Exercise Test: Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.Dipyridamole: A phosphodiesterase inhibitor that blocks uptake and metabolism of adenosine by erythrocytes and vascular endothelial cells. Dipyridamole also potentiates the antiaggregating action of prostacyclin. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p752)Salivary alpha-Amylases: A subclass of alpha-amylase ISOENZYMES that are secreted into SALIVA.Echocardiography, Stress: A method of recording heart motion and internal structures by combining ultrasonic imaging with exercise testing (EXERCISE TEST) or pharmacologic stress.Dobutamine: A catecholamine derivative with specificity for BETA-1 ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS. It is commonly used as a cardiotonic agent after CARDIAC SURGERY and during DOBUTAMINE STRESS ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Hydrocortisone: The main glucocorticoid secreted by the ADRENAL CORTEX. Its synthetic counterpart is used, either as an injection or topically, in the treatment of inflammation, allergy, collagen diseases, asthma, adrenocortical deficiency, shock, and some neoplastic conditions.Myocardial Perfusion Imaging: The creation and display of functional images showing where the blood is flowing into the MYOCARDIUM by following over time the distribution of tracers injected into the blood stream.Chest Pain: Pressure, burning, or numbness in the chest.Urinary Incontinence, Stress: Involuntary discharge of URINE as a result of physical activities that increase abdominal pressure on the URINARY BLADDER without detrusor contraction or overdistended bladder. The subtypes are classified by the degree of leakage, descent and opening of the bladder neck and URETHRA without bladder contraction, and sphincter deficiency.Suburethral Slings: Support structures, made from natural or synthetic materials, that are implanted below the URETHRA to treat URINARY STRESS INCONTINENCE.Coronary Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Thallium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of thallium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Tl atoms with atomic weights 198-202, 204, and 206-210 are thallium radioisotopes.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Myocardial Ischemia: A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon: A method of computed tomography that uses radionuclides which emit a single photon of a given energy. The camera is rotated 180 or 360 degrees around the patient to capture images at multiple positions along the arc. The computer is then used to reconstruct the transaxial, sagittal, and coronal images from the 3-dimensional distribution of radionuclides in the organ. The advantages of SPECT are that it can be used to observe biochemical and physiological processes as well as size and volume of the organ. The disadvantage is that, unlike positron-emission tomography where the positron-electron annihilation results in the emission of 2 photons at 180 degrees from each other, SPECT requires physical collimation to line up the photons, which results in the loss of many available photons and hence degrades the image.Cardiotonic Agents: Agents that have a strengthening effect on the heart or that can increase cardiac output. They may be CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES; SYMPATHOMIMETICS; or other drugs. They are used after MYOCARDIAL INFARCT; CARDIAC SURGICAL PROCEDURES; in SHOCK; or in congestive heart failure (HEART FAILURE).Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Angina Pectoris: The symptom of paroxysmal pain consequent to MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA usually of distinctive character, location and radiation. It is thought to be provoked by a transient stressful situation during which the oxygen requirements of the MYOCARDIUM exceed that supplied by the CORONARY CIRCULATION.Coronary Artery Disease: Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.Saliva: The clear, viscous fluid secreted by the SALIVARY GLANDS and mucous glands of the mouth. It contains MUCINS, water, organic salts, and ptylin.Ligaments, Articular: Fibrous cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE that attach bones to each other and hold together the many types of joints in the body. Articular ligaments are strong, elastic, and allow movement in only specific directions, depending on the individual joint.Microvascular Angina: ANGINA PECTORIS or angina-like chest pain with a normal coronary arteriogram and positive EXERCISE TEST. The cause of the syndrome is unknown. While its recognition is of clinical importance, its prognosis is excellent. (Braunwald, Heart Disease, 4th ed, p1346; Jablonski Dictionary of Syndromes & Eponymic Diseases, 2d ed). It is different from METABOLIC SYNDROME X, a syndrome characterized by INSULIN RESISTANCE and HYPERINSULINEMIA, that has increased risk for cardiovascular disease.Atlanto-Occipital Joint: The point of articulation between the OCCIPITAL BONE and the CERVICAL ATLAS.Urologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the urinary tract or its parts in the male or female. For surgery of the male genitalia, UROLOGIC SURGICAL PROCEDURES, MALE is available.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Exercise Tolerance: The exercise capacity of an individual as measured by endurance (maximal exercise duration and/or maximal attained work load) during an EXERCISE TEST.Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System: A collection of NEURONS, tracts of NERVE FIBERS, endocrine tissue, and blood vessels in the HYPOTHALAMUS and the PITUITARY GLAND. This hypothalamo-hypophyseal portal circulation provides the mechanism for hypothalamic neuroendocrine (HYPOTHALAMIC HORMONES) regulation of pituitary function and the release of various PITUITARY HORMONES into the systemic circulation to maintain HOMEOSTASIS.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Heart Function Tests: Examinations used to diagnose and treat heart conditions.Stress, Physiological: The unfavorable effect of environmental factors (stressors) on the physiological functions of an organism. Prolonged unresolved physiological stress can affect HOMEOSTASIS of the organism, and may lead to damaging or pathological conditions.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Thallium: A heavy, bluish white metal, atomic number 81, atomic weight [204.382; 204.385], symbol Tl.Urodynamics: The mechanical laws of fluid dynamics as they apply to urine transport.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Pituitary-Adrenal System: The interactions between the anterior pituitary and adrenal glands, in which corticotropin (ACTH) stimulates the adrenal cortex and adrenal cortical hormones suppress the production of corticotropin by the anterior pituitary.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Vasodilator Agents: Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Coronary Circulation: The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.Technetium Tc 99m Sestamibi: A technetium imaging agent used to reveal blood-starved cardiac tissue during a heart attack.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Psychological Tests: Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Syncope: A transient loss of consciousness and postural tone caused by diminished blood flow to the brain (i.e., BRAIN ISCHEMIA). Presyncope refers to the sensation of lightheadedness and loss of strength that precedes a syncopal event or accompanies an incomplete syncope. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp367-9)Physical Exertion: Expenditure of energy during PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. Intensity of exertion may be measured by rate of OXYGEN CONSUMPTION; HEAT produced, or HEART RATE. Perceived exertion, a psychological measure of exertion, is included.Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Coronary Stenosis: Narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Rest: Freedom from activity.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Cold Temperature: An absence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably below an accustomed norm.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Adenosine: A nucleoside that is composed of ADENINE and D-RIBOSE. Adenosine or adenosine derivatives play many important biological roles in addition to being components of DNA and RNA. Adenosine itself is a neurotransmitter.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Coronary Vessel Anomalies: Malformations of CORONARY VESSELS, either arteries or veins. Included are anomalous origins of coronary arteries; ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULA; CORONARY ANEURYSM; MYOCARDIAL BRIDGING; and others.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Calcinosis: Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Ventricular Dysfunction, Left: A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.Angina, Unstable: Precordial pain at rest, which may precede a MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Echocardiography, Doppler: Measurement of intracardiac blood flow using an M-mode and/or two-dimensional (2-D) echocardiogram while simultaneously recording the spectrum of the audible Doppler signal (e.g., velocity, direction, amplitude, intensity, timing) reflected from the moving column of red blood cells.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Ventricular Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Adrenocorticotropic Hormone: An anterior pituitary hormone that stimulates the ADRENAL CORTEX and its production of CORTICOSTEROIDS. ACTH is a 39-amino acid polypeptide of which the N-terminal 24-amino acid segment is identical in all species and contains the adrenocorticotrophic activity. Upon further tissue-specific processing, ACTH can yield ALPHA-MSH and corticotrophin-like intermediate lobe peptide (CLIP).Myocardial Contraction: Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary: Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Infusions, Intravenous: The long-term (minutes to hours) administration of a fluid into the vein through venipuncture, either by letting the fluid flow by gravity or by pumping it.Heart Ventricles: The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
  • Bank stress testing is a framework for analyzing the financial impact of unfavorable economic scenarios to ensure that banks have sufficient capital to maintain operations during such situations. (mathworks.com)
  • After the failure of standard bank stress testing to prevent the global financial and economic crisis in 2007-2008, regulators around the world promptly expanded the scope and degrees of unfavorable scenarios in order to limit or prevent another systemic failure in financial services. (mathworks.com)
  • Business-specific stress tests, which are designed to test real-world scenarios defined by line-of-business managers -- can help decision makers walk the tightrope between opportunity and risk - and drive better performance. (sas.com)
  • Other scenarios and elements of the testing process will not be released publicly, according to the officials. (cnbc.com)
  • In a brief statement in May, the committee confirmed that it was "carrying out an E.U.-wide forward-looking stress testing exercise on the aggregate banking system" based on common guidelines and scenarios. (cnbc.com)
  • The process was so informative that Utah Office of Management and Budget Director Kristin Cox and her colleagues are developing additional scenarios to test. (governing.com)
  • Liquidity stress tests have been applied in parallel to and independently from solvency stress tests, based on scenarios which may not be consistent with those used in solvency stress tests. (imf.org)
  • The stress scenarios, conducted outside the model, are never explicitly assigned probabilities. (ssrn.com)
  • Instead, we suggest folding the stress-tests into the risk model, thereby requiring all scenarios to be assigned probabilities. (ssrn.com)
  • Updated with Stifel Nicolaus analysts Christopher Mutascio's comments on the Federal Reserve's 2013 stress test scenarios. (thestreet.com)
  • In all scenarios, cardiac MRI stress results were the key predictor of mortality. (auntminnie.com)
  • Stress testing a CPU over the course of 24 hours at 100% load is, in most cases, sufficient to determine that the CPU will function correctly in normal usage scenarios such as in a desktop computer, where CPU usage typically fluctuates at low levels (50% and under). (wikipedia.org)
  • Stress tests are one way to measure the heart's output and how hard it's having to work in various scenarios. (wisegeek.com)
  • The stress scenarios are applied simultaneously to the investment and risk-sharing groups as well as to the Pensionskasse (ie. (gv.at)
  • The stress test focuses on defined benefits (DB) systems and hybrid pension schemes, in which effects of prescribed adverse capital market scenarios are observed. (gv.at)
  • According to the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition ( DSM-5 ), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a trauma - or stressor-related disorder that can develop after exposure to actual or threatened death, serious injury, or sexual violence. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Theoretical. (majortests.com)
  • Posttraumatic Stress Disorder JOHN DOE Abstract Posttraumatic stress disorder is a common and disabling disorder that develops as a consequence of traumatic events and is characterized by distressing re-experiencing portions of the trauma, avoidance of reminders, emotional numbing and hyper-arousal. (majortests.com)
  • Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Andre' Gonsalves SCIN 132 American Military University Abstract Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric disorder that effects not just war torn military veterans, but can affect anyone at any age that experienced or witnessed a traumatic event. (majortests.com)
  • ASE (American Society of Echocardiography) has sent a letter to McKesson objecting to this edit, based on the description in the CPT book that 'decision making' does not include the actual diagnostic testing, but helps determine the level, along with information in the CPT book stating performance and interpretation of diagnostic tests/studies during a patient encounter are not included in the E & M. (aapc.com)
  • Pharmacologic stress testing is used in combination with imaging modalities such as radionuclide imaging and echocardiography. (medscape.com)
  • 1. I had an echo stress test (echocardiography done before and after the treadmill) to find out if there is 'anything wrong' with my heart. (healingwell.com)
  • Also available are stress echocardiography - an ultrasound done before and after a period of exercise - and color flow Doppler, which can reveal problems with blood flow. (ucsfhealth.org)
  • Six months after a 'normal' stress test, surgeons cracked open Wallack's chest for quadruple bypass surgery. (courant.com)
  • In an exercise stress test, electrodes are taped to your chest to detect your heart's rhythm. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Report any chest pains or other complications you notice on the day of the test. (healthline.com)
  • If you experience any difficulties - especially, chest pains, weakness, or fatigue - you may ask to stop the test. (healthline.com)
  • The occurrence of ischemic chest pain consistent with angina is important, particularly if it forces termination of the test. (medscape.com)
  • A cardiac stress test is performed on patients with chest pain or other types of angina. (utmedicalcenter.org)
  • Do not use powders or lotions on your chest area the day of your test. (upmc.com)
  • I was taught to believe in the power of stress tests to establish safety and identify disease in low risk chest pain patients before they leave the hospital. (epmonthly.com)
  • Accordingly, in the handful of studies examining outcomes of emergency department (or chest pain center) patients after stress tests, the rate of heart attacks and deaths approaches zero regardless of whether the test was positive or negative-and even regardless of whether they had a stress test. (epmonthly.com)
  • In the rare case where a stress test might be appropriate (e.g. a diabetic, 75-year old smoker with diaphoresis and squeezing chest pressure when he walks the third flight), the patient probably qualifies for more than just a stress test. (epmonthly.com)
  • This is because if you have taken the drug, dangerous side effects like drastic drop of blood pressure may occur, especially when a drug called nitroglycerin is required to relieve chest pain during the test. (medindia.net)
  • Results of a head-to-head comparison study led by Johns Hopkins researchers show that noninvasive CT scans of the heart's vessels are far better at spotting clogged arteries that can trigger a heart attack than the commonly prescribed exercise stress that most patients with chest pain undergo. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Stress tests are performed at a medical facility, where 10 sticky electrodes are placed on the patient's chest. (reference.com)
  • Patients taking the test are connected to a series of electrodes on the chest, ankles, and wrists. (wisegeek.com)
  • In addition, lotions, powders, or oils should not be applied to the chest area the day of the test as these can affect the electrodes attached to the skin. (wisegeek.com)
  • For the stress test you will have EKG leads placed on your chest and you will be monitored closely. (nationaljewish.org)
  • Next, the technician or nurse will attach small sticky patches (electrodes) on the chest to monitor heart function throughout the exercise or IV infusion part of the test. (cooperhealth.org)
  • First, a stress lab technician will gently rub 10 small areas on your chest and place electrodes (small, flat, sticky patches) on these areas. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • On 26 September 2019, Andrea Enria, Chair of the European Central Bank's Supervisory Board, gave a speech on the future of stress testing ("The future of stress testing - realism, relevance and resources") in which he outlined a proposal on how to achieve meaningful progress with a view to make the tests both more realistic and more relevant, with fewer resources required. (europa.eu)
  • For 2019, the stress test exercise was performed by Multi-employer Pensionskassen. (gv.at)
  • I'd like to thank ISMA for a world-class stress conference in 2019 which I was delighted to take part in. (isma.org.uk)
  • At the same time, administration officials are pressing wary banks and regulators to agree to disclose summary details of the stress test assessment of each bank's assets. (ft.com)
  • A Goldilocks result: That is what the European Central Bank's bank stress tests seem to have produced. (wsj.com)
  • Such disclosures, Bernanke said, will give investors and analysts an "alternative perspective" on the test results, while also helping them assess a bank's appetite for risk and its risk-management practices. (americanbanker.com)
  • Adopting a proportionate approach, the PRA expects the larger firms that participate in the Bank of England's (the Bank) annual concurrent stress testing to apply the principles contained in this SS in full, while firms not participating in the Bank's annual concurrent stress testing should apply the principles on a proportionate basis, taking into account their size, complexity, risk profile and the relevance to them of stress test models. (bankofengland.co.uk)
  • Bernanke noted the evolution of the Fed's annual stress tests exercises, which are meant to check whether banks' capital and liquidity positions are resilient enough to withstand prolonged periods of economic stress while still continuing to lend. (americanbanker.com)
  • That testing is going to identify any risks that we haven't gone through, any design problems, any potential failures, right here in a controlled environment on the ground," Free said. (space.com)
  • A macro stress testing framework for assessing systemic risks in the banking sector ," Occasional Paper Series 152, European Central Bank. (repec.org)
  • However, if you're pregnant, you shouldn't have this test because of risks it might pose to your unborn child. (smartdraw.com)
  • After a lengthy conversation about risks and options, she proposed her own solution: "What about a stress test? (epmonthly.com)
  • It supports firms' development and implementation of policies and procedures to identify, manage and control the risks inherent in the use of stress test models. (bankofengland.co.uk)
  • Sometime in 2018, NASA plans to launch Orion on a fully integrated test flight known as Exploration Mission-1. (space.com)
  • The test consisted of an intravenous infusion of dobutamine, starting with a dose of 5 micrograms/kg/min for 5 minutes and continuing with 10, 15, 20 and up to 40 micrograms/kg/min every 5 minutes (mean peak dose = 20 micrograms/kg/min). (nih.gov)
  • When you arrive at the doctor's office or medical center for the test, an intravenous, or IV line will be placed into your vein. (sutterhealth.org)
  • Patients who are able to walk or jog on a treadmill are often encouraged to participate in an activities-based stress test that doesn't involve intravenous monitoring. (wisegeek.com)
  • The tests measure the ability of banks to withstand theoretical market shocks like a disorderly Brexit, a sell-off in government bonds and property, or a rise in political uncertainty against a backdrop of falling economic growth. (reuters.com)
  • A critical piece of NASA's Orion spacecraft - which may carry astronauts to deep-space locations like Mars - is about to begin a series of crucial tests to determine whether or not it can withstand the rigors of spaceflight. (space.com)
  • The facility will test how the system will withstand the intense shaking and thrust associated with a launch, as well as the heat and pressure extremes it will encounter in space, among other things. (space.com)
  • When the stress tests were revealed two months ago, the authorities defined the adverse scenario as one in which unemployment rose gradually to peak at 10.4 per cent in late 2010. (ft.com)
  • That several Italian lenders fared poorly under regulators' basic stress scenario, not just the adverse one, raises more questions about the past rigor of Italian banking regulation and suggests serious restructuring is still required to restore the country's fragmented banking system to health. (wsj.com)
  • The doctor may stop the test early if you display any adverse signs. (livestrong.com)
  • The Federal Reserve's next round of bank stress tests will use a particularly "severely adverse scenario," but will also allow banks to reduced planned dividend increases or share buybacks. (thestreet.com)
  • For the next round of stress tests, the Fed requires bank holding companies to show that they can maintain a "Tier 1 common ratio of 5 percent on a pro forma basis under expected and stressful conditions throughout the planning horizon," which includes a far less severe Adverse Scenario than the previous round of stress tests, but also includes a new "Severely Adverse Scenario. (thestreet.com)
  • A manual of laboratory and diagnostic tests (8th ed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Professional guide to diagnostic tests. (wikipedia.org)
  • The actual performance and/or interpretation of diagnostic tests/studies ordered during a patient encounter are NOT included in the levels of E/M services. (aapc.com)
  • Physician performance of diagnostic tests/studies for which specific CPT codes are available MAY BE REPORTED SEPARATELY, IN ADDITION to the appropriate E/M code. (aapc.com)
  • The physician's interpretation of the results of diagnostic tests/studies (ie, professional component) with preparation of a separate distinctly identifiable signed written report MAY ALSO BE REPORTED SEPARATELY, using the appropriate CPT code with modifier 26 appended. (aapc.com)
  • We perform technologically enhanced versions of traditional diagnostic tests, such as electrocardiograms, echocardiograms, Holter monitoring - wearing a device that records your heart's activity for a day or longer - and exercise stress testing, which assesses your heart's ability to function during exertion. (ucsfhealth.org)
  • Kids can get anxious about arriving late and then having to rush to prepare for the test, so set the alarm ten minutes early to get everyone out the door without last-minute chaos. (scholastic.com)
  • Since there are so many possible variations of the stress test, it is difficult to instruct people on what to expect or how they should prepare. (wisegeek.com)
  • If you need to deliver a stress management training course and have no time to prepare. (isma.org.uk)
  • Cain, K., "Practical Use of a Minicomputer for Stress Laboratory Testing," SAE Technical Paper 770753, 1977, https://doi.org/10.4271/770753 . (sae.org)
  • Padfield, C. and Padfield, T., "Plane Stress Fracture Toughness Testing of Die Cast Magnesium Alloys," SAE Technical Paper 2002-01-0077, 2002, https://doi.org/10.4271/2002-01-0077 . (sae.org)
  • Peer Steinbrück, the German finance minister, had previously signaled his reluctance to release findings of stress tests. (cnbc.com)
  • Although the findings showed that more detailed screening fails to identify many patients who have caffeine in their circulation, the results don't make a case for routine serum testing, said Dr. Banko. (medpagetoday.com)
  • [ 4 , 5 ] Findings from the Henry Ford Exercse Testing (FIT) Project appear to indicate a graded, inverse relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness and incident atrial fibrillation, particularly for obese patients. (medscape.com)
  • Despite these findings, the modality is involved in less than 0.1% of all imaging-based stress tests performed in the U.S., according to the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. (auntminnie.com)
  • A report on the findings comparing CT angiograms and stress tests , published online Oct. 14 in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging , show the scans correctly identified blockages in nine out of 10 people, while stress tests picked up blockages in six out of 10. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • No tests is 100 percent accurate 100 percent of the time, but our findings indicate CT angiograms get pretty close to that coveted threshold," says lead investigator Armin Zadeh, M.D., Ph.D. , associate professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Researchers say the total tab stemming from either test, including downstream costs related to additional testing due to unclear or unrelated findings, remains unclear and should be an important consideration in crafting any new testing recommendations. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Twenty-two large banks in Europe may have accumulated credit losses of close to €400 billion for this year and next, according to officials who have seen a draft of conclusions of "stress tests" conducted by European regulators. (cnbc.com)
  • The bank tests in Europe were conducted by the Committee of European Banking Supervisors, or C.E.B.S., a pan-E.U. regulators' panel based in London, which was assigned the matter by governments. (cnbc.com)
  • U.S. regulators released their stress test results in May, saying that 9 of the 19 largest U.S.-based banks were adequately protected, while the other 10 were ordered to raise a combined $75 billion as a buffer against potential losses. (cnbc.com)
  • In recent months and years practitioners and regulators have embraced the idea of supplementing VaR estimates with stress-testing. (ssrn.com)
  • Regulators recognize that for the tests to be credible, not all of the banks can be winners. (nakedcapitalism.com)
  • Apr 29 - European banks must show they can survive simultaneous routs in bonds, property and stocks, in the toughest test so far by regulators aiming to restore confidence in an industry that had to be rescued by taxpayers in the financial crisis. (reuters.com)
  • Among the tests that the service module will undergo at Glenn Space Center will be an acoustic stress test and a mechanical vibration test to simulate the launch environment, as well as shocks tests to mimic the vehicle's separation from the rocket. (space.com)
  • Some of the remaining parts will be refurbished and undergo further testing, with some sent to Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, while other parts will return to Europe, where additional iterations of the service module are being constructed. (space.com)
  • There are a number of reasons why doctors and other healthcare providers might suggest that a patient undergo a stress test. (wisegeek.com)