Gastric Fundus: The superior portion of the body of the stomach above the level of the cardiac notch.Gastrins: A family of gastrointestinal peptide hormones that excite the secretion of GASTRIC JUICE. They may also occur in the central nervous system where they are presumed to be neurotransmitters.Muscle Relaxation: That phase of a muscle twitch during which a muscle returns to a resting position.Corpus Luteum: The yellow body derived from the ruptured OVARIAN FOLLICLE after OVULATION. The process of corpus luteum formation, LUTEINIZATION, is regulated by LUTEINIZING HORMONE.Corpus Callosum: Broad plate of dense myelinated fibers that reciprocally interconnect regions of the cortex in all lobes with corresponding regions of the opposite hemisphere. The corpus callosum is located deep in the longitudinal fissure.Stomach: An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM.Pyloric Antrum: The region between the sharp indentation at the lower third of the STOMACH (incisura angularis) and the junction of the PYLORUS with the DUODENUM. Pyloric antral glands contain mucus-secreting cells and gastrin-secreting endocrine cells (G CELLS).Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide: A highly basic, 28 amino acid neuropeptide released from intestinal mucosa. It has a wide range of biological actions affecting the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and respiratory systems and is neuroprotective. It binds special receptors (RECEPTORS, VASOACTIVE INTESTINAL PEPTIDE).Muscle, Smooth: Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Agenesis of Corpus Callosum: Birth defect that results in a partial or complete absence of the CORPUS CALLOSUM. It may be isolated or a part of a syndrome (e.g., AICARDI'S SYNDROME; ACROCALLOSAL SYNDROME; ANDERMANN SYNDROME; and HOLOPROSENCEPHALY). Clinical manifestations include neuromotor skill impairment and INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY of variable severity.Bupranolol: An adrenergic-beta-2 antagonist that has been used for cardiac arrhythmia, angina pectoris, hypertension, glaucoma, and as an antithrombotic.Peptide PHI: A 27-amino acid peptide with histidine at the N-terminal and isoleucine amide at the C-terminal. The exact amino acid composition of the peptide is species dependent. The peptide is secreted in the intestine, but is found in the nervous system, many organs, and in the majority of peripheral tissues. It has a wide range of biological actions, affecting the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, respiratory, and central nervous systems.Hydroxocobalamin: Injectable form of VITAMIN B 12 that has been used therapeutically to treat VITAMIN B 12 DEFICIENCY.Gastric Mucosa: Lining of the STOMACH, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. The surface cells produce MUCUS that protects the stomach from attack by digestive acid and enzymes. When the epithelium invaginates into the LAMINA PROPRIA at various region of the stomach (CARDIA; GASTRIC FUNDUS; and PYLORUS), different tubular gastric glands are formed. These glands consist of cells that secrete mucus, enzymes, HYDROCHLORIC ACID, or hormones.Receptors, Cholecystokinin: Cell surface proteins that bind cholecystokinin (CCK) with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Cholecystokinin receptors are activated by GASTRIN as well as by CCK-4; CCK-8; and CCK-33. Activation of these receptors evokes secretion of AMYLASE by pancreatic acinar cells, acid and PEPSIN by stomach mucosal cells, and contraction of the PYLORUS and GALLBLADDER. The role of the widespread CCK receptors in the central nervous system is not well understood.Enprostil: A synthetic PGE2 analog that has an inhibitory effect on gastric acid secretion, a mucoprotective effect, and a postprandial lowering effect on gastrin. It has been shown to be efficient and safe in the treatment of gastroduodenal ulcers.Carteolol: A beta-adrenergic antagonist used as an anti-arrhythmia agent, an anti-angina agent, an antihypertensive agent, and an antiglaucoma agent.Guanethidine: An antihypertensive agent that acts by inhibiting selectively transmission in post-ganglionic adrenergic nerves. It is believed to act mainly by preventing the release of norepinephrine at nerve endings and causes depletion of norepinephrine in peripheral sympathetic nerve terminals as well as in tissues.Receptor, Cholecystokinin B: A subtype of cholecystokinin receptor found primarily in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM and the GASTRIC MUCOSA. It may play a role as a neuromodulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission the regulation of GASTRIC ACID secretion from GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS.Muscle Tonus: The state of activity or tension of a muscle beyond that related to its physical properties, that is, its active resistance to stretch. In skeletal muscle, tonus is dependent upon efferent innervation. (Stedman, 25th ed)Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Nitric Oxide: A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.Nitroprusside: A powerful vasodilator used in emergencies to lower blood pressure or to improve cardiac function. It is also an indicator for free sulfhydryl groups in proteins.Fluorescein Angiography: Visualization of a vascular system after intravenous injection of a fluorescein solution. The images may be photographed or televised. It is used especially in studying the retinal and uveal vasculature.Photography: Method of making images on a sensitized surface by exposure to light or other radiant energy.Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Stomach Diseases: Pathological processes involving the STOMACH.Nitric Oxide Donors: A diverse group of agents, with unique chemical structures and biochemical requirements, which generate NITRIC OXIDE. These compounds have been used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and the management of acute myocardial infarction, acute and chronic congestive heart failure, and surgical control of blood pressure. (Adv Pharmacol 1995;34:361-81)Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Nitroarginine: An inhibitor of nitric oxide synthetase which has been shown to prevent glutamate toxicity. Nitroarginine has been experimentally tested for its ability to prevent ammonia toxicity and ammonia-induced alterations in brain energy and ammonia metabolites. (Neurochem Res 1995:200(4):451-6)Atropine: An alkaloid, originally from Atropa belladonna, but found in other plants, mainly SOLANACEAE. Hyoscyamine is the 3(S)-endo isomer of atropine.Gastric Acid: Hydrochloric acid present in GASTRIC JUICE.Sumatriptan: A serotonin agonist that acts selectively at 5HT1 receptors. It is used in the treatment of MIGRAINE DISORDERS.Gastrointestinal Motility: The motor activity of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Gastric Juice: The liquid secretion of the stomach mucosa consisting of hydrochloric acid (GASTRIC ACID); PEPSINOGENS; INTRINSIC FACTOR; GASTRIN; MUCUS; and the bicarbonate ion (BICARBONATES). (From Best & Taylor's Physiological Basis of Medical Practice, 12th ed, p651)Ophthalmoscopy: Examination of the interior of the eye with an ophthalmoscope.OxadiazolesApamin: A highly neurotoxic polypeptide from the venom of the honey bee (Apis mellifera). It consists of 18 amino acids with two disulfide bridges and causes hyperexcitability resulting in convulsions and respiratory paralysis.Pinacidil: A guanidine that opens POTASSIUM CHANNELS producing direct peripheral vasodilatation of the ARTERIOLES. It reduces BLOOD PRESSURE and peripheral resistance and produces fluid retention. (Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed)Corpora Allata: Paired or fused ganglion-like bodies in the head of insects. The bodies secrete hormones important in the regulation of metamorphosis and the development of some adult tissues.Carbachol: A slowly hydrolyzed CHOLINERGIC AGONIST that acts at both MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS and NICOTINIC RECEPTORS.Ophthalmoscopes: Devices for examining the interior of the eye, permitting the clear visualization of the structures of the eye at any depth. (UMDNS, 1999)Muscarinic Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous ACETYLCHOLINE or exogenous agonists. Muscarinic antagonists have widespread effects including actions on the iris and ciliary muscle of the eye, the heart and blood vessels, secretions of the respiratory tract, GI system, and salivary glands, GI motility, urinary bladder tone, and the central nervous system.Esophagus: The muscular membranous segment between the PHARYNX and the STOMACH in the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Gastrin-Secreting Cells: Endocrine cells which secrete GASTRIN, a peptide that induces GASTRIC ACID secretion. They are found predominantly in the GASTRIC GLANDS of PYLORIC ANTRUM in the STOMACH, but can also be found in the DUODENUM, nervous and other tissues.Pentagastrin: A synthetic pentapeptide that has effects like gastrin when given parenterally. It stimulates the secretion of gastric acid, pepsin, and intrinsic factor, and has been used as a diagnostic aid.Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome: A syndrome that is characterized by the triad of severe PEPTIC ULCER, hypersecretion of GASTRIC ACID, and GASTRIN-producing tumors of the PANCREAS or other tissue (GASTRINOMA). This syndrome may be sporadic or be associated with MULTIPLE ENDOCRINE NEOPLASIA TYPE 1.Autonomic Nervous System: The ENTERIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; PARASYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; and SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM taken together. Generally speaking, the autonomic nervous system regulates the internal environment during both peaceful activity and physical or emotional stress. Autonomic activity is controlled and integrated by the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the HYPOTHALAMUS and the SOLITARY NUCLEUS, which receive information relayed from VISCERAL AFFERENTS.Guinea Pigs: A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.QuinoxalinesAchlorhydria: A lack of HYDROCHLORIC ACID in GASTRIC JUICE despite stimulation of gastric secretion.Enterochromaffin Cells: A subtype of enteroendocrine cells found in the gastrointestinal MUCOSA, particularly in the glands of PYLORIC ANTRUM; DUODENUM; and ILEUM. These cells secrete mainly SEROTONIN and some neuropeptides. Their secretory granules stain readily with silver (argentaffin stain).Enterochromaffin-like Cells: Neuroendocrine cells in the glands of the GASTRIC MUCOSA. They produce HISTAMINE and peptides such as CHROMOGRANINS. ECL cells respond to GASTRIN by releasing histamine which acts as a paracrine stimulator of the release of HYDROCHLORIC ACID from the GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS.Chromogranin A: A type of chromogranin which was first isolated from CHROMAFFIN CELLS of the ADRENAL MEDULLA but is also found in other tissues and in many species including human, bovine, rat, mouse, and others. It is an acidic protein with 431 to 445 amino acid residues. It contains fragments that inhibit vasoconstriction or release of hormones and neurotransmitter, while other fragments exert antimicrobial actions.Carcinoid Tumor: A usually small, slow-growing neoplasm composed of islands of rounded, oxyphilic, or spindle-shaped cells of medium size, with moderately small vesicular nuclei, and covered by intact mucosa with a yellow cut surface. The tumor can occur anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract (and in the lungs and other sites); approximately 90% arise in the appendix. It is now established that these tumors are of neuroendocrine origin and derive from a primitive stem cell. (From Stedman, 25th ed & Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1182)Somatostatin: A 14-amino acid peptide named for its ability to inhibit pituitary GROWTH HORMONE release, also called somatotropin release-inhibiting factor. It is expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems, the gut, and other organs. SRIF can also inhibit the release of THYROID-STIMULATING HORMONE; PROLACTIN; INSULIN; and GLUCAGON besides acting as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator. In a number of species including humans, there is an additional form of somatostatin, SRIF-28 with a 14-amino acid extension at the N-terminal.
The vagal afferents are activated during the gastric phase of digestion when the corpus and fundus of the stomach are distended ... The stimulation of the mechanical receptors located in the gastric mucosa stimulates the vagus afferents. The completion of the ... Finally, the Delta cells are inhibited to reduce the inhibition of gastrin release. Vasovagal episode Vagus influence on ... One, the parietal cells in the body of the stomach are stimulated to release H+. Two, the ECL cells of the lamina propria of ...
... which travels through the bloodstream to parietal cells in the fundus. Gastrin stimulates the parietal cells to secrete more ... gastric cancer, or both. Acquisition at an older age brings different gastric changes more likely to lead to duodenal ulcer. ... Inflammation of the pyloric antrum is more likely to lead to duodenal ulcers, while inflammation of the corpus (body of the ... is more likely to lead to gastric ulcers and gastric carcinoma. However, H. pylori possibly plays a role only in the first ...
... which travels through the bloodstream to parietal cells in the fundus.[52] Gastrin stimulates the parietal cells to secrete ... while inflammation of the corpus (body of the stomach) is more likely to lead to gastric ulcers and gastric carcinoma.[17][18] ... gastric cancer, or both. Acquisition at an older age brings different gastric changes more likely to lead to duodenal ulcer.[12 ... after endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer, for first-degree relatives with gastric cancer, and in certain cases of ...
The vagal afferents are activated during the gastric phase of digestion when the corpus and fundus of the stomach are distended ... The stimulation of the mechanical receptors located in the gastric mucosa stimulates the vagus afferents. The completion of the ... Finally, the Delta cells are inhibited to reduce the inhibition of gastrin release. Vasovagal episode Vagus influence on ... One, the parietal cells in the body of the stomach are stimulated to release H+. Two, the ECL cells of the lamina propria of ...
At upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (Olympus Videoscope GIF/Q140; Melville, NY), at least two biopsies from fundus, corpus, ... gastrin levels, and gastric histology. The relationship between gastric emptying and gastrointestinal symptoms was also ... TSH, thyroid-stimulating hormone. As many as 30-50% of type 1 diabetic patients have evidence of delayed gastric emptying, a ... Delayed Gastric Emptying and Gastric Autoimmunity in Type 1 Diabetes. Christophe E.M. De Block, Ivo H. De Leeuw, Paul A. ...
Corpus atrophy and ECL cell proliferation were assessed in gastric biopsies.. RESULTS-PCA+ patients had higher gastrin (P , ... At upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (GIF/Q140 videoscope; Olympus, Melville, NY), at least two biopsies from fundus, corpus, ... after a 12-h overnight fast using pentagastrin-stimulated acid output (6 μg/kg s.c. Pentagastrin Injection BP; Cambridge ... and gastrin level (r = 0.67, P = 0.02). One PCA+ patient with elevated gastrin, CgA, and 5-HIAA levels had a gastric carcinoid ...
... pepsin secretion and relaxation of gastric corpus and fundus ... gastrin 23 How does gastrin and somatostatin reach parietal ... The phase triggered by site, smell and taste of food - causes salivation, gastric acid secretion, ...
What is the gastric phase? Stretch receptors in the stomach directly stimulate gastrin release which stimulates the reflex and ... What do the fundus and corpus secrete? Acid 12 of 32. What does the pylorus secrete? ... How are parietal cells stimulated? All three receptors are necessary these include: ACh from vagus nerve, Gastrin from G cells ...
Gastrin is the hormone that stimulates the release of gastric acid and aids in motility. Cholecystokinin helps to cause ... Next, the corpus or body is the piece of the stomach that holds most food as the stomach works to break it down. The last part ... The most northern part of the stomach is the Fundus. This section is the part that creates the curved part of the stomach. ... Gastric Inhibitory Polypeptide (GIP) neutralizes stomach acid to protect the small intestine from acid damage. Enteroglucagon ...
In the gastric stimulates proliferation of epithelial cells.. gastrin. Clinical evidence for this divergent followed by overall ... In the fundus for the TNM classification system) (UICC, and corpus, they differentiate within few 1997) are lined by two ... Study of the proliferation in human gastric A. von Herbay, J. Rudi : Role of apoptosis in gastric epithelial turnover. ... pylori infected gastric mucosa. The sTNF- TNF in vitro to induce apoptosis in gastric strains of H. pylori (Wagner et al., 1997 ...
G cells secrete gastrin which stimulates the secretion of hydrochloric acid.. LIVER ... Corpus. is the largest of the four parts that make up the stomach. And this is where the bulk of the partial digestion occurs. ... consists mainly of the gastric glands that secrete the digestive juices. It is covered by a layer of columnar ... Fundus. stores undigested food and also the gases released. from the chemical digestion of food. ...
Gastrin: This signals the production of acids in the stomach.. *Secretin: This hormone signals the pancreas to produce ... The corpus spongiosum is yet another part of the male anatomy that facilitates sexual reproduction. It is a soft, spongy tissue ... The upper part of the stomach, the fundus, acts as the initial contact for food when it meets the stomach lining. There, pepsin ... The inner oblique layer also has small wave-like ridges called rugae, or gastric folds. These ridges allow the stomach to ...
Gastrin acts on the enterochromaffin-like cells in the gastric corpus to release histamine, which stimulates parietal cells to ... Mucosal glands of the fundus and body of the stomach secrete gastric juice rich in acid and pepsinogen (Fig 10.1 B). Mucosa of ... Gastrin stimulates the parietal cells in the corpus to secrete more acid into the stomach lumen. Chronically increased gastrin ... Regulation of gastric emptying:. Distention of stomach or increased gastrin secretion increases the strength of gastric ...
tubular glands (from gastric pits) in fundus and corpus areas. - parietal cells, chief cells, mucous neck cells ... vagal reflex stimulates parietal cell directly and induces the release of gastrin from the G-cell ... in the oxyntic glands located in the fundus and corpus of the stomach ... a proton pump (H+/K+ ATPase) inhibitor - decreases amount of H+ secreted - increases pH in lumen -- used to treat gastric ulcer ...
... of the stomach with the gastroesophageal junction labeling the esophagus gastroesophageal junction the fundus corpus the antrum ... Gastric Inhibitory Peptide Also Known as GIP. This hormone is a member of the secretin family of enzymes and probably has a ... Gastrin. A hormone produced by G cells in the stomach in response to perceived need for acid production. ... These proton pumps are stimulated by these modulators:. Acetylcholine. The nerve transmitter important for movement of the ...
Evaluation of specific biochemical indicators of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric cancer in Egypt ... The roles of H. pylori infection and gastrin have been reported to stimulate and induce overexpression of COX-2 [30]; this ... pylori colonization of the gastric body and fundus, resulting in decreased acid secretion and thus lowering the inhibitory ... Spontaneous disappearance of Helicobacter pylori antibodies in patients with advanced atrophic corpus gastritis. Acta ...
Stimulates acid secretion and can stimulate motility. G cells from secreting gastrin, 2. Parietal cells from secreting HCl, 3. ... The parietal cells are located in the middle part of the glands of the fundus-body region of the stomach. They secrete gastric ... in the antrum and corpus that inhibits gastric acid secretion from parietal cells. ... Stomach Physiology: Gastric Acid Secretion. acid secretion by parietal cells in the stomach. Gastrin and Ach work. stress ...
The gastric mucosa and fecal microbiota of mice were characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The body weight was much ... The gastric mucosa and fecal microbiota of mice were characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The body weight was much ... However, no study has explored the effect of HFD on the gastric microbiota. This study established the HFD animal model to ... This study established the HFD animal model to determine the impact of HFD on the gastric microbiota and its relationship with ...
If you found IM in either Fundus or Antrum, your chance of gastric cancer is higher than normal. If you found IM in both Fundus ... If you have HP, it will be everywhere in your stomach - Antrum, Corpus, Fundus, ... as a result, your whole stomach will be ... I thought H. Pylori didnt like an acidic environment, so doesnt eating stimulate a more acidic environment? Shouldnt the ... My histamine, n-methylhistamine, chronic urticaria index, IgE, IgG, CgA, gastrin, basophils levels very high.. Can someone ...
showed that gastric Shh expression and processing depends on circulating gastrin serum levels and gastric acidity. This ... 4.7 ). The gastric glands of the proximal (fundus) and distal (antrum) stomach are functionally distinct. From E11.5 until ... showed that Gli is required for metaplastic changes in the gastric corpus during chronic Helicobacter infection. The study ... They demonstrated that histamine-stimulated acid secretion is severely compromised and hypergastrinemia develops. They further ...
... and G-17 itself stimulates acid output from parietal cells in the gastric corpus. Gastrins are also trophic hormones and ... G-17 is a 17-aminoacids form of gastrin produced by antral G cells. Its fasting level increases in case of gastric antrum ... Autoimmune pathogenesis usually involving gastric body and fundus.. *. Chronic atrophic type B gastritis:. Commonly H. pylori- ... produced by the gastric corpus) and PGC (also called PGII, produced by the gastric corpus and antrum). Their serum levels ...
Serum Gastrin Effects In studies involving more than 200 patients, serum gastrin levels increased during the first 1 to 2 weeks ... Gastric Malignancy: In adults, symptomatic response does not preclude the presence of gastric malignancy. Consider additional ... This effect is dose-related and leads to inhibition of both basal and stimulated acid secretion irrespective of the stimulus. ... No significant differences between treatment groups were observed in development of ECL cell hyperplasia, corpus atrophic ...
45-7B ). Gastrin release is stimulated by gastric distention, vagal stimulation, dietary amino acids, and peptide, with rapid ... The body, or corpus, the largest portion of the stomach, is located immediately below and continuous with the fundus. The ... Significant quantities of gastrin are also secreted into the gastric lumen; gastrin is a known gastric growth and ... and most gastric enzymes. These fairly straight and simple tubular glands are closely associated in the areas of gastric fundus ...
gastrin - produced by G-cells of the stomach.It regulates gastric acidity, responsible for synthesis of hydrochloric acid, and ... corpus.. * pyloric or pyloric.At the outlet of pyloric sphincter of the stomach it is that separates the stomach from the ... Through hard muscle layer lying on it and submucosa, mucosa has many folds.In the area of ​​the body and fundus of the stomach ... Duokrinin - stimulates the secretion of 12-duodenum.. * vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP).This hormone is synthesized in all ...
Y. Kito and H. Suzuki, "Properties of Rikkunshi-to (TJ-43)-induced relaxation of rat gastric fundus smooth muscles," American ... M. Yagi, S. Homma, M. Kubota et al., "The herbal medicine Rikkunshi-to stimulates and coordinates the gastric myoelectric ... T. Naito, H. Itoh, F. Yasunaga, and M. Takeyama, "Rikkunshi-to raises levels of somatostatin and gastrin in human plasma," ... and isolated fundus smooth muscle from diabetic neuropathic rats with gastric dysmotility [29]. Rikkunshito not only increased ...
Stomach cancer and ulcers can also cause an excess in the production of gastrin, which stimulates the production of ... the parietal cells are found in the Corpus & Fundus regions of the stomach. Intrinsic factor is necessary because without it we ... When we eat, stomach acid, also known as gastric acid is made on demand by the parietal cells which line our stomach. Stomach ... Stomach acid, also referred to as gastric acid is a digestive liquid consisting of hydrochloric acid that is produced in the ...
  • This article will focus on the role of which line the foveolae ('pits') and the consideration of gastric histology, which epithelia migrate downwards in the gastric differs in the four anatomical subsites of glands. (dosingpdf.com)
  • I do not have any IM or atrophy (still awaiting endoscopy results but most look clear except for fundus) but do seem to have iron deficiency getting worse. (helico.com)
  • 25 pg/mL) are a marker of severe atrophic gastritis, and, when associated with high serum G-17 and PGC levels, results in a low PGA/PGC ratio, testified corpus atrophy, and a risk condition for gastric cancer. (clinicalpainadvisor.com)
  • The model includes four modules representing the host transcriptional changes in response to infection, gastric atrophy, the Hedgehog pathway response, and the restriction point that controls cell cycle. (biomedcentral.com)
  • OBJECTIVE -Parietal cell antibodies (PCAs) are found in 20% of type 1 diabetic patients, denoting autoimmune gastritis and pernicious anemia, which may predispose to enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell hyper/dysplasia and gastric carcinoid tumors. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Gastric carcinoid tumors, evolving from enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell hyperplasia induced by chronic hypergastrinemia, may develop in 4-9% of patients with autoimmune gastritis/pernicious anemia and are 13 times less frequent in control subjects ( 12 - 16 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • The study participants comprised 20 patients with gastric carcinoma, 20 patients with positive H. pylori-associated gastritis and 20 individuals as the control group. (who.int)
  • Gastric cancer is the fourth commonest ently reported that H. pylori eradication were subjected to routine history and malignant disorder and the second com- can lead to a regression of acute gastritis clinical examination, fol owed by an monest cause of cancer-related death and intestinal metaplasia, and that such upper gastrointestinal endoscopic ex- worldwide . (who.int)
  • It was identified in 1982 by Australian scientists Barry Marshall and Robin Warren, who found that it was present in a person with chronic gastritis and gastric ulcers, conditions not previously believed to have a microbial cause. (wikipedia.org)
  • 10 , 11 ] Gastric carcinoids may be associated with chronic atrophic gastritis. (uwhealth.org)
  • Table 10.1 The cell source and chief functions of various constituents of gastric juice and endocrine gastric secretions. (essayeducation.com)
  • The GI endocrine system is stimulated by the ingestion of food. (slideplayer.es)
  • Most NETs of the small and large intestines occur sporadically, while others may occur within the background of an inherited neoplasia syndrome such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) or neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) (e.g., gastrin-producing G-cell tumors and somatostatin-producing D-cell tumors of the duodenum, respectively). (uwhealth.org)
  • Hormonal regulation of some physiological activities involves a hierarchy of cell types acting on each other either to stimulate or to modulate the release and action of a particular hormone. (bionity.com)
  • Conversely, many patients with gastroparesis are asymptomatic, and subjects with symptoms may have normal gastric emptying ( 4 , 5 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • This study demonstrates diversity in bacterium-host interactions within the species H. heilmannii s.s. and that the pathogenesis of gastric infections with this microorganism is not identical to that of an H. pylori infection. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Thus, to obtain better insights into the pathogenesis of human gastric disease associated with H. heilmannii s.s., experimental infection studies with pure cultures of this microorganism are essential. (biomedcentral.com)
  • CONCLUSIONS -We found that ∼50% of type 1 diabetic patients studied had delayed gastric emptying that did not correlate with symptoms. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • CONCLUSIONS -PCA + patients, particularly those with high gastrin and CgA levels, risk developing ECL cell hyper/dysplasia. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Jan 29, 2017 · Gastric and duodenal ulcers usually cannot be differentiated based on history alone, although some findings may be suggestive (see DDx). (numpor.org)
  • Known contributing factors are autonomic neuropathy and acute hyperglycemia, but the role of gastric autoimmunity has never been investigated, although 15-20% of type 1 diabetic patients exhibit parietal cell antibodies (PCAs). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • The etiology of diabetic gastroparesis is still not fully established, but important factors seem to be autonomic neuropathy ( 6 , 11 - 13 ), acute hyperglycemia ( 14 , 15 ), and abnormalities of gut hormones and neurotransmitters, such as motilin ( 16 ), gastrin ( 17 ), and nitric oxide ( 18 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • These data suggest that HFD affects not only gut microbiota but also gastric microbiota and the disruption of microbial ecosystem in the digestive tract may play a part in the development and progression of metabolic diseases although molecular mechanism requires further investigation. (frontiersin.org)
  • Information on environmental status such as place of birth, parental income, type of housing, number of persons in the household, parents' occupation, family history of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer was obtained. (bvsalud.org)
  • Seropositive rates of anti-H. pylori IgG on the basis of gender, place of birth, parental income, type of housing, parents' occupation, family history of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer showed no statistically significant difference. (bvsalud.org)