)
  • Despite the findings of increased levels of plutonium, strontium, cesium and other radioactive particles in soil and water, no meaningful medical studies were performed on the local population. (hibakusha-worldwide.org)
  • Radioisotopes decay over decades and produce heat. (spacenews.com)
  • Decay constants for radioisotopes typically used in deep-time dating range from 0.0654 × 10 -10 yr -1 for 147 Sm to 9.85 × 10 -10 yr -1 for 235 U. (icr.org)
  • Until recently, the direct conversion of the energy inherent in radioactive decay involved the use of solid radioisotope materials. (materialstoday.com)
  • Radioactive strontium is a nuclear fission decay product found in industrial products and nuclear waste and is released during nuclear accidents. (cdc.gov)
  • This is evidence that radioisotopes, in addition to tritium, washed out of the AOG pipe tunnel into the environment with the leaking nuclear reactor water. (healthvermont.org)
  • The information is needed,' she says, 'so that any subsequent efforts to understand the severity of the releases, the bioaccumulation of radionuclides in the ocean food web, and ocean processes and spreading patterns of the released radioisotopes, all have good baseline data. (nsf.gov)
  • New developments have led to the creation of a more efficient version, known as an Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator. (topicsforseminar.com)
  • Naturally occurring strontium is nonradioactive and nontoxic at levels normally found in the environment, but 90Sr is a radiation hazard. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1961, the Transit 4A satellite became the first U.S. spacecraft to be powered by a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). (ans.org)
  • 7. Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator  A thermoelectric converter uses thermocouples. (topicsforseminar.com)
  • Dr. Linus Pauling recommends calcium supplementation, as it can lower Strontium absorption by up to 90 percent. (lewrockwell.com)
  • Strontium-90 is a long lived highly radioactive fallout product of atomic-bomb explosions. (buyisotope.com)
  • Yttrium-90 radioisotope as a daughter of Strontium-90 is one of the nuclear fission products and plays an important role in the treatment of malignant tumors in nuclear medicine. (nstri.ir)
  • According to Zeno, they have tested the first commercially developed radioisotope heat source and reached a key milestone for Zeno to begin delivering RPSs to customers in 2025. (ans.org)
  • The DEPTHS program will enable Zeno Power to demonstrate a commercially developed radioisotope power system that can support critical sensing capabilities and other seabed applications for the Navy. (overtoperator.com)
  • Algae has shown selectivity for strontium in studies, where most plants used in bioremediation have not shown selectivity between calcium and strontium, often becoming saturated with calcium, which is greater in quantity and also present in nuclear waste. (wikipedia.org)
  • Each of these essential minerals can decontaminate a form of nuclear waste known as Strontium 90 . (lewrockwell.com)
  • This also meant that other radioisotopes could have contaminated the environment, which soil testing confirmed. (healthvermont.org)
  • proposed the technology of combined enterosorbents production such as «Ultrasorb» and «Carboxycam» for removal of radioisotopes of cesium, strontium, transuranium elements and heavy metal ions from human organism. (isc.gov.ua)
  • By providing continuous and reliable energy to underwater infrastructure, Zeno Power's radioisotope power system could pave the way for a new era of autonomous undersea vehicles and long-endurance seafloor sensor systems. (overtoperator.com)
  • Strontium is a soft yellowish white-silver metallic element, belongs to group 2 of the periodic table. (buyisotope.com)
  • But, these radioisotopes only occur naturally in trace amounts in food. (sciencenotes.org)
  • On 85% of one's selections was basically K-Ar day s, 8% rubidium-strontium schedules, and you can 4% uranium-lead dates. (procrodrywall.ca)
  • Strontium-90 is a "bone seeker" that exhibits biochemical behavior similar to calcium, the next lighter group 2 element. (wikipedia.org)
  • As strontium has an affinity to the calcium-sensing receptor of parathyroid cells that is similar to that of calcium, the increased risk of liquidators of the Chernobyl power plant to suffer from primary hyperparathyroidism could be explained by binding of strontium-90. (wikipedia.org)
  • Radioisotopes are passed through ingestion in the bloodstream. (anavara.com)
  • The biological half-life of strontium-90 in humans has variously been reported as from 14 to 600 days, 1000 days, 18 years, 30 years and, at an upper limit, 49 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some radioisotopes persist for years. (sciencenotes.org)
  • Radioisotope many years you to definitely did not see this type of criteria have been declined toward the foundation out-of presumed chemical substances and you will/otherwise physical adjustment that produced the newest "ages" unsound symptoms off alive. (procrodrywall.ca)
  • Virtually all remaining strontium-90 is deposited in bones and bone marrow, with the remaining 1% remaining in blood and soft tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • While such rods are spent in terms of their usefulness in the reactor core, they still contain deadly radioisotopes that remain hazardous. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The construction of this date size try considering regarding the 380 radioisotope ages which were selected due to their arrangement for the assumed fossil and geological sequences found in the rocks. (procrodrywall.ca)
  • ORNL had several roles in the discovery, the most prominent being production of the radioisotope berkelium-249 for the search. (oakridgetoday.com)
  • We're a radioisotope source," he said. (spacenews.com)
  • Zeno Power, a developer of commercial radioisotope power systems (RPSs), announced on October 26 that it has completed the design, fabrication, and testing of its Z1 strontium-90 heat source. (ans.org)
  • Unsealed source radiotherapy, also called a systemic radioisotope. (anavara.com)
  • A nuclear disaster leads to both external and internal contamination of the radioisotopes. (researchsquare.com)
  • It includes the contamination of skin surface, foodstuff, water and gamma radiations from the spread of radioisotopes in the atmosphere. (researchsquare.com)
  • Nuclear industry advancements and growing concerns about environmental contamination and terrorist activity have increased interest in quantifying radioisotopes in environmental and human samples. (cdc.gov)
  • notify any health care professional (especially other doctors) giving you treatment that you will be taking strontium-89 chloride. (medlineplus.gov)
  • They are drastically different from conventional phosphorescent pigments which are either based on Zinc Sulfide or on radioisotopes for their self-luminous properties. (maxmax.com)
  • WASHINGTON - Zeno Power Systems was awarded a $30 million contract to build a radioisotope-powered satellite for the U.S. Air Force by 2025. (spacenews.com)
  • Zeno, a startup founded in 2018, develops radioisotope power systems (RPS), a type of nuclear energy technology that converts the heat from decaying nuclear materials directly into electricity. (spacenews.com)
  • Seattle-based Zeno Power has been awarded a $7.5 million contract from the Department of Defense (DoD) to design and demonstrate a radioisotope power system capable of providing distributed power on the seabed. (overtoperator.com)
  • Zeno Power recently announced the successful demonstration of its next-generation strontium-90 heat generator, showcasing the company's advancements in this field. (overtoperator.com)
  • By securing this contract, Zeno Power solidifies its position as a key player in the field of radioisotope power systems. (overtoperator.com)
  • Strontium-89 (Metastron) versus external beam radiotherapy in patients with painful bone metastases secondary to prostatic cancer: preliminary report of a multicenter trial. (jamanetwork.com)
  • A comparison of the palliative effects of strontium-89 and external beam radiotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer. (jamanetwork.com)
  • En considérant que la dose annuelle moyenne est de 2,4 mSv, ce niveau de dose ne devrait pas être mortel. (fukushima-diary.com)
  • Researchers have looked at the bioaccumulation of strontium by Scenedesmus spinosus (algae) in simulated wastewater. (wikipedia.org)
  • Food radioactivity due to accidents is a bigger problem because radioisotopes are absorbed into the plants and animals and may also form a dust on their surfaces. (sciencenotes.org)
  • The Defense Innovation Unit (DIU), a Department of Defense organization focused on swiftly putting commercial technology to use in the U.S. military, has awarded contracts for two nuclear technologies-compact fusion and radioisotope heat-for spacecraft that could carry a high-power payload and freely maneuver in cislunar space. (ans.org)
  • Every single adultfrinendfinder.de login element has radioisotopes that no longer exist on Earth! (adultfrriendfinder.net)
  • The collaboration brings together Zeno's expertise in radioisotope power systems and Blue Origin's ingenuity in aerospace technology. (overtoperator.com)
  • Radioisotope power systems have a long history of application in both undersea and space environments. (overtoperator.com)
  • Title : Human hair and strontium 90 Personal Author(s) : Moeller, Dade W.;Baratta, Edmond J.;Leonard, Ira E. (cdc.gov)
  • But, aside from something of an image problem associated with radioisotopes, "Controlled nuclear technologies are not inherently dangerous. (materialstoday.com)