A genus of fungi in the family Ophiostomataceae, order OPHIOSTOMATALES. Several species are the source of Dutch elm disease, which is spread by the elm bark beetle.
Esterases are hydrolase enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of ester bonds, converting esters into alcohols and acids, playing crucial roles in various biological processes including metabolism and detoxification.
Steroids with a hydroxyl group at C-3 and most of the skeleton of cholestane. Additional carbon atoms may be present in the side chain. (IUPAC Steroid Nomenclature, 1987)
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of CHOLESTEROL ESTERS and some other sterol esters, to liberate cholesterol plus a fatty acid anion.
Enzymes which catalyze the hydrolysis of carboxylic acid esters with the formation of an alcohol and a carboxylic acid anion.
Hydrolytic enzyme activity used as a histocytochemical test for the presence of esterases in tissue. Substrate used is 3-hydroxy-4'-nitro-2-naphthanilide chloroacetate (naphthol AS-D).
An NADPH-dependent P450 enzyme that plays an essential role in the sterol biosynthetic pathway by catalyzing the demethylation of 14-methyl sterols such as lanosterol. The enzyme acts via the repeated hydroxylation of the 14-methyl group, resulting in its stepwise conversion into an alcohol, an aldehyde and then a carboxylate, which is removed as formic acid. Sterol 14-demethylase is an unusual cytochrome P450 enzyme in that it is found in a broad variety of organisms including ANIMALS; PLANTS; FUNGI; and protozoa.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of acetate esters and water to alcohols and acetate. EC 3.1.1.6.
A class of organic compounds known as STEROLS or STEROIDS derived from plants.

Structural characterization of the N-linked oligosaccharides in bile salt-stimulated lipase originated from human breast milk. (1/661)

The detailed structures of N- glycans derived from bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL) found in human milk were determined by combining exoglycosidase digestion with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The N- glycan structures were conclusively determined in terms of complexity and degree of fucosylation. Ion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection, together with mass-spectral analysis of the esterified N- glycans, indicated the presence of monosialylated structures. The molecular mass profile of esterified N- glycans present in BSSL further permitted the more detailed studies through collision-induced dissociation (CID) and sequential exoglycosidase cleavages. The N- glycan structures were elucidated to be complex/dibranched, fucosylated/complex/dibranched, monosialylated/complex/dibranched, and monosialylated/fucosylated/dibranched entities.  (+info)

Paradoxical effect on atherosclerosis of hormone-sensitive lipase overexpression in macrophages. (2/661)

Foam cells formed from receptor-mediated uptake of lipoprotein cholesterol by macrophages in the arterial intima are critical in the initiation, progression, and stability of atherosclerotic lesions. Macrophages accumulate cholesterol when conditions favor esterification by acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) over cholesteryl-ester hydrolysis by a neutral cholesteryl-ester hydrolase, such as hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), and subsequent cholesterol efflux mediated by extracellular acceptors. We recently made stable transfectants of a murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, that overexpressed a rat HSL cDNA and had a 5-fold higher rate of cholesteryl-ester hydrolysis than control cells. The current study examined the effect of macrophage-specific HSL overexpression on susceptibility to diet-induced atherosclerosis in mice. A transgenic line overexpressing the rat HSL cDNA regulated with a macrophage-specific scavenger receptor promoter-enhancer was established by breeding with C57BL/6J mice. Transgenic peritoneal macrophages exhibited macrophage-specific 7-fold overexpression of HSL cholesterol esterase activity. Total plasma cholesterol levels in transgenic mice fed a chow diet were modestly elevated 16% compared to control littermates. After 14 weeks on a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet, total cholesterol increased 3-fold, with no difference between transgenics and controls. However, HSL overexpression resulted in thicker aortic fatty lesions that were 2.5-times larger in transgenic mice. HSL expression in the aortic lesions was shown by immunocytochemistry. Atherosclerosis was more advanced in transgenic mice exhibiting raised lesions involving the aortic wall, along with lipid accumulation in coronary arteries occurring only in transgenics. Thus, increasing cholesteryl-ester hydrolysis, without concomitantly decreasing ACAT activity or increasing cholesterol efflux, is not sufficient to protect against atherosclerosis. hormone-sensitive lipase overexpression in macrophages.  (+info)

Testis expression of hormone-sensitive lipase is conferred by a specific promoter that contains four regions binding testicular nuclear proteins. (3/661)

The testicular isoform of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSLtes) is encoded by a testis-specific exon and 9 exons common to the testis and adipocyte isoforms. In mouse, HSLtes mRNA appeared during spermiogenesis in round spermatids. Two constructs containing 1.4 and 0.5 kilobase pairs (kb) of the human HSLtes gene 5'-flanking region cloned upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene were microinjected into mouse oocytes. Analyses of enzyme activity in male and female transgenic mice showed that 0.5 kb of the HSLtes promoter was sufficient to direct expression only in testis. Cell transfection experiments showed that CREMtau, a testis-specific transcriptional activator, does not transactivate the HSLtes promoter. Using gel retardation assays, four testis-specific binding regions (TSBR) were identified using testis and liver nuclear extracts. The testis-specific protein binding on TSBR4 was selectively competed by a probe containing a SRY/Sox protein DNA recognition site. Sox5 and Sox6 which are expressed in post-meiotic germ cells bound TSBR4. Mutation of the AACAAAG motif in TSBR4 abolished the binding. Moreover, binding of the high mobility group domain of Sox5 induced a bend within TSBR4. Together, our results showed that 0.5 kb of the human HSLtes promoter bind Sox proteins and contain cis-acting elements essential for the testis specificity of HSL.  (+info)

Purification and properties of a cholesteryl ester hydrolase from rat liver microsomes. (4/661)

This report describes a purification procedure for a cholesteryl ester hydrolase (CEH) from female rat liver microsomes, and some structural, immunological, kinetic, and regulatory properties of the enzyme that distinguish the microsomal CEH from other hepatic cholesteryl ester-splitting enzymes. CEH was purified 12.4-fold from reisolated microsomes using sequential solubilization by sonication, polyethylene glycol precipitation, fractionation with hydroxyapatite, anion exchange chromatography, and chromatography on hydroxyapatite, with an overall yield of 3.2%. CEH activity was purified 141-fold over nonspecific esterase activity and 56-fold over triacylglycerol lipase activity. In sharp contrast with most esterases and lipases, CEH did not bind to concanavalin A-Sepharose and heparin-Sepharose. After polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the purified enzyme exhibited two silver-stained bands, but only the protein electroeluted from the low mobility band had CEH activity. Affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies raised to electroeluted CEH inhibited 90% of the activity of liver microsomal CEH and reacted with a 106 kDa protein band on Western blot analysis. This 106 kDa CEH contains a unique N-terminal amino acid sequence. The purified enzyme had optimal activity at pH 6 and no taurocholate requirements, and was inhibited by the serine active site inhibitor phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and by free sulfhydryl specific reagents. It hydrolyzed cholesteryl oleate much more efficiently than trioleine, and hydrolytic activity with p-nitrophenyl acetate was higher than with p-nitrophenyl butyrate. These results indicate that rat liver microsomes contain a bile salt-independent catalytic protein that is relatively specific for cholesteryl ester hydrolysis.  (+info)

Relationship between hormone-sensitive lipolysis and lipase activity in rat fat cells. (5/661)

An assay for total hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) in rat fat cells was devised in which fat-associated HSL was solubilized with ether, and triolein or cholesteryloleate was used as substrate. Norepinephrine (NE) caused marked release of glycerol from fat cells but did not activate HSL as estimated using triolein or cholesteryloleate as substrate. Propranolol, a beta-blocker, inhibited NE-induced lipolysis in fat cells without a concomitant reduction in HSL activity. The antilipolytic action of insulin on NE-induced lipolysis could not be explained by a decrease in HSL activity. Neither ACTH-induced lipolysis in fat cells nor its inhibition by insulin was accompanied by matching fluctuations in HSL activity. These results indicate that neither NE and ACTH-induced lipolysis in fat cells, nor the antilipolytic actions of propranolol and insulin, involve fluctuations in HSL activity.  (+info)

Interaction of rat hormone-sensitive lipase with adipocyte lipid-binding protein. (6/661)

Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) is a cytosolic neutral lipase that functions as the rate-limiting enzyme for the mobilization of free fatty acids in adipose tissue. By using the yeast two-hybrid system to examine the potential interaction of HSL with other cellular proteins, evidence is provided to demonstrate a direct interaction of HSL with adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP), a member of the family of intracellular lipid-binding proteins that binds fatty acids, retinoids, and other hydrophobic ligands. The interaction was demonstrated in vitro by the binding of ALBP to HSL translated in vitro, to HSL in extracts of HSL overexpressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and to HSL in extracts of rat adipose tissue. Finally, the presence of ALBP was documented in immune complexes from rat adipose tissue immunoprecipitated with anti-HSL antibodies. The HSL-ALBP interaction was mapped to an N-terminal 300-aa region of HSL that is distinct from the C-terminal catalytic domain. These results suggest that HSL-derived fatty acids are bound by ALBP to facilitate intracellular trafficking of hydrophobic lipids.  (+info)

Expression of hormone-sensitive lipase and its regulation by adrenaline in skeletal muscle. (7/661)

The enzymic regulation of triacylglycerol breakdown in skeletal muscle is poorly understood. Western blotting of muscle fibres isolated by collagenase treatment or after freeze-drying demonstrated the presence of immunoreactive hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), with the concentrations in soleus and diaphragm being more than four times the concentrations in extensor digitorum longus and epitrochlearis muscles. Neutral lipase activity determined under conditions optimal for HSL varied directly with immunoreactivity. Expressed relative to triacylglycerol content, neutral lipase activity in soleus muscle was about 10 times that in epididymal adipose tissue. In incubated soleus muscle, both neutral lipase activity against triacylglycerol (but not against a diacylglycerol analogue) and glycogen phosphorylase activity increased in response to adrenaline (epinephrine). The lipase activation was completely inhibited by anti-HSL antibody and by propranolol. The effect of adrenaline could be mimicked by incubation of crude supernatant from control muscle with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, while no effect of the kinase subunit was seen with supernatant from adrenaline-treated muscle. The results indicate that HSL is present in skeletal muscle and is stimulated by adrenaline via beta-adrenergic activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The concentration of HSL is higher in oxidative than in glycolytic muscle, and the enzyme is activated in parallel with glycogen phosphorylase.  (+info)

Domain identification of hormone-sensitive lipase by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy, limited proteolysis, and mass spectrometry. (8/661)

Structure-function relationship analyses of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) have suggested that this metabolically important enzyme consists of several functional and at least two structural domains (Osterlund, T., Danielsson, B., Degerman, E., Contreras, J. A., Edgren, G., Davis, R. C., Schotz, M. C., and Holm, C. (1996) Biochem. J. 319, 411-420; Contreras, J. A., Karlsson, M., Osterlund, T., Laurell, H., Svensson, A., and Holm, C. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 31426-31430). To analyze the structural domain composition of HSL in more detail, we applied biophysical methods. Denaturation of HSL was followed by circular dichroism measurements and fluorescence spectroscopy, revealing that the unfolding of HSL is a two-step event. Using limited proteolysis in combination with mass spectrometry, several proteolytic fragments of HSL were identified, including one corresponding exactly to the proposed N-terminal domain. Major cleavage sites were found in the predicted hinge region between the two domains and in the regulatory module of the C-terminal, catalytic domain. Analyses of a hinge region cleavage mutant and calculations of the hydropathic pattern of HSL further suggest that the hinge region and regulatory module are exposed parts of HSL. Together, these data support our previous hypothesis that HSL consists of two major structural domains, encoded by exons 1-4 and 5-9, respectively, of which the latter contains an exposed regulatory module outside the catalytic alpha/beta-hydrolase fold core.  (+info)

"Ophiostoma" is a genus of fungi that are often associated with trees and woody plants. Many species in this genus are able to cause diseases in trees, including the well-known Dutch Elm Disease, which is caused by the species Ophiostoma ulmi and Ophiostoma novo-ulmi. These fungi typically invade the sapwood of trees and can block the water-conducting vessels, leading to wilting and dieback of branches or even death of the entire tree in severe cases. The fungi produce specialized structures called perithecia, which contain asci (sexual spore-producing structures), and ascospores (sexual spores) are released from the perithecia to infect new trees. Some species of Ophiostoma can also be transported by bark beetles, which can carry the fungi into new trees and facilitate their spread.

Esterases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of ester bonds in esters, producing alcohols and carboxylic acids. They are widely distributed in plants, animals, and microorganisms and play important roles in various biological processes, such as metabolism, digestion, and detoxification.

Esterases can be classified into several types based on their substrate specificity, including carboxylesterases, cholinesterases, lipases, and phosphatases. These enzymes have different structures and mechanisms of action but all share the ability to hydrolyze esters.

Carboxylesterases are the most abundant and diverse group of esterases, with a wide range of substrate specificity. They play important roles in the metabolism of drugs, xenobiotics, and lipids. Cholinesterases, on the other hand, specifically hydrolyze choline esters, such as acetylcholine, which is an important neurotransmitter in the nervous system. Lipases are a type of esterase that preferentially hydrolyzes triglycerides and plays a crucial role in fat digestion and metabolism. Phosphatases are enzymes that remove phosphate groups from various molecules, including esters, and have important functions in signal transduction and other cellular processes.

Esterases can also be used in industrial applications, such as in the production of biodiesel, detergents, and food additives. They are often produced by microbial fermentation or extracted from plants and animals. The use of esterases in biotechnology is an active area of research, with potential applications in biofuel production, bioremediation, and medical diagnostics.

Sterols are a type of organic compound that is derived from steroids and found in the cell membranes of organisms. In animals, including humans, cholesterol is the most well-known sterol. Sterols help to maintain the structural integrity and fluidity of cell membranes, and they also play important roles as precursors for the synthesis of various hormones and other signaling molecules. Phytosterols are plant sterols that have been shown to have cholesterol-lowering effects in humans when consumed in sufficient amounts.

A sterol esterase is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of sterol esters, which are fatty acid esters of sterols (such as cholesterol) that are commonly found in lipoproteins and cell membranes. Sterol esterases play a crucial role in the metabolism of lipids by breaking down sterol esters into free sterols and free fatty acids, which can then be used in various biochemical processes.

There are several types of sterol esterases that have been identified, including:

1. Cholesteryl esterase (CE): This enzyme is responsible for hydrolyzing cholesteryl esters in the intestine and liver. It plays a critical role in the absorption and metabolism of dietary cholesterol.
2. Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL): This enzyme is involved in the hydrolysis of sterol esters in adipose tissue, as well as other lipids such as triacylglycerols. It is regulated by hormones such as insulin and catecholamines.
3. Carboxylesterase (CES): This enzyme is a broad-specificity esterase that can hydrolyze various types of esters, including sterol esters. It is found in many tissues throughout the body.

Sterol esterases are important targets for drug development, as inhibiting these enzymes can have therapeutic effects in a variety of diseases, such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

Carboxylic ester hydrolases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of ester bonds in carboxylic acid esters, producing alcohols and carboxylates. This group includes several subclasses of enzymes such as esterases, lipases, and thioesterases. These enzymes play important roles in various biological processes, including metabolism, detoxification, and signal transduction. They are widely used in industrial applications, such as the production of biodiesel, pharmaceuticals, and food ingredients.

Naphthol AS-D esterase is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of Naphthol AS-D esters to produce phenol and naphthoic acids. It is commonly found in various tissues, including the liver, kidney, and intestine, and is used as a marker for neutrophil activation in diagnostic tests.

In medical terms, Naphthol AS-D esterase is often referred to as a "non-specific esterase" because it can hydrolyze various types of esters, not just those containing the Naphthol AS-D group. It is also known as "alkaline phosphatase" because it has optimal activity at alkaline pH levels and contains phosphate groups in its active site.

Naphthol AS-D esterase is often used in histological staining techniques to identify and differentiate various types of cells, such as neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages, based on their enzymatic activity. The presence and intensity of the enzyme activity can provide valuable information about the type, location, and severity of inflammation or tissue damage in various pathological conditions.

Sterol 14-demethylase is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the biosynthesis of sterols, particularly ergosterol in fungi and cholesterol in animals. This enzyme is classified as a cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme and is located in the endoplasmic reticulum.

The function of sterol 14-demethylase is to remove methyl groups from the sterol molecule at the 14th position, which is a necessary step in the biosynthesis of ergosterol or cholesterol. Inhibition of this enzyme can disrupt the normal functioning of cell membranes and lead to various physiological changes, including impaired growth and development.

Sterol 14-demethylase inhibitors (SDIs) are a class of antifungal drugs that target this enzyme and are used to treat fungal infections. Examples of SDIs include fluconazole, itraconazole, and ketoconazole. These drugs work by binding to the heme group of the enzyme and inhibiting its activity, leading to the accumulation of toxic sterol intermediates and disruption of fungal cell membranes.

Acetylesterase is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of acetyl esters into alcohol and acetic acid. This enzyme plays a role in the metabolism of various xenobiotics, including drugs and environmental toxins, by removing acetyl groups from these compounds. Acetylesterase is found in many tissues, including the liver, intestine, and blood. It belongs to the class of enzymes known as hydrolases, which act on ester bonds.

Phytosterols are a type of plant-derived sterol that have a similar structure to cholesterol, a compound found in animal products. They are found in small quantities in many fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes, and vegetable oils. Phytosterols are known to help lower cholesterol levels by reducing the absorption of dietary cholesterol in the digestive system.

In medical terms, phytosterols are often referred to as "plant sterols" or "phytostanols." They have been shown to have a modest but significant impact on lowering LDL (or "bad") cholesterol levels when consumed in sufficient quantities, typically in the range of 2-3 grams per day. As a result, foods fortified with phytosterols are sometimes recommended as part of a heart-healthy diet for individuals with high cholesterol or a family history of cardiovascular disease.

It's worth noting that while phytosterols have been shown to be safe and effective in reducing cholesterol levels, they should not be used as a substitute for other lifestyle changes such as regular exercise, smoking cessation, and weight management. Additionally, individuals with sitosterolemia, a rare genetic disorder characterized by an abnormal accumulation of plant sterols in the body, should avoid consuming foods fortified with phytosterols.

The enzyme sterol esterase (EC 3.1.1.13) catalyzes the reaction a sterol ester + H2O ⇌ {\displaystyle \rightleftharpoons } a ... Other names in common use include cholesterol esterase, cholesteryl ester synthase, triterpenol esterase, cholesteryl esterase ... Okawa Y, Yamaguchi T (May 1977). "Studies on sterol-ester hydrolase from Fusarium oxysporum. I Partial purification and ... cholesteryl ester hydrolase, sterol ester hydrolase, cholesterol ester hydrolase, cholesterase, and acylcholesterol lipase. ...
... sterol esterase EC 3.1.1.14: chlorophyllase EC 3.1.1.15: L-arabinonolactonase EC 3.1.1.16: deleted, mixture of EC 5.3.3.4 ( ... apo-salmochelin esterase * EC 3.1.1.108: iron(III)-enterobactin esterase * EC 3.1.1.109: iron(III)-salmochelin esterase * EC ... acetylxylan esterase EC 3.1.1.73: feruloyl esterase EC 3.1.1.74: cutinase EC 3.1.1.75: poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) depolymerase EC ... juvenile-hormone esterase EC 3.1.1.60: bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate esterase EC 3.1.1.61: protein-glutamate methylesterase EC 3.1 ...
... and some other proteins Pancreatic lipase that degrades triglycerides into two fatty acids and a monoglyceride Sterol esterase ... Some carnivorous plants digestive enzymes: Hydrolytic process Esterase a hydrolase enzyme Proteases enzyme Nucleases enzyme ...
Biochemistry of regulatory lipids and sterols in insects., in: Goodwin, T.W. (Ed.), Biochemistry of Lipids II. International ... Other names in common use include JH esterase, juvenile hormone esterase, and juvenile hormone carboxyesterase. Juvenile ... JH esterase and JH epoxide hydrolase are crucial in terminating the action of JH. The role of juvenile hormone binding proteins ... Juvenile hormone esterase is induced by factors naturally occurring in the head of insects. In addition, it is induced by ...
Experiments on the synthesis of substances related to the sterols. Part II. A new general method for the synthesis of ... a tetracyclic Lycopodium alkaloid that has potential application to inhibiting the acetylcholine esterase. Scientists at Merck ...
Norlin M, Chiang JY (2004). "Transcriptional regulation of human oxysterol 7alpha-hydroxylase by sterol response element ... nine esterase genes, and two other genes in the Japanese population". J. Hum. Genet. 48 (5): 249-70. doi:10.1007/s10038-003- ...
Pradelles, Phillippe; Jaques Grassi; Jaques Maclouf (1985). "Enzyme immunoassays of eicosanoids using acetylcholine esterase as ... and sterols. Freed, Ben (5 June 2012). "Cayman Chemical plans to expand in Pittsfield Township". AnnArbor.com. Retrieved 15 ...
Gold AM, Fahrney D (1964). "Sulfonyl Fluorides as Inhibitors of Esterases. II. Formation and Reactions of Phenylmethanesulfonyl ... is responsible for activating the sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBP). By selectively inhibiting S1P, AEBSF can ...
They inhibit the enzyme 14-alpha-sterol demethylase, a microsomal CYP, which is required for biosynthesis of ergosterol for the ... hydrolysed to acetic acid by fungal esterases Undecylenic acid - an unsaturated fatty acid derived from natural castor oil; ... As a polyene's hydrophobic chain is shortened, its sterol binding activity is increased. Therefore, further reduction of the ... The polyene antimycotics bind with sterols in the fungal cell membrane, principally ergosterol. This changes the transition ...
Three families of genes, which include P450s, esterases, and glutathione s-transferases, contain the specific genes known to ... Components leading to the toxicity of desert cacti include medium fatty acid chains, dihydroxy sterols, and senita alkaloids. ...
... naphthol as d esterase MeSH D08.811.277.352.100.680 - phospholipases MeSH D08.811.277.352.100.680.510 - lysophospholipase MeSH ... phosphatidylcholine-sterol O-acyltransferase MeSH D08.811.913.050.646 - retinol O-fatty-acyltransferase MeSH D08.811.913.050. ... cholesterol esterase MeSH D08.811.277.352.100.170 - cholinesterases MeSH D08.811.277.352.100.170.176 - acetylcholinesterase ... 668 - serine C-palmitoyltransferase MeSH D08.811.913.050.712 - sphingosine N-acyltransferase MeSH D08.811.913.050.799 - sterol ...
Calcein-AM, A highly permeable derivative of calcein readily penetrates into intact cells, where the endogenous esterases ... sterols, drugs, and a large variety of primary and secondary metabolites. Some of these exporters in humans are involved in ... cells expressing MDR1 and/or MRP1 transporters pump the calcein-AM out of the cell before esterases can hydrolyze it. This ...
The enzyme sterol esterase (EC 3.1.1.13) catalyzes the reaction a sterol ester + H2O ⇌ {\displaystyle \rightleftharpoons } a ... Other names in common use include cholesterol esterase, cholesteryl ester synthase, triterpenol esterase, cholesteryl esterase ... Okawa Y, Yamaguchi T (May 1977). "Studies on sterol-ester hydrolase from Fusarium oxysporum. I Partial purification and ... cholesteryl ester hydrolase, sterol ester hydrolase, cholesterol ester hydrolase, cholesterase, and acylcholesterol lipase. ...
sterol esterase. Additional Information & Resources. Tests Listed in the Genetic Testing Registry. *Tests of LIPA ...
Sterol esterase. Background. LIPA( AAH12287, 1 a.a. - 400 a.a.) recombinant protein with GST. ...
Sterol Esterase Medicine & Life Sciences 16% View full fingerprint Cite this. * APA ...
sterol esterase activity - sterol metabolic process - tissue remodeling Data from Gene Ontology via CGAP [Hide] ...
Sterol Esterase 38% * Brown Adipose Tissue 33% * Lipolysis 32% * Facilitative Glucose Transport Proteins 31% ...
2. Sterol esterase TGL1. General function:. Involved in lipid metabolic process. Specific function:. Mediates the hydrolysis of ...
Cholesterol Esterase. Sterol Esterase. Mannitol Dehydrogenase. Mannitol Dehydrogenases. Na(+)-K(+)-Exchanging ATPase. Sodium- ...
Cholesterol Esterase. Sterol Esterase. Mannitol Dehydrogenase. Mannitol Dehydrogenases. Na(+)-K(+)-Exchanging ATPase. Sodium- ...
Cholesterol Esterase. Sterol Esterase. Mannitol Dehydrogenase. Mannitol Dehydrogenases. Na(+)-K(+)-Exchanging ATPase. Sodium- ...
Cholesterol Esterase. Sterol Esterase. Mannitol Dehydrogenase. Mannitol Dehydrogenases. Na(+)-K(+)-Exchanging ATPase. Sodium- ...
Cholesterol Esterase. Sterol Esterase. Mannitol Dehydrogenase. Mannitol Dehydrogenases. Na(+)-K(+)-Exchanging ATPase. Sodium- ...
Cholesterol Esterase. Sterol Esterase. Mannitol Dehydrogenase. Mannitol Dehydrogenases. Na(+)-K(+)-Exchanging ATPase. Sodium- ...
Cholesterol Esterase. Sterol Esterase. Mannitol Dehydrogenase. Mannitol Dehydrogenases. Na(+)-K(+)-Exchanging ATPase. Sodium- ...
Cholesterol Esterase. Sterol Esterase. Mannitol Dehydrogenase. Mannitol Dehydrogenases. Na(+)-K(+)-Exchanging ATPase. Sodium- ...
Cholesterol Esterase. Sterol Esterase. Mannitol Dehydrogenase. Mannitol Dehydrogenases. Na(+)-K(+)-Exchanging ATPase. Sodium- ...
Cholesterol Esterase. Sterol Esterase. Mannitol Dehydrogenase. Mannitol Dehydrogenases. Na(+)-K(+)-Exchanging ATPase. Sodium- ...
Cholesterol Esterase. Sterol Esterase. Mannitol Dehydrogenase. Mannitol Dehydrogenases. Na(+)-K(+)-Exchanging ATPase. Sodium- ...
Sterol Esterase Medicine & Life Sciences 100% * Lipolysis Medicine & Life Sciences 28% * Adipocytes Medicine & Life Sciences 19 ...
Sterol esterase. TGL1. Lipase 2. Lipase 3. Lipase 4. Lipase 5. Lipase 3. Monoglyceride. lipase. Myristoleoyl-. CoA. Glycerol. 3 ...
sterol esterase activity GO:0004771 * CXCR1 chemokine receptor binding GO:0045237 * mannose binding ...
sterol esterase 89% * Protein Hydrolysates 84% * bile salt-stimulated lipase 76% * Protein Hydrolysate 73% ...
Ussher, J. R., Campbell, J. E., Mulvihill, E. E., Baggio, L. L., Bates, H. E., McLean, B. A., Gopal, K., Capozzi, M., Yusta, B., Cao, X., Ali, S., Kim, M., Kabir, M. G., Seino, Y., Suzuki, J. & Drucker, D. J., 6 Feb 2018, In: Cell Metabolism. 27, 2, p. 450-460.e6. Research output: Contribution to journal › Article › peer-review ...
Sterol Esterase 26% * Hydrops Fetalis 25% * PGE2 induction of labor for consistent decreased perception of fetal movements at ...
Bacterial triacylglycerol lipase is a potential cholesterol esterase: Identification of a key determinant for sterol-binding ... Bacterial triacylglycerol lipase is a potential cholesterol esterase: Identification of a key determinant for sterol-binding ... Bacterial triacylglycerol lipase is a potential cholesterol esterase: Identification of a key determinant for sterol-binding ... Ldl cholesterol esterase (Che) from Burkholderia stabilis (BsChe) is a homolog of well-characterized and industrially related ...
Sterol Esterase Medicine & Life Sciences 18% * Carotenoids Medicine & Life Sciences 15% * Nitrogen Medicine & Life Sciences 12% ... Results showed that cholesterol esterase facilitated astaxanthin deesterification (975.65 μg mg−1 DW) while saponification ... Results showed that cholesterol esterase facilitated astaxanthin deesterification (975.65 μg mg−1 DW) while saponification ... Results showed that cholesterol esterase facilitated astaxanthin deesterification (975.65 μg mg−1 DW) while saponification ...
Sterol esterase - genetics, deficiency, therapeutic use *Pretraži slične. Cholesterol esters - metabolism *Pretraži slične ...
Sterol Esterase, Transcription Factors, Whites ...
sterol esterase activity serine hydrolase activity phospholipase activity prenylcysteine methylesterase activity lipase ... methyl indole-3-acetate esterase activity methyl salicylate esterase activity methyl jasmonate esterase activity ... retinyl-palmitate esterase activity carboxylic ester hydrolase activity mannosyl-oligosaccharide 1,6-alpha-mannosidase activity ...
  • Ldl cholesterol esterase (Che) from Burkholderia stabilis (BsChe) is a homolog of well-characterized and industrially related bacterial triacylglycerol lipases (Lips). (allelebio.com)
  • Results showed that cholesterol esterase facilitated astaxanthin deesterification (975.65 μg mg −1 DW) while saponification positively affected zeaxanthin (1038.68 μg mg −1 DW). (pucv.cl)
  • The pancreas secretes pancreatic lipase , colipase, and cholesterol esterase , which hydrolyze the lipid into cholesterol , fatty acids , and 2-monoglyceride molecules. (amboss.com)
  • Other enzymes involved in lipid digestion are cholesterol esterase and phospholipases A 1 and A 2 . (tuscany-diet.net)
  • Our particular focus in the yeast lipid field are sterols, their biosynthesis and homeostasis, and their interactions with membrane proteins. (tugraz.at)
  • Fatty acyltransferase-like subfamily of the SGNH hydrolases, a diverse family of lipases and esterases. (unl.edu)
  • The enzyme sterol esterase (EC 3.1.1.13) catalyzes the reaction a sterol ester + H2O ⇌ {\displaystyle \rightleftharpoons } a sterol + a fatty acid This enzyme belongs to the family of hydrolases, specifically those acting on carboxylic ester bonds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recently, the sterol regulatory element binding protein SrbA was found to be essential for adaptation to iron starvation, thereby linking regulation of iron metabolism, ergosterol biosynthesis, azole drug resistance, and hypoxia adaptation. (frontiersin.org)
  • As mono or diiron center as well as incorporated into heme or iron-sulfur clusters, this metal is an indispensable cofactor for a variety of cellular processes including electron transport, amino acid metabolism, and biosynthesis of DNA and sterols. (frontiersin.org)
  • We have identified a novel isoform of the pig liver esterase protein family, markedly improved expression of pig liver esterases in P. pastoris and E. coli, and have evolutionarily engineered pig liver esterases for biocatalytic applications. (tugraz.at)
  • Might catalyze fatty acid transfer between phosphatidylcholine and sterols. (unl.edu)
  • The altered cell permeability due to the presence of methylated sterols in the membrane and resulting accumulation of toxic ergosterol precursors in the cytoplasm leads to cell lysis and death. (jacmjournal.org)
  • A variety of plant stanols and sterols, in particular the beta-sitosterol, which is not absorbed under physiological conditions, are also included among dietary steroids. (tuscany-diet.net)
  • An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of CHOLESTEROL ESTERS and some other sterol esters, to liberate cholesterol plus a fatty acid anion. (nih.gov)
  • Removal of the pitch- Pitch comprises of sterols, fatty acids, glycerol esters of fatty acid, resin acids, and other fats. (balajichemsolutions.com)
  • Acylated sterols are also found in plant structures, their analysis is similar to that of cholesterol esters. (gerli.com)
  • Elution is started with hexane/ethyl acetate (90/10, v/v) to collect the steryl esters, followed by elution with hexane/ether/ethanol (25/25/50, v/v) for collection of free sterols. (gerli.com)
  • Sterol esters were methanolyzed in 0.08 ml methyl propionate with 0.12 ml 0.84 M NaOH in methanol dried with Molecular Sieves 3A. (gerli.com)
  • At the second step, cholesterol esters are measured by enzymatic determination (cholesterol esterase and oxidase) and finally by colorimetry or fluorimetry. (gerli.com)
  • Studies on sterol-ester hydrolase from Fusarium oxysporum. (wikipedia.org)
  • en Hydrolase that splits fatty acids from sterols. (roche.com)
  • The enzyme sterol esterase (EC 3.1.1.13) catalyzes the reaction a sterol ester + H2O ⇌ {\displaystyle \rightleftharpoons } a sterol + a fatty acid This enzyme belongs to the family of hydrolases, specifically those acting on carboxylic ester bonds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Might catalyze fatty acid transfer between phosphatidylcholine and sterols. (unl.edu)
  • Probing the active sites of butyrylcholinesterase and cholesterol esterase with isomalathion: conserved stereoselective inactivation of serine hydrolases structurally related to acetylcholinesterase. (nih.gov)
  • Ldl cholesterol esterase (Che) from Burkholderia stabilis (BsChe) is a homolog of well-characterized and industrially related bacterial triacylglycerol lipases (Lips). (allelebio.com)
  • Fatahinia M, Poormohamadi F, Zarei Mahmoudabadi A. Comparative study of esterase and hemolytic important candida activities in clinically species, isolated from oral cavity of diabetic and non-diabetic individuals. (ac.ir)
  • Smooth ER has no ribosomes associated with it and is involved in lipid and sterol synthesis. (yourdictionary.com)
  • Pairwise sequence alignment employed for the comparative modeling from the J. curcas esterase based on the strucFigure 7. (deubiquitinaseinhibitor.com)
  • 7) The main objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro cholesterol esterase inhibitory activity and in vivo antihyperlipidemic activity of Anisomeles malabarica leaf extract. (repository-tnmgrmu.ac.in)
  • The strain of Nocardioides simplex VKM Ac-2033D is well known mainly for its superior 3-ketosteroid Δ 1 -dehydrogenase activity towards various 3-oxosteroids and other important reactions of sterol degradation. (biomedcentral.com)
  • However, its biocatalytic capacities and the molecular fundamentals of its activity towards natural sterols and synthetic steroids were not fully understood. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 3.1.4.1.12.3 from Pseudomonas species, lyophilizate Cholesterol Esterase, Grade I custom fill CustomBiotech product. (roche.com)
  • Currently, degradation of sterols (such as cholesterol, or phytosterols) by actinobacteria is in the focus of intensive researches due to its exclusive role in pathogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis , and established applications of the non-pathogenic species and their engineered derivatives in biotechnology for production of high-value steroids for the pharmaceutical industry. (biomedcentral.com)
  • SQ 11520857103 Not Available Reagents, kits en Use Cholesterol Esterase in diagnostic tests for the determination of cholesterol in combination with Cholesterol Oxidase, Catalog Nos. (roche.com)
  • Sterol catabolism is a complicated, multi-step process that included degradation of side chain, rings A/B and rings C/D of steroid core oxidation (Fig. 1 ). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Experimental evidence of the effect of increased sterol forma tion in resistance to tuberculosis is still scanty. (yourdictionary.com)